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View Full Version : Jellyfish are facinating creatures!!


RVD
Aug 5th, 2006, 04:47 AM
http://www.fresh99.com/images/oversizestuff/1705_meduza.jpg

The largest jellyfish has a bell that can reach 2.4 metres across :eek: and tentacles that extend over half the length of a football field.

Oneofakind0490
Aug 5th, 2006, 04:54 AM
:eek: When I first saw that I was like it doesnt look big. Then when I read the tenticles half the length of a football field I looked at the pic and noticed the human:eek:

drake3781
Aug 5th, 2006, 04:55 AM
Yes, I agree!!

I used to be a lifeguard on a beach. And for a few weeks each summer the jellyfish would be around. We would warn people but they wanted to swim and that was OK.... the sting hurts but not really badly.

When people got stung they would come up to my lifeguard chair, and I would send them to shower to wash it off, then I would give them meat tenderizer! That is what we used to cut the venom.

hurricanejeanne
Aug 5th, 2006, 04:58 AM
Jellyfish scare the shit out of me.
This picture makes me literally shake in fear and make me sick to my stomach. Now that I think about it, I think those scare me more than anything.
:scared: :scared: :scared:

Brooklyn90
Aug 5th, 2006, 04:59 AM
i guess so......

hurricanejeanne
Aug 5th, 2006, 05:01 AM
Yes, I agree!!

I used to be a lifeguard on a beach. And for a few weeks each summer the jellyfish would be around. We would warn people but they wanted to swim and that was OK.... the sting hurts but not really badly.

When people got stung they would come up to my lifeguard chair, and I would send them to shower to wash it off, then I would give them meat tenderizer! That is what we used to cut the venom.

A meat tenderizer!? Now I am really scared of these things...

Wigglytuff
Aug 5th, 2006, 05:18 AM
http://www.fresh99.com/images/oversizestuff/1705_meduza.jpg

The largest jellyfish has a bell that can reach 2.4 metres across :eek: and tentacles that extend over half the length of a football field.


they are indeed fascinating but ummm thats closer than i want to be i think.

-SheLL-
Aug 5th, 2006, 05:21 AM
scary...

ceiling_fan
Aug 5th, 2006, 06:17 AM
wow thats fricken scary...

Barrie_Dude
Aug 5th, 2006, 06:19 AM
I have had experience with the much smaller versions in Florida and I really do not like jellyfish!

RVD
Aug 5th, 2006, 06:26 AM
Now that I think about it, it reminds me of a hot air ballon. :lol:

Cat's Pajamas
Aug 5th, 2006, 06:29 AM
One of these damn bitches stung me in the ocean last year :o I thought it was a plastic grocery sack floating in the ocean and then it hit my leg and grr :fiery: ya the lifeguard gave me vinegar and meat tenderizer but you could see the cut. They're cool but I don't like them :mad:

jbone_0307
Aug 5th, 2006, 07:14 AM
Thats like man-eating jellyfish :lol: The smallest ones are the most dangerous. It was some type of box jelly fish that was really small and only had like 2 tentacles that lived in Australia. Their life stages and how it grows is sooo fascinating.

DuLeafs
Aug 5th, 2006, 10:21 AM
Don't wanna meet that thing when i'm swimming in tha ocean :unsure:

Didn't knew these things could get so huge! It's amazing, where do they occur?

drake3781
Aug 5th, 2006, 10:16 PM
[/B]

A meat tenderizer!? Now I am really scared of these things...

Yes, Adolph's meat tenderizer.

I was a lifeguard on a beach on the Atlantic Ocean in South Carolina.

Also we had sharks, or possible sharks, after the shrimp boats passed in the early morning. Then I would keep people out of the water.

Gerri
Aug 5th, 2006, 10:29 PM
That's real? :speakles: My God it's enormous :eek:

Perfection
Aug 5th, 2006, 10:32 PM
Wow.. I thought the human was a piece of poopoo at first, but now :eek:..

Ellery
Aug 5th, 2006, 10:41 PM
Very interesting. :worship:

hurricanejeanne
Aug 5th, 2006, 11:40 PM
Don't wanna meet that thing when i'm swimming in tha ocean :unsure:

Didn't knew these things could get so huge! It's amazing, where do they occur?

When I was on vacation a couple of years ago, I was in the ocean and felt something rub my leg. I ran so fast out of the water looking like a spastic retard because I thought it was a jelly fish.
Come to find out, that it was only a piece of seaweed that raped my leg.

I think they get that big in the South Pacific. Just a guess though.

* shudders in fear again * :scared:

Hayato
Aug 5th, 2006, 11:44 PM
omg :speakles:

égalité
Aug 5th, 2006, 11:45 PM
AAAH it's so cool.

esquímaux
Aug 6th, 2006, 04:33 PM
Pardon my skepticism, but maybe the pic is altered? I agree though, jellfish are fascinating creatures.

Slumpsova
Aug 6th, 2006, 06:31 PM
OMG that's scary :scared:

wipeout
Aug 6th, 2006, 06:51 PM
Pardon my skepticism, but maybe the pic is altered? I agree though, jellfish are fascinating creatures.

Yeah, if the biggest jellyfish bell is 2.4 meters across then that diver must be like 0.5 meter tall. ;)

That picture is altered for dramatic effect.

Here's a real one, maybe 1.2 meters across and so only half the size of the biggest! :eek:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/01/images/060119_jellyfish.jpg

Got that from here:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/01/0119_060119_jellyfish.html

Here's some more information on this giant jellyfish:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion's_mane

hurricanejeanne
Aug 6th, 2006, 07:15 PM
Yeah, if the biggest jellyfish bell is 2.4 meters across then that diver must be like 0.5 meter tall. ;)

That picture is altered for dramatic effect.

Here's a real one, maybe 1.2 meters across and so only half the size of the biggest! :eek:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/01/images/060119_jellyfish.jpg

Got that from here:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/01/0119_060119_jellyfish.html

Here's some more information on this giant jellyfish:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion's_mane

Thanks for the links, I think that there may be something wrong with me since I keep coming back here and looking at those evil things... :unsure:

reguardless of the authenticity of the original picture, they're still massive and they're still fucking scary. :scared:

njnetswill
Aug 6th, 2006, 07:20 PM
Imagine you are scuba diving and one of those things comes into your view.

:scared:

Slumpsova
Aug 6th, 2006, 07:43 PM
Thanks for the links, I think that there may be something wrong with me since I keep coming back here and looking at those evil things... :unsure:

honey, you are not the only one doing that :o

hurricanejeanne
Aug 6th, 2006, 07:45 PM
honey, you are not the only one doing that :o

that's a good thing, right? :o

drake3781
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:44 PM
They also have a very intersesting life cycle. What you see in the pictures is only one of I think FOUR stages of life!! In the other stages, they are completely different!!

Anyone study this recently and can fill us in? (It's been since high school biology so I forget the details.)

Dexter
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:54 PM
Hmmm I don't think the first pic is real... they can't grow that big (from what I know). I saw quite big jellyfishes when I was in Turkey. There is a kind of jellyfish in Baltic Sea also but it's doesn't hurt (I remember when I was first time at the sea when I was like 9 yo I collected it with my cousines :tape: )

Btw I find English name 'jellyfish' a bit odd, as these creatures have nothing to do with fishes... maybe only the fact that they also live in the water :shrug:

Dexter
Aug 6th, 2006, 09:56 PM
They also have a very intersesting life cycle. What you see in the pictures is only one of I think FOUR stages of life!! In the other stages, they are completely different!!
yeah exactly... that's why I wrote they have nothing to do with fishes :lol:

RVD
Aug 6th, 2006, 10:11 PM
They also have a very intersesting life cycle. What you see in the pictures is only one of I think FOUR stages of life!! In the other stages, they are completely different!!

Anyone study this recently and can fill us in? (It's been since high school biology so I forget the details.)Yeah, their life cycles reads so alien. Right after I created this thread, I immediately searched for more info. And so far, this is the best description that I can find.

The most recognized image of a jellyfish is that of the adult jellyfish, with its bell-shaped body and long tentacles. But this image is just one of several stages in the life cycle of a jellyfish which include:

[B]* egg and sperm
* planula larva
* scyphistoma (polyp)
* strobilating scyphistomata (polyp hydroid colony)
* ephyra
* medusa

Jellyfish experience alternation of generations in which one generation (medussa) reproduces sexually and the next (scyphistomae) reproduces asexually. The medusa form is the dominant form. http://animals.about.com/od/cnidarians/a/lifecyclejellyf.htm

I'll try to find associated pics for each stage. :)

EGG
http://www1.istockphoto.com/file_thumbview_approve/981981/2/istockphoto_981981_embryotic_jellyfish.jpg

drake3781
Aug 6th, 2006, 10:16 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/61/Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg

Life cycle and reproduction

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/61/Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg/180px-Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg)
The developmental stages of jellyfish.


Most jellyfish pass through two different body forms during their life cycle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_cycle). The first is the polyp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyp) stage; in this phase, the jellyfish takes the form of either a sessile (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sessile) stalk which catches passing food, or a similar free-floating configuration. The polyp's mouth and tentacles are located anteriorly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatomical_terms_of_location), facing upwards.

In the second stage, the jellyfish is known as a medusa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medusa_%28biology%29). Medusae have a radially symmetric (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symmetry_%28biology%29#Radial_symmetry), umbrella-shaped body called a bell. The medusa's tentacles hang from the border of the bell. This is the form most people know jellyfish as.

Jellyfish are dioecious (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_sexuality#Terminology) (that is, they are either male or female). In most cases, to reproduce, a male releases his sperm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sperm) into the surrounding water. The sperm then swims into the mouth of the female jelly, allowing the fertilization of the ova (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovum) process to begin. Moon jellies, however, use a different process: their eggs become lodged in pits on the oral arms, which form a temporary brood chamber to accommodate fertilization.

After fertilization and initial growth, a larval form, called the planula (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planula), develops from the egg. The planula larva is small and covered with cilia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cilium). It settles onto a firm surface and develops into a polyp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyp). The polyp is cup-shaped with tentacles surrounding a single orifice, perhaps resembling a tiny sea anemone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_anemone). Once the polyp begins reproducing asexually by budding (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budding), it's called a segmenting polyp, or a scyphistoma (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Scyphistoma&action=edit). New scyphistomae may be produced by budding or new, immature jellies called ephyra (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ephyra&action=edit) may be formed. Many jellyfish can bud off new medusae directly from the medusan stage.

Slumpsova
Aug 6th, 2006, 11:07 PM
ewww :scared:

hurricanejeanne
Aug 7th, 2006, 12:58 AM
ewww :scared:


ditto...ewwww......
* shudders *
:scared:

ampers&
Aug 7th, 2006, 01:01 AM
omg...EW.
one stung me once on my inner thigh and it was one of the most painful things EVAR.
luckily, i hadn't pissed all day.
i've never been happier to piss on myself in my entire life.

Vincey!
Aug 7th, 2006, 01:01 AM
They also have a very intersesting life cycle. What you see in the pictures is only one of I think FOUR stages of life!! In the other stages, they are completely different!!

Anyone study this recently and can fill us in? (It's been since high school biology so I forget the details.)
I studied a little bit the jellyfish this years,but it was in french and I don't think I can explain that in english but if someone have questions, maybe i can help

Wigglytuff
Aug 7th, 2006, 01:11 AM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/61/Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg

Life cycle and reproduction

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/61/Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg/180px-Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg)
The developmental stages of jellyfish.


Most jellyfish pass through two different body forms during their life cycle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_cycle). The first is the polyp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyp) stage; in this phase, the jellyfish takes the form of either a sessile (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sessile) stalk which catches passing food, or a similar free-floating configuration. The polyp's mouth and tentacles are located anteriorly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatomical_terms_of_location), facing upwards.

In the second stage, the jellyfish is known as a medusa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medusa_%28biology%29). Medusae have a radially symmetric (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symmetry_%28biology%29#Radial_symmetry), umbrella-shaped body called a bell. The medusa's tentacles hang from the border of the bell. This is the form most people know jellyfish as.

Jellyfish are dioecious (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_sexuality#Terminology) (that is, they are either male or female). In most cases, to reproduce, a male releases his sperm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sperm) into the surrounding water. The sperm then swims into the mouth of the female jelly, allowing the fertilization of the ova (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovum) process to begin. Moon jellies, however, use a different process: their eggs become lodged in pits on the oral arms, which form a temporary brood chamber to accommodate fertilization.

After fertilization and initial growth, a larval form, called the planula (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planula), develops from the egg. The planula larva is small and covered with cilia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cilium). It settles onto a firm surface and develops into a polyp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyp). The polyp is cup-shaped with tentacles surrounding a single orifice, perhaps resembling a tiny sea anemone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_anemone). Once the polyp begins reproducing asexually by budding (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budding), it's called a segmenting polyp, or a scyphistoma (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Scyphistoma&action=edit). New scyphistomae may be produced by budding or new, immature jellies called ephyra (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ephyra&action=edit) may be formed. Many jellyfish can bud off new medusae directly from the medusan stage.

taking into account the sizes it would be at all stages i think it would scare me shitless at all stages after 4.

RVD
Aug 7th, 2006, 04:07 AM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/61/Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg

Life cycle and reproduction

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/61/Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg/180px-Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Schleiden-meduse-2.jpg)
The developmental stages of jellyfish.


Most jellyfish pass through two different body forms during their life cycle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_cycle). The first is the polyp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyp) stage; in this phase, the jellyfish takes the form of either a sessile (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sessile) stalk which catches passing food, or a similar free-floating configuration. The polyp's mouth and tentacles are located anteriorly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatomical_terms_of_location), facing upwards.

In the second stage, the jellyfish is known as a medusa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medusa_%28biology%29). Medusae have a radially symmetric (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symmetry_%28biology%29#Radial_symmetry), umbrella-shaped body called a bell. The medusa's tentacles hang from the border of the bell. This is the form most people know jellyfish as.

Jellyfish are dioecious (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plant_sexuality#Terminology) (that is, they are either male or female). In most cases, to reproduce, a male releases his sperm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sperm) into the surrounding water. The sperm then swims into the mouth of the female jelly, allowing the fertilization of the ova (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ovum) process to begin. Moon jellies, however, use a different process: their eggs become lodged in pits on the oral arms, which form a temporary brood chamber to accommodate fertilization.

After fertilization and initial growth, a larval form, called the planula (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planula), develops from the egg. The planula larva is small and covered with cilia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cilium). It settles onto a firm surface and develops into a polyp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyp). The polyp is cup-shaped with tentacles surrounding a single orifice, perhaps resembling a tiny sea anemone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_anemone). Once the polyp begins reproducing asexually by budding (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budding), it's called a segmenting polyp, or a scyphistoma (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Scyphistoma&action=edit). New scyphistomae may be produced by budding or new, immature jellies called ephyra (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ephyra&action=edit) may be formed. Many jellyfish can bud off new medusae directly from the medusan stage.Grrrrr!!!! :mad:
I got knocked offline, then receieved company before I could post an elaborate pictorial of all stages. :fiery:
Thanks a bunch drake3781! :mad: :lol:

P.S.
Great post. :yeah: