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Mother_Marjorie
Jul 31st, 2006, 05:28 PM
Massachusetts governor apologizes for 'tar baby' comment

Monday, July 31, 2006; Posted: 9:42 a.m. EDT (13:42 GMT)


Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney is considering a presidential bid in 2008.

BOSTON, Massachusetts (AP) -- Gov. Mitt Romney has apologized for referring to the troubled Big Dig construction project as a "tar baby" during a fundraiser with Iowa Republicans, saying he didn't know anyone would be offended by the term some consider a racial epithet.

In a speech Saturday, Romney, a Republican considering a run for president in 2008, acknowledged he took a big political risk in taking control of the project after a fatal tunnel ceiling collapse, but said inaction would have been even worse.

"The best thing politically would be to stay as far away from that tar baby as I can," he told a crowd of about 100 supporters in Ames, Iowa.

Black leaders were outraged at his use of the term, which dates to the 19th century Uncle Remus stories, referring to a doll made of tar that traps Br'er Rabbit. It has come to be known as a way of describing a sticky mess, and has been used as a derogatory term for a black person.

"Tar baby is a totally inappropriate phrase in the 21st century," said Larry Jones, a black Republican and civil rights activist.

"He thinks he's presidential timber," Jones said. "But all he's shown us is arrogance."

Romney's spokesman, Eric Fehrnstrom, said the governor was describing "a sticky situation."

"He was unaware that some people find the term objectionable and he's sorry if anyone's offended," Fehrnstrom said.

White House spokesman Tony Snow sparked similar criticism in May when he used the term in response to a question about government surveillance.

griffin
Jul 31st, 2006, 05:51 PM
We are all capable of saying stupid, innapropriate things.

But if Romney is apologizing, and really regrets the choice of words, why are all the quotes I'm seeing from his press flak?

and perhaps if Governor Hairdo hadn't BEEN staying "far away from that tar baby" (press releases and photo ops don't count) since his election, maybe it would be just a little less of a mess right now

*JR*
Jul 31st, 2006, 06:49 PM
We are all capable of saying stupid, innapropriate things.

But if Romney is apologizing, and really regrets the choice of words, why are all the quotes I'm seeing from his press flak?

and perhaps if Governor Hairdo hadn't BEEN staying "far away from that tar baby" (press releases and photo ops don't count) since his election, maybe it would be just a little less of a mess right now
I agree that Mitt should say whatever himself about the tar baby gaffe. But re. the Big Boondoggle, when he took office in January '03, it was already a disaster both timewise and financially. Besides, he did try to wrest control of it from the Turnpike Authority chairman who finally resigned after the accident.

But who kept the money flowing thru all these years of cost ovaruns, so that Massachusetts has gotten back $3 in Federal highway money for every dollar its paid into the Highway Trust Fund thru gas taxes? Mostly Democrats like ex-stunt driver Ted Kennedy, and his sidekick John F(ucking) Kerry. :p

Lord Nelson
Jul 31st, 2006, 07:27 PM
What caught my eye is that some of these black civil right leaders really seem a bit cocky. It is obvious that the governor made a mistake. I wonder how many 'mistakes' this Larry guy has made in his public speeches.

griffin
Jul 31st, 2006, 07:27 PM
Oh certainly, there's lots of blame to go around. 3 successive Republican governors before him (Weld, Cellucci, NotSoSwift) and the Democratic legislature. But Mitt didn't try to wrest control of the Big Dig form the TA, he just wanted control of the TA (his problem with Matt Amorello was not that he's a hack, it that Matt wasn't HIS hack), period, and he focused soley on consolidating that control and not on dealing with, or trying to force the TA to deal with the corruption, cost-over runs and shit construction that's plagued the whole mess.

The Inspector General's office did a huge, indpth audit of the Dig Boondoggle, dtailing all of the above and including information on how the bolting system could be a significant safety problem, and handed it to the Romney administration. They ignored it. Possibly because they were too busy claiming the IG's office was redundant and trying to fold THAT office under Mittens' control to bother looking at the work they were doing.

As for the Federal money involved - yeah we got more for the Dig than our GAS taxes paid out. I might feel bad about that if we didn't actually send more tax money out than we got back one the whole.

But thanks for the Zakim bridge ;)

*JR*
Jul 31st, 2006, 07:39 PM
...
The Inspector General's office did a huge, indpth audit of the Dig Boondoggle, dtailing all of the above and including information on how the bolting system could be a significant safety problem, and handed it to the Romney administration. They ignored it. Possibly because they were too busy claiming the IG's office was redundant and trying to fold THAT office under Mittens' control to bother looking at the work they were doing.
So why didn't the IG give it to Attorney General Tom Reilly, whose responsibility it was to Probe Potential Criminal Conduct (and ovacharges) B4 his present race for Governor? (Or to the US Attorney, given the Federal money involved).
:confused:

RVD
Jul 31st, 2006, 07:48 PM
Hmm...?

Was this an actual mistake? :scratch:
Do you guys truly believe that this was an honest slip-of-the-tongue'?

...that he didn't reeeeally mean to use this term, and that he wasn't aware of the negative connotations? :confused: I mean we're talking about a Governor here folks.

But okay... :shrug:

I guess Blacks and Whites do live in two totally different worlds. :o

griffin
Jul 31st, 2006, 07:48 PM
So why didn't the IG give it to Attorney General Tom Reilly, whose responsibility it was to Probe Potential Criminal Conduct (and ovacharges) B4 his present race for Governor? (Or to the US Attorney, given the Federal money involved).
:confused:

It's not like I said Reilly ISN'T a horse's ass :lol: - although he HAS been going after Bechtel for cost over-runs.

I do think there's a lot of over-reaction to this particular quote: Romney is not the first person I've run across who had no idea that the term "tar baby" had some ugly racial connotations. That said, I'm having a hard time feeling bad for him having his political grandstanding bite him on the backside.

kabuki
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:21 PM
I don't think any politician would be stupid enough to use a term like tar baby if he or she knew what it meant. It is tantamount to political suicide. Clearly an error of ignorance on the part of the Gov., not racism.

HOWEVER.

What is truly troubling is that it is probably not the first time he has used it. People don't whip out a brand new word for fund raising speeches. The fact that his peers, family, and colleagues either didn't know, or didn't care, or didn't bother to tell him how heinous tar baby is, is the truly troubling part of it.

Are people so insulated and ignorant in their own worlds? I guess so.

Rocketta
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:34 PM
I don't think any politician would be stupid enough to use a term like tar baby if he or she knew what it meant. It is tantamount to political suicide. Clearly an error of ignorance on the part of the Gov., not racism.

HOWEVER.

What is truly troubling is that it is probably not the first time he has used it. People don't whip out a brand new word for fund raising speeches. The fact that his peers, family, and colleagues either didn't know, or didn't care, or didn't bother to tell him how heinous tar baby is, is the truly troubling part of it.

Are people so insulated and ignorant in their own worlds? I guess so.

The question is how likely is it that all his support staff didn't realize the inappropriateness of the comment. Not bloody likely. It was probably mentioned to him that people would take offense and he probably thought well it'll just be a couple of darkies upset but nothing major. :shrug:

thrust
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:42 PM
Black leaders hate Republicans. To critisize Romney for that statement is stupid and politically motivated. He has been an outstanding governor, something Black leaders can^t or refuse to understand. I am sure Romney meant nothing racial in his remark. Black leaders need to get real and try to motivate some of their people to take advantage of the opportunities available to them today, as most Blacks have.

Black Mamba.
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:44 PM
Black leaders hate Republicans. To critisize Romney for that statement is stupid and politically motivated. He has been an outstanding governor, something Black leaders can^t or refuse to understand. I am sure Romney meant nothing racial in his remark. Black leaders need to get real and try to motivate some of their people to take advantage of the opportunities available to them today, as most Blacks have.


What Black leaders? We don't have leaders, we have individuals that are about themselves and try to use us when it is convienent.

Rocketta
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:45 PM
Black leaders hate Republicans. To critisize Romney for that statement is stupid and politically motivated. He has been an outstanding governor, something Black leaders can^t or refuse to understand. I am sure Romney meant nothing racial in his remark. Black leaders need to get real and try to motivate some of their people to take advantage of the opportunities available to them today, as most Blacks have.

only way the gov didn't know that term was derogatory was if he has spent his life with his head up his ass and I know you are not saying that.

Also, people should get upset that a public official is using a term that 'epitomizes' the hate and discrimination black people have felt in the history of the United States.

Words have power and if anyone knows that it would be a politician. :rolleyes:

Rocketta
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:46 PM
What Black leaders? We don't have leaders, we have individuals that are about themselves and try to use us when it is convienent.

because white leaders lead everybody but black leaders only lead black people. :tape:

RVD
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:47 PM
I don't think any politician would be stupid enough to use a term like tar baby if he or she knew what it meant. It is tantamount to political suicide. Clearly an error of ignorance on the part of the Gov., not racism.I guess the point I was trying to make was that this sort of thing happens quite often. How many times have we heard, over the years, where a political figure, sports figure, radio personality or host, makes a remark like this and then isuue the same 'ol excuse?...: "...he didn't know anyone would be offended by the term some consider a racial epithet."We're talking about BOSTON, Massachusetts after all. And I personally experienced this very same mentality when I visited, so I'm not surprised.
What is truly troubling is that it is probably not the first time he has used it. People don't whip out a brand new word for fund raising speeches. The fact that his peers, family, and colleagues either didn't know, or didn't care, or didn't bother to tell him how heinous tar baby is, is the truly troubling part of it.Exactly!
However, I'm of the mind that he did know, but that he may have felt 'untouchable' for some reason. :shrug:
Are people so insulated and ignorant in their own worlds? I guess so.This sort of thing happens all the time. What it demonstrates is out-and-out arrogance on the part of the offender. He/she knows that nothing will be done becomes he/she is surrounded by supporters who will vouch for his/her personal integrity.

Honestly, this sort of thing no longer bothers or disturbs me. I just mark it down as insensitivity or ignorance, and if they are a local representative, not vote for 'em. :shrug:

RVD
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:50 PM
What Black leaders? We don't have leaders, we have individuals that are about themselves and try to use us when it is convienent.:worship: Sad...but true. :sad:

Black Mamba.
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:50 PM
I guess the point I was trying to make was that this sort of thing happens quite often. How many times have we heard, over the years, where a political figure, sports figure, radio personality or host, makes a remark like this and then isuue the same 'ol excuse?...: We're talking about BOSTON, Massachusetts after all. And I personally experienced this very same mentality when I visited, so I'm not surprised.
Exactly!
However, I'm of the mind that he did know, but that he may have felt 'untouchable' for some reason. :shrug:
This sort of thing happens all the time. What it demonstrates is out-and-out arrogance on the part of the offender. He/she knows that nothing will be done becomes he/she is surrounded by supporters who will vouch for his/her personal integrity.

Honestly, this sort of thing no longer bothers or disturbs me. I just mark it down as insensitivity or ignorance, and if they are a local representative, not vote for 'em. :shrug:


Boston has been that way for a long time. In fact some consider it more "that way" than some Southern cities.

Wannabeknowitall
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:52 PM
I don't think any politician would be stupid enough to use a term like tar baby if he or she knew what it meant. It is tantamount to political suicide. Clearly an error of ignorance on the part of the Gov., not racism.

HOWEVER.

What is truly troubling is that it is probably not the first time he has used it. People don't whip out a brand new word for fund raising speeches. The fact that his peers, family, and colleagues either didn't know, or didn't care, or didn't bother to tell him how heinous tar baby is, is the truly troubling part of it.

Are people so insulated and ignorant in their own worlds? I guess so.

Well technically that's not true. A Republican city council member in Philadelphia used it last year in writing a letter to a black democratic city council member. I'm pretty sure he knew what that word meant in regards to that other city council member.
The thing is not many people cared. If it's not the "n" word many people in the black community don't have an issue with it. It hasn't been really used in a negative way since the 30s and 40s.
It still has a very nasty history behind it,almost as bad a the "n" word, the majority of people in the black community don't know the history behind it or have never been called one.

I find it to be offensive. I think he knew he could get away with using it Ames, he just forgot the media would be listening in as well. Whoops. :tape:

Stamp Paid
Jul 31st, 2006, 08:53 PM
:lol::lol::lol::lol:
thats funny.

RVD
Jul 31st, 2006, 09:00 PM
Boston has been that way for a long time. In fact some consider it more "that way" than some Southern cities.Yeah, I was there on a business trip in the late 80s with some white co-workers, and walked into a nice little Café near where the Spruce Goose was docked, and that nice little café wouldn't serve me. :sad:

Imagine my surprise. :lol:

Black Mamba.
Jul 31st, 2006, 09:21 PM
Yeah, I was there on a business trip in the late 80s with some white co-workers, and walked into a nice little Café near where the Spruce Goose was docked, and that nice little café wouldn't serve me. :sad:

Imagine my surprise. :lol:


This girl I met at college was from Boston and she said her "friends" use to pick on her because she's Jewish. Imagine my suprise because if she never told me I would've never known she was Jewish.

griffin
Jul 31st, 2006, 10:26 PM
Look, I can't stand Mitt Romney (who's originally from Michigan, not Boston), and the only thing that infuriates me more than having him as Governor is the horrifying idea of having him as President. I have no motivation for defending him, but considering that he used the phrase to refer not to a person or group of people but a really messed up public works project, and that we're talking about a man so concerned with having a clean public image that his campaign is funding a website and education campaign to explain his religion...yeah, I think it's a stretch to say that he knew the term was offensive and used it anyway.

No kidding, most white people really don't get that "tar baby" has racist connotations (and yes, I know that this is a problem in and of itself)

*JR*
Jul 31st, 2006, 10:40 PM
Look, I can't stand Mitt Romney (who's originally from Michigan, not Boston), and the only thing that infuriates me more than having him as Governor is the horrifying idea of having him as President. I have no motivation for defending him, but considering that he used the phrase to refer not to a person or group of people but a really messed up public works project, and that we're talking about a man so concerned with having a clean public image that his campaign is funding a website and education campaign to explain his religion...yeah, I think it's a stretch to say that he knew the term was offensive and used it anyway.

No kidding, most white people really don't get that "tar baby" has racist connotations (and yes, I know that this is a problem in and of itself)
Maybe Mitt will acknowledge the original Mormon theory of race: That in the beginning everyone was black, then God sent a cleansing rain to "wash it off" ppl, but the lazy ones were asleep out of its range. When they woke up there was just a puddle left that they dipped the palms of their hands and soles of their feet into. (Explaining why those areas on black ppl are much lighter to this day). :o

OTOH, they might merge their theology with MA's gay marriage law, and allow gay & lesbian polygamy! :tape:

kabuki
Jul 31st, 2006, 10:40 PM
Politicians and people in general work in their own best interest. No politician would willfully use an epithet in the US in this day and age because unlike for celebrities, there is such a thing as bad press. It was an off the cuff remark rather than a plotted speech. Otherwise it would have never happened.

I'm not defending his ignorance, but there's no way a politician with national aspirations would ever use an epithet, whether in front of a friendly crowd or not, because their every word and movement is documented, and one misstep by a marginal candidate like Romney is game over.

*JR*
Jul 31st, 2006, 10:47 PM
...
I'm not defending his ignorance, but there's no way a politician with national aspirations would ever use an epithet, whether in front of a friendly crowd or not, because their every word and movement is documented, and one misstep by a marginal candidate like Romney is game over.
Ironically, Mitt's late father (Michigan Gov. George Romney) blew his chance for the 1968 Republican nomination by saying after a fact-finding trip to Vietnam that he'd been brainwashed by the US Generals there (in terms of his having said from there that the war was going well).

mykarma
Jul 31st, 2006, 10:56 PM
[QUOTE=Lord Nelson]What caught my eye is that some of these black civil right leaders really seem a bit cocky. Oh, do they?:tape:
I wonder how many 'mistakes' this Larry guy has made in his public speeches. Why and what does it have to do with anything?

Wigglytuff
Jul 31st, 2006, 10:56 PM
"Tar baby is a totally inappropriate phrase in the 21st century," said Larry Jones, a black Republican and civil rights activist.

WTF? :scared: :help:


anyway, the context of what the gov. said, is such that i cant believe he meant anything racist by it. "the best thing i can do is to stay way from that black person" when talking about a construction project? makes no sense. "the best thing i can do is stay away from that stick situation," that makes more sense.

thrust
Jul 31st, 2006, 10:57 PM
Jumpman23- Unfortunately, you are correct. People like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton are prime examples. In all honesty the term tar baby is one that most white Americans would not associate with a Black child, at least not today. I am not young, and would never have connected the two. Oh well, we learn something new every day.

Wigglytuff
Jul 31st, 2006, 10:58 PM
WTF? :scared: :help:


anyway, the context of what the gov. said, is such that i cant believe he meant anything racist by it. "the best thing i can do is to stay way from that black person" when talking about a construction project? makes no sense. "the best thing i can do is stay away from that stick situation," that makes more sense.
now i am waiting for all those retards who talk about how much jiggly hates all white people are going to spin this one!! :lol: :lol: :tape: :tape:

:haha:

Black Mamba.
Jul 31st, 2006, 11:04 PM
Jumpman23- Unfortunately, you are correct. People like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton are prime examples. In all honesty the term tar baby is one that most white Americans would not associate with a Black child, at least not today. I am not young, and would never have connected the two. Oh well, we learn something new every day.


I'd take it a step further JC Watts, Condi Rice, Armstrong Williams, Judge Mathis, certain members of the CBC etc are all cut from the same cloth. They aren't our leaders and they want to use us when it is beneficial for them. This isn't a problem that is limited to Jesse and Al. The true Black leaders are those that are in their own communities setting positive examples for people and trying to make a difference. One misconception many people have is that Black folks sit around and take orders from our media appointed leaders when in fact many of us are out doing our own thing.

Black Mamba.
Jul 31st, 2006, 11:05 PM
now i am waiting for all those retards who talk about how much jiggly hates all white people are going to spin this one!! :lol: :lol: :tape: :tape:

:haha:


You only disagreed because he's a Black republican :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:. We all know how you really feel. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

*JR*
Jul 31st, 2006, 11:14 PM
The Nixon-Ford Secretary of Agriculture was fired (after a history of borderline remarks) for saying about the diversity of a study group: "We've got a black, a Jew, and a cripple". (Some comedian then said that he was talking about Sammy Davis Jr.) :tape:

Wigglytuff
Jul 31st, 2006, 11:14 PM
You only disagreed because he's a Black republican :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:. We all know how you really feel. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
hotness!!! that was some good spinning!!! :worship: :worship:


What is truly troubling is that it is probably not the first time he has used it. People don't whip out a brand new word for fund raising speeches. The fact that his peers, family, and colleagues either didn't know, or didn't care, or didn't bother to tell him how heinous tar baby is, is the truly troubling part of it.

Are people so insulated and ignorant in their own worlds? I guess so.
yes that is what is troubling, and yes some people are the insulated and ignorant.

only way the gov didn't know that term was derogatory was if he has spent his life with his head up his ass and I know you are not saying that.

rocky, he's a politician. of course there is a good chance he spent his life with his head up his own ass.
now mind you i am not saying what he is saying is excuseable or right. just that this guy is ignorant first. and then every other bad name one likes (and you know i can think of quite a few :devil: )

No kidding, most white people really don't get that "tar baby" has racist connotations (and yes, I know that this is a problem in and of itself)
yep. i believe it. you know i loves me some white women :lick: (and really any kind of hot dyke) but i have heard some say some shit, while trying to get in my pants mind, and have no honest clue why or how what they were saying is offensive. not out of meanness or racist-ness or anything like, just plain ignorance.

mykarma
Jul 31st, 2006, 11:15 PM
Boston has been that way for a long time. In fact some consider it more "that way" than some Southern cities.
I've lived in Boston and the south and I disagree with your statement. If I had the time, I'd explain the difference to you.

Black Mamba.
Jul 31st, 2006, 11:17 PM
I've lived in Boston and the south and I disagree with your statement. If I had the time, I'd explain the difference to you.


PM me if you get the time.

mykarma
Jul 31st, 2006, 11:47 PM
[QUOTE] If it's not the "n" word many people in the black community don't have an issue with it. If they didn't have an issue with it, we wouldn't be discussing it.

the majority of people in the black community don't know the history behind it :scratch: Maybe the majority of people in the white community don't know the history.

Using the tar baby thing is ignorant, it's like someone said to me when I first moved back to the south. It's a term I'd never heard before and was totally shocked that this particular person used it. She was giving us a presentation in the office and said that some product was, "****** rigged". The other people (all white), just got quiet and everyone just looked at each other. She just kept right on talking about this product. Obviously, it was something she'd been saying all of her life. It so happen that no customers were there. Later, one of our co-workers made her aware that it was a racist statement. She apologized and said she had no idea why it was a racist statement.

What's so sad about it is that she was clueless. Racism is so embedded in our society that an intelligent person would be so ignorant as to feel comfortable saying something like that.

mykarma
Jul 31st, 2006, 11:50 PM
Yeah, I was there on a business trip in the late 80s with some white co-workers, and walked into a nice little Café near where the Spruce Goose was docked, and that nice little café wouldn't serve me. :sad:

Imagine my surprise. :lol:
I left Boston in the late 80's and never went any place where I wasn't served or felt as though they didn't want to serve me. Of course, racist are everywhere.

mykarma
Jul 31st, 2006, 11:54 PM
The Nixon-Ford Secretary of Agriculture was fired (after a history of borderline remarks) for saying about the diversity of a study group: "We've got a black, a Jew, and a cripple". (Some comedian then said that he was talking about Sammy Davis Jr.) :tape:
:lol::lol::lol:

Rocketta
Aug 1st, 2006, 12:10 AM
Using the tar baby thing is ignorant, it's like someone said to me when I first moved back to the south. It's a term I'd never heard before and was totally shocked that this particular person used it. She was giving us a presentation in the office and said that some product was, "****** rigged". The other people (all white), just got quiet and everyone just looked at each other. She just kept right on talking about this product. Obviously, it was something she'd been saying all of her life. It so happen that no customers were there. Later, one of our co-workers made her aware that it was a racist statement. She apologized and said she had no idea why it was a racist statement.

What's so sad about it is that she was clueless. Racism is so embedded in our society that an intelligent person would be so ignorant as to feel comfortable saying something like that.

:lol:

wait she was white and used the term "****** rigged"? :spit:

ok, I've heard black people use the terms "****** rigged" and "****** rich" so she was black right? :help:

Wigglytuff
Aug 1st, 2006, 12:14 AM
:lol:

wait she was white and used the term "****** rigged"? :spit:

ok, I've heard black people use the terms "****** rigged" and "****** rich" so she was black right? :help:
i dont know what the term means and dont think i have heard it before, but it shouldnt take a Ph.d. to know that anything with the term "******" in it is going to be offensive.

mykarma
Aug 1st, 2006, 12:15 AM
:lol:

wait she was white and used the term "****** rigged"? :spit:

ok, I've heard black people use the terms "****** rigged" and "****** rich" so she was black right? :help:
Nope, she was white. :lol:

Rocketta
Aug 1st, 2006, 12:17 AM
Nope, she was white. :lol:

uh uh, she deserved to get fired for stupidity. :lol:

How do you not know using the 'n' word associated with anything is a big NO NO? :retard:

Black Mamba.
Aug 1st, 2006, 12:34 AM
I have a confession guys. Sometimes when people say racist things in a non-racist way I have to call them on it even though I find it amusing sometimes. Case in point, in high school I was on the basketball team and we were playing some team and a guy in the crowd really liked how we were playing so he yelled "they playing that nigga ball" keep in mind he was a white guy but I almost fell out laughing right there in the middle of the game. I had to look displeased to show that guy that probably wasn't the best comment to make at a high school basketball game, but that comment cracks me up till this day.

Wannabeknowitall
Aug 1st, 2006, 12:42 AM
[QUOTE=Wannabeknowitall] If they didn't have an issue with it, we wouldn't be discussing it.

:scratch: Maybe the majority of people in the white community don't know the history.

Using the tar baby thing is ignorant, it's like someone said to me when I first moved back to the south. It's a term I'd never heard before and was totally shocked that this particular person used it. She was giving us a presentation in the office and said that some product was, "****** rigged". The other people (all white), just got quiet and everyone just looked at each other. She just kept right on talking about this product. Obviously, it was something she'd been saying all of her life. It so happen that no customers were there. Later, one of our co-workers made her aware that it was a racist statement. She apologized and said she had no idea why it was a racist statement.

What's so sad about it is that she was clueless. Racism is so embedded in our society that an intelligent person would be so ignorant as to feel comfortable saying something like that.
I honestly don't find this forum to be the representative majority view of the black community.

No. A lot of the white people who use the word do know some of it's history, they just still choose to use it. The example of yours pretty much shows that.
I don't care if she used the phrase "****** rigged", it still has the "n" word in it, and no amount of ignorance will hide that fact.
If you wanted to just let it slide and let a co-worker handle it, then there's the problem right there.

The govenor chose to use the word in Ames, Iowa. To me that says he thought he could likely use the word in front of these people without an issue.
The media thought otherwise.

Infiniti2001
Aug 1st, 2006, 12:46 AM
These Republicans just have such a way of putting their big feet in their big mouths, don't they? :shrug: And they just don't learn from the (highly publicized) mistakes of others :scratch:

mykarma
Aug 1st, 2006, 01:10 AM
[QUOTE=mykarma]
[QUOTE] I honestly don't find this forum to be the representative majority view of the black community.
I used the word majority since I was replying to your post. Read below.

"It still has a very nasty history behind it,almost as bad a the "n" word, the majority of people in the black community don't know the history behind it or have never been called one."

If you wanted to just let it slide and let a co-worker handle it, then there's the problem right there.
Why was that a problem? What would have been gained by me stopping her presentation and calling her on it? As long as she was made aware of it and we had an opportunity to discuss it, mission accomplished. To tell you the truth, I was nodding during the presentation until I heard the words "****** rigged". :lol: After shaking my head in disbelief, wondering if I heard what I thought I heard, she had gone on. IMO, it was best that it happened that way. I really am interested in how you would have handled the situation since you think I didn't handle it properly

The govenor chose to use the word in Ames, Iowa. To me that says he thought he could likely use the word in front of these people without an issue.
The media thought otherwise.
Either he thought he could get away with it or he was as ignorant as my co-worker.

Wannabeknowitall
Aug 1st, 2006, 01:46 AM
[QUOTE=Wannabeknowitall][QUOTE=mykarma]

I used the word majority since I was replying to your post. Read below.

"It still has a very nasty history behind it,almost as bad a the "n" word, the majority of people in the black community don't know the history behind it or have never been called one."

Why was that a problem? What would have been gained by me stopping her presentation and calling her on it? As long as she was made aware of it and we had an opportunity to discuss it, mission accomplished. To tell you the truth, I was nodding during the presentation until I heard the words "****** rigged". :lol: After shaking my head in disbelief, wondering if I heard what I thought I heard, she had gone on. IMO, it was best that it happened that way. I really am interested in how you would have handled the situation since you think I didn't handle it properly


Either he thought he could get away with it or he was as ignorant as my co-worker.

I'm sorry but you're retarded if you think your co-worker was that blatantly ignorant as to not know the phrase "****** rigged" was offensive to a group of people.
I wouldn't have put the issue in other people's hands is what I would have done. I might have a personal story to tell her that maybe the others might not have.

mykarma
Aug 1st, 2006, 03:57 AM
[QUOTE=Wannabeknowitall]

[QUOTE] I'm sorry but you're retarded I know your id says wannabeknowitall, but in reality, it should read dontknowshitatall. The next time you want to say someone is retarded, look in the mirror and pinch your own ass.
I wouldn't have put the issue in other people's hands is what I would have done. So you're saying that you would have disrupted the meeting and accomplished what? I might have a personal story to tell her that maybe the others might not have. And what is that bomb shell. :lol::lol::lol: