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raquel
Jul 6th, 2006, 07:38 PM
Sounds like a tough regime. Sam Smith also said during commentary a lot is expected from the Federation of the girls to bring home gold medals in Beijing. If they are trained too hard and too much pressure is piled on them to win medals, they are in danger of burning these girls out.


http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/topstories/tm_objectid=17337923%26method=full%26siteid=94762-name_page.html


CASH RAPS CHINA
By Neil Mcleman
PAT CASH claims Chinese tennis coaches subject their female players to inhuman training regimes.

Na Li became the first Chinese player to reach the quarter-final of a Grand Slam before losing to Kim Clijsters at Wimbledon this week.

But as the Asian superpower prepares to host the 2008 Olympics, the Australian claimed progress in tennis had come at a high physical price.


Speaking on BBC Two's Today at Wimbledon, the 1987 champion said: "A group came to my academy in Australia and, boy, are they tough on the girls.

"We had never seen anything like it. We were almost shocked. They trained in the hot sun in Australia for five hours and then the coaches were screaming at them: 'Go out there and do some more running.'

"Certainly, we told them to stop. But they didn't."

The Guilty
Jul 6th, 2006, 07:49 PM
Sounds like a tough regime. Sam Smith also said during commentary a lot is expected from the Federation of the girls to bring home gold medals in Beijing. If they are trained too hard and too much pressure is piled on them to win medals, they are in danger of burning these girls out.


http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/topstories/tm_objectid=17337923%26method=full%26siteid=94762-name_page.html


CASH RAPS CHINA
By Neil Mcleman


PAT CASH claims Chinese tennis coaches subject their female players to inhuman training regimes.







Na Li became the first Chinese player to reach the quarter-final of a Grand Slam before losing to Kim Clijsters at Wimbledon this week.







But as the Asian superpower prepares to host the 2008 Olympics, the Australian claimed progress in tennis had come at a high physical price.








Speaking on BBC Two's Today at Wimbledon, the 1987 champion said: "A group came to my academy in Australia and, boy, are they tough on the girls.







"We had never seen anything like it. We were almost shocked. They trained in the hot sun in Australia for five hours and then the coaches were screaming at them: 'Go out there and do some more running.'







"Certainly, we told them to stop. But they didn't."





Last year in Estoril, I didn't count but they must have been 4 to 5 hours practicing in a row. Playing a lot of points and hitting as hard as they could.

manu32
Jul 6th, 2006, 07:55 PM
pat cash is a joke.....others regims.....but a not a great career.......
it's amazing to see and heard gilbert,mac enroe,cash......speaking about tennis players.....poor guys ...they were unclened players and now they opened big mouths....please go away.......

drake3781
Jul 6th, 2006, 11:17 PM
Well it is interesting to hear the opinion of others in the business. I do believe that they train extremely hard.

They are not the same situation as most other players, who are in control of their careers, and what they do from day-to-day and week-to-week.

The Chinese players are like employees of the Chinese government, who can either go along with the program or quit. They have no other choice. They get their training and travel expenses paid, and in exchange they "work" to pay it off. And the work is very hard and the expectations are very high. They don't even get to see their families except about twice a year.

Chinese government keeps a large portion of all of their winnings, to recoup the expenses afforded to the players and to pay for other players' development.

Chinese members...... please correct anything that is wrong, and add more info.

QUEENLINDSAY
Jul 6th, 2006, 11:31 PM
I can only say, tough training wont do it alone.
You need talent, healthy body, dedication and most of all, you need to enjoy what you are doing.

hdfb
Jul 7th, 2006, 01:00 AM
I'm of Chinese heritage, and it is true, it's a given that Chinese people are always made to do what others want them to excel in. You can pretty much forget about freedom, you'll never get as much human rights as say a country like America. Even my mother thinks Australia should restrict rights to reduce crime rates and the like.

And boy, they are worked hard. What's worse is little girls and boys who are physically forced and stretched at young ages of five not to become Olympic champion gymnasts, but so that they can join an acrobat troupe.

Many Chinese live in poverty and the parents just can't give them a chance of education, and so they are forced to make them join circus troupes or whatever.

Chinese are also very 'strict'. They expect you to be the very best, and so being made to practice five hours straight while being hounded to practice even harder doesn't surprise me at all. It is afterall, the Chinese way.

trivfun
Jul 7th, 2006, 01:22 AM
I'm of Chinese heritage, and it is true, it's a given that Chinese people are always made to do what others want them to excel in. You can pretty much forget about freedom, you'll never get as much human rights as say a country like America. Even my mother thinks Australia should restrict rights to reduce crime rates and the like.

And boy, they are worked hard. What's worse is little girls and boys who are physically forced and stretched at young ages of five not to become Olympic champion gymnasts, but so that they can join an acrobat troupe.

Many Chinese live in poverty and the parents just can't give them a chance of education, and so they are forced to make them join circus troupes or whatever.

Chinese are also very 'strict'. They expect you to be the very best, and so being made to practice five hours straight while being hounded to practice even harder doesn't surprise me at all. It is afterall, the Chinese way.

What happens to those who aren't successful in their fields?

Prizeidiot
Jul 7th, 2006, 03:56 AM
Well, look at Peng. She won silver in the Asian games last summer, and they considered in a failure, and stop funding her.

So they're very tough on the players

trivfun
Jul 7th, 2006, 03:59 AM
I remember Jackie Chan talking about the regimentation at this school in Hong Kong where they Martial Arts and theater. He talked how guy was doing this flip and knocked himself unconscious and their master called him lazy for sleeping during instruction.

Veritas
Jul 7th, 2006, 04:18 AM
I feel sorry for Peng, because she's an enormously talented girl who's progress is being hindered by the meddling of Chinese authorities.

As for Pat Cash, he has a loud and annoying motor mouth that never fails to reveal how much of a fool he is, but this is the only time I'll ever agree with his assessments. Culturally, the Chinese are more strict and because of that have higher expectations than Westerners. I guess their idea is that if they train you hard, the results will automatically follow. Logically, it should always work out like that, except it doesn't and the dominance of the U.S. in the Olympic Games is testimony to that. Even when the U.S.S.R. was competing (and it's also known for similarly brutal training methods), the U.S. usually came out on top.

What non-Chinese have to understand is that patriotism and national pride is so important because it's a very effective political tool. Without patriotism from the public, it'll be almost impossible for the Chinese Communist Party to administer control. And there's no better way to spice up patriotic fervor than sporting success.

Billy Moonshine
Jul 7th, 2006, 04:43 AM
If the Chinese government is paying for these girls to travel and play tennis, they should expect a return. These girls would not be able to be pros otherwise. If they had the money they would have left China and funded themselves.
Look at the LTA. They are not tough enough and millions of pounds has been wasted (or did it even get spent on tennis?)
We are not tough enough in some western countries. Practising in the hot sun for five hours a day! Poor babies! Does Pat know what they would be doing in China if they weren't playing tennis? Well it wouldn't be sipping a beer or chilling in the shade like the ozzie kids. If the British juniors were practising as intensely, we too might some results.
Real life, imo, is not all about enjoyment. Only the lucky few get to enjoy what they do. In developing countries like China, where hundreds of millions live in poverty, life is about working hard to survive. Rewards are few and the Chinese girls probably know that compared to 99% of their country, they are lucky.

clonesheep
Jul 7th, 2006, 05:00 AM
I feel sorry for Peng, because she's an enormously talented girl who's progress is being hindered by the meddling of Chinese authorities.

As for Pat Cash, he has a loud and annoying motor mouth that never fails to reveal how much of a fool he is, but this is the only time I'll ever agree with his assessments. Culturally, the Chinese are more strict and because of that have higher expectations than Westerners. I guess their idea is that if they train you hard, the results will automatically follow. Logically, it should always work out like that, except it doesn't and the dominance of the U.S. in the Olympic Games is testimony to that. Even when the U.S.S.R. was competing (and it's also known for similarly brutal training methods), the U.S. usually came out on top.

What non-Chinese have to understand is that patriotism and national pride is so important because it's a very effective political tool. Without patriotism from the public, it'll be almost impossible for the Chinese Communist Party to administer control. And there's no better way to spice up patriotic fervor than sporting success.
Very good points. Well said.

As far as tennis is concerned, it's a myth that if you push kids 10 times harder they will do something good. I think there are many talented kids, Chinese or American, whose careers are ruined exactly because they are forced to over-train under unrealistic expectations.

Brian Stewart
Jul 7th, 2006, 09:40 AM
China is in danger of burning out their players before they even have a chance to succeed. The Japanese boom went bust largely because of demands on the players, who were required by sponsors to compete in team leagues in Japan whilst still playing a full tour schedule. It proved too much, and many promising players fell by the wayside.

But at least the Japanese players had a bit more freedom in controlling their own fate. The Chinese players seem to have no say, and are being pushed really hard. It sort of divides your feeling as a fan. You'd like to see some players succeed because the country hasn't had success before, and you'd like to see the hard work pay off. But on the other hand, it will only enourage the federation to continue the regimen, or even accelerate it in the hopes of producing even better results.

Interesting that this would come from Cash, whose idea of a "tough training" regimen would be anything that requires him to get out of bed before noon. But he does have a point.

hdfb
Jul 7th, 2006, 11:48 AM
What happens to those who aren't successful in their fields?

They are forgotten about, left behind. At the very worst, if their family is very very poverty-stricken, then some resort to begging on the streets. If you have been to China you will see many beggars.

tennislover
Jul 7th, 2006, 11:50 AM
:tape: :tape: :tape: :tape: :tape: :tape: :tape: :tape: :tape: :tape:

Sam L
Jul 7th, 2006, 12:02 PM
For once I agree with Cash. I HATE the Chinese sports factory. I think it's disgusting.

wukenaihe
Jul 7th, 2006, 01:00 PM
No one can force them to train so hard.

If you don't want to train hard and be a pro player, you can choose to retire like Na did three years ago.

As to these young children, their parents make a choose for most of them to give up lessons and train all day, I feel sad for these childen... their family is so poor that they can't afford the education and it's good way for them to get into university.

What can I say?
training five hours a day or starvation? what's your choice???!!!
Don't talk me about humanity even you cant eat enough food!!!

Of couse, this situcation mainly exist in the rural areas.

Modiac.
Jul 7th, 2006, 01:15 PM
I don't think what Cash said is totally true,he overexaggerate the real situation. :lol:

I can see many professional athletes trainning hard in China,because they just wanna to be outstanding in their field.
In China,professional athletes generally don't accept any education at all,they focus on their professionls only.So if they don't have some good results in their field,they'll not live by themselves.In other words,they can't get enough money to keep their lives.After all,they don't master any other knowledge.

So Cash's words are not so objective. :smash:

Believe it or not,Chinese are common persons,and Chinese athletes are not machines.They know what is harmful and what is good to their body and health. :)

Bus
Jul 7th, 2006, 02:08 PM
The thing is, in every sector of Chinese society it is a lot tougher, be it agriculture, education etc.

People here go to school until 9PM and do extra classes over summer. I have a friend from Taiwan who goes to school until midnight...
Yes, it's something of the culture and value. Chinese people always admires one who works hard. We believe that hard-working brings success. And the truth is, many outstanding players is famous for training hard.
Just see Meng Yuan, she is not belong to the CTA and not coached by a normal Chinese coach, but she works harder than any other national team players, has a busist schedule, and suffer injures almost everyday :sad:
But after all, live is not always tough to everyone, I am the one who leave school at 4PM :lol:

Bus
Jul 7th, 2006, 02:19 PM
China is in danger of burning out their players before they even have a chance to succeed. The Japanese boom went bust largely because of demands on the players, who were required by sponsors to compete in team leagues in Japan whilst still playing a full tour schedule. It proved too much, and many promising players fell by the wayside.

But at least the Japanese players had a bit more freedom in controlling their own fate. The Chinese players seem to have no say, and are being pushed really hard. It sort of divides your feeling as a fan. You'd like to see some players succeed because the country hasn't had success before, and you'd like to see the hard work pay off. But on the other hand, it will only enourage the federation to continue the regimen, or even accelerate it in the hopes of producing even better results.

Interesting that this would come from Cash, whose idea of a "tough training" regimen would be anything that requires him to get out of bed before noon. But he does have a point.
I agree. Talanted girl Nan-Nan Liu retired in a young age because of serious injures. Most Chinese athlete from poverty families, they tried hard to raise their lives, but not considered the affect if they trained too hard. Of course, the Chinese sports system is partly blamed, but not all.

Fantastic
Jul 7th, 2006, 02:39 PM
Pat Cash is a lot of things but one thing he is most known for is his work ethic. Out of all the Aussie guys past and present, he'd have to be one of the Top 5 hardest working players. He often condemns those players who do not fulfill their potential by being lazy. So if Cash is saying that what he saw was tough, then I figure that he may be in a position to judge.

But Cash aside, I think the Chinese girls, like the Russian girls, put enough pressure on themselves to succeed without needing their coaches to get on their backs too. But then again, the coach is earning his living too. If he/she was even perceived as being casual or relaxed towards his players by the Chinese Tennis Association, then his reputation might be questioned and he could lose his/her job too.

My opinion is that as long as the Chinese girls aren't actually complaining themselves, that they must know that everyone has their job to do, and that they are just doing their part. The Chinese players are carrying the hopes of billions of people, not just themselves.

However, it is definitely a worry that the girls might be training too hard and risking career-ending injuries by doing so. As a tennis fan, you'd just have to hope and have faith that the Chinese coaches know what they are doing.

Alec
Jul 7th, 2006, 02:49 PM
How could Pat Cash know all of these?

BTW, I think these chinese players look pretty happy on court, so I don't think they suffer from something. we all know na once retired in 2002. so I believe these players have freedom to decide on their own career.

trivfun
Jul 7th, 2006, 02:50 PM
I agree. Talanted girl Nan-Nan Liu retired in a young age because of serious injures. Most Chinese athlete from poverty families, they tried hard to raise their lives, but not considered the affect if they trained too hard. Of course, the Chinese sports system is partly blamed, but not all.


My question is if the Chinese believe and respect individuals who work hard why are there so many beggars on the street?

Bus
Jul 7th, 2006, 03:16 PM
My question is if the Chinese believe and respect individuals who work hard why are there so many beggars on the street?
China has a large population, it's now easy for everyone to get a job, and a large number of people lives in property, they come form rural area which are not enough earth for them to cultivate, but they can't make livings in the city
One admires hard-working doesn't mean He is hard-working, for example, me, it's a little lazzy :lol:

wukenaihe
Jul 7th, 2006, 03:17 PM
My question is if the Chinese believe and respect individuals who work hard why are there so many beggars on the street?

cause china has a much large population.

wukenaihe
Jul 7th, 2006, 03:20 PM
China has a large population, it's now easy for everyone to get a job, and a large number of people lives in property, they come form rural area which are not enough earth for them to cultivate, but they can't make livings in the city
One admires hard-working doesn't mean He is hard-working, for example, me, it's a little lazzy :lol:

oops, you are faster than me...how can I delete my reply?

Pureracket
Jul 7th, 2006, 03:48 PM
I'm not sure you all understand what's going on here with "burnout." The Chinese Federation doesn't care about that until the Olympics. The welfare of their overall health will become virtually insignificant to them after the Games. It will continue in gymnastics, though.

MLF
Jul 7th, 2006, 03:59 PM
They probably do get worked very hard but then again whenever I've seen Zheng & Yan and Li & Sun play doubles they've always been full of smiles and seem to enjoy playing - the'yre not trudging around the court looking miserable like Koukalova, Benesova, Chakvetadze and Zvonareva for example.

CoryAnnAvants#1
Jul 7th, 2006, 05:21 PM
If the Chinese government is paying for these girls to travel and play tennis, they should expect a return. These girls would not be able to be pros otherwise. If they had the money they would have left China and funded themselves.


They don't have the money because the Chinese government takes about 70-75% of their winnings. Also, China is a communist country. If they just get up and leave, odds are they won't be allowed back in the country (much like Navratilova was for many many years when she defected from then Czechoslovakia). There is no doubt that Na, Shuai, Jie, and Zi would have the money to fund themselves if they could keep all of their winnings and that they have the intelligence to create a schedule best for them. That being said, they don't really have a choice in this situation.

The amount of pressure they put on these girls is incredibly unrealistic. They've basically made it so that Shuai Peng will be considered a failure to the entire country if she doesn't win a medal at the Olympics. That is CRAZY. She has NO chance at winning a medal or even coming close to winning one. Some people can have fine careers and just aren't meant to win Olympic medals...yet that's considered unacceptable logic to the Chinese government.

Ellery
Jul 7th, 2006, 09:01 PM
They probably do get worked very hard but then again whenever I've seen Zheng & Yan and Li & Sun play doubles they've always been full of smiles and seem to enjoy playing - the'yre not trudging around the court looking miserable like Koukalova, Benesova, Chakvetadze and Zvonareva for example.

Ditto. :)

Brian Stewart
Jul 8th, 2006, 10:28 AM
Pat Cash is a lot of things but one thing he is most known for is his work ethic. Out of all the Aussie guys past and present, he'd have to be one of the Top 5 hardest working players....

I stand corrected. :) I must have been thinking of some of those tales from the senior tour, and their "training" programs.

Pasta-Na
Jul 8th, 2006, 12:27 PM
They don't have the money because the Chinese government takes about 70-75% of their winnings. Also, China is a communist country. If they just get up and leave, odds are they won't be allowed back in the country (much like Navratilova was for many many years when she defected from then Czechoslovakia). There is no doubt that Na, Shuai, Jie, and Zi would have the money to fund themselves if they could keep all of their winnings and that they have the intelligence to create a schedule best for them. That being said, they don't really have a choice in this situation.

The amount of pressure they put on these girls is incredibly unrealistic. They've basically made it so that Shuai Peng will be considered a failure to the entire country if she doesn't win a medal at the Olympics. That is CRAZY. She has NO chance at winning a medal or even coming close to winning one. Some people can have fine careers and just aren't meant to win Olympic medals...yet that's considered unacceptable logic to the Chinese government.

i heard the players can get around 60% of the winning.

Pasta-Na
Jul 8th, 2006, 12:32 PM
They don't have the money because the Chinese government takes about 70-75% of their winnings. Also, China is a communist country. If they just get up and leave, odds are they won't be allowed back in the country (much like Navratilova was for many many years when she defected from then Czechoslovakia). There is no doubt that Na, Shuai, Jie, and Zi would have the money to fund themselves if they could keep all of their winnings and that they have the intelligence to create a schedule best for them. That being said, they don't really have a choice in this situation.

The amount of pressure they put on these girls is incredibly unrealistic. They've basically made it so that Shuai Peng will be considered a failure to the entire country if she doesn't win a medal at the Olympics. That is CRAZY. She has NO chance at winning a medal or even coming close to winning one. Some people can have fine careers and just aren't meant to win Olympic medals...yet that's considered unacceptable logic to the Chinese government.

i meant chinese players dont have to worry what will happen on them tomorrow or something like that in comparing with Russia and some of other countries. it is true that they cant keep all of their winning. but remember they dont have to pay to hire the coaches, hotels and flights etc etc when they started their career. i think they might a bit selfish to think of themselves in the past. but now, they are happy to try their best for their country.

Bus
Jul 8th, 2006, 01:20 PM
The amount of pressure they put on these girls is incredibly unrealistic. They've basically made it so that Shuai Peng will be considered a failure to the entire country if she doesn't win a medal at the Olympics. That is CRAZY. She has NO chance at winning a medal or even coming close to winning one. Some people can have fine careers and just aren't meant to win Olympic medals...yet that's considered unacceptable logic to the Chinese government.
I don't think so. No one in China really believes Shuai could win a medal in the Olympic Games, and they don't have to win a medal in the Olympics. Yes Olympic Games is a important goal for them, but I don't think the pressure on them are that high. They are not like other Chinese players, they are more professional.

Billy Moonshine
Jul 8th, 2006, 01:33 PM
[QUOTE=CoryAnnAvants#1]They don't have the money because the Chinese government takes about 70-75% of their winnings. Also, China is a communist country. If they just get up and leave, odds are they won't be allowed back in the country (much like Navratilova was for many many years when she defected from then Czechoslovakia). There is no doubt that Na, Shuai, Jie, and Zi would have the money to fund themselves if they could keep all of their winnings and that they have the intelligence to create a schedule best for them. That being said, they don't really have a choice in this situation.


QUOTE]

What I meant to say was that had the Chinese girls come from wealthy families they could have left China and supported themselves from scratch. However I doubt they came from wealthy families and so if it wasn't for the Chinese government these girls would not be tennis pros.

excitement1995
Jul 8th, 2006, 01:46 PM
How come I heard that Peng was expelled from the team because of shoplifting. I have nothing against Peng, and I think what she did sould be forgiven. But we need to get the fact straight.

Well, look at Peng. She won silver in the Asian games last summer, and they considered in a failure, and stop funding her.

So they're very tough on the players

excitement1995
Jul 8th, 2006, 02:02 PM
For those of u who's posting "China this, China that" here, I wonder where the knowledges came from, because they are simply wrong.

I don't know exactly how much of the players earnings was taken away, but I have heard other Chinese posters say it's less than 50%. And also, I suspect the players would have had the chance of being a professional tennis player if they were not supported by the Federation. Yes they are talented players, but prefessional tennis is an expensive way of life, without the Federation, the Chinese players wont be able to get started at the first place.

And we need to keep in mind that the players aren't really forced to play or something. Li Na considered retiring and went to college. But she decide to continue her tennis career after she graduated from college. I heared that very few American players have the luxury of having both college education and tennis career. It isn't like the fereration cares nothing about the players future. They do, because if they don't and use the players like slaves, the parents won't send their kids there. Deciding a career in tennis is the choice of the players or their parents.

The situation in China is that the govenement spends money on training athletes not for their prize money. Acutlly believing this is silly because it's not a really proffitable business. What they want is the glory in international contests, especially the Olympics. They certainly push the players but that's the players choice, they are not forced into this contract.

Some people here really need to totally reconstruct what ever idea they have about China. It makes me lough reading some of the posts. They are so imaginary.

fufuqifuqishahah
Jul 8th, 2006, 02:22 PM
Well, look at Peng. She won silver in the Asian games last summer, and they considered in a failure, and stop funding her.

So they're very tough on the players

Yah, and she had a bad end to that year and bad beginning to this year didn't she?

---------------

As far as tennis is concerned, it's a myth that if you push kids 10 times harder they will do something good. I think there are many talented kids, Chinese or American, whose careers are ruined exactly because they are forced to over-train under unrealistic expectations.

but remember, if you don't push kids enough, a lot of careers can also be ruined that way.

-----------------------------

They probably do get worked very hard but then again whenever I've seen Zheng & Yan and Li & Sun play doubles they've always been full of smiles and seem to enjoy playing - the'yre not trudging around the court looking miserable like Koukalova, Benesova, Chakvetadze and Zvonareva for example.

SOOOOOO TRUE hahaa.

--------------------------
i meant chinese players dont have to worry what will happen on them tomorrow or something like that in comparing with Russia and some of other countries. it is true that they cant keep all of their winning. but remember they dont have to pay to hire the coaches, hotels and flights etc etc when they started their career. i think they might a bit selfish to think of themselves in the past. but now, they are happy to try their best for their country.

don't chinese players like get a lot of money if they do something really spectacular like win the olympics or something

switz
Jul 8th, 2006, 02:26 PM
i'm not saying he is wrong but i refuse to read anything Cash says or writes because he's an attention whore. Hís academies are exactly pumping out the champions of tomorrow either

Veritas
Jul 8th, 2006, 02:43 PM
I don't know exactly how much of the players earnings was taken away, but I have heard other Chinese posters say it's less than 50%. And also, I suspect the players would have had the chance of being a professional tennis player if they were not supported by the Federation. Yes they are talented players, but prefessional tennis is an expensive way of life, without the Federation, the Chinese players wont be able to get started at the first place.

No one's denying this. It's the "training regime" that's being focused on, not whether the Chinese players have been forced into a career.

And we need to keep in mind that the players aren't really forced to play or something.

Again, you're missing the point. No one's saying that the players are "forced to play"; what they're discussing is how tough the training being inflicted on the players is.

I heared that very few American players have the luxury of having both college education and tennis career. It isn't like the fereration cares nothing about the players future. They do, because if they don't and use the players like slaves, the parents won't send their kids there. Deciding a career in tennis is the choice of the players or their parents.

Just as the Chinese players have a choice of having a sports career or an academic one, the same applies for their American counterparts. They might not have a college degree because it's probably something that they decided on themselves.

The situation in China is that the govenement spends money on training athletes not for their prize money. Acutlly believing this is silly because it's not a really proffitable business. What they want is the glory in international contests, especially the Olympics. They certainly push the players but that's the players choice, they are not forced into this contract.

Again, no one's saying that the players are forced into a tennis career.

On this point, I agree that the Chinese government is more supportive of their sports people, but whether it's because of ethics, generosity or for some political agenda is up for debate.

Some people here really need to totally reconstruct what ever idea they have about China. It makes me lough reading some of the posts. They are so imaginary.

Yes, some of the comments here are uninformed (and stupid), but you did make an assumption about American players as well, so it's not as if you're basing some of your claims on things that are factual.

Rising Sun
Jul 8th, 2006, 02:51 PM
How come I heard that Peng was expelled from the team because of shoplifting. I have nothing against Peng, and I think what she did sould be forgiven. But we need to get the fact straight.
That was Yuan Meng. :rolleyes:

fufuqifuqishahah
Jul 8th, 2006, 03:04 PM
I heard that the rewards for getting medals in the Chinese national games were absolutely ridiculous, and included cars etc., which is why Peng choked in the final.

seeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee so its not all so bad.


when u think about it... that's kind of like capitalism.

ashwu
Jul 8th, 2006, 03:18 PM
How come I heard that Peng was expelled from the team because of shoplifting. I have nothing against Peng, and I think what she did sould be forgiven. But we need to get the fact straight.

true:)

not the stealing part

excitement1995
Jul 8th, 2006, 03:46 PM
The original post makes it sounds like being a tennis player in China is a horrible way of life. And I pointed out that it couldn't be that horrible, since it's the players who made the choice.

I also doubt the Chinese players are really pushed much harder than other players. If so, we should expect a high risk of injuries and burn out. The Chinese players don't show sign of this.

No one's denying this. It's the "training regime" that's being focused on, not whether the Chinese players have been forced into a career.

excitement1995
Jul 8th, 2006, 03:51 PM
God, I certainly jumpt into this too fast. And I alwasy confuse between Peng Shuai and Yuan Meng.

That was Yuan Meng. :rolleyes:

ashwu
Jul 8th, 2006, 03:51 PM
for most of you the chinese government can't do anything right (they might be stupid, but i really doubt bush is wiser, and i think he's the more evil one). and everytime the chinese win some matches, some idiot jump out and complain about sth. then more stupid posts here~ for most of you the image of china is so 70s. (and so are many american movies and tv shows).

again, if cta hasn't paid for them when they were young, they'll have some jobs paid $300 a month now. and will never get the chance to play. look at lucic now! and the chinese girls' situation is even tougher.
also i don't think the cta could foresee that beijing will host olympics back then when they starting their financial supports. and even if the reason is only the olympics, so what? the players got the supports they need anway. you just don't know how many people have to give up their dreams because of the lack of money. again, look at lucic now!

and next time, if the training method is wrong, blame the coach, and better say it after they lost, when they're sinking. though i doubt if anyone care then.

also, fyi, the players are happy, and most of them are much more injuryfree than say lindsay, kim, mary :sad:, justine, venus, serena...

btw, china is not a communist country. never was and never will be :P