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Marcus1979
Jun 19th, 2006, 04:02 AM
School coursework being scanned for plagiarism

LONDON (Reuters) - A new computer program, sensitive enough to detect even small fragments of copied work, is scanning school coursework this Summer, to see whether candidates have been lifting essays wholesale from the Internet.

Exam board Edexcel is using the Turnitin program on coursework submitted for GCSEs and A-levels.

Students accused of plagiarism will receive no grade for the module or possibly for the whole exam.

"We are determined to ensure that those who cheat are caught," said John Black, Edexcel's Head of Compliance and Quality Management.

"Additionally, this software will also benefit head teachers by providing detailed information and evidence, which they can use when discussing plagiarism with colleagues and candidates."

The Turnitin program scans billions of pages from the Internet, checking for match-ups between submitted coursework and previously published work.

Concerns about plagiarism resurfaced earlier this month after a study revealed the phenomenon of "contract cheating" in which students use legitimate out-sourcing Web sites to employ others to write essays for them.

ozstyl
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:30 AM
teachers at my college used a similar program.

Pengwin
Jun 19th, 2006, 09:15 AM
Edexcel is a fucking joke, worst exam board ever. Always setting inconsistant questions, questions with WRONG ANSWERS, getting their own staff to mark papers when they can't find other people. I DO ALL MY A LEVELS WITH THEM :o

Oh and re:coursework, it's not going to help since the main issue is getting too much help from teachers and friends/parents, of which I know people who have managed to get full marks by doing. And on top of that, only 10% of coursework is scanned! The rest doesn't touch the mailbox.

Julie
Jun 19th, 2006, 09:48 AM
I hate plagiarism though - and in universities its just feels ten times worse - i remember marking things last year from about 4 different people who had obviously copied and none had used a spellchecker cos they all spelt the same words wrong in the same ways - ahrggggg

And the more annoying thing it that sometimes the universities dont even want to bother about reprimanding people from doing it- its all about the fees nowadays - double ahrggg

CondiLicious
Jun 19th, 2006, 11:42 AM
Oh and re:coursework, it's not going to help since the main issue is getting too much help from teachers and friends/parents, of which I know people who have managed to get full marks by doing.

That's true. I remember in my A Level English Language class a friend getting her first draft back with loads of corrections on it and a note saying if she submitted the piece it would only be worth a D... so she added in all the corrections and got an A :rolleyes: She was pig shit thick and didn't deserve the grade and I think overall she only got a D anyway, after the exams.

skanky~skanketta
Jun 19th, 2006, 11:47 AM
good. we need these.

DevilishAttitude
Jun 19th, 2006, 11:53 AM
Noooo.

I did coursework this year, and copying is what everyone does :o I remember in Science, in my group, about 8 of us were all helping each other and copying answers with different style words :tape:

Everyone cheats, there not going to stop that. Teachers are just as bad, we write an answer and they change it to make it better or even give you the answer :tape:

I was even copying answers in the exams :tape: :tape: :tape:

Pengwin
Jun 19th, 2006, 12:18 PM
As the exam board Edexcel admits to another mistake on an exam paper, BBC News Online looks at its history.

1996: Edexcel is formed by the merger of two exam boards.

22 March 2001: 10,000 sixth-formers are given the wrong results for an information technology exam (key skills test).

14 June 2001: Candidates sit a maths A-level paper which has been leaked, as shown on BBC News the night before.

August 2001: Bolton education authority complains 280 children have to wait for GCSE exam results.

4 October 2001: Chief executive of Edexcel, Dr Christina Townsend, resigns, saying it has been a "demanding year".

18 December 2001: It emerges that a question from a mock exam was in a paper taken during the summer.

18 January 2002: An AS-level maths paper with a mistake in it is taken by 2,500 pupils. Other errors emerge.

22 January 2002: General Secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers, David Hart, calls for Edexcel to be sacked.

The Association of Colleges complains of "widespread cocnern" among its members.

The Education Secretary, Estelle Morris, demands action.

1 February 2002: The exams watchdog, the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority (QCA), gives Edexcel a month to put its house in order.

The quango says Edexcel is "failing to meet its responsibilities to schools and colleges" and "too many of Edexcel's centres received poor service in 2001".

1 March 2002: QCA says it is happy with Edexcel's plans for reform.

20 April 2002: To tackle recruitment problems, the board plans to let trainee teachers act as examiners.

29 April 2002: Edexcel says candidates answered January's problematic maths question better than any other.

15 May 2002: QCA chairman, Sir William Stubbs, tells MPs all the big English exam boards - Edexcel, AQA and OCR - are struggling to find enough examiners.

Edexcel says missing or muddled pages in a Key Skills advanced level paper are an "operative error" at a printing company.

28 May 2002: Edexcel says an error in a government and politics AS-level paper was also due to printers failing to correct something.

Cariaoke
Jun 19th, 2006, 12:29 PM
This has been going on for at least two years in the states. Besides, all you really have to do is google two lines from the essay in question and voila, busted.

I know that most professors at my university use a program similar to that. That's why a lot of them like you to email your papers. ;)

Here if you're caught, you get an automatic F for the assignment. If it happens again, you fail the course and it's reported to the department. After that, I believe it's automatic expulsion from the entire university system in the state. :o

I've learned you can basically change four words, give credit and you're ok. :lol: It's so simple to credit. People are just lazy.

Veritas
Jun 19th, 2006, 02:04 PM
I have a feeling this measure will turn out bad. The world's getting bigger and more interconnected - who's to say it's impossible that one person's point wouldn't be so similar to another person's that it might look plagiarised when it wasn't? :confused:

The people responsible for reviewing work are seasoned professionals who know the course and its materials thoroughly. If they can't pick up lines that have been pinched, then they're either not doing their job properly, or that particular line wasn't plagiarised in the first place.

I hate plagiarism though - and in universities its just feels ten times worse - i remember marking things last year from about 4 different people who had obviously copied and none had used a spellchecker cos they all spelt the same words wrong in the same ways - ahrggggg

And the more annoying thing it that sometimes the universities dont even want to bother about reprimanding people from doing it- its all about the fees nowadays - double ahrggg

I don't know which university you go to, but the one I'm at takes plagiarism very, very seriously. Every course would have a specific web-page, documents and course guides that have at least 5 pages dedicated to what constitutes plagiarism, why it's inappropriate and how the university deals with it.

In fact, plagiarism is so serious that one guy who was caught rehashing an old essay he did before was handed back his work with copies of pages from the internet and photocopies from book excerpts that he had plagiarised from. Even the specific sentences were highlighted to drive the point home very clear: the university doesn't take plagiarism lightly.

Rocketta
Jun 19th, 2006, 03:28 PM
This has been going on for at least two years in the states. Besides, all you really have to do is google two lines from the essay in question and voila, busted.

I know that most professors at my university use a program similar to that. That's why a lot of them like you to email your papers. ;)

Here if you're caught, you get an automatic F for the assignment. If it happens again, you fail the course and it's reported to the department. After that, I believe it's automatic expulsion from the entire university system in the state. :o

I've learned you can basically change four words, give credit and you're ok. :lol: It's so simple to credit. People are just lazy.

Gosh they are lazy and citing your sources is sooo easy... I mean paranthetical references are as easy as they come. The reason people can't and won't do it is because they don't even do the research....ie, read the articles, the passages in the book so they just go online and find someone who wrote a paper on that topic already. :rolleyes: The other problem is there are professors who are even too lazy to check...they know the paper is plagerized but it would require more work of them to prove it and if it's proved to take action against it. :rolleyes:

meyerpl
Jun 19th, 2006, 04:44 PM
Gosh they are lazy and citing your sources is sooo easy... I mean paranthetical references are as easy as they come. The reason people can't and won't do it is because they don't even do the research....ie, read the articles, the passages in the book so they just go online and find someone who wrote a paper on that topic already. :rolleyes: The other problem is there are professors who are even too lazy to check...they know the paper is plagerized but it would require more work of them to prove it and if it's proved to take action against it. :rolleyes:
Rocketta, you've crystalized the issue concisely and completely. I'm going to use this in a paper I'm writing. Thanks!
(Please accept my thanks here and now, as it's the only credit you'll be receiving.)

Crazy Canuck
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:12 PM
I hate plagiarism though - and in universities its just feels ten times worse - i remember marking things last year from about 4 different people who had obviously copied and none had used a spellchecker cos they all spelt the same words wrong in the same ways - ahrggggg

And the more annoying thing it that sometimes the universities dont even want to bother about reprimanding people from doing it- its all about the fees nowadays - double ahrggg
Seriously? Where I went, plagerism could get you expelled and not invited back. At the very least it was a guarenteed 0% on that assignment.

Crazy Canuck
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:14 PM
I've learned you can basically change four words, give credit and you're ok. :lol: It's so simple to credit. People are just lazy.

I quickly learned that my psych papers were merely activities that required copying, pasting, organizing, and referencing. It's so bloody simple to do this that I can't understand the mindset of peopl who try to take the easy way out and cheat. The benefit simply doesn't outweight the potential cost. :shrug;

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:17 PM
:yawn: Am I the only one who is sick and tired of hearing about plagiarism? Research *is* plagiarism.

Crazy Canuck
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:31 PM
:yawn: Am I the only one who is sick and tired of hearing about plagiarism? Research *is* plagiarism.
Errr?

Research may require you to consult various sources that cite the opinions of others on a particular topic. It requires drawing what is relevant from these sources and organizing them into a coherent package. It then requires you to draw some conclusions based on these opinions.

It's plagerism if you don't give credit to your sources and/or you copy them outright.

Again... errrr?

meyerpl
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:33 PM
:yawn: Am I the only one who is sick and tired of hearing about plagiarism? Research *is* plagiarism.
Research is a systematic investigation into a subject in order to discover or revise facts, theories or applications.
Plagerism is the appropriation of the language, ideas and thoughts of another author and representation of them as one's original work.
They are hardly the same thing.

Crazy Canuck
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:35 PM
Research is a systematic investigation into a subject in order to discover or revise facts, theories or applications.
Plagerism is the appropriation of the language, ideas and thoughts of another author and representation of them as one's original work.
They are hardly the same thing.
Nicely put :kiss:

People who intentionally plagerize are lazy and piss me off. That or they are simply untalented and are in above their heads. Either way - BOO.

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:39 PM
Research is a systematic investigation into a subject in order to discover or revise facts, theories or applications.
Plagerism is the appropriation of the language, ideas and thoughts of another author and representation of them as one's original work.
They are hardly the same thing.

Yes, I know the dictionary definitionsm, thanks.


Research may require you to consult various sources that cite the opinions of others on a particular topic. It requires drawing what is relevant from these sources and organizing them into a coherent package. It then requires you to draw some conclusions based on these opinions.

Well, you are just taking ideas from other people and synthesising them. While it's work, I wouldn't say you invented anything new. It's not original per se.

TdF_DBLL
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:42 PM
We have a similair program, but it sucks. Cause if you need to use articles for an essay or paper, you always have a high plagiarism score. And then they don't even watch the part you wrote yourself.

Brashkoala
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:43 PM
my school has been using turnitin for over a year and a half

meyerpl
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:59 PM
Yes, I know the dictionary definitionsm, thanks.
You're welcome. I appreciate your acknowledgment of the fruits of my.....er....ahem....research.

Seriously, surely you recognize the difference between plagerism and research?

TdF_DBLL
Jun 19th, 2006, 07:03 PM
You're welcome. I appreciate your acknowledgment of the fruits of my.....er....ahem....research.

Seriously, surely you recognize the difference between plagerism and research?

I guess he does, but the computer program doesn't cause it's only looking to similarities in essays and papers.

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 07:04 PM
Seriously, surely you recognize the difference between plagerism and research?

I think I've already explained what I think about this. ;) It's overrated as an issue.

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 07:09 PM
People who intentionally plagerize are lazy and piss me off.

You make it sound like lazy is wrong. ;) Honestly, I'd rather not read a 100 page legal case, but a summary. Does it make me lazy? Maybe. But then I also think reading 100-page cases is bloody pointless and a waste of time.

CanadianBoy21
Jun 19th, 2006, 07:18 PM
Turnitin has been around for couple of years at least. In University of Toronto I had to submit almost every paper through this system.

duck
Jun 19th, 2006, 07:20 PM
I think I've already explained what I think about this. ;) It's overrated as an issue.

Not if you are the person who is being plagiarised though? Why should someone else take credit for what might be years and years of your work? Every discovery, every piece of research is built on what has gone before and thousands of hours of other people's work, ideas and conclusions are involved in all top-level research.

Research only advances because people share and publicise their material and the quid pro quo of that is proper acknowledgement of other people's insights when it helped or guided you in your work.

meyerpl
Jun 19th, 2006, 07:36 PM
Not if you are the person who is being plagiarised though? Why should someone else take credit for what might be years and years of your work? Every discovery, every piece of research is built on what has gone before and on thousands of hours of other people's work, ideas and conclusions are involved in all top-level research.

Research only advances because people share and publicise their material and the quid pro quo of that is proper acknowledgement of other people's insights when it helped or guided you in your work.
:worship: :worship: :worship:

I think it's sad that plagerism in academia has become as common as it apparently has; it's even sadder that people are actually trying to justify it.

Crazy Canuck
Jun 19th, 2006, 07:58 PM
You make it sound like lazy is wrong. ;) Honestly, I'd rather not read a 100 page legal case, but a summary. Does it make me lazy? Maybe. But then I also think reading 100-page cases is bloody pointless and a waste of time.

I'm very lazy. I still write my own papers correctly and don't plagerize.

I will also pass on reading a 100 pag legal case, and would gladly read a summary. You can summarize without plagerizing. :p

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:00 PM
Not if you are the person who is being plagiarised though? Why should someone else take credit for what might be years and years of your work?

I didn't say anything about taking credit? However, in many cases "original research" just doesn't make sense. :shrug: I don't agree with copying somebody's paper as submitting it as your own, but I don't see anything wrong with copying a paragraph, which some people get completely asinine about.

meyerpl
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:04 PM
I didn't say anything about taking credit? However, in many cases "original research" just doesn't make sense. :shrug: I don't agree with copying somebody's paper as submitting it as your own, but I don't see anything wrong with copying a paragraph, which some people get completely asinine about.
That's like saying, "I don't agree with stealing a lot, but I don't see anything wrong with stealing a little."

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:04 PM
I'm very lazy. I still write my own papers correctly and don't plagerize.

I will also pass on reading a 100 pag legal case, and would gladly read a summary. You can summarize without plagerizing. :p

I didn't say that example had anything to do with plagiarizing. ;) It was more about being lazy.

And btw how is summarizing better than plagiarism? You still took somebody's stuff and just stated it in your own words. :shrug:

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:06 PM
That's like saying, "I don't agree with stealing a lot, but I don't see anything wrong with stealing a little."

I never said I agreed with stealing period. :shrug:

duck
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:13 PM
I didn't say anything about taking credit? However, in many cases "original research" just doesn't make sense. :shrug: I don't agree with copying somebody's paper as submitting it as your own, but I don't see anything wrong with copying a paragraph, which some people get completely asinine about.

Copying someone else's work word for word is stealing that person's work, in which they have an intellectual copyright. You are getting mark for something you did not write yourself and therefore you do not deserve those marks. If someone copied three or four paragraphs from your work, pretended that they had written it and got the credit that only you deserved, wouldn't you be annoyed?

Plagiarism basically is taking credit for someone else's work - what else is it but that? The amount of material plagiarised doesn't matter.

"original" research is genuinely a misnomer, imo. No-one starts off from Base Zero when doing research. Everyone has to build on work that went before - using ideas, principles, laws formulated by others in order to develop their own interpretation or advance their own research. What is original about any piece of work is that the writer is exploring ideas (of others) for the first time, examining them, thinking about them and developing them, from their own unique perspective. That's original research. And that is why plagiarism ultimately is cheating yourself as well as everyone else, imo.

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:16 PM
Copying someone else's work word for word is stealing that person's work, in which they have an intellectual copyright. You are getting mark for something you did not write yourself and therefore you do not deserve those marks.

But I guess you deserve marks for summarising it? :scratch:

If someone copied three or four paragraphs from your work, pretended that they had written it and got the credit that only you deserved, wouldn't you be annoyed?

Again, I never said anything about taking credit for it.

Crazy Canuck
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:16 PM
I didn't say that example had anything to do with plagiarizing. ;) It was more about being lazy.

And btw how is summarizing better than plagiarism? You still took somebody's stuff and just stated it in your own words. :shrug:
Because you're referencing the original work in your summary?!?!!?!?

meyerpl
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:16 PM
I never said I agreed with stealing period. :shrug:
I was using stealing to make an analogy. If something is wrong, it isn't O.K. to do it a little, but not a lot, as you suggested. If you copy a paragraph and fail to give credit to the author, you're just as guilty of plagerism as you are if you copy an entire paper. The foul would be more egregious if you copied an entire paper, but that doesn't make the other instance right.

duck
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:20 PM
And btw how is summarizing better than plagiarism? You still took somebody's stuff and just stated it in your own words. :shrug:

the difference in a summary is that you state: X argues/Y claims/Q discovered facts A B And C

Plagiarism is saying I claimed/I discovered/I surmised facts A B C

Research is saying Q discovered facts A B and C and when I took Facts A B and C (as deduced by Q) and applied them in Situations D E and F
I discovered G. That's your piece of original research.

Rocketta
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:23 PM
Rocketta, you've crystalized the issue concisely and completely. I'm going to use this in a paper I'm writing. Thanks!
(Please accept my thanks here and now, as it's the only credit you'll be receiving.)



Don't make me sue you! :armed:
















:p

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:24 PM
Because you're referencing the original work in your summary?!?!!?!?

So summarising and referencing is better than copying a paragraph and referencing?

duck
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:26 PM
But I guess you deserve marks for summarising it? :scratch:

And you get far fewer marks for doing it. If you are marking a paper and the writer summarises an argument you give them marks for doing the reading. Just like everyone else.

If you get a paper where the writer claims that s/he has done this work on their own - by going into the lab, by reading the original documents, by thinking and planning and organising their arguments and findings- thereby demonstrating the ability to work both independently and innovatively, then the writer gets far more marks.

Except if the work is plagiarised they have done no such thing.

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:27 PM
the difference in a summary is that you state: X argues/Y claims/Q discovered facts A B And C

Plagiarism is saying I claimed/I discovered/I surmised facts A B C

Research is saying Q discovered facts A B and C and when I took Facts A B and C (as deduced by Q) and applied them in Situations D E and F
I discovered G. That's your piece of original research.

Not necessarily. You can say X discovered blah-blah-blah ("quote"), and it would still be considered plagiarism, which is what I was talking about.

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:30 PM
I think we should stop arguing about crediting work, because I didn't say you should credit the work as your own.

duck
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:31 PM
Not necessarily. You can say X discovered blah-blah-blah ("quote"), and it would still be considered plagiarism, which is what I was talking about.

That's not plagiarism - have we been at cross purposes this whole time?


You must credit other people's work - by using quotation marks, parenthetical references, footnotes etc, Plagiarism is a consequence of failing to clearly distinguish in an essay which words are yours and which words come from someone else. You can distinguish by using quotation marks - for a direct quotation - or with a summary and mentioning the author's name.

Crazy Canuck
Jun 19th, 2006, 09:40 PM
So summarising and referencing is better than copying a paragraph and referencing?
You're trolling, right? I mean, you're not ACTUALLY struggling with this issue... are you?

cellophane
Jun 19th, 2006, 11:06 PM
You're trolling, right? I mean, you're not ACTUALLY struggling with this issue... are you?

Who peed in your cornflakes? :confused: I'm not struggling with anything, because I've never done it? :confused:

partbrit
Jun 20th, 2006, 12:29 AM
The problem, at least in the U.S., is that there are few consequences for cheating of any kind. Once they start tossing people out of school, something may change. But studies of American kids have shown that they cheat regularly and do without a second thought.

And people wonder why America is so corrupt.

thelittlestelf
Jun 20th, 2006, 02:53 AM
At my school I have to turn in every paper I write to turnitin.com before I can even get credit for it. It's definitely an effective measure in getting people to stop plagiarizing. It picks up everything.

meyerpl
Jun 20th, 2006, 03:13 AM
Not necessarily. You can say X discovered blah-blah-blah ("quote"), and it would still be considered plagiarism, which is what I was talking about.
You say you know the dictionary definition of plagerism, yet here you act as if you don't. Plagerism is, by definition, failing to give credit where credit is due and claiming someone else's work as your own.

Marcus1979
Jun 20th, 2006, 03:23 AM
basically plagiarism is passing something off as your own work and ideas.
even in web design using someones layout or source code can be called plagurised work.

if u get permission i.e if its associated with graphics thats ok but u must cite the source i.e owner.

same as with books and works u must cite the book u get the info from that u quote

cellophane
Jun 20th, 2006, 03:55 AM
You say you know the dictionary definition of plagerism, yet here you act as if you don't. Plagerism is, by definition, failing to give credit where credit is due and claiming someone else's work as your own.


Because plagiarism isn't just when you don't give credit. I'm too lazy/tired to quote stuff now, but here

http://gethelp.library.upenn.edu/guides/engineering/ee/plagiarize.html#ex1

if you want to read up on it.

"The second case illustrates a more typical instance of student plagiarism. Even the footnote to the original does not excuse the substantial use of the originalís language."

meyerpl
Jun 20th, 2006, 04:33 AM
Because plagiarism isn't just when you don't give credit. I'm too lazy/tired to quote stuff now, but here

http://gethelp.library.upenn.edu/guides/engineering/ee/plagiarize.html#ex1

if you want to read up on it.

"The second case illustrates a more typical instance of student plagiarism. Even the footnote to the original does not excuse the substantial use of the originalís language."



If you read and comprehended this, what is your apparent problem with applying it to your own academic endeavors? Plagerism is described as "serious academic misconduct" and then clearly defined. Why is there any confusion in your mind?

cellophane
Jun 20th, 2006, 04:47 AM
If you read and comprehended this, what is your apparent problem with applying it to your own academic endeavors? Plagerism is described as "serious academic misconduct" and then clearly defined. Why is there any confusion in your mind?

I don't have any confusion? I just gave you a quote from there, which explains it's not just failing to reference sources. Look through the examples, and you'll see that. I have a problem with these examples being considered plagiarism.

cellophane
Jun 20th, 2006, 04:48 AM
Anyhow, off to bed now. :yawn:

Brashkoala
Jul 9th, 2006, 11:42 PM
ann coulter was just caught

Wigglytuff
Jul 10th, 2006, 12:03 AM
Noooo.

I did coursework this year, and copying is what everyone does :o I remember in Science, in my group, about 8 of us were all helping each other and copying answers with different style words :tape:

Everyone cheats, there not going to stop that. Teachers are just as bad, we write an answer and they change it to make it better or even give you the answer :tape:

I was even copying answers in the exams :tape: :tape: :tape:
no its not. its what cheaters do.

it does seem like the punishment for getting caught in most cases is too light. immediate expulsion after getting caught the first time is the only way to go.

Wigglytuff
Jul 10th, 2006, 12:05 AM
:yawn: Am I the only one who is sick and tired of hearing about plagiarism? Research *is* plagiarism.
most retarded post ever.

meyerpl
Jul 10th, 2006, 12:06 AM
ann coulter was just caught
I haven't heard about it. Hopefully, tar and feathers are in her future.

Brashkoala
Jul 10th, 2006, 12:11 AM
I haven't heard about it. Hopefully, tar and feathers are in her future.

keeping my fingers crossed.

Wigglytuff
Jul 10th, 2006, 12:14 AM
ann coulter was just caught
of course she does it, that thing has not one professional bone in its disgusting body. she has been caught for doing other unprofessional things.

for example if someone writes a book about "how evil pigs are" and person b reviews it. ann coulter will say that person a hate pigs so much she wrote a book about it. :smash:

Wigglytuff
Jul 10th, 2006, 12:14 AM
keeping my fingers crossed.
can you post the article where you read this, so i can bask in its full glory.

Brashkoala
Jul 10th, 2006, 04:57 AM
can you post the article where you read this, so i can bask in its full glory.

there was a segment on msnbc the other day. but i dont have link or remember what paragraph it was. look for it on google.

CooCooCachoo
Jul 10th, 2006, 05:33 AM
It is already being used here but I think there are so many leapholes in the program :lol:

CooCooCachoo
Jul 10th, 2006, 05:36 AM
Sorry, I meant a similar program, not this one ;)

Marcus1979
Jul 10th, 2006, 05:39 AM
the amount of people who attempt to rationalise plagiarism is really suprising

its like trying to rationalise shoplifting

just beacuse everyone else does it (which I doubt) doesn't make it any more legal or acceptable

PatrickRyan
Jul 10th, 2006, 05:49 AM
our school has already been using something like that for 2 years now

Beefy
Jul 10th, 2006, 07:52 AM
It's something that they need to try crack down on, but it would be hard to do. I remember in year 12 we had to do poetry, and I plagiarised most of it, I just did the Manic Street Preachers album The Holy Bible and would've got away with it if things didn't change :devil: The teacher scrapped the poetry