PDA

View Full Version : What is the best book you've ever read?


twight6
Jun 16th, 2006, 03:47 PM
I just was wondering what to read, so i started this thread. What is the best book you've ever read? Why? (plus give a little description if you don't mind, so i can decide whether or not i want to read it :angel: )

I haevn't really read any novels, and since it's the summer I decided i'm going to start. I'm about 1/4 of the way through The Da Vinci Code, and so far it's easily the best :worship: Anyone else read this?

IceHock
Jun 16th, 2006, 03:51 PM
well,to kill a mockingbird is really good if you haven't read it.basicly just about these 2 kids growing up in the south and the things they go through,it's really good.all but my life is also good if you like books about the holocaust.it's kinda like anne frank except i find this more sad.it's not a diary though it's a book and it's by gerda weissman.

IceHock
Jun 16th, 2006, 03:52 PM
lol i also loved the harry potter books!!i'm guesssing you know what those are so i won't give a description

twight6
Jun 16th, 2006, 03:54 PM
well,to kill a mockingbird is really good if you haven't read it.basicly just about these 2 kids growing up in the south and the things they go through,it's really good.all but my life is also good if you like books about the holocaust.it's kinda like anne frank except i find this more sad.it's not a diary though it's a book and it's by gerda weissman.

I'm going to read To Kill a Mockingbird next year during school, so i've tried not to read it. I've checked it out several times and it's been very tempting, but I hate reading books more than once, lol...

Our english teacher this year was a holocaust buff, and she has told us several books from WWII, but I just don't find things like that interesting eough to read ( :tape: that may sound bad, but IMO: you've read one, you've read 'em all... sorry if this offends anyeone :o)

twight6
Jun 16th, 2006, 03:55 PM
lol i also loved the harry potter books!!i'm guesssing you know what those are so i won't give a description

I've never read the books, I've found the movies good enough... :tape: kind of like Lord of the Rings, lol...

deep bass
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:00 PM
The Old Man And The Sea by Ernest Hemingway.

Summary here -> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Old_Man_and_the_Sea

Geoffry
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:08 PM
'The Laws' and 'The Friendship' by Connie Palmen.

lakeway11
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:08 PM
Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead

twight6
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:23 PM
I'm sorry but I can't take you or this thread seriously after you said that The Da Vinic Code is the best book you've read...i don't mean to be insulting but did you just start reading :confused:

lol, yes. Like I said, I don't think I've ever read a novel in my whole life, and this summer started. So, as you can see, The Da Vinci Code wins since it's my first novel ever ;). Why did you not like it? I've only ever heard good things from it...

harloo
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:23 PM
Their Eyes Were Watching God

controlfreak
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:33 PM
George's Magic Medicine by Roald Dahl :worship:

SelesFan70
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:35 PM
"A Wrinkle In Time"

I was in 3rd grade and really is the last book I've read entirely through. I'm 36 years old. :o

cometz9
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:40 PM
George Orwell's "Animal Farm" i read this book in the 12th grade, loved it.

Maajken
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:43 PM
donna tartt - the secret history

ico4498
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:49 PM
'Jonathan Livingston Seagull' - Richard Bach

if you're new to novels this is a great starting point. if you've ever felt that you should be more than another brick in the wall, if your passion for something drives you beyond 'normalcy', you'll love this book.

its public domain now so you can google and download this great novel for FREE!

TF Chipmunk
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:51 PM
Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger :sad:
Angels & Demons, by Dan Brown (for pure entertainment value)
Harry Potter & The Half-Blood Prince, by JK Rowlings (for pure entertainment value)

But really, every book I read is a good book :p I'm just a nerd like that :o

lakeway11
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:53 PM
I'm sorry but I can't take you or this thread seriously after you said that The Da Vinic Code is the best book you've read...i don't mean to be insulting but did you just start reading :confused:

Brown's other book angles & demons had far more truth :rolleyes:

BUBI
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:53 PM
George Orwell's "Animal Farm" i read this book in the 12th grade, loved it.
What about Orwell's "1984"? So political and influential :angel:

lakeway11
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:54 PM
George Orwell's "Animal Farm" i read this book in the 12th grade, loved it.

an absolute classic

lakeway11
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:56 PM
What about Orwell's "1984"? So political and influential :angel:

what is so ironic is that Orwell underestimated the New World Order....

twight6
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:56 PM
Brown's other book angles & demons had far more truth :rolleyes:

you're saying the information in The Da Vinci Code is untrue? :rolleyes: This coming from a person who believed they were merging three countries into a "super country" :rolleyes:

partbrit
Jun 16th, 2006, 04:57 PM
It is impossible for me to pick the "best" book I have ever read. I read many very good books when I was young, and recall only my impression of them, but not much else. Since we seem to be talking about fiction only, here are some outstanding novels that are favorites of mine (a few of which are vague in my memory). Unfortunately, there are a gazillion I should have read but didn't--it embarrasses me.

This is a mix of older and contemporary.

Pride and Prejudice (Austen)
To Kill A Mockingbird (Lee)
Great Expectations (Dickens)
The Color Purple (Walker)
An American Tragedy (Dreiser)
To the Lighthouse (Woolf)
Mrs. Dalloway (Woolf)
After Many A Summer Dies the Swan (Huxley)
Time Must Have A Stop (Huxley)
Main Street (Lewis)
Beloved (Morrison)
The Secret Life Of Bees (Monk Kidd)
Failure To Zigzag (Vandenburgh)
The Company Of Women (Gordon)
Final Payments (Gordon)
The Second Coming (Percy)

If I had to pick a favorite novelist, it would be Virginia Woolf.

ico4498
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:01 PM
George Orwell's "Animal Farm" i read this book in the 12th grade, loved it.

"All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."

BUBI
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:04 PM
"All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others."
Orwell, the master of language :angel:

~Cherry*Blossom~
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:05 PM
Of Mice and Men :sad:

Ems__
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:12 PM
The best..I dont know.

Although I read the outsider (by albert camus) today. It left a very strange feeling...which is a big plus by me

selyoink
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:14 PM
Fiction wise Before Adam by Jack London is probably my favorite book. I also love the Lord of the Rings Trilogy.

BUBI
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:18 PM
The best..I dont know.

Although I read the outsider (by albert camus) today. It left a very strange feeling...which is a big plus by me
That's a great book! I read it about 10 years ago... Now I want to read it again...

SpikeyAidanm
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:19 PM
Looking for Alibrandi by Melina Marchetta

Dahveed
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:27 PM
One of my fave books:

Perfume: The Story of a Murderer
Patrick Suskind (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/index=books-uk&field-author=Suskind%2C%20Patrick/203-7021738-2411163)

Synopsis
A murder was the start of his obsession. It was after that first crime that he knew he was a genius, that he understood his destiny. He, Jean-Baptiste Grenouille, the fishmonger's bastard, was to be the greatest perfumier of all time.

:yeah:

ampers&
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:31 PM
My Top 5
1) Invisible Man- Ralph Ellison
2) The Bluest Eye- Toni Morrison
3) The Sound and the Fury- William Faulkner
4) Their Eyes Were Watching God- Zora Neale Hurston
5) To Kill a Mockingbird- Harper Lee

:worship:

Il Primo!
Jun 16th, 2006, 05:57 PM
Why I ate my father by Roy Lewis

spiceboy
Jun 16th, 2006, 06:09 PM
The Shadow of the Wind :hearts: :worship:

The novel, set in post- Spanish Civil War Barcelona concerns a young boy, Daniel. One day just after the war, Daniel's father takes him to the secret Cemetery of Forgotten Books, a huge library of old, forgotten titles lovingly preserved by a select few iniates. According to tradition, everyone initiated to this secret place is allowed to take one book from it, and must protect it for life. Daniel selects a book called The Shadow of the Wind by Julian Carax. That night he takes the book home and reads it, completely engrossed. Daniel then attempts to look for other books by this unknown author, but can find none. All he comes across are stories of a strange man - calling himself Lain Coubert, after a character in one of the book who was in fact the Devil - who has been seeking out Carax' books for decades, buying them all and burning them. In time this mysterious figure seeks out Daniel and attemps to make him part with the book. Terrified, Daniel returns the book to Cemetery. But by now Daniel is already in the middle of a story that began many years ago, and will come to threaten his own life.

RJWCapriati
Jun 16th, 2006, 06:25 PM
Venus Envy

harloo
Jun 16th, 2006, 06:47 PM
Of Mice and Men :sad:

I loved this book also. It was a great story.

Drake1980
Jun 16th, 2006, 06:48 PM
The coming of the Night-John Rechy

le bon vivant
Jun 16th, 2006, 06:55 PM
Great Expectations, Charles Dickens
Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison
The Smell of Apples, Mark Behr
Things Fall Apart, Chinua Achebe
Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston

meyerpl
Jun 16th, 2006, 07:14 PM
"To Kill a Mockingbird" is one of my favorite books, and I'm always heartened by this books popularity. It was published in 1960, won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in '61, and remains a best seller.
Amazingly, it's the only novel ever published by Harper Lee. She was not prepared for the book's immediate and lasting success. Lee once said of her masterpiece, "I was hoping for a quick and merciful death at the hands of the reviewers."
I love this book so much, it puts a lump in my throat just thinking about it.

I am impressed by the literary tastes of the posters on this thread. It causes me to see some of you in a new light. You have expanded my "must read" list considerably. :worship:

WorldWar24
Jun 16th, 2006, 07:37 PM
What about Orwell's "1984"? So political and influential :angel:

nice, but "Oh Brave New World" is much scarier, probably because it's a lot more likely to happen

Grohl
Jun 16th, 2006, 07:38 PM
phileine zegt sorry by Ronald Giphart,
I've read a few times, and everytime I don't know what to read, I grab that book again

ampers&
Jun 16th, 2006, 07:47 PM
OK....one more book i have to recommend. it was absolutely heartbreaking but inspirational at the same time. i've read it like 6 times already...lol...

Bastard Out of Carolina- Dorothy Allison

http://www.whatthebook.com/img/cover/l/06/13/18/06/66.jpg

This novel is a coming of age narrative, written from the perspective of Bone, the out-of-wedlock (hence, bastard) young daughter of one of the fiercely proud, dirt-poor Boatwrights of Greenville County, South Carolina. The story moves from Bone's very young recollections of life with her waitress mother Anne and her numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins; through her mother's brief marriage and quick widowhood; to her volatile, painful marriage to Daddy Glenn, whose jealousy of Bone, combined with his own destructive evilness, leads the story to a heinous climax of sexual abuse.

crazyroberto6767
Jun 16th, 2006, 08:02 PM
My all-time favorite book remains Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card :bowdown:. The whole series on Ender is one of my favorites. They're really the only sci-fi books I've ever gotten into. Man I got attached to all those characters.

Other books that I *really* enjoyed:

The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald
Something Wicked this Way Comes by Bradbury (better than F. 451 IMO)
To Kill a Mockingbird by Lee
Secret Life of Bees by Monk Kidd (a guy liking this book :SHOCK: :p)
The Scarlet Letter by Hawthorne
The Giver by Lowry (first read it in grade school, continue to like it)
Where the Red Fern Grows by Rawls (still love it)

Edit: Forgot about Finding Fish by Fisher, I liked it much more than the film

twight6
Jun 16th, 2006, 08:12 PM
A Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks is great too...

deep bass
Jun 16th, 2006, 08:26 PM
My all-time favorite book remains Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card :bowdown:. The whole series on Ender is one of my favorites. They're really the only sci-fi books I've ever gotten into. Man I got attached to all those characters.

Just started reading that! It is great so far. I was shocked he was so young.

crazyroberto6767
Jun 16th, 2006, 08:31 PM
Just started reading that! It is great so far. I was shocked he was so young.
:yeah: You'll enjoy it. I think I'm going to read it again, this thread inspired me to do so :lol:. Yeah he is quite young to be sent away, six right?

Cat's Pajamas
Jun 16th, 2006, 08:33 PM
I'm not much of a reader but in school we read The Counte of Monte Cristo and it was amazing :worship:

FedExpress
Jun 16th, 2006, 08:34 PM
A Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks is great too...

Yeah it's really great. I love this book. It's the best I've ever read :)

twight6
Jun 16th, 2006, 08:36 PM
Yeah it's really great. I love this book. It's the best I've ever read :)

after that i learned to ALWAYS WATCH THE MOVIE FIRST!

When you watch a movie that is also a book first, you will like it. Then when you read the book you'll like it even more (the book is always better!). But, if you read the book first you'll be sadly dissapointed when you watched the movie...

in this case i ready the book first, and I didn't really like the movie....

FedExpress
Jun 16th, 2006, 08:48 PM
after that i learned to ALWAYS WATCH THE MOVIE FIRST!

When you watch a movie that is also a book first, you will like it. Then when you read the book you'll like it even more (the book is always better!). But, if you read the book first you'll be sadly dissapointed when you watched the movie...

in this case i ready the book first, and I didn't really like the movie....

Yeah I can understand you. My sister told me to read the book because it's awesome. So I read the book first. Then my sister told me to watch the film. So I watched the film. The book is so much better than the film.

mc8114
Jun 16th, 2006, 09:22 PM
A Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks is great too...
That's a beautiful book.

I like a lot Memoirs of a Geisha

Wiggly
Jun 16th, 2006, 09:46 PM
Seabiscuit :) Liek the horse, you know :lol: It's the only one I remember.

L'Aiguille Creuse, also :)

Sally Struthers
Jun 16th, 2006, 09:48 PM
Stephen King's It ... might not be the most sophisticated choice but I enjoyed it ...

besides the children gang bang scene towards the end :o

twight6
Jun 16th, 2006, 09:52 PM
That's a beautiful book.

I like a lot Memoirs of a Geisha

although i don't usually admit this, i cried and cried throughout that whole book. I knew all along what was going to happen, so every time they talked about the future or anything that i knew wasn't going to happen, i just started crying. Same thing with the movie... kinda strange, all along i knew it was gonna happen, but couldn't help myself :o

tennislover
Jun 16th, 2006, 09:56 PM
Dante's Comedy

pimpie
Jun 16th, 2006, 10:10 PM
Dante's Comedy

that's a very tough book to read


I don't really have a favourite but memoirs of a Geisha was :sad:
I also find about a boy very amusing and the most saddest I ever read was
the Painted bird by Jerzy Kosinksi

Denise4925
Jun 16th, 2006, 10:13 PM
So many...but a few of my all time favs:

The Red Tent

Your Blues Ain't Like Mine

Memnoch the Devil

Wifey

Mama

Memoirs of a Geisha

Once Is Not Enough (I like'em trashy)

Denise4925
Jun 16th, 2006, 10:19 PM
OK....one more book i have to recommend. it was absolutely heartbreaking but inspirational at the same time. i've read it like 6 times already...lol...

Bastard Out of Carolina- Dorothy Allison

http://www.whatthebook.com/img/cover/l/06/13/18/06/66.jpg

This novel is a coming of age narrative, written from the perspective of Bone, the out-of-wedlock (hence, bastard) young daughter of one of the fiercely proud, dirt-poor Boatwrights of Greenville County, South Carolina. The story moves from Bone's very young recollections of life with her waitress mother Anne and her numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins; through her mother's brief marriage and quick widowhood; to her volatile, painful marriage to Daddy Glenn, whose jealousy of Bone, combined with his own destructive evilness, leads the story to a heinous climax of sexual abuse.

Have you seen the movie :drool: Beautifully portrayed. Superb acting.

Denise4925
Jun 16th, 2006, 10:27 PM
although i don't usually admit this, i cried and cried throughout that whole book. I knew all along what was going to happen, so every time they talked about the future or anything that i knew wasn't going to happen, i just started crying. Same thing with the movie... kinda strange, all along i knew it was gonna happen, but couldn't help myself :o
I'm confused, first you say that the Da Vinci Code is the first book you ever read and you're in the process of reading it, then you say that you've read A Walk to Remember and saw the movie and was disappointed with the movie, now you say you've read Memoirs of a Geisha. If I've misunderstood you, please forgive me.

You knew what was going to happen in MOG? Not to spoil the ending for those who want to read it or for those who want to see the movie, but there's really nothing to be sad about in the end.

>>krew<<
Jun 16th, 2006, 11:38 PM
A book with no pages :):p

¤CharlDa¤
Jun 16th, 2006, 11:56 PM
The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald


I've read it for class and I really enjoyed it. I started less liking it after the exhaustive, i.e. maniac, analysis of the teacher ;)

requiem
Jun 17th, 2006, 12:39 AM
So many books so little time.

Being SF fan just a few from this genre
"2001: A Space Odissey" by Artur Clarke
Pretty much anything wtitten by Ursula LeGuin (to name a few: "Dispossessed", "Earthsea series" /not SF, but fantasy best one I read besides Tolkien/, "Vaster Than Empires and More Slow" /short story/, "The Word for World is Forest", "Rocannon's World")
"Startide Rising" by David Brin (actually complete uplift series)
"I, Robot" by Isak Asimov (I had to write this one, because movie sucked big time, and not only that, but it sent completely different message at the end)

Outside SF

Orwels "Animal Farm" (I really loved this book, especially as i use to live in communist country, so it gives me maybe a better perspective than to those who don't have such experiance, and for me it has THE best punchline i've encountered /last sentence/) and "1984"

"War and Peace" by Tolstoy
"The Count of Monte Cristo" by Dumas (read it in like less than 10 days, very, very interesting to read)
"The Name of the Rose" by Umberto Eco (a bit slow, but i did like it)
.
.
.

Volcana
Jun 17th, 2006, 02:32 AM
"Powers of Mind" by Adam Smith

Rocketta
Jun 17th, 2006, 02:53 AM
OK....one more book i have to recommend. it was absolutely heartbreaking but inspirational at the same time. i've read it like 6 times already...lol...

Bastard Out of Carolina- Dorothy Allison

http://www.whatthebook.com/img/cover/l/06/13/18/06/66.jpg

This novel is a coming of age narrative, written from the perspective of Bone, the out-of-wedlock (hence, bastard) young daughter of one of the fiercely proud, dirt-poor Boatwrights of Greenville County, South Carolina. The story moves from Bone's very young recollections of life with her waitress mother Anne and her numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins; through her mother's brief marriage and quick widowhood; to her volatile, painful marriage to Daddy Glenn, whose jealousy of Bone, combined with his own destructive evilness, leads the story to a heinous climax of sexual abuse.

Hey Mo, did you see the movie? Did you know part of it was filmed in my hometown? If you've seen the movie.....the scene where they are burning the courthouse...that's the courthouse in my town. :)

tennislover
Jun 17th, 2006, 02:59 AM
that's a very tough book to read




:D

Rocketta
Jun 17th, 2006, 03:05 AM
I can only lists the books that impacted my life the most...

"My Brother Fine With Me" --- The first book I truly fell in love with.

"Sandy and the Rockstar" --- The first novel I ever loved.

"To Kill a Mockingbird" ---- The first assigned reading that I ever loved.

"Beloved" ---- The first thought provoking novel that I fell inlove with.

"Dreyfus Affair" ---- The funniest novel I have read.....I rode the city bus all day cause I didn't want to stop reading after I got on the bus from the mall...stayed up all night to finish it....went to sleep and then read it again. :D

Barrie_Dude
Jun 17th, 2006, 03:07 AM
Actually, I tend to fall in love with an authors style and read all he/she has to offer. I recommend F.Scott Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Steinbeck and McMurtry!

twight6
Jun 17th, 2006, 03:26 AM
I'm confused, first you say that the Da Vinci Code is the first book you ever read and you're in the process of reading it, then you say that you've read A Walk to Remember and saw the movie and was disappointed with the movie, now you say you've read Memoirs of a Geisha. If I've misunderstood you, please forgive me.

You knew what was going to happen in MOG? Not to spoil the ending for those who want to read it or for those who want to see the movie, but there's really nothing to be sad about in the end.

no, haha. When i said i knew what was going to happen i was referring to A Walk to Remember. I've never read Memoirs of a Geisha, but i am going to watch the movie.

And about the novel thing, i completely forgot about A Walk to Remember :tape:. That was a couple years ago...

Prizeidiot
Jun 17th, 2006, 04:16 AM
Anything by Roald Dahl... even though a lot of them are children's books, they are still brilliant.

Dahl aside, off the top of my head, I really enjoyed George Orwell's 1984.

Jakeev
Jun 17th, 2006, 04:22 AM
In recent times I have been absolutely mesmerized by Alice Seibolds The Lovely Bones. It's incredibly dark and original, and although it will tear you up frequently with the content, it leaves you exhilirated too.

Pheobo
Jun 17th, 2006, 04:25 AM
no, haha. When i said i knew what was going to happen i was referring to A Walk to Remember. I've never read Memoirs of a Geisha, but i am going to watch the movie.

And about the novel thing, i completely forgot about A Walk to Remember :tape:. That was a couple years ago...


Oh no, read the book (Memoirs of a Geisha) The movie really doesn't do it justice...it's too focused on cinematics, and not the actual plot.

Requiem for a Dream would be the best book I've ever read.

DemWilliamsGulls
Jun 17th, 2006, 06:45 AM
On the Down Low by J.L. King ....he tell it all on the churren

Beefy
Jun 17th, 2006, 07:17 AM
American Psycho - Brett Easton Ellis
The Bell Jar - Sylvia Plath
Go Ask Alice
Crash and Empire of the Sun - J.G Ballard
Junkie - William S. Burroughs
A Bastard of a Place
Addicted - Tony Adams
Playing With Fire - Nasser Hussain
Bravo Two Zero - Andy McNab
The One That Got Away - Chris Ryan

Billy Moonshine
Jun 17th, 2006, 07:23 AM
The Secret History by Donna Tartt.
Great stuff. Characters, location, plot all come alive and you can't put it down.
Easily my favorite book of recent times.
But you can't beat Bleak House for emotion and drama.

rebel_ffighter
Jun 17th, 2006, 07:31 AM
My all time 2 favorites are:
Mrs Dalloway-Virginia Woolf(24 hours of the life of a woman who seems pleased with her life but it turns out she isnt)
Nana-Emil Zola(The life of a prostitute,from the begining up to her death)

Sam L
Jun 17th, 2006, 03:28 PM
Gone with the Wind

mc8114
Jun 17th, 2006, 05:53 PM
although i don't usually admit this, i cried and cried throughout that whole book. I knew all along what was going to happen, so every time they talked about the future or anything that i knew wasn't going to happen, i just started crying. Same thing with the movie... kinda strange, all along i knew it was gonna happen,but couldn't help myself :o

I didn't know the story when i read it, i also cry towards the end. I did like that movie, thought was alright even when the book is so much better.

Memoirs of a Geisha made me cry as well, i think the movie is enjoyable but doesn't do any justice to all the details written in the book.

Brashkoala
Jun 17th, 2006, 06:01 PM
night by eli wiezel-i actually read it seven years ago. it was amazing

a wrinkle in time-i read it when i was kid and it really captures your imagination

meyerpl
Jun 17th, 2006, 06:55 PM
Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

I feel the need to read this masterpiece about every five years.

No Name Face
Jun 17th, 2006, 07:32 PM
i love me some books.

the stranger by albert camus and a lesson before dying by ernest gaines are my ultimate favorites.

ampers&
Jun 18th, 2006, 09:15 PM
Have you seen the movie :drool: Beautifully portrayed. Superb acting.
Hey Mo, did you see the movie? Did you know part of it was filmed in my hometown? If you've seen the movie.....the scene where they are burning the courthouse...that's the courthouse in my town. :)
nope haven't seen it.
i didn't even know there was a movie. :lol:
i'll definitely look for it.

*JR*
Jun 18th, 2006, 10:14 PM
I could mention many (mostly with political themes, be they fiction, biography, or other history). But I'll go with the same novel (about Canadian politicians in the early 60's) as a certain WTA player:

Coached by Jens Gerlach since New Haven 2002 ... Represented by International Sports Advisors Company ... Father’s name is Andrey; mother’s name is Galina ... Has a Scottish Setter named Gorde ... Favorites include the film “How To Lose A Guy In 10 Days” and the book “In High Places” by Arthur Hailey ... Favorite foods include sushi, white sausages and gnocchi ... Hobbies include reading, watching movies and hanging out with friends in Moscow ... Most memorable tennis experiences are winning 2004 Roland Garros, the Kremlin Cup 2003-04 and representing Russia at the 2004 Olympic Games.

marmite1
Jun 18th, 2006, 10:35 PM
The Old Man And The Sea by Ernest Hemingway.

Summary here -> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Old_Man_and_the_Sea

I loved that book :D

marmite1
Jun 18th, 2006, 10:38 PM
My favs are:

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
Brother in the Land by Robert Swindells
Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
The Snow Garden by Christopher Rice

charmedRic
Jun 18th, 2006, 10:42 PM
The Great Gatsby. Map of Bones. Angels and Demons.

naughty_sprite
Jun 18th, 2006, 11:04 PM
I don't read many books but I've always enjoyed the Harry Potter books

CondiLicious
Jun 18th, 2006, 11:09 PM
The Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger

*roddicksinme*
Jun 18th, 2006, 11:33 PM
Party Monster :D

*JR*
Jun 19th, 2006, 12:08 AM
A forthcoming classic, 2B sure: LINK (http://the-white-mile.com) :devil:

Rocketta
Jun 19th, 2006, 02:00 AM
nope haven't seen it.
i didn't even know there was a movie. :lol:
i'll definitely look for it.

Yeah, Jennifer Jason Leigh has the lead role in it. hit half.com I'm sure you can get one for less than $5. :D

Geisha
Jun 19th, 2006, 02:09 AM
Tuesday's With Morrie
Memoirs of a Geisha
Confessions of a Shopaholic
Shopaholic Takes Manhattan
To Kill a Mockingbird

iPatty
Jun 19th, 2006, 02:18 AM
My all-time favorite book remains Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card :bowdown:. The whole series on Ender is one of my favorites. They're really the only sci-fi books I've ever gotten into. Man I got attached to all those characters.


Really? I enjoyed "Speaker For The Dead" a lot more than "Ender's Game".

But, I agree with you, those are a great series of books. :worship:

iPatty
Jun 19th, 2006, 02:20 AM
I would say my all time fave book is either "The House of the Scorpion", or "The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm".

Both are superb books written by a very gifted woman, Nancy Farmer. :worship:

I'm reading "The Sea of Trolls" now.

"To Kill A Mockingbird" was very good, as well as "Pride and Prejudice". Classics.

anlavalle
Jun 19th, 2006, 03:21 AM
The Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger
and i love virginia woolf especially Orlando

Brett.
Jun 19th, 2006, 03:29 AM
When i was a kid i used to love reading a Golden Book called "Three Little Pigs and a Big Wolf"

A best book i ever read was written by Lance Armstrong, speaking about how he survived from cancers and success in Tour De France!

rebel_ffighter
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:43 AM
The Catcher in the Rye - J.D. Salinger
and i love virginia woolf especially Orlando

Oh yeah,Orlando was another good one!

J-Baby
Jun 19th, 2006, 06:46 AM
Brave New World or 1984

Kunal
Jun 19th, 2006, 08:55 AM
Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged were both life changing.

and John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men....aaah those were the days

ceiling_fan
Jun 19th, 2006, 10:21 AM
To Kill A Mockingbird - Lee Harper

The Power of One - Bryce Courtenay

Philbo
Jun 19th, 2006, 01:54 PM
Conversations with God by Neale Donald Walsch

Lord of the Rings Trilogy

The Mallorean by David Eddings

The SerpentWar Saga and the Riftwar Series by Raymond E Feist

Daughter of the Empire by Janny Wurts and Raymond E Feist

A Song of Ice and Fire by George R Martin

The Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan

Anything by Sheri S Tepper

100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Theres just too many to choose from...

CanadianBoy21
Jun 19th, 2006, 01:58 PM
Herman Hesse;

'The Glass Bead Game'

as well as 'Narcissus & Goldmund'


Thomas Mann

'The Magic Mountain'

and especially 'Confessions of Felix Krull'

Viktymise
Jun 19th, 2006, 02:29 PM
Anything by the legend that is Agatha Christie :)

Mercury Rising
Jun 19th, 2006, 04:12 PM
Conversations with God by Neale Donald Walsch

Lord of the Rings Trilogy

The Mallorean by David Eddings

The SerpentWar Saga and the Riftwar Series by Raymond E Feist

Daughter of the Empire by Janny Wurts and Raymond E Feist

A Song of Ice and Fire by George R Martin

The Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan

Anything by Sheri S Tepper

100 Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Theres just too many to choose from...

:eek: you know George RR Martin? He's great. ASOIAF is n awesome series :yeah:

marmite1
Jun 20th, 2006, 04:15 PM
Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged were both life changing.

and John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men....aaah those were the days

Im in the middle of this book at the moment. I find it utterly intriguing :)

Hachiko
Jul 12th, 2006, 10:36 AM
Memoirs of a Geisha. It was just interesting, insightful and emotional.

Cage
Jul 12th, 2006, 11:13 AM
boycamp :drool: It was the hottest thing i have ever read eek!!

~lollipop_girl~
Jul 12th, 2006, 11:39 AM
"Twilight" Stephanie Meyer - It is so cute and just really well written, but if you aren't a fan of teen-chick flicks u won't like it!

"Ghosts of Albion" Amber Benson, Cristopher Golden - :worship:AMBER BENSON!!!:worship: Need I say more? :p

"To Kill a Mockingbird" was pretty damn good too!

Jogi
Jul 12th, 2006, 01:26 PM
the last book I read was "Cupido" (Retribution) from Jilliane Hoffman, pretty thrilling

drake3781
Jul 12th, 2006, 02:33 PM
donna tartt - the secret history

This is one of my favorite books too!! :wavey:

égalité
Jul 12th, 2006, 03:03 PM
Beloved by Toni Morrison. Probably the best American novel ever written!

I also like the Harry Potter series :tape:

Mattographer
Jul 12th, 2006, 03:04 PM
"Derailed" by James Siegel :eek: It has many massive twists and unstoppable!

Don't even watch the movie version! :o

Mattographer
Jul 12th, 2006, 03:08 PM
By the way, I only read crime/thriller books :p The book I am currently reading called "Along Came A Spider" by James Patterson and it has been great so far! :D

Oermi
Jul 12th, 2006, 03:12 PM
"Gossip.Girl" (all of them) :hearts:
& "So B. It" (i had to cry!)

skanky~skanketta
Jul 12th, 2006, 03:40 PM
Master of The Game - Sidney Sheldon

skanky~skanketta
Jul 12th, 2006, 03:41 PM
and i can still read kids on willow farm by enid blyton. i love it!

Quack
Jul 12th, 2006, 03:52 PM
The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins :worship:

http://images.barnesandnoble.com/images/9640000/9643029.jpg

The story concerns a young woman called Rachel Verinder who inherits a large Indian diamond, the Moonstone, on her eighteenth birthday. It is a legacy from her uncle, a corrupt English colonial army officer. The diamond is of great religious significance as well as being enormously valuable, and three Indian Hindus have dedicated their lives to recovering it. The story incorporates elements of the legendary origins of the Hope Diamond (or perhaps the Orloff).

Rachel's eighteenth birthday is celebrated with a large party, whose guests include her impecunious beau Franklin Blake. She wears the Moonstone on her dress that evening for all to see, including some Indian jugglers who happen to call on the house. Later that night, the diamond is stolen from Rachel's bedroom.

Rachel rejects the attentions of Franklin Blake and leaves in an emotional turmoil for London. She refuses to allow the police to question her or search her possessions raising suspicions. No one can figure out how the stone is stolen since no one was in her room. The Hindu jugglers are taken into custody but no stone is found. The young housemaid, who also happens to be in love with Franklin Blake, also acts suspiciously and then commits suicide by throwing herself into quicksand.