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View Full Version : My 2006 Mardi Gras Pics....Support Hurricane Katrina Recovery


Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2006, 09:43 PM
The first one is a test to make sure I've changed the attributes correctly. More to come.

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2006, 09:51 PM
Okay, I figured it out

yellowcard
Apr 14th, 2006, 09:54 PM
That's so cool, those people can party after a hurricane shattered their town in a thousand pieces. Respect (knocks twice on trunk, does peace sign:lol:)

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2006, 09:58 PM
More to come

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:08 PM
Pic 17 has to be the gayest member of the Thoth Krewe... :lol:

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:09 PM
Meet the Queen of the Comus Krewe

Summer Snow
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:21 PM
Which one of them is you MarJen? :)

Summer Snow
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:22 PM
Nice pictures by the way! :yeah:

CooCooCachoo
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:31 PM
Nice photos ;)

But can't help but think that Mardi Gras is a mixture of the Gay Pride Parade and Disneyland/world's Electric Light Parade :tape:

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:32 PM
Which one of them is you MarJen? :)

My boyfriend is the mean looking guy in the cool sunglasses. :D

Summer Snow
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:39 PM
My boyfriend is the mean looking guy in the cool sunglasses. :D
You're a very beautiful woman! :hug:

Summer Snow
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:40 PM
wait...you're a woman? :unsure:
Yeah! Don't you remember in our racist thread, she was like "On behalf of all white women, I can assure you this isn't true" :bolt:

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:52 PM
You're a very beautiful woman! :hug:

Thanks, John. Now be nice to me! :kiss:

Summer Snow
Apr 14th, 2006, 10:58 PM
Thanks, John. Now be nice to me! :kiss:
I am normally nice :hug: :kiss: Truce? :D :worship:

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2006, 11:03 PM
Nice photos ;)

But can't help but think that Mardi Gras is a mixture of the Gay Pride Parade and Disneyland/world's Electric Light Parade :tape:

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Well, I think that would be more descriptive of the Annual Bourbon Street Awards. :lol:

Me and my boyfriend went to Bourbon Street with some of my best gay friends from years past in New Orleans and had a blast. I was able to meet the Diamond Queen herself, Miss Raven and many from her court.

I know some of the extremists religious groups blamed Katrina on the Gays, but the funny thing is that most of the largely populated gay areas were spared Katrina's wrath. Ironic, huh?

ampers&
Apr 14th, 2006, 11:04 PM
Yeah! Don't you remember in our racist thread, she was like "On behalf of all white women, I can assure you this isn't true" :bolt:
lol...i deleted is because i looked back and saw.
i didn't really read it last night.
it's still a shock to me though.

Summer Snow
Apr 14th, 2006, 11:07 PM
lol...i deleted is because i looked back and saw.
i didn't really read it last night.
it's still a shock to me though.
Why? :shrug:

Denise4925
Apr 14th, 2006, 11:09 PM
My boyfriend is the mean looking guy in the cool sunglasses. :D
MarJen, you're beautiful. :D

ampers&
Apr 14th, 2006, 11:17 PM
Why? :shrug:
oh...because she's been a dude to me for the last...hmmm....9 months...lol.
now to find out she's female is weird to me. :shrug:
she’s hot though. :D

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 14th, 2006, 11:59 PM
MarJen, you're beautiful. :D

Thanks, Denise :)

The first day after we arrived in New Orleans, my boyfriend and I toured large parts of the city that were hardest hit (as much as we were able to see). For one, I wanted to see it for myself, and two, I was looking for spray-painted markings on the houses of those friends of mine I haven't heard from since the storm to see if they were found in their homes or not. It was the most nightmarish, hellish scene I've ever witnessed in my life. The pictures and news reports they show on television don't do it justice. Tons of rubble and shells of homes in areas that were once populous, bustling are now ghost neighborhoods. No electricity, no street lights, no stop lights, nothing. It was amazing to see that much of the city largely uninhabitable. We didn't photograph any of those areas, primarily because they are still finding people in their homes and I thought it be disrespectful.

The tour left me overwhelmed and I will say its taken me quite some time to absorb everything I saw.

The areas largely unaffected by flooding, Uptown/Garden District, French Quarter, Fauxbourg Marigny, etc. were the typical hustling, bustling places. Most of the population has shifted to those areas. But something was quite different. The people seemed to be a little more on edge, obviously carrying around the elevated stress since returning from the storm. Not knowing if they should stay, wondering if the city is ever going to be rebuilt, or will they protected if another storm should hit the levies. The residents of New Orleans are VERY frustrated with the actions of FEMA and the federal government.

Things we take for granted like Pharmacies, Post Offices, and grocery stores are not in large supply there. There were large areas of FEMA trailers outside of the cities only Trauma center at Touro Infirmary in Uptown. What was once a quiet Uptown/Garden District area is now littered with sounds of medical helicopters flying over the area transporting patients to and from Touro.

Even in Jefferson Parish, a suburb of New Orleans, there were TONS of FEMA trailers parked on the lawn in front of homes where owners lived while gutting their once flooded homes. It had been six months since the storm, and SO MANY homes had blue tarps over them to protect their damaged roofs from rain. SIX MONTHS.

The city lost many thousands of jobs and homes/apartment rentals that once were fairly reasonable are now outrageous. Those who want to come back, cannot afford it. Basic things such as trash pickup has been affected because the city is broke.

There had been some controversy as to whether or not Mardi Gras should have taken place. Without doubt, after having been there and interacted with the people, I'm glad it did. The city and businesses needed the extra financial boost and the residents of New Orleans needed a chance to relax, party and get some sense of normalcy from the chaos they currently live in.

It will be YEARS before some displaced New Orleanians will be able to return, even with help from the federal government. They need all the support they can get from congress and federal agencies. And us as well!

It just seems like a lot of people have forgotten New Orleans and their recovery efforts. I hope this will be a reminder to everyone of their plight, and why its so important not to forget the people of New Orleans.

Denise4925
Apr 15th, 2006, 12:11 AM
Thanks, Denise :)

The first day after we arrived in New Orleans, my boyfriend and I toured large parts of the city that were hardest hit (as much as we were able to see). For one, I wanted to see it for myself, and two, I was looking for spray-painted markings on the houses of those friends of mine I haven't heard from since the storm to see if they were found in their homes or not. It was the most nightmarish, hellish scene I've ever witnessed in my life. The pictures and news reports they show on television don't do it justice. Tons of rubble and shells of homes in areas that were once populous, bustling are now ghost neighborhoods. No electricity, no street lights, no stop lights, nothing. It was amazing to see that much of the city largely uninhabitable. We didn't photograph any of those areas, primarily because they are still finding people in their homes and I thought it be disrespectful.

The tour left me overwhelmed and I will say its taken me quite some time to absorb everything I saw.

The areas largely unaffected by flooding, Uptown/Garden District, French Quarter, Fauxbourg Marigny, etc. were the typical hustling, bustling places. Most of the population has shifted to those areas. But something was quite different. The people seemed to be a little more on edge, obviously carrying around the elevated stress since returning from the storm. Not knowing if they should stay, wondering if the city is ever going to be rebuilt, or will they protected if another storm should hit the levies.

Things we take for granted like Pharmacies, Post Offices, and grocery stores are not in large supply there. There were large areas of FEMA trailers outside of the cities only Trauma center at Touro Infirmary in Uptown. What was once a quiet Uptown/Garden District area is now littered with sounds of medical helicopters flying over the area transporting patients to and from Touro.

Even in Jefferson Parish, a suburb of New Orleans, there were TONS of FEMA trailers parked on the lawn in front of homes where owners lived while gutting their once flooded homes. It had been six months since the storm, and SO MANY homes had blue tarps over them to protect their damaged roofs from rain. SIX MONTHS.

The city lost many thousands of jobs and homes/apartment rentals that once were fairly reasonable are now outrageous. Those who want to come back, cannot afford it. Basic things such as trash pickup has been affected because the city is broke.

There had been some controversy as to whether or not Mardi Gras should have taken place. Without doubt, after having been there and interacted with the people, I'm glad it did. The city and businesses needed the extra financial boost and the residents of New Orleans needed a chance to relax, party and get some sense of normalcy from the chaos they currently live in.

It will be YEARS before some displaced New Orleanians will be able to return, even with help from the federal government. They need all the support they can get from congress and federal agencies. And us as well!

Wow, my sister's in-laws just returned. He's a doctor and wanted to get back to his patients. They were in Dallas, but I guess he didn't like it or couldn't get any patients, so he decided to move his family back. I know his wife didn't want to go, and with the way you describe it, I don't blame her. It's sad.

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 15th, 2006, 12:31 AM
Wow, my sister's in-laws just returned. He's a doctor and wanted to get back to his patients. They were in Dallas, but I guess he didn't like it or couldn't get any patients, so he decided to move his family back. I know his wife didn't want to go, and with the way you describe it, I don't blame her. It's sad.

For the people who were able to return, just about everywhere they go is a constant reminder of what happened last August. For some that attempt to return, that burden is rightfully too much to bear.

I know a few people in the medical profession that were able to return to New Orleans, whose homes were spared in the Uptown/Garden district area and they describe a lot of contracted healthcare employees having to be brought in from different parts of the country because a majority of the medical community lost their homes (Lakeview area) and haven't been able to return. Pre-Katrina, the city had over 2,000 hospital beds available. Currently, they only have 400+. Medical specialities took a huge hit.

Another huge problem is the lack of schools in the city. It really underscores the struggle for basic services for those that remain in the city. And as people begin returning, unfortunately the problem will only get worse.

Denise4925
Apr 15th, 2006, 12:39 AM
For the people who were able to return, just about everywhere they go is a constant reminder of what happened last August. For some that attempt to return, that burden is rightfully too much to bear.

I know a few people in the medical profession that were able to return to New Orleans, whose homes were spared in the Uptown/Garden district area and they describe a lot of contracted healthcare employees having to be brought in from different parts of the country because a majority of the medical community lost their homes (Lakeview area) and haven't been able to return. Pre-Katrina, the city had over 2,000 hospital beds available. Currently, they only have 400+. Medical specialities took a huge hit.

Another huge problem is the lack of schools in the city. It really underscores the struggle for basic services for those that remain in the city. And as people begin returning, unfortunately the problem will only get worse.
Wow. I don't know where they are living, because their house was hit hard by the flood. I know they didn't live in the Garden district. Unless it was purely humanitarian on his part, I have no idea why he would want to return to that, when he had solid footing in Dallas.

Mother_Marjorie
Apr 15th, 2006, 01:16 AM
Wow. I don't know where they are living, because their house was hit hard by the flood. I know they didn't live in the Garden district. Unless it was purely humanitarian on his part, I have no idea why he would want to return to that, when he had solid footing in Dallas.

Well, New Orleans is a special place for those who have lived there any length of time. The people are so great there and culturally its such a diverse place, rich in tradition that hard to give up easily.

Even though the city has been hit hard, the cities core is still very active and people are working hard to preserve and project what is uniquely New Orleans. Musicians, the Arts, entertainment, etc. are struggling, but doing everything they can to rebuild.

One thing I will say, is that the French architects were ingenious when they built the original New Orleans, the French Quarter, along the ridge of the Mississippi River. It is the highest point of New Orleans and those other areas built in close proximity were spared the ravages of the flooding.

On a foonote, City Park Tennis Center, which has in the past hosted The National Junior Easter Bowl is up and running again. They have both Har-Tru and Hard Courts. I was pretty surprised they got up and running as quickly as they did considering the damage to City Park as a whole.

Summer Snow
Apr 15th, 2006, 01:36 AM
oh...because she's been a dude to me for the last...hmmm....9 months...lol.
now to find out she's female is weird to me. :shrug:
she’s hot though. :D
I know what you mean ;)

Indeed, MarJen is hot :drool: I would hit it :lick: :tape: :lol: