PDA

View Full Version : Is shorter season really the answer!? NO!


Raj
Jan 11th, 2006, 03:10 PM
All these people complaining about the season being too long, My question is will a shorter season really reduce injuries? Admittedly it is a long season.

The players are given a 10 month long season to choose around 17 events they want to play, spread these events out over the year, realistically that is only 4 months of play a year.

So a player only has to play for 40% of the season!

Given that a player chooses to play this maximum of 17 events that they are required to play. The (top) player is unlikely to win all 17 events, on average may make loads of SF, F and wins (a few early exits?).

Is this player really playing too much? NO!

With this LONG season: The player has the advantage of choosing when and where to play most of their events, on their favourite surfaces and spread out their events. And say have a couple (or more) 4 week periods off!

Now let's shorten the season, in a shorter period of time a player will have to play more matches (more stress on the body), with reduced number of surfaces, reduced choice.

Furthermore if there was an off-season maybe this would give players a chance to really work on their weak areas OR MORE LIKELY many top players would have a long break pursue other interests, spend loads of money, really chill out (lolz) come back lose in the first round as they have been taking it easy for the off-season!

I really don't think a shorter season is the answer but it is upto the players to work out a good schedule and work out their limits and spread their tournaments over a longer period of time if they feel their bodies cannot handle it.

Or just treat the US Open as the last event of the year or something (8 month season), work out your limit cos at the end of the day health is more important!

I used to get annoyed Serena and Venus never played enough but look at how many events and Slams they have won. Loads! These girls only step out onto the court if they feel good! If your body can't handle it play less!

Petrova played 25 events last year.
Hantuchova played 26 events.
Schynder played 26 events.

Nobody is making them play all these events, I wonder if they want a shorter season?

Davenport only played 16 and is ranked Number 1!
Sharapova played 15 and is ranked 4.
Pierce played 14 and is ranked 5.
Henin played 9 and is ranked 8.

Do you see the trend, the top players who have accomplised games obviously play less as they always win events or get to finals (Davenport, Clijsters etc)

The up and coming players play loads more events as they lose in the first round many times!

Do you still think a shorter season is the answer?

SelesFan70
Jan 11th, 2006, 03:22 PM
I dunno about a shorter season, but rebound ace should be banned. It literally MELTS in the Australian summer.

Mynne Dassidy
Jan 11th, 2006, 03:28 PM
I dunno about a shorter season, but rebound ace should be banned. It literally MELTS in the Australian summer.

In the past both Gaby and Zina took bad spills for that very reason. :(

LoveFifteen
Jan 11th, 2006, 05:36 PM
Yeah, Rebound Ace is a terrible surface for the body. Why the heck do they use it?

I think the season SHOULD be shorter. Yes, you can pick and choose your events, but you have to keep yourself in good shape all year round. In other sports, you have a significant off-season where you can rest for a few months. The body needs a few months to get "out of shape". It just does. In tennis, let's say you take 4 weeks off after Wimbledon ... you can just get out of shape during that time because the US Open is coming up. In tennis, you have to train and stay fit all year. That is just murder on the body, and you can see it everywhere ... it seems like everyone is injured. It's ridiculous.

TeamUSA#1
Jan 11th, 2006, 06:13 PM
Rebound Ace is actually supposed to be easier on the joints because of the rubbery compound they use to make it--- causing it to give more and be softer on the joints, like clay is. The problem is that it gets sticky in the Aus. summer heat. Now if the AO was played 2 months later, the surface would be perfect.

A shroter season is a big part of the answer to getting rid of these injuries. All other athletes have an off season (of atleast 4 months)to recuperiate and then train.. tennis gives you 2 months off.. if that. Having a slam right out of the gate is really stupid. There should be a couple months of tournament play so that the players can get themselves in tournament shape before competing in a 2 week slam. The types of injuries the players are getting are from reptetive use of their joints. They need some time off to let their bodies heal. The season should def only be 8 months long, and should have a nice 3-4 break in the middle for recuperation and training.

I hope the powers that be finally wake up and smell the coffee on this one. This year's AO is gonna suck big time with all the peeps who are injured and not playing.

Spunky83
Jan 11th, 2006, 06:15 PM
Every hard court surface should be banned and only carpet, clay and grass allowed;)

and I might say that a longer off-season might help very well. Every other kind of athletes have a long off-season, but tennis players donīt. (I am not sure of the Golf tour though but...itīs golf)

tommyk75
Jan 11th, 2006, 07:03 PM
The ranking system is a factor. It only counts the best 17 (or is it 16) events, so players feel pressured to play a lot of tournaments to make up for the ones where they lost early. An averaging system with a minimum divisor of 16 events would be the best solution.

KoOlMaNsEaN
Jan 11th, 2006, 07:17 PM
I dont like the shorter season because they'll play more exhibitions anyway!

manu32
Jan 11th, 2006, 07:17 PM
after 1 week,everybody is injured.....

Meesh
Jan 11th, 2006, 07:19 PM
Shorter off season = longer EXO season

Players just need to manager their schedule better.

darrinbaker00
Jan 11th, 2006, 07:23 PM
To those who say the season should be shortened, I have two questions to ask you:

1. Which tournaments would you cut?

2. How would you handle the subsequent lawsuits filed by the promoters of the tournaments you cut?

darrinbaker00
Jan 11th, 2006, 07:27 PM
Shorter off season = longer EXO season

Players just need to manager their schedule better.
B-I-N-G-O! Maria Sharapova wasn't complaining about her pec muscle while she was collecting those fat appearance fees during her Asian exo tour, was she?

Andy T
Jan 11th, 2006, 07:33 PM
A few random thoughts/questions:

1) The Aussie season is often among the worst hit by injuries.
Is this because of the surface (hard on the joints and a bit sticky by all accounts so producing more "jolts" as movement cannot be as smooth as on the more "natural" surfaces?
or...
the shock to the players' bodies after a period off?
or both?

2) Of the GS-Tier I & II events, the surface breakdown is as follows (two-week events in caps):
Hardcourt (Indoor & Outdoor): 18 events = 22 weeks. Sydney, AUSTRALIAN OPEN, Dubai, Qatar, INDIAN WELLS, MIAMI, Stanford, San Diego, Los Angeles, Canadian Open, New Haven, US OPEN, Beijing, Luxembourg, Stuttgart, Linz, Zurich, YEC/Madrid

Clay: 6 events = 7 weeks Hilton Head, Amelia Island, Warsaw, Berlin, Rome, FRENCH OPEN,
Grass: 2 events = 3 weeks Eastbourne, WIMBLEDON
Indoor surfaces: 4 events = 4 weeks Carpet- Tokyo, Greenset Paris/Antwerp, Supreme: Moscow

Almost 2/3 of the entire circuit is played on hardcourts.....

These outdoor hardcourt events are also played in the most extreme climate conditions - the temperatures during the outdoor clay and grass season are rarely as high as those often experienced in the Aussie events, for example.

3) California is traditionally the home of hardcourt tennis in the US. Billie Jean King and Tracy Austin, the most accomplished Californian tennis players (i.e. raised on hardcourts) in the pro era both had dreadful injury problems. After about 6 seasons playing more or less full time (1969), King's knees were shot to pieces and she had the first of several major operations in 1970.... and this is a woman who had excellent technique. Austin's career was over in 83, after about 6 seasons on the tour.

Spunky83
Jan 11th, 2006, 07:51 PM
A few random thoughts/questions:

1) The Aussie season is often among the worst hit by injuries.
Is this because of the surface (hard on the joints and a bit sticky by all accounts so producing more "jolts" as movement cannot be as smooth as on the more "natural" surfaces?
or...
the shock to the players' bodies after a period off?
or both?

2) Of the GS-Tier I & II events, the surface breakdown is as follows (two-week events in caps):
Hardcourt (Indoor & Outdoor): 18 events = 22 weeks. Sydney, AUSTRALIAN OPEN, Dubai, Qatar, INDIAN WELLS, MIAMI, Stanford, San Diego, Los Angeles, Canadian Open, New Haven, US OPEN, Beijing, Luxembourg, Stuttgart, Linz, Zurich, YEC/Madrid

Clay: 6 events = 7 weeks Hilton Head, Amelia Island, Warsaw, Berlin, Rome, FRENCH OPEN,
Grass: 2 events = 3 weeks Eastbourne, WIMBLEDON
Indoor surfaces: 4 events = 4 weeks Carpet- Tokyo, Greenset Paris/Antwerp, Supreme: Moscow

Almost 2/3 of the entire circuit is played on hardcourts.....

These outdoor hardcourt events are also played in the most extreme climate conditions - the temperatures during the outdoor clay and grass season are rarely as high as those often experienced in the Aussie events, for example.

3) California is traditionally the home of hardcourt tennis in the US. Billie Jean King and Tracy Austin, the most accomplished Californian tennis players (i.e. raised on hardcourts) in the pro era both had dreadful injury problems. After about 6 seasons playing more or less full time (1969), King's knees were shot to pieces and she had the first of several major operations in 1970.... and this is a woman who had excellent technique. Austin's career was over in 83, after about 6 seasons on the tour.

Yep...the surface definetly matters. Anyway, hardcourt is considered to be the one and only surface that suits all players (Southamericans and Spaniards donīt share this general opinion though;)) which is why the YEC/Mastersfinal are played on hard.

tommyk75
Jan 12th, 2006, 07:04 AM
I think comparing tournaments and exhibitions is like comparing apples and oranges. In an exhibition, you can pace yourself, take it easier, and not have to go full out running for each and every ball. Plus, you're not as stressed when playing an exhibition. I'd imagine that playing tournaments take a LOT more out of a player than exhibitions do.

darrinbaker00
Jan 12th, 2006, 07:23 AM
I think comparing tournaments and exhibitions is like comparing apples and oranges. In an exhibition, you can pace yourself, take it easier, and not have to go full out running for each and every ball. Plus, you're not as stressed when playing an exhibition. I'd imagine that playing tournaments take a LOT more out of a player than exhibitions do.
It's amazing what guaranteed money can do for a player's stress level, isn't it? ;)