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daffodil
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:21 AM
by Sports Illustrated

#75. Alice Marble (1913-1990)
[Four-time US Open Singles Champion; Triple Crown Wimbledon Champion in 1939.]

Alice Marble took up tennis as an alternative to her favorite sport, baseball. Her brother urged her to do so, concerned that if she did not trade in her bat and glove her femininity would be called into question. A natural all-around athlete, Marble took to tennis quickly. She had an aggressive serve-and-volley style -- unusual for a woman in those days -- that set new standards for tennis. From 1936 to '40 she won 12 U.S. Open and five Wimbledon titles in singles, doubles and mixed doubles. In her last three years as an amateur (she turned pro in 1940), she won 23 of 24 tournaments and 120 of 122 matches. Marble achieved her remarkable accomplishments despite a two-year disappearance from tennis (1933 to '35) due to anemia, pleurisy and a doctor's decision that she must give up the game. Flamboyant by nature, Marble typically wore a baseball cap on the court. Her theatrics continued off the court as well, where she associated with the movie-star set and even became a spy during World War II after being approached by U.S. army intelligence to keep tabs on a former lover who had gone on to work for the Nazis in Switzerland.

#72. Evonne Goolagong-Cawley (1951-)
[Seven Grand Slam Singles Titles]

Of Aboriginal descent, Evonne Goolagong grew up in Barellan, a small farming community in Australia. Tennis came into her life when her father discovered some balls in a used car he had purchased. Four-year-old Goolagong started swatting the balls around with a borrowed racket, and the rest is tennis history. At the age of 14, she moved to Sydney to train more seriously, and five years later played at Wimbledon for the first time, losing in the second round. In 1971, just six months after her Wimbledon appearance, she made it all the way to the finals of the Australian Open, where she lost to fellow Aussie Margaret Court. That spring she beat Helen Gourlay for the French Open title, and a month later crushed Court to win the Wimbledon ladies championship. Between 1974-'77, she won four Australian Open singles titles. In September 1976 -- after making it to the finals of every event she played that year -- Goolagong took a hiatus from tennis during which she gave birth to her first child. After a year away from the game, she returned and in 1980 defeated Chris Evert to win her second Wimbledon title. Goolagong retired three years later after suffering recurring foot problems, and in 1991 moved back to Australia, hoping to reconnect with her roots after living in the U.S. for eight years with her husband, Roger Cawley, and two children. Her 1993 autobiography "Home! The Evonne Goolagong Story" was an Australian best seller. Goolagong -- who during her career earned $1.4 million and reached 18 Grand Slam finals -- is an International Tennis Hall of Fame inductee.

#52. Helen Wills Moody (Roark) (1905-1998)
[31 Grand Slam Titles]

An icy cool customer on the court, Helen Wills Moody was known as "Little Miss Poker Face". No tennis player ever wanted to win more and not many did. The daughter of a prominent and wealthy California doctor, Wills grew up playing tennis at the posh Berkeley Tennis Club. She became so good at the game so fast that her father arranged for her to take private lessons. Preferring to hit with men to improve her power game, Wills had a heavy serve and booming ground strokes off both sides. She won her first U.S. singles title in 1923 at the age of 17, and the following year took home gold in both singles and doubles at the Paris Olympic Games.

Of all her memorable matches --including those played during her 15-year rivalry with Helen Jacobs-- one stood above the rest. In 1926, with the world clamoring for her to play French champion Suzanne Lenglen, 20-year-old Wills traveled to France to face La Belle Suzanne, six years her senior. With fans perched on ladders above a sold-out crowd at the Carlton Club in Cannes, Lenglen proved the 6-3, 8-6 winner. Motivated by that loss, Wills held the No. 1 world ranking for eight years and did not lose a set from 1927 to '33. She captured a total of 31 career Grand Slam titles, including 19 in singles. Her dominance of Wimbledon was particularly remarkable. Wills won eight singles titles at the All-England Club between 1927 and '38, second only to Martina Navratilova (nine). Wills also held the No. 1 world ranking for eight years and did not lose a set from 1927 to '33. In the early 1930s, Wills married and in 1938 she played her last major tournament, but not before bringing unprecedented and well-deserved attention to women's tennis.

#33. Suzanne Lenglen (1899-1938)
[Dominated women's tennis from 1919-1926]

French-born Suzanne Lenglen was a captivating crowd pleaser, and as a result, became one of the first female athletes to attain true celebrity status. Off the court, she was known for her hard drinking, flirtatiousness and vanity. On the court, however, she played with a so-called "unfeminine athleticism" and wore unconventional short skirts. Her play was fluid and elegant and she possessed a wicked zest for winning, which she did with regularity: two gold medals and a bronze at the 1920 Antwerp Olympics, plus six Wimbledon and six French Open singles titles. From 1919 to '26, Lenglen lost only one match -- and that was by default. In 1926, at the Carlton Club tournament in Cannes, Lenglen played Helen Wills, a 20-year-old American who was her opposite both on and off the court. What would turn out to be the first and only match between these two tennis greats was one of the most ballyhooed of its era and among the most famed in the sport's history (Lenglen won, 6-3, 8-6).

#30. Althea Gibson (1927-)
[First African-American to win Wimbledon; 5 Grand Slam Singles titles.]

Althea Gibson brought grace, dignity and power to the world of tennis in the 1950's. She intimidated opponents with her powerful serve, pinpoint volleys and thundering overhead. But she is best remembered for having the courage to take on major tennis' all-white establishment. Gibson was a pioneer who broke several racial barriers in the sport and paved the way for future stars such as Arthur Ashe, Zina Garrison, and Venus and Serena Williams. The first African-American to win the Wimbledon singles title (she did it twice, in 1957 and 1958), she also won the French Open and U.S. Open singles titles.

Born to a South Carolina sharecropper who moved his family to New York City in 1930, Gibson grew up in Harlem during the great Depression. She shot pool with the local sharks and played basketball with the boys in her neighborhood -- but she was especially adept at paddle ball. During the summer of 1941, a Police Athletic League supervisor watched Gibson win a local tournament and suggested she take up tennis. Gibson began taking lessons, beating all comers and rapidly rising through the ranks of New York's all-Black American Tennis Association (ATA). In 1947, Gibson won the first of her 10 consecutive ATA national championships. She continued to dominate the ATA circuit while remaining shut out of all-white United States Lawn Tennis Association (USLTA) events.

After years of lobbying on the part of ATA officials and contemporaries such as former Wimbledon champion Alice Marble, Gibson made tennis history when she stepped onto Court 14 at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, New York on August 28, 1950 to compete in women's singles at the U.S. Championship. Gibson became the first African-American -- male or female -- to play in a major USLTA event. She defeated England's Barbara Knapp in straight sets, but lost to former Wimbledon champion Louise Brough in the second round. She made history again at Wimbledon that year, advancing to the quarterfinals.

Over the next five years, Gibson continued to win ATA titles, but her success in USLTA events was somewhat uneven until she returned from an exhibition tour of Asia for the U.S. State Department in 1955. She won 16 of 18 USLTA matches during the 1956 season, including the French Championships on May 20, becoming the first African-American to win a major tennis singles title.

Gibson was nearly 30 when she won her first Wimbledon title in 1957. She returned to a hero's welcome and ticker-tape parade in New York. She won her first U.S. Championship later that year and became the top-ranked female tennis player in the world. After winning her second U.S. title in 1958, Gibson retired from amateur competition. She took up golf and broke another color barrier by becoming the first African-American woman to compete on the LPGA circuit. She won one tournament during a seven-year career.

After retiring from professional competition in 1971, Gibson taught tennis and also served as athletic commissioner for the State of New Jersey from 1975 to '77. She was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1971 and to the International Women's Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

#28. Maureen Connolly (1934-1969)
[First woman to win tennis' Grand Slam]

Though her tennis career spanned just a little more than four years, Maureen Connolly ranks as one of the sport's all-time great players. "Little Mo" began playing on the municipal courts of San Diego. After successfully lobbying her parents for a racket, Connolly started training with a local pro at age 10 -- and finished second in the first tournament she entered. She later worked with renowned coach Eleanor "Teach" Tennant, who had previously coached champions Helen Wills Moody and Alice Marble. A natural lefthander, Connolly played righthanded and developed overpowering groundstrokes from both sides. At 13, she won the national junior title. She won her first major title, the U.S. championship, in 1951 -- two weeks before her 17th birthday. She would lose only four matches during the rest of her career.

Connolly won nine Grand Slam titles in the space of four years: Wimbledon (1952-54), the U.S. (1951-53), French (1953-54) and Australian Championships (1953). In 1953, she became the first woman to capture tennis' Grand Slam. Connolly was particularly dominant at Wimbledon -- she was never beaten in singles in her three appearances at the All-England Club. But in 1954, just two weeks after winning her third straight Wimbledon title, Connolly's right leg was crushed in a horseback-riding accident. The injury proved career-ending, and Little Mo was forced to retire at age 19. She remained active in tennis, serving as a sponsor and coach until she died of cancer in 1969 at age 34 .

16. Margaret Smith Court (1942-)
[62 Grand Slam titles; won Grand Slam in 1970]

In the 1960s and early '70s, women's tennis was an all-Court game. Tall, agile and overpowering, Margaret Smith Court dominated her sport as few others have. Between 1960 and 1973, Court won a ridiculous 62 Grand Slam titles, including the Australian Open singles crown seven straight times. "With her athleticism and training, Margaret took the game to another level," says Billie Jean King, who nicknamed her the Arm because of her reach.

Weaned on grass, she was a nifty serve-and-volleyer. She also had the penetrating strokes -- and, yes, court sense -- to win on slower surfaces. In 1970, a year when her singles record was 104-6, she won the Grand Slam (all four majors in one calendar year), for which she earned only $14,800. The same feat today is worth roughly $2.5 million. No matter. Court played for love, not money. In '77 she retired to Australia, where she is a minister who tours for a nondenominational church. Though far removed from the public eye, her legacy endures as one of the great champions.

#14. Steffi Graf (1969-)
[Won all four Grand Slams plus Olympic Gold in 1988]

Perfection is an awfully tough standard. But for tennis's Überfrau, Steffi Graf, there was never an alternative. From the day of her pro debut at 13 to her retirement last summer at age 30 after winning the French Open, Graf was unable to tolerate anything less than flawlessness. Often described by her peers as "a machine," Graf was mirthless and merciless in plying her trade. But the results speak volumes. "Steffi," says no less an authority than Billie Jean King, "is definitely the greatest women's tennis player of all time." It's virtually impossible to exaggerate Graf's greatness. She's the only player to have won all four Grand Slam events at least four times. After assuming the No. 1 ranking in 1987, she topped the charts for 186 straight weeks -- and a preposterous 377 weeks total -- the longest reign of any player, male or female. She retired having won more than 900 matches, $20 million in prize money and 22 Grand Slam singles titles. "Sometimes I wish I could have been a bit more relaxed," she says, looking back on her career. "But then I wouldn't have been the same player."

5/6. Martina Navratilova (1956-) and Chris Evert (1954-)
[Each won 18 Grand Slam Singles titles; rivalry elevated women's tennis]

Just as the NBA had Bird and Magic, as boxing had Ali and Frazier, and as golf had Nicklaus and Palmer, so did women's tennis once boast an epic rivalry. For upwards of 15 years, Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova matched each other shot for shot, fighting over the sport's most coveted titles and playing an ongoing game of leapfrog for the No. 1 ranking. "Everywhere I went, Chris was there to meet me," says Navratilova. "Everywhere she went, I was there to meet her."

Heightening their rivalry was the fact that Navratilova and her nemesis were a study in contrasts. Martina, a Czech expatriate who embraced America's freedoms, was unabashed about her homosexuality and freely loaned her name to dozens of political causes. Evert, known forever as Chrissy, was, as the nickname implied, the image-conscious girl-next-door with whom fans felt an instant familiarity. Their games betrayed their disparate personalities as well. Evert was the picture of consistency, keeping her foes at bay with classic, impeccably positioned strokes and a will of iron. Navratilova was a relentlessly aggressive athlete who attacked at every opportunity and forced the action.

Off the court, "Chrissy" was the smiling girl-next-door, but on it she was the iron-willed Ice Princess. Manny Millan
For all their differences, they were remarkably evenly matched. Evert won 157 career singles titles, and Navratilova claimed 167. Evert was the better clay-court player but reached the semifinals or better on the lawn of Wimbledon a staggering 17 times. Navratilova was at her best on grass but twice won on the red clay at the French Open. Appropriately, they each finished their careers with 18 Grand Slam singles titles. Head-to-head, Navratilova held a 43-37 edge, but Evert, who's two years older, won 23 of their first 29 meetings. Replicating the path of a ball in a tennis match, the "who's better?" debate will continue back and forth in perpetuity.

Beyond the numbers, their rivalry was marked by a profound mutual respect. Chris hated losing to Martina as much as Martina hated losing to Chris, but they felt a shared kinship. "I think we both realized that we pushed each other and, in the end, made the other one a much better player," says Evert, now 44. They were inextricably entwined throughout their playing careers, and it was somehow fitting that when the two players retired, they chose to settle in the same community, Aspen, Colo. As Evert joked at the time, "We just can't seem to shake each other.

#3. Billie Jean King (1943-)
[established Women's Sports Foundation in 1974. Won the Battle of the Sexes in 1973.]

Never mind the 39 Grand Slam titles, 695 match victories or the redoubtable career that lasted more than two decades. Mention Billie Jean King's name and the images first conjured are not of a tennis champion. Instead, King's legacy is that of a trailblazer who used her fame on the court to smooth the pavement for the next generation of female athletes.

The daughter of a fireman and a homemaker, King was imbued with an activist spirit as a middle-class prodigy trying to infiltrate a country-club sport. While she practiced tirelessly on the public courts of Long Beach, Calif., less skilled but better-connected players always seemed to get noticed first. Years later, traveling the circuit as an amateur, King grew weary of winning large events only to go uncompensated. So in 1968 she helped usher in tennis's open era by joining with several other women in signing professional contracts. In '70, angered by the fact that male players were being paid significantly more for victories than females, King and eight other women signed with Gladys Heldman, founder of what would become the Virginia Slims Tour. The next year King became the first female athlete to surpass the $100,000 benchmark in annual prize money.

King will forever be known for her 1973 victory over Bobby Riggs in the so-called "Battle of the Sexes." The match, played in the cavernous Houston Astrodome and televised nationally, was as much burlesque as tennis. But at the height of the women's liberation movement, its significance transcended sport. In defeating Riggs, the aging male chauvinist oink-oink, in three decisive sets, King laid to rest notions that testosterone was a prerequisite for athletic ability and intestinal fortitude. "Before that, women were chokers who couldn't take the pressure," says King. "Except, of course, in childbirth." Truth be told, King was so nervous before the match that she vomited in the locker room.

Her devotion to causes wasn't limited to tennis. In 1974 she helped create the Women's Sports Foundation, and she has long been a vocal supporter of Title IX. Today, in addition to serving on the board of a Fortune 500 corporation, the 56-year-old King (who retired from competitive tennis in '84) captains the U.S. Federation Cup team and remains active in, as she puts it, "growing the game of tennis" -- a game now filled with millionaire female athletes who are international celebrities. "Like the slogan says, We've come a long way," says Lindsay Davenport. "And we owe a big debt to Billie Jean King.

Oneofakind0490
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:28 AM
Hahahahahahahahahaha Graf #14 :haha:Its a American magazine:rolleyes::mad::fiery::p

VSFan1 aka Joshua L.
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:34 AM
Who was #1 and who was #2?

marmite1
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:41 AM
Probably Muhammad Ali or some such person.

Barrie_Dude
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:43 AM
:woohoo: I love Billie Jean!

Chunchun
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:43 AM
Hahahahahahahahahaha Graf #14 :haha:
:smash: :smash:

daffodil
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:44 AM
#1. Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Track & Field
#2. Babe Didrikson Zaharias, Track & Field and Golf

Other notables

#9. Nadia Comaneci, Gymnastics
#12. Mia Hamm, Soccer
#18. Olga Korbut, Gymnastics
#38. Katarina Witt, Figure Skating

daffodil
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:46 AM
WOW! In 1970, Margaret Smith Court's Win/Loss Record was 104-6 (%.945)

daffodil
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:46 AM
Nadia Comaneci is my second favourite athlete. I get chills every time I talk about her because of her spectacular accomplishments at the 1976 Montreal Games. Wow, 7 Perfect 10s! At only 14-years-old!


HAIL NADIA.

daffodil
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:48 AM
Venus, Serena, Davenport, Clijsters, Henin-Hardenne, Capriati, Hingis, and others aren't there because it's the list for the Greatest Female Athletes of the 20th Century.

kabuki
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:48 AM
Poor poor Cali. :lol:

kabuki
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:49 AM
Its a American magazine:rolleyes::mad::fiery::p

And?

Poor poor Cali. :lol:

Oneofakind0490
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:55 AM
And?

Poor poor Cali. :lol:Well you know in Germany in 1996 they did the same exact list and Graf was number 1:rolleyes:;)

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:56 AM
by Sports Illustrated

.....
#33. Suzanne Lenglen (1899-1938)
[Dominated women's tennis from 1919-1926]

French-born Suzanne Lenglen was ...


#30. Althea Gibson (1927-)
[First African-American to win Wimbledon; 5 Grand Slam Singles titles.]

Althea Gibson brought ...


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
:aparty: :aparty: :aparty: :aparty: :aparty:


U.S.A. - U.S.A. - rah - rah - rah!!!

Embarrassing. Simply embarrassing ....

daffodil
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:59 AM
Steffi Graf (2 Olympic medals)
Venus Williams (2 Olympic medals)
Serena Williams (1 Olympic medal)
Lindsay Davenport (1 Olympic medal)
Justine Henin-Hardenne (1 Olympic medal)



Nadia Comaneci (9 Olympic medals)

daffodil
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:05 AM
Cali, you should only be upset at Graf not getting the greatest tennis player spot. Nadia is by far the superior athlete.

Everything Nadia did was superior to Steffi.

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:18 AM
Cali, you should only be upset at Graf not getting the greatest tennis player spot. Nadia is by far the superior athlete.

Everything Nadia did was superior to Steffi.


I watched both live.
Comanci in Montreal 1976, Graf several times in Hamburg and New York.

Nadia a superior athlete?
Graf would have beaten Comanci in track& fields, weight lifting, rowing, cycling, football, basketball, tennis. Only in gymnastics Comanci would have had the edge.

BTW, what did you say, Dumbo .... ?

:lol:

Volcana
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:18 AM
'Greatest' being the subjective term it is, I think the list is pretty complete, and accurate. When I saw the thread title, I immediately thought 'Babe Didrickson'. But Jackie Joyner-Kersee was such an outstanding athlete over so long a period, I can't argue with her as #1.

BJK had to be pretty far up there. She opened up sports for women in general, not just tennis.

Who was #4?

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:22 AM
Steffi Graf (2 Olympic medals)
Venus Williams (2 Olympic medals)
Serena Williams (1 Olympic medal)
Lindsay Davenport (1 Olympic medal)
Justine Henin-Hardenne (1 Olympic medal)



Nadia Comaneci (9 Olympic medals)


Nadia's medal were not only gold medals.

Where are Birgit Fischer (8 Olympic gold medals) and Kristin Otto (6 Olympic gold medals)?

venus_rulez
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:23 AM
:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
:aparty: :aparty: :aparty: :aparty: :aparty:


U.S.A. - U.S.A. - rah - rah - rah!!!

Embarrassing. Simply embarrassing ....


Ummmm how is anything Althea Gibson did anything to laugh about?

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:26 AM
'Greatest' being the subjective term it is, I think the list is pretty complete, and accurate. When I saw the thread title, I immediately thought 'Babe Didrickson'. But Jackie Joyner-Kersee was such an outstanding athlete over so long a period, I can't argue with her as #1.

BJK had to be pretty far up there. She opened up sports for women in general, not just tennis.

Who was #4?


Maybe a U.S. citizen .... ?

:haha: :haha: :hehehe: :rolls: :rolls:

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:26 AM
Poor poor Cali. :lol:


:haha: :haha: :haha: what a LOSER this Calimero creature is... :haha:

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:29 AM
Cali, you should only be upset at Graf not getting the greatest tennis player spot. Nadia is by far the superior athlete.

Everything Nadia did was superior to Steffi.


Yep, Nadia did not benefit from physical attacks on athletes in her sport who was higher ranked than she is.

:lol:

PaulieM
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:49 AM
i'm surprised that many tennis players made the list, tennis doesn't usually get much representation in lists like that. good for those ladies :)

daffodil
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:52 AM
Yep, Nadia did not benefit from physical attacks on athletes in her sport who was higher ranked than she is.

:lol:

I know. It's not like a Romanian man jumped on the balance beam and stabbed Olga.

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 04:57 AM
I know. It's not like a Romanian man jumped on the balance beam and stabbed Olga.


:lol:

Volcana
Oct 29th, 2005, 05:04 AM
U.S.A. - U.S.A. - rah - rah - rah!!!

Embarrassing. Simply embarrassing ....I agree. Your unwillingness to do basic research IS embarassing. yet you continue to post. Did you bother actually LOOKING at the entire list before posting. Do you think names like Fanny Blankers-Koen, Lyubov Egorova, Larissa Latynina, Amy Van Dyken, Gertrude Ederle, Annemarie Moser-Proll (The Killer Queen!), Paula Newby-Fraser, Hassiba Boulmerka (Who should have been WAY further up the list, IMHO), Manon Rheaume, Tegla Loroupe or Fu Mingxia, actually mean anything to the average American?

Sure there are a lot of Americans on the list. That;s because the USA offered a lot more professional opportunites for women in a lot more sports. And that list of 100 women lists 34 different sports!

Track & Field, Middle Distance Running, Distance Running, Tennis, Figure Skating, Speed Skating, Gymnastics, Swimming, Soccer, Golf, Basketball, Horse Racing, Wheelchair Racing, Cross Country Skiing, Diving, Skiing, Rock Climbing, Dogsledding, Softball, Rowing, Triathlete, Auto Racing, Sailing, Ultramarathon, Volleyball, Surfing, Hockey, Fencing, Administrator, Mountain Biking, Waterskiing, Bowling , Cycling, Baseball

If you're going to cast your net that broadly in women's sports, you're going to come up with a lot of Americans.

Of course, you main beef is Graf not being the top tennis player listed. All you have to do is look at the ENTIRE list, freely available on the web, and its immediately evident that 'Greatest' is measure more by impact on sports, than by mere records. Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding are on the list as a set! But it WAS the incident that really got people looking at the seamier side of the world's most popular televised sport, figure skating.

As for Graf, what's been her lasting impact on tennis? Is tennis bigger and better than ever in a small country like Germany for her presence? Or is Germany losing some of it'sbigger tournaments for lack of interest? Or do you think Graf had a greater impact on tennis than Evert? (Get real.)

All in all, SI did a remarkable job, and tennis is well represented. The only serious problem is that Jeannie Longo isn't top twenty! At least!

01. Jackie Joyner-Kersee............. Track & Field
02. Babe Didrikson Zaharias.......... Track & Field
03. Billie Jean King................. Tennis
04. Sonja Henie...................... Figure Skating
05. Martina Navratilova.............. Tennis
05. Chris Evert...................... Tennis
07. Bonnie Blair..................... Speed Skating
08. Wilma Rudolph.................... Track & Field
09. Nadia Comaneci................... Gymnastics
10. Tracy Caulkins................... Swimming
11. Florence Griffith Joyner......... Track & Field
12. Mia Hamm......................... Soccer
13. Nancy Lopez...................... Golf
14. Steffi Graf...................... Tennis
15. Cheryl Miller.................... Basketball
16. Margaret Court................... Tennis
17. Mary T. Meagher.................. Swimming
18. Olga Korbut...................... Gymnastics
19. Peggy Fleming.................... Figure Skating
20. Joan Benoit Samuelson............ Distance Running
21. Dawn Fraser...................... Swimming
22. Teresa Edwards................... Basketball
23. Julie Krone...................... Horse Racing
24. Ann Meyers....................... Basketball
25. Jean Driscoll.................... Wheelchair Racing
26. Fanny Blankers-Koen.............. Track & Field
27. Mickey Wright.................... Golf
28. Maureen Connolly................. Tennis
29. Janet Evans...................... Swimmer
30. Althea Gibson.................... Tennis
31. Mary Decker Slaney............... Track & Field
32. Dorothy Hamill................... Figure Skating
33. Suzanne Lenglen.................. Tennis
34. Lyubov Egorova................... Cross Country Skiing
35. Kathy Whitworth.................. Golf
36. Larissa Latynina................. Gymnastics
37. Grete Waitz...................... Distance running
38. Katarina Witt.................... Figure Skating
39. Amy Van Dyken.................... Swimming
40. Michelle Akers................... Soccer
41. Pat McCormick.................... Diving
42. Gertrude Ederle.................. Swimming
43. Wyomia Tyus...................... Track and Field
44. Nancy Lieberman-Cline............ Basketball
45. Picabo Street.................... Skiing
46. Anne Donovan..................... Basketball
47. Tenley Albright.................. Figure Skating
48. Lynn Hill........................ Rock Climbing
49. Rosi Mittermaier................. Skiing
50. Susan Butcher.................... Dogsledding
51. Nera White....................... Basketball
52. Helen Wills Moody Roark.......... Tennis
53. Ruffian.......................... Horse Racing
54. Chamique Holdsclaw............... Basketball
55. Lisa Fernandez................... Softball
56. Anita DeFrantz................... Rowing
57. Mary Lou Retton.................. Gymnastics
58. Marion Jones..................... Track & Field
59. Annemarie Moser-Proll............ Skiing
60. Paula Newby-Fraser............... Triathlete
61. Shirley Muldowney................ Auto Racing
62. Jenny Thompson................... Swimming
63. Dawn Riley....................... Sailing
64. Carol Blazejowski................ Basketball
65. Ann Trason....................... Ultramarathon
66. Lynn Jennings.................... Middle Distance Running
67. Shirley Babashoff................ Swimming
68. Kornelia Ender................... Swimming
69. Flo (Flora) Hyman................ Volleyball
70. Hassiba Boulmerka................ Track and Field
71. Connie Carpenter................. Speed Skating and Cycling
72. Evonne Goolagong Cawley.......... Tennis
73. Alice Coachman................... Track and Field
74. Silken Laumann................... Rowing
75. Alice Marble..................... Tennis
76. Lisa Andersen.................... Surfer
77. Manon Rheaume.................... Hockey
78. Tegla Loroupe.................... Running
79. Willye White..................... Track and Field
80. Ailleen Riggin Soule............. Swimming and Diving
81. Lynette Woodard.................. Basketball
82. Donna de Varona.................. Swimming
83. Helene Mayer..................... Fencing
84. Donna Lopiano.................... Athlete and Administrator
85. Kristin Otto..................... Swimming
86. Sheila Young..................... Speedskating and Cycling
87. Sheryl Swoopes................... Basketball
88. Juli Furtado..................... Mountain Biking
89. Louise Suggs..................... Golf
90. Cynthia Cooper................... Basketball
91. Camille Duvall................... Waterskiing
92. Fu Mingxia....................... Diving
93. Lyn St. James.................... Auto Racing
94. Marion Ladewig................... Bowling
95. Nancy Kerrigan & Tonya Harding... Figure Skating
96. Cammi Granato.................... Hockey
97. Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli........... Cycling
98. Ila Borders...................... Baseball
99. Margo Oberg...................... Surfing
100. Dorothy Kamenshek............... Baseball

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 05:05 AM
Ummmm how is anything Althea Gibson did anything to laugh about?


Gibson #30 and Lenglen only #33 is beyond embarrassing. Is it only RETARDED.

It is exactly THIS attitude that makes the U.S. so much hated all over the world. And make no mistake, I'm defending the U.S. wherever possible ...

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 05:08 AM
I agree. Your unwillingness to do basic research IS embarassing. yet you continue to post. Did you bother actually LOOKING at the entire list before posting. Do you think names like Fanny Blankers-Koen, Lyubov Egorova, Larissa Latynina, Amy Van Dyken, Gertrude Ederle, Annemarie Moser-Proll (The Killer Queen!), Paula Newby-Fraser, Hassiba Boulmerka (Who should have been WAY further up the list, IMHO), Manon Rheaume, Tegla Loroupe or Fu Mingxia, actually mean anything to the average American?

Sure there are a lot of Americans on the list. That;s because the USA offered a lot more professional opportunites for women in a lot more sports. And that list of 100 women list 34 different sports!

Track & Field, Middle Distance Running, Distance Running, Tennis, Figure Skating, Speed Skating, Gymnastics, Swimming, Soccer, Golf, Basketball, Horse Racing, Wheelchair Racing, Cross Country Skiing, Diving, Skiing, Rock Climbing, Dogsledding, Softball, Rowing, Triathlete, Auto Racing, Sailing, Ultramarathon, Volleyball, Surfing, Hockey, Fencing, Administrator, Mountain Biking, Waterskiing, Bowling , Cycling, Baseball

If you're going to cast your net that broadly in women's sports, you're going to come up with a lot of Americans.

Of course, you main beef is Graf not being the top tennis player listed. All you have to do is look at the ENTIRE list, freely available on the web, and its immediately evident that 'Greatest' is measure more by impact on sports, than by mere records. Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding are on the list as a set! But it WAS the incident that really got people looking at the seamier side of the world's most popular televised sport, figure skating.

As for Graf, what's been her lasting impact on tennis? Is tennis bigger and better than ever in a small country like Germany for her presence? Or is Germany losing some of it'sbigger tournaments for lack of interest? Or do you think Graf had a greater impact on tennis than Evert? (Get real.)

All in all, SI did a remarkable job, and tennis is well represented. The only serious problem is that Jeannie Longo isn't top twenty! At least!

01. Jackie Joyner-Kersee............. Track & Field
02. Babe Didrikson Zaharias.......... Track & Field
03. Billie Jean King................. Tennis
04. Sonja Henie...................... Figure Skating
05. Martina Navratilova.............. Tennis
05. Chris Evert...................... Tennis



Wow, BJ King, Navratilova and Evert TOPS the list among tennis players.

:lol:

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 05:11 AM
... Or do you think Graf had a greater impact on tennis than Evert? (Get real.)
....

Yes, indeed I think so!
:lol:

Blondie, we are discussing the WORLD here, not only California and New England!

Volcana
Oct 29th, 2005, 05:21 AM
Yes, indeed I think so!
:lol:

Blondie, we are discussing the WORLD here, not only California and New England!Every two-hand backhand on the tour today is the result of Chris Evert. What has changed on the tour as the resulr of Graf's presence?

LUIS9
Oct 29th, 2005, 05:28 AM
i'm surprised that many tennis players made the list, tennis doesn't usually get much representation in lists like that. good for those ladies :)

Or american sports broadcasts.:p

Volcana
Oct 29th, 2005, 05:31 AM
i'm surprised that many tennis players made the list, tennis doesn't usually get much representation in lists like that. good for those ladies :)Are you really surprised? I'm not. For women, tennis is a VERY prominent sport. I don't see how such a list could NOT have a lot of tennis players, figure skaters and swimmers.

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:53 AM
Every two-hand backhand on the tour today is the result of Chris Evert. What has changed on the tour as the resulr of Graf's presence?


50 million more solid women's tennis fans in Europe and Asia maybe?

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:59 AM
50 million more solid women's tennis fans in Europe and Asia maybe?

Martina Navratilova, Anna Kournikova and Monica Seles are the most popular tennis players here in Australia and other parts of Asia.

I really don't know what you're talking about. :tape:

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:12 AM
Martina Navratilova, Anna Kournikova and Monica Seles are the most popular tennis players here in Australia and other parts of Asia.

I really don't know what you're talking about. :tape:


"Australia and OTHER parts of Asia."

Priceless! :lol: :lol: :lol:


You have a lot of work to do if you want to get your high school diploma one day, mate .... :tape:

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:35 AM
"Australia and OTHER parts of Asia."

Priceless! :lol: :lol: :lol:


You have a lot of work to do if you want to get your high school diploma one day, mate .... :tape:


Asian
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

The term Asian in a geographical sense simply refers to something or someone from Asia. However the term has evolved in popular usage to often mean a person from a specific part of Asia rather than the continent as a whole. Its precise use varies depending on who is using it, where it is being used, and in which context it is being used in.


'Asian' in the UK and anglophone Africa

In the United Kingdom and Anglophone Africa, the term "Asian", though it can be used to refer to the continent of Asia as a whole, is more usually associated specifically with people and cultures whose origin lies in South Asia: that is, modern-day India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka (see British Asian). Some Britons carelessly use "India" to refer to the whole of South Asia, while others make a clear distinction between the various countries that form the region. The British term of Asian is now making headway into Canadian English.

Up until recently, Asians were seen from the perspective of England. The term "Far East" comes from the English. It is clearly not American, as Asia is directly West of America. The newer classifications of "Asia/Pacific" etc. are the American view of the world.

Many Chinese South Africans dislike the label 'Asian', which they associate with being Indian or South Asian.


'Asian' in other English-speaking countries

In the United States, Canada, and Australasia, since approximately 1990, "Asian" has been used to refer to people from China, Japan, Korea and other East Asian countries. "Asian" is often considered a more polite (or, some would say, more politically correct) alternative to "Oriental". This is partially due to the perception amongst some in academia that the term "Orientalism" is now associated with the European colonial attitude toward the Ottoman East.

To avoid the confusion that sometimes occurs, the term "East Asian" is sometimes used to distinguish people from South-East Asia, China, Japan, and Korea, and "South Asian" for Indians, Pakistanis and Bangaldeshis (or, more commonly, in North America, "Asian Indians" and "East Indians"). It should be noted that both of these clarifications are relatively formal, and are used only when it is necessary to make a distinction between the group concerned and other Asian peoples.


'Asian' in the US Census

In the US Census, the term Asian refers to all of these peoples, whether their racial origins are in the Far East (East Asia), Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent. However, respondents are allowed to indicate more precise racial groupings, such as "Asian Indian", "Chinese", "Filipino", "Korean", "Japanese", "Vietnamese", Burmese, Hmong, Pakistani, Laotian, Thai or "Other Asian".

Far East (East-Asian American) : China/Chinese American, Japan/Japanese American, Mongolia/Mongolian American, South Korea/South-Korean American, and Taiwan/Taiwanese American.

Southeast Asia (Southeast-Asian American): Brunei/Bruneian American, Burma/Burmese American, Cambodia/Cambodian American, East Timor/Timorese American, Indonesia/Indonesian American, Laos/Laotian American, Malaysia/Malaysian American, The Philippines/Filipino American, Singapore/Singaporean American, Thailand/Thai American, and Vietnam/Vietnamese American.

Indian Subcontinent (South-Asian American) : Bangladesh/Bangladeshi American, Bhutan/Bhutanese American, India/Asian-Indian American,The Maldives/Maldivian American, Pakistan/Pakistani American.

The US Census's definition of "Asian" does not, however include Arabs, or other peoples living in the Near East or Middle East.


When is an Asian not an Asian?

Despite the fact that these people are technically 'Asians' by geographical location on the map, they have generally have not been labelled as such in Western society.

'West Asians'

The term "West Asian" is now sometimes used to refer to people from Middle Eastern nations. This term is used mostly in Australasia where the "Middle East" is actually to the west, and so the term "Middle East" is geographically confusing.

Though in Western society, Middle Easterners rarely evoke the term Asian, the original Greek name Asia referred to Asia Minor, where we would now consider as Middle East. An example of this is in Alexander the Great's title King of Asia.


Russians

Although some ethnic Russians hail from Asia (descendants of people shipped off to Siberia centuries ago, among other settlers), these people are not racially classified as "Asian" in most countries (including the United States) because their ancestors were Caucasian, rather than Mongoloid. However, Russian citizens who are Mongoloid, those who are descended from Siberian ethnic parentage, as well as the Russian geographical segment of the trans-continental Eskimo population, the Yuit or Siberian Yupik - that is, Northeast Asians - also are not classified as "Asian," for no apparent reason, although this may related to Cold War classification of people in the former USSR as Soviets or Russians, to the exclusion of other ethnic labels.


Are Pacific Islanders Asian?

Sometimes, Pacific Islanders, such as Native Hawaiians or Samoans, who do not technically belong to the continent of Asia, may be classified or "clumped together" with the Asians as a group, often in censuses, surveys or studies. Thus, occasionally the term "Asians and Pacific Islanders" or "Asia/Pacific" may be used. However, in the 2000 US Census, many Pacific Islanders did not consider themselves the same race as Asians, and classified themselves separately.

Are Australasians Asian?

Australia and New Zealand now consider themselves part of Asia, as they are definely not European nations. The mere term "Australasia" indiciates that it is part of Asia. Americans now define the groupings, and lump Australians into "Asia/Pacific".


Calimero LOVES to be proven wrong over and over again. :tape:

This one is Calimero377 the IDIOT, version #13,837. :lol:

Now Cali will claim that its an Asian CONSPIRACY:haha: :haha: :haha:Oh boy...its really PRICELESS.... :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:

korben
Oct 29th, 2005, 12:01 PM
13. Nancy Lopez...................... Golf
27. Mickey Wright.................... Golf
35. Kathy Whitworth.................. Golf
89. Louise Suggs..................... Golf

95. Nancy Kerrigan & Tonya Harding... Figure Skating



Harding :lol:

Annika Sörenstam not listed :lol:

Not even commenting their selections (and absences) of Winter Sports (hockey, cross country etc.)

fammmmedspin
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:31 PM
Its ludicrous even as all lists go. Its a US list in practically any sport you mention - even Comaneci , Navratilova and Korbut are now American. Graf is lucky to establish a non-US presence at 14. Its full of silly names - Mary Decker Slaney was less successful and less significant than any one of several dozen European, chinese or african runners - her main claim is she fell over Zola Budd's feet. Benoit is famous for one success in one Olympics - Radcliffe holds all the records. Where are the Russian skaters, the non-US marathon runners, the non American pole vaulters, the no-defecting gymnasts, the European Jackie Joyners jumpers and sprinters, the European wheelchair racers, the german swimmers? its even bad with US stars - Shannon Miller was more important than the transient success and hype that was Mary-Lou Retton and they even miss out the only American with two successive sprint olympic golds and a clutch of world championships in a list with Benoit and decker in it..

Its like having a list of world leaders which only has American Presidents and Margaret Thatcher at number 37. Anyone really think Jimmy Carter belongs in a list of the 100 greatest world leaders?

daffodil
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:34 PM
Graf was the reason for the abandonment of tennis in the world in 1992-1996.

GoDominique
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:37 PM
Its ludicrous even as all lists go. Its a US list in practically any sport you mention - even Comaneci , Navratilova and Korbut are now American. Graf is lucky to establish a non-US presence at 14.
I agree.
Congrats Steffi on making it to no.14 under these adverse circumstances. :worship:

alfajeffster
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:38 PM
'Greatest' being the subjective term it is, I think the list is pretty complete, and accurate. When I saw the thread title, I immediately thought 'Babe Didrickson'. But Jackie Joyner-Kersee was such an outstanding athlete over so long a period, I can't argue with her as #1.

BJK had to be pretty far up there. She opened up sports for women in general, not just tennis.

Who was #4?

Being that "Greatest Athlete" is the operative term, it's a perfectly ridiculous list which isn't based in reality, at least not if it purports that Billie Jean King was a greater athlete than Martina Navratilova, Steffi Graf, or Margaret Court. She was far and away a better thinker, but athletic ability? They may as well have placed Monica Seles in the top 10.

raquel
Oct 29th, 2005, 03:43 PM
Of course, you main beef is Graf not being the top tennis player listed. All you have to do is look at the ENTIRE list, freely available on the web, and its immediately evident that 'Greatest' is measure more by impact on sports, than by mere records. Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding are on the list as a set! But it WAS the incident that really got people looking at the seamier side of the world's most popular televised sport, figure skating.

Thanks for the full list Volcana. I think though if impact and famous incidents combined with results are included in the list then Monica Seles should be on the list somewhere. She won all her Slams in the 20th Century and was the victim of one of the most famous (or infamous) incidents in tennis. Unlike Harding, Monica has the achievements as well as being involved in an incident that transcended the sport.


Also, this -

53. Ruffian.......................... Horse Racing

is a horse. Now she was a great horse but if I was one of the women athletes ranked below Ruffian, I'd feel a little bit slighted there ;)

Venus, Serena, Davenport, Clijsters, Henin-Hardenne, Capriati, Hingis, and others aren't there because it's the list for the Greatest Female Athletes of the 20th Century.

Davenport won 2 of her 3 Slams and her Olympic gold in the 20th Century. She had more success in that century than this one, so she just didn't make it. It wasn't a time issue.

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:02 PM
Asian
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
...


( ) Tennis_anus knows what "Wikipedia" is.

"Australasia" showing that Australia is part of Asia ....
:rolleyes:

:lol: :lol: :lol:


(OMG, dumb and dumber .... )

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:07 PM
Harding :lol:

Annika Sörenstam not listed :lol:

...


OMG, that really is priceless!!!!

:lol: :lol: :lol:

But who knows -maybe the dogsledge girl was really too good for Annika ... ?
:haha: :haha: :haha:

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:15 PM
Graf was the reason for the abandonment of tennis in the world in 1992-1996.

The FO 92 final (Seles-Graf) was voted by journalists as the greatest women's match in the open era.
The Wim 92 final (Graf-Seles) showed us what a female can do on a tennis court. :worship: :worship:
The Wim 93 final (Graf-Novotna) is perhaps the 2nd most remembered women's tennis match of all time today.
The Wim 95 final (Graf-ASV) brought the most famous game (the 11th in the 3rd) ever in a women's Wimbledon match.
The USO 95 final (Graf-Seles) most probably had the most anticipated and dramatic confrontation ever in women's tennis since Cannes 1926.
The FO 96 final (Graf-ASV) was one of the 3 best ever FO finals ever.

Six absolute classics of the women's game.
All within 5 years. All with Graf in them.

Where are the classics in the Willy years?
Where are they?
Where .... ?

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:17 PM
I agree.
Congrats Steffi on making it to no.14 under these adverse circumstances. :worship:


If it weren't for her marriage with Agassi (U.S.) the U.S. rock climber most probably would have been ahead of her in that list ... :tape:

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:21 PM
Thanks for the full list Volcana. I think though if impact and famous incidents combined with results are included in the list then Monica Seles should be on the list somewhere. She won all her Slams in the 20th Century and was the victim of one of the most famous (or infamous) incidents in tennis. Unlike Harding, Monica has the achievements as well as being involved in an incident that transcended the sport.
[/font]

[font=Courier New]Also, this -

53. Ruffian.......................... Horse Racing

is a horse. Now she was a great horse but if I was one of the women athletes ranked below Ruffian, I'd feel a little bit slighted there ;)

...


Let me guess - a horse from the U.S.A. ... ? :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :yippee: :yippee: :haha: :haha: :bigwave: :bigwave: :rolls: :rolls: :aparty: :aparty: :aparty:

Mother_Marjorie
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:48 PM
Listing Evert ahead of Court, Graf, and Wills-Moody is an instant credibility killer. Yet again, another AMERICAN-owned Sports Magazine is seemingly kinder to the Americans. :rolleyes:

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:53 PM
Listing Evert ahead of Court, Graf, and Wills-Moody is an instant credibility killer. Yet again, another AMERICAN-owned Sports Magazine is seemingly kinder to the Americans. :rolleyes:


Give it up Cali aka Marjen!, :tape: nobody really acknowledges Graf as the greatest of all time (anywhere in the world) except in the parallel world of your demented mind. :lol:

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:54 PM
Graf was the reason for the abandonment of tennis in the world in 1992-1996.


true. :lol:

Andy T
Oct 29th, 2005, 07:54 PM
This list does seem very US-centred to me.

I feel that Maria Bueno and Monica Seles should both be there somewhere.

Nancy Kerrigan & Tonya Harding should NOT.

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:02 PM
Hahahahahahahahahaha Graf #14 :haha:

poor, poor calimero.. :lol:

wta_zuperfann
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:15 PM
This list does seem very US-centred to me.


That may indeed may be part of the problem. The real problem, however, seems to be that there is no basis for judging who actually belongs in that listing.

A horse at # 53???

Tonya Harding in the top 100? Not in your life.

Pat McCormick (diver) at 41 but no mention of Lt Micki King who was one of the greatest female athletes who ever lived? I believe that she was promoted to general and is still active as a collegiate athletic director. This gal was one heck of an overall athlete and she excelled at the old Super Stars competition back in the early 70s. Paula Pope was another great diver who merited some consideration as being one of the best female athletes of all time.

I believe that diving is the most under-rated sports in the USA. It requires great stamina, athleticism, timing, coordination, and is very artistic as well. I love our WTA Super Stars and have long admired women's sports. But the very first women's sport that I ever enjoyed was diving and the girls who do it deserve far more credit for being great athletes than is generally done here in the States.

tennislover
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:19 PM
BJK greater than Martina??????????????????

I adore BJ :worship: , she was amazing but Martina is Martina.....

jackie who???????????????????????
:tape: :tape: :tape: :tape: :tape: :tape:

tennislover
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:20 PM
Hahahahahahahahahaha Graf #14 :haha:


:lol: :lol: :lol:

tennislover
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:22 PM
Navratilova - Graf 2 - 0 (so far)

:p :p :p

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:25 PM
Navratilova - Graf 2 - 0 (so far)

:p :p :p


:haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:30 PM
Give it up Cali aka Marjen!, :tape: nobody really acknowledges Graf as the greatest of all time (anywhere in the world) except in the parallel world of your demented mind. :lol:


Well, the panel that was put together by the International Olympic Comittee elected Graf as the female "Sportsperson of the Century" in "ball sports".
Nadia Comaneci (athletics), Dawn Fraser (swimming) and Annemarie Moser-Pröll (winter sports) were the other three female winners. They got their awards at a great gala in Vienna that was broadcast on TV in more than 80 countries. Navi and Evert weren't even mentioned last time I checked my video ... :lol:

tennis aus
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:30 PM
Six absolute classics of the women's game.
All within 5 years. All with Graf in them.

Where are the classics in the Willy years?
Where are they?
Where .... ?

Ma'am, where does Gunther fit into the Graf SLICE classics. :tape: He was the MVP of that infamous doubles team remember? :lol:

Calimero377
Oct 29th, 2005, 08:32 PM
This list does seem very US-centred to me.
...

No, REALLY ... ?

What makes you think so???

:lol: :lol: :lol:

alfajeffster
Oct 30th, 2005, 12:41 PM
No, REALLY ... ?

What makes you think so???

:lol: :lol: :lol:

It's rumoured that an American Lesbian held him down with his face in a pile of horse manure until he admitted his true anti-American revisionist agenda.

manu32
Oct 30th, 2005, 12:56 PM
this list is ridiculous.....and the first place of joyner kersee not a good thing for sport....why not marita koch???

manu32
Oct 30th, 2005, 12:58 PM
I agree.
Congrats Steffi on making it to no.14 under these adverse circumstances. :worship:

too....always the same song

alfajeffster
Oct 30th, 2005, 01:05 PM
On Tracy Austin: "I can't stand her!"
On Billie Jean King: "I just don't like her."
On Steffi Graf: "I just don't like her."
On Virginia Wade: "I cant stand her voice."

Danči Dementia
Oct 30th, 2005, 05:16 PM
01. Jackie Joyner-Kersee............. Track & Field
02. Babe Didrikson Zaharias.......... Track & Field
03. Billie Jean King................. Tennis
04. Sonja Henie...................... Figure Skating
05. Martina Navratilova.............. Tennis
05. Chris Evert...................... Tennis
07. Bonnie Blair..................... Speed Skating
08. Wilma Rudolph.................... Track & Field
09. Nadia Comaneci................... Gymnastics
10. Tracy Caulkins................... Swimming
11. Florence Griffith Joyner......... Track & Field
12. Mia Hamm......................... Soccer
13. Nancy Lopez...................... Golf
14. Steffi Graf...................... Tennis
15. Cheryl Miller.................... Basketball
16. Margaret Court................... Tennis
17. Mary T. Meagher.................. Swimming
18. Olga Korbut...................... Gymnastics
19. Peggy Fleming.................... Figure Skating
20. Joan Benoit Samuelson............ Distance Running
21. Dawn Fraser...................... Swimming
22. Teresa Edwards................... Basketball
23. Julie Krone...................... Horse Racing
24. Ann Meyers....................... Basketball
25. Jean Driscoll.................... Wheelchair Racing
26. Fanny Blankers-Koen.............. Track & Field
27. Mickey Wright.................... Golf
28. Maureen Connolly................. Tennis
29. Janet Evans...................... Swimmer
30. Althea Gibson.................... Tennis
31. Mary Decker Slaney............... Track & Field
32. Dorothy Hamill................... Figure Skating
33. Suzanne Lenglen.................. Tennis
34. Lyubov Egorova................... Cross Country Skiing
35. Kathy Whitworth.................. Golf
36. Larissa Latynina................. Gymnastics
37. Grete Waitz...................... Distance running
38. Katarina Witt.................... Figure Skating
39. Amy Van Dyken.................... Swimming
40. Michelle Akers................... Soccer
41. Pat McCormick.................... Diving
42. Gertrude Ederle.................. Swimming
43. Wyomia Tyus...................... Track and Field
44. Nancy Lieberman-Cline............ Basketball
45. Picabo Street.................... Skiing
46. Anne Donovan..................... Basketball
47. Tenley Albright.................. Figure Skating
48. Lynn Hill........................ Rock Climbing
49. Rosi Mittermaier................. Skiing
50. Susan Butcher.................... Dogsledding
51. Nera White....................... Basketball
52. Helen Wills Moody Roark.......... Tennis
53. Ruffian.......................... Horse Racing
54. Chamique Holdsclaw............... Basketball
55. Lisa Fernandez................... Softball
56. Anita DeFrantz................... Rowing
57. Mary Lou Retton.................. Gymnastics
58. Marion Jones..................... Track & Field
59. Annemarie Moser-Proll............ Skiing
60. Paula Newby-Fraser............... Triathlete
61. Shirley Muldowney................ Auto Racing
62. Jenny Thompson................... Swimming
63. Dawn Riley....................... Sailing
64. Carol Blazejowski................ Basketball
65. Ann Trason....................... Ultramarathon
66. Lynn Jennings.................... Middle Distance Running
67. Shirley Babashoff................ Swimming
68. Kornelia Ender................... Swimming
69. Flo (Flora) Hyman................ Volleyball
70. Hassiba Boulmerka................ Track and Field
71. Connie Carpenter................. Speed Skating and Cycling
72. Evonne Goolagong Cawley.......... Tennis
73. Alice Coachman................... Track and Field
74. Silken Laumann................... Rowing
75. Alice Marble..................... Tennis
76. Lisa Andersen.................... Surfer
77. Manon Rheaume.................... Hockey
78. Tegla Loroupe.................... Running
79. Willye White..................... Track and Field
80. Ailleen Riggin Soule............. Swimming and Diving
81. Lynette Woodard.................. Basketball
82. Donna de Varona.................. Swimming
83. Helene Mayer..................... Fencing
84. Donna Lopiano.................... Athlete and Administrator
85. Kristin Otto..................... Swimming
86. Sheila Young..................... Speedskating and Cycling
87. Sheryl Swoopes................... Basketball
88. Juli Furtado..................... Mountain Biking
89. Louise Suggs..................... Golf
90. Cynthia Cooper................... Basketball
91. Camille Duvall................... Waterskiing
92. Fu Mingxia....................... Diving
93. Lyn St. James.................... Auto Racing
94. Marion Ladewig................... Bowling
95. Nancy Kerrigan & Tonya Harding... Figure Skating
96. Cammi Granato.................... Hockey
97. Jeannie Longo-Ciprelli........... Cycling
98. Ila Borders...................... Baseball
99. Margo Oberg...................... Surfing
100. Dorothy Kamenshek............... Baseball

WHAT THE HELL SORENSTAM IS NOT THERE OH C`MON :fiery: :fiery: :fiery:
they forget also to SVETLANA KHORKINA an i`m even more :fiery: :fiery: :fiery: for that 7 OLIMPIC MEDALS, 3 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS(more than any female or male ) an 3 EUROPEANS( share record with Comaneci) an what about bars she won EVERYTHING there even when she is tall :worship: and Mary Lou Retton is there with Just a gold in the olympics taht she won becuase the soviets din`t went there someone please kill me and Im saying this because I love gymnastics too.and Khorkina is the best of the last decade.

Danči Dementia
Oct 30th, 2005, 05:17 PM
It has to be an american magazine

hablo
Oct 30th, 2005, 05:39 PM
they forget also to SVETLANA KHORKINA
:eek:

XMan
Oct 30th, 2005, 06:39 PM
As for Graf, what's been her lasting impact on tennis? Is tennis bigger and better than ever in a small country like Germany for her presence? Or is Germany losing some of it'sbigger tournaments for lack of interest? Or do you think Graf had a greater impact on tennis than Evert?

It says a lot about the American world view if they believe that the 14th biggest country in the world with a population of +82 million is considered "small".

Martian Willow
Oct 30th, 2005, 06:56 PM
...blah blah blah...

Being American might explain the lists stupidity, but it doesn't excuse it, or make it any less ridiculous or pointless.

daffodil
Oct 30th, 2005, 06:58 PM
The FO 92 final (Seles-Graf) was voted by journalists as the greatest women's match in the open era.
The Wim 92 final (Graf-Seles) showed us what a female can do on a tennis court. :worship: :worship:
The Wim 93 final (Graf-Novotna) is perhaps the 2nd most remembered women's tennis match of all time today.
The Wim 95 final (Graf-ASV) brought the most famous game (the 11th in the 3rd) ever in a women's Wimbledon match.
The USO 95 final (Graf-Seles) most probably had the most anticipated and dramatic confrontation ever in women's tennis since Cannes 1926.
The FO 96 final (Graf-ASV) was one of the 3 best ever FO finals ever.

Six absolute classics of the women's game.
All within 5 years. All with Graf in them.

Where are the classics in the Willy years?
Where are they?
Where .... ?

Just because she played classic matches doesn't mean she dumped TV ratings, especially in the US.

daffodil
Oct 30th, 2005, 06:59 PM
No, REALLY ... ?

What makes you think so???

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Billie Jean and Martina N. should have been ranked higher on the list than Graf whether it's a US based list or not.

Billie Jean King did more for women's tennis than everybody in the sport combined.

The list is the Top 100 Female Athletes Ever! Martina Navratilova has the numbers to prove that she was the best in Singles AND doubles.

Calimero377
Oct 30th, 2005, 07:13 PM
Just because she played classic matches doesn't mean she dumped TV ratings, especially in the US.


Well, please check the TV ratings in the U.S. for the Wimbledon finals in the 90ies and today.

Graf-ASV, Wimbledon 95, was surpassed only once (Venus-Serena, Wim 02).
Fact.
Live with it ... :lol: :lol: :lol:

BTW, when Graf played Navratilova at YEC 1989, a 18,000 capacity crowd wanted to watch them. Graf-Sabatini at YEC 1987 had almost the same crowd.

Do you think a Serena-Venus match could draw a comparable crowd today?
:lol: :lol: :lol: