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CanadianBoy21
Oct 4th, 2005, 09:28 PM
I've only have enough read to give my opinion on German literature.

Germany;
Hermann Hesse
Thomas Mann
Franz Kafka

There is of course Goethe and Schiller, etc... But that is my opinion.
Anyone got anything else, and what about other countries?

tennislover
Oct 4th, 2005, 09:59 PM
Italy:
Dante Alighieri
Boccaccio
Alessandro Manzoni

MisterQ
Oct 5th, 2005, 12:11 AM
I wanted to take a crack at Russia, but I can't narrow it down to three! :bigcry:

Surely these are shoe-ins:

Pushkin
Dostoevsky
Tolstoy

but I also love Gogol, Chekhov, Pasternak, Akhmatova, Solzhenitsyn... :cool:

CanadianBoy21
Oct 5th, 2005, 09:15 AM
Thanks for the replies.
I've read some of Solzhenitsyn, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov. It's hard to narrow it down.
Any more. I went to the Noble Prize literature site, and I'd like to read more of those who won. I only read Hesse and Mann, and I'd like to read more good books, suggestions?

Tenisci
Oct 5th, 2005, 09:16 AM
Orhan Pamuk, Turkey :)

Halardfan
Oct 5th, 2005, 10:19 AM
For Britain, my picks...

Charles Dickens
HG Wells
George Orwell

I adore Dickens, and Im hoping to work my way through all his novels...it may take a while! :)

VivalaSeles
Oct 5th, 2005, 10:25 AM
Portugal

Camões
Eça de Queiroz
Fernando Pessoa

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 5th, 2005, 10:36 AM
For the UK I'd be going with Shakespeare, Milton and .... finding a third one is hard, too many to choose from. :scratch: I suppose Dickens is the obvious third choice (factoring out Joyce and Yeats as Irish). But what about Chaucer, Donne, Pope ... Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Byron (what a generation or two that was... the great Romantics :worship: ), Jane Austen, Tennyson, Thomas Hardy, D.H. Lawrence ... and you could even consider the likes of Emily Bronte, Wells (yes, good call), J.R.R. Tolkien, whatever ....

Sam L
Oct 5th, 2005, 10:43 AM
American:

Mark Twain
Henry James
Tennessee Williams

Lindsayfan
Oct 5th, 2005, 10:55 AM
Italy: I'd add leopardi and petrarca
france: hugo, balzac, molière, proust

~ The Leopard ~
Oct 5th, 2005, 11:07 AM
I wonder who'd we say for Australia. Too young to have much in the way of "great" authors. I guess Patrick White.

Veritas
Oct 5th, 2005, 11:23 AM
I like Albert Camus (French? Albanian?) and Agatha Christie (British), but I guess they're not as "deep" compared to the other authors listed above...

Nicjac
Oct 5th, 2005, 11:43 AM
Switzerland:
Friedrich Dürrenmatt
Max Frisch
Erich Maria Remarque (well, he had the Swiss citizenship)

spokenword73
Oct 5th, 2005, 11:52 AM
American:

Mark Twain
Henry James
Tennessee Williams

:yeah:

I would add: John Steinbeck, Edgar Allen Poe and Richard Wright:cool:

manu32
Oct 5th, 2005, 12:13 PM
american also:

scott fitzgerald
william faulkner.....
henry miller
but i think henry james is an english author...

manu32
Oct 5th, 2005, 12:14 PM
french:
flaubert
stendahl
camus
proust

vancouverite
Oct 5th, 2005, 12:52 PM
Spain:
Cervantes
Garcia Lorca
Lope de Vega
Canada:
Margaret Atwood
Robertson Davies
Gabrielle Roy
England (novelists only):
Fielding
Austen
Dickens

And yes, Henry James died a British subject, but was born in the U.S. Not sure how that categorises him?

Lovely thread!:)

spokenword73
Oct 5th, 2005, 01:12 PM
British:

Charlotte Bronte
Emily Bronte
Charles Dickens
Agatha Christie
William Shakespeare

Irish:
James Joyce

French
Alexander Dumas

Not sure if he is German, but...
Franz Kafka




:wavey:

Justineladivine
Oct 5th, 2005, 01:22 PM
I've only have enough read to give my opinion on German literature.

Germany;
Hermann Hesse
Thomas Mann
Franz Kafka

There is of course Goethe and Schiller, etc... But that is my opinion.
Anyone got anything else, and what about other countries?

Sorry for being pedantic Kafka did indeed write in German but he was Austro-Hungarian not German (and even so at a time when Bohemia was part of the Hapsburg Empire as Czechoslovakia only existed after World War I)
Anyway, I'll try for Belgium
Maurice Maeterlinck
Emile Verhaeren
Hendrik Conscience

Justineladivine
Oct 5th, 2005, 01:25 PM
american also:

scott fitzgerald
william faulkner.....
henry miller
but i think henry james is an english author...

Second pedantic moment by JLD today. He was born in America but came to live in England and eventually took British nationality like T.S. Eliot

Ellery
Oct 5th, 2005, 01:32 PM
France:

de Balzac
Dumas
Hugo (and Flaubert, Stendhal)

spokenword73
Oct 5th, 2005, 01:39 PM
great thread, indeed. please for some of us not familiar with a writer, name their most famous work.:wavey:


Botswana:
Bessie Head "When Rain Clouds Gather"

Zimabawe (Scotish descent)
Alexander Smith McCall "The Number One Ladies Detective Agency"

CanadianBoy21
Oct 5th, 2005, 02:12 PM
Thanks for the correction Justineladivine. :)

Hermann Hesse - The Glass Bead Game.

Amazing book IMO. I read it in the summer but had to work a lot so read it in like two months. I bought it recently and look forward to reading it in few days and really grasping the whole of it.

Josh
Oct 5th, 2005, 02:37 PM
For Belgium I would say :

Louis Paul Boon
Hugo Claus
Maurice Maeterlinck

Wigglytuff
Oct 5th, 2005, 02:52 PM
rowling,
shakespeare,
and
kafka

Hulet
Oct 5th, 2005, 02:53 PM
Thanks for the replies.
I've read some of Solzhenitsyn, Dostoyevsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov. It's hard to narrow it down.
Any more. I went to the Noble Prize literature site, and I'd like to read more of those who won. I only read Hesse and Mann, and I'd like to read more good books, suggestions?
Did you read Gunter Grass (German) and Elfriedie Jelinek(Austrian) yet? They both won Nobel prizes and are brilliant writers. They write about real historical horrors but with contrasting styles. Books that I suggest are:
-Tin Drum or the whole Danzig Trilogy( by GG)
-Wonderful, wonderful times (by EJ)
-CrabWalk (by GG)
-Local Anestethic (by GG)
-The Piano Teacher (by EJ)

Hulet
Oct 5th, 2005, 02:58 PM
...

Irish:
James Joyce

...


:wavey:
I really would like to read Joyce and I have tried numerous times to do so. But, with in two pages, I start yawning and put the book down. I think he is very hard to read or atleast for a non-native English speaker. :(

spokenword73
Oct 5th, 2005, 03:03 PM
I really would like to read Joyce and I have tried numerous times to do so. But, with in two pages, I start yawning and put the book down. I think he is very hard to read or atleast for a non-native English speaker. :(

I agree Joyce is no joke. I listen to "Books on CD" so when I "read" "Dubliners" it was like listening to a play.:)

Hulet
Oct 5th, 2005, 03:09 PM
Oh, may be I will do that. I actually have never tried any "books on tapes" so I don't know if it will help.

spokenword73
Oct 5th, 2005, 03:12 PM
Hearing books is an enlightening experience, especially if the narrator is dramatic and engaging.

best best better
Oct 5th, 2005, 03:18 PM
American:

Walt Whitman
(Not an author I know but is a part of great American literally imo)

Hulet
Oct 5th, 2005, 03:25 PM
Hearing books is an enlightening experience, especially if the narrator is dramatic and engaging.I don't know why, but I always thought somehow listening to the "book on tape" cheapens the book even though I have never tried it. May be it's because reading books is kind of an intimate (for lack of a better word) experience for me where there is no intermediary voice between the story and I except for the narrator in the story. Even that narrator could sometimes be a bit too much. I want to get to the characters in the book as close as possible. And, besides there is a difference in how much I get involved in the story when I read it with my eyes (which seems to involve my whole sensory experience too) and when I listen to it (which isn't as absorbing).

That said, I will give this "books on tape" thing a shot for Joyce books because there is no other way that I could read them anyways.

spokenword73
Oct 5th, 2005, 03:37 PM
I know what you mean. I love books and I do feel a little guilty listening to books on tape. I know I should be letting my imagination take over in terms of how a character says what he or she says, setting, etc.

Listening on cd, I confess, is quicker and since I drive long drives to work every day, they are great company.

tennisbum79
Oct 5th, 2005, 03:38 PM
french:
flaubert
stendahl
camus
proust

Add
Voltaire
Rousseau

propi
Oct 5th, 2005, 03:46 PM
From Spain...
Miguel de Cervantes
Antonio Machado
Pío Baroja

with mentions to Cela, Valle Inclán, Quevedo/Góngora, Lorca, Pérez Galdós and a very long etc.

MisterQ
Oct 5th, 2005, 04:49 PM
I really would like to read Joyce and I have tried numerous times to do so. But, with in two pages, I start yawning and put the book down. I think he is very hard to read or atleast for a non-native English speaker. :(

Don't worry, he's extremely hard, even for an English speaker. Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is doable, although a bit tough. I enjoyed that book, actually. Ulysses is even harder, and longer. Finnegan's Wake is for literary scholars only! :lol: ;)

MisterQ
Oct 5th, 2005, 04:54 PM
I went to the Noble Prize literature site, and I'd like to read more of those who won. I only read Hesse and Mann, and I'd like to read more good books, suggestions?



Lots of great authors on that list, no doubt. I haven't read most of them. But I recommend these VERY highly:

Boris Pasternak: Dr. Zhivago :worship:
Gabriel Garcia Marquez: 100 Years of Solitude :bowdown:
Toni Morrison: Beloved :yeah:

tennislover
Oct 5th, 2005, 07:58 PM
Italy: I'd add leopardi and petrarca


right

CanadianBoy21
Oct 5th, 2005, 09:42 PM
thanks for your replies, i'm into reading and have the time, so I'll definitely take your suggestions.

Sam L
Oct 6th, 2005, 12:39 PM
I wonder who'd we say for Australia. Too young to have much in the way of "great" authors. I guess Patrick White.
True. Peter Carey? I can't think of anyone else actually. That's bad. lol

England

Jane Austen
William Makepeace Thackeray
E.M. Forster

Lady
Oct 6th, 2005, 01:33 PM
I wanted to take a crack at Russia, but I can't narrow it down to three! :bigcry:

Surely these are shoe-ins:

Pushkin
Dostoevsky
Tolstoy

but I also love Gogol, Chekhov, Pasternak, Akhmatova, Solzhenitsyn... :cool:

Pushkin, for sure!
Which Tolstoy? ;) there were 3 of them. :p
Dostoevsky is more popular abroad then in Russia. :lol:

Justineladivine
Oct 6th, 2005, 02:32 PM
Pushkin, for sure!
Which Tolstoy? ;) there were 3 of them. :p
Dostoevsky is more popular abroad then in Russia. :lol:

Is he really? Well, Dostoevsky is with Chekhov one of my five favourite writers. I must have read The Idiot (I know, I know, suits me perfectly, some people will say) at least fifty times and never got tired of it.
Gogol is also a great writer. The only great Russian writer I've always found boring is Lev Tolstoy.

MisterQ
Oct 6th, 2005, 04:49 PM
Pushkin, for sure!
Which Tolstoy? ;) there were 3 of them. :p


:lol: Leo, the one who wrote that really big book... ;)

MisterQ
Oct 6th, 2005, 04:56 PM
OMG, you could read all of War and Peace online! :rolls:

http://www.friends-partners.org/oldfriends/literature/war_and_peace/war-peace_intro.html


Get to it! ;)

tennislover
Oct 6th, 2005, 08:20 PM
OMG, you could read all of War and Peace online! :rolls:

http://www.friends-partners.org/oldfriends/literature/war_and_peace/war-peace_intro.html


Get to it! ;)

all of War and Peace? :eek: :lol:

great link!!! but i noticed that the sentences in French language are translated into English as well :confused:

MisterQ
Oct 13th, 2005, 06:07 PM
British playwright Harold Pinter has won this year's Nobel Prize in Literature.

http://edition.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/europe/10/13/nobel.pinter/index.html