PDA

View Full Version : Please Pray For The People of New Orleans, Biloxi, Slidell, Gulfport, et al


Mother_Marjorie
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:09 PM
Here is what is known today:

1. The water continues to rise, as the 17th street levy was breached near the center city two blocks long, as water from Lake Ponchartrain continues to pour in.

2. 80% of New Orleans, Orleans Parish underwater. In some places, over 20 feet of water. Metairie, Kenner and Jefferson Parish is completely submerged. Over 40,000 homes in St. Bernard Parish has been completely destroyed and the Parish is submerged.

The less affected areas are the New Orleans Central Business district, Uptown and French Quarter (albeit, drier and less damage than other parts of the city).

3. New Orleans East is 100% submerged and totally destroyed. The twin spans (Interstate 10) which is the only major connection between New Orleans proper and the New Orleans East suburbs (heading toward MS, Fl, etc.) is totally destroyed. There is no longer an I-10 heading east out of New Orleans.

The lower 9th ward is completely devistated and destroyed...flooded.

4. The director of FEMA in New Orleans has said it is the worst devistation of a major metropolitan area he has seen as a result of natural disaster.

5. The Mayor of New Orleans has said that power will not be restored for at least 4-6 weeks. There is no drinking water in New Orleans and surrounding parishes.

6. The Mayor of New Orleans has said that widespread and catastropic loss of life has occured, as reported by Fire, Police and National Guard troops who have witnessed dead bodies floating in flood waters. It could take weeks to recover all the bodies.

7. The National Guard is in the process of setting up temporary morgues.

Of the people who stayed in New Orleans during Katrina in the face of mandatory evacuation are thousands of impoverished people who were too poor to afford transportation to leave the city. They had no resources. Unfortunately, these people are most likely the ones who have perished as a result of Hurricane Katrina.

For others who have also at one time lived in New Orleans, I know your heart is heavy today as well. New Orleans is a special place and if you've ever lived there, I don't need to explain why. :)

Please pray for those who have lost love ones as a result of Katrina and for the safety and well-being of the residents who are remaining in New Orleans, Biloxi, Gulfport, Slidell, Bay St. Louis, and any other municipality I've missed.

SelesFan70
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:18 PM
:sad: Thankfully, for NOLA, she veered East at the very last minute which is why Mississippi got hit so badly. I can't imagine the devastation if it was a direct hit. :sad:

But who are we praying to? The same god that sent the storm? :tape:

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:25 PM
But who are we praying to? The same god that sent the storm? :tape:

Good point.. Also.. The same god that has made those people so smart that they didn't leave under an order of mandatory evacuation?

Seriously.. Some things are beyond my understanding.. When a similar hurricane would strike before the middle of XXst century, that was really tough shit.. But these days? It was known that a very dangerous hurricane would strike the area 3 days in advance. It was known that it is going to be an absolute monster of hurricane two days in advance.. And still, some people would not leave..

Also.. They built the towns, cities, everything knowing what kind of place is that.. Has that kind of hurricane never happened before? Didn't they know that that kind of things is possible?

Rocketta
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:28 PM
Good point.. Also.. The same god that has made those people so smart that they didn't leave under an order of mandatory evacuation?

Seriously.. Some things are beyond my understanding.. When a similar hurricane would strike before the middle of XXst century, that was really tough shit.. But these days? It was known that a very dangerous hurricane would strike the area 3 days in advance. It was known that it is going to be an absolute monster of hurricane two days in advance.. And still, some people would not leave..

Also.. They built the towns, cities, everything knowing what kind of place is that.. Has that kind of hurricane never happened before? Didn't they know that that kind of things is possible?

yes, because it's so easy to leave when you don't have a car or you do have a car but no money so it ran out of gas after being stuck in traffic for 7 hours.

Take your negative ass somewhere else why don't you. With all your knowledge surely you have better things to do.



Guess not! :rolleyes:

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:31 PM
or you do have a car but no money so it ran out of gas after being stuck in traffic for 7 hours.

I guess you are not even aware of how nonsensical what you write is.. :lol:

Rocketta
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:32 PM
I guess you are not even aware of how nonsensical what you write is.. :lol:

I guess you are not even aware of how much shit you're full of? :lol:

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:33 PM
It's just awful, I can't watch the news without starting to cry, and you know how hard-hearted Helen is, so that's really saying something.

It's easy to blame people for not evacuating, until you're the one told to evacuate. Apart from money and the short period of time in which to flee, people sometimes don't want to leave their homes behind, and that can be hard. It's like you feel if you stay there, you can protect it from being destroyed.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:39 PM
It's easy to blame people for not evacuating, until you're the one told to evacuate. Apart from money and the short period of time in which to flee, people sometimes don't want to leave their homes behind, and that can be hard. It's like you feel if you stay there, you can protect it from being destroyed.

Sure, we can't but sympathise with those people, because of sentiental reason, but we have to admit that not leaving was clearly not a smart thing to do. Irresponsible thing to do..

Maybe it is just me, as I generally don't give a fuck about property, mine or someone's else.. There is only one irreversible damage - and that's loss of lives, and that could have been totally, totally avoided.

And when someone's first refuses to evacuate and then they are crying over loss of a loved one, all we can say is "That sucks, guys, but it was you who have made that choice"..

SelesFan70
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:43 PM
It's just awful, I can't watch the news without starting to cry, and you know how hard-hearted Helen is, so that's really saying something.

It's easy to blame people for not evacuating, until you're the one told to evacuate. Apart from money and the short period of time in which to flee, people sometimes don't want to leave their homes behind, and that can be hard. It's like you feel if you stay there, you can protect it from being destroyed.

Houses can be rebuilt (although I"m not sure I'd rebuild in a city that is 25ft under sea level)...memories can be handed down to the next generation by word of mouth...but you can't keep your house from being destroyed by staying there. At least evacuate to a shelter if you can't leave the city. They were giving free bus rides to residents in NOLA.

However, I am going to send money because I'm sure "the International community" won't be helping us out....they never do. Ironic, huh? :o

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:44 PM
Sure, we can't but sympathise with those people, because of sentiental reason, but we have to admit that not leaving was clearly not a smart thing to do. Irresponsible thing to do..

Maybe it is just me, as I generally don't give a fuck about property, mine or someone's else.. There is only one irreversible damage - and that's loss of lives, and that could have been totally, totally avoided.

And when someone's first refuses to evacuate and then they are crying over loss of a loved one, all we can say is "That sucks, guys, but it was you who have made that choice"..

I'm just saying, I don't know if you've ever been evacuated before, but it majorly sucks big time, to spend hours and hours on a highway with nowhere to go, hotels booked everywhere, mass panic and hysteria, and rain coming. And it turns out to be a false alarm sometimes, or it veers elsewhere at the last minute. So it's real tempting to stay at home and risk it. Would Helen have gotten the hell out of Dodge for Katrina? Of course, but I can understand people staying put, some people don't want to walk away from everything in their life in a house. I don't know if you own a house, but when you do, at least for me, you do feel like you can't abandon it.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:48 PM
However, I am going to send money because I'm sure "the International community" won't be helping us out....they never do. Ironic, huh? :o

Well, that's those people - Alabama, Mississipi and Luisiana, who overwhelmingly voted for current administration, that wasted our surplus and spent money on a meaningless war, money that will completely dwarf the material losses after Katrina. The money that could have been used to help these very people.. Surely, what they are going to get from this administrattion will be just scraps comparing to what it could have been..

SelesFan70
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:51 PM
Well, that's those people - Alabama, Mississipi and Luisiana, who overwhelmingly voted for current administration, that wasted our surplus and spent money on a meaningless war, money that will completely dwarf the material losses after Katrina. The money that could have been used to help these very people.. Surely, what they are going to get from this administrattion will be just scraps comparing to what it could have been..

I disagree...they will get what they need and then some I"m sure.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:55 PM
I'm just saying, I don't know if you've ever been evacuated before, but it majorly sucks big time, to spend hours and hours on a highway with nowhere to go, hotels booked everywhere, mass panic and hysteria, and rain coming. And it turns out to be a false alarm sometimes, or it veers elsewhere at the last minute.

And you know? That's another payment for choices that America makes. We chose to completely neglect a development of system of public transportation. Of course, the highway system of any US city is not designed for mass evacuation by cars. But 2000 buses would have made the same job just fine. with no problem whatsoever. Could they find themselves 2000 buses? Easily.

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 04:58 PM
And you know? That's another payment for choices that America makes. We chose to completely neglect a development of system of public transportation. Of course, the highway system of any US city is not designed for mass evacuation by cars. But 2000 buses would have made the same job just fine. with no problem whatsoever. Could they find themselves 2000 buses? Easily.

Yes, I do know. The next time, I'm just flying the fuck out of here, to hell with it.

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:08 PM
Sure, we can't but sympathise with those people, because of sentiental reason, but we have to admit that not leaving was clearly not a smart thing to do. Irresponsible thing to do..

Maybe it is just me, as I generally don't give a fuck about property, mine or someone's else.. There is only one irreversible damage - and that's loss of lives, and that could have been totally, totally avoided.

And when someone's first refuses to evacuate and then they are crying over loss of a loved one, all we can say is "That sucks, guys, but it was you who have made that choice"..

Imagine being on a fixed income, or barely that, without transportation. Its the end of the month and you don't have any money left until the first of the month.

The mayor tells you to evacuate, but you have no money, no car, and cannot afford to go any place other than your home. It takes money to leave, and you can't afford to stay in a hotel somewhere else, even if you had money for a bus out of town.

Many of these people live day-to-day, sometimes going without food until their next check comes.

WHAT IN THE FUCK ARE THEY SUPPOSED TO DO?

For those who had the ability to leave and had insurance, they can rebuild their lives easily. For those who didn't, rebuilding and just surviving is a monstrous challenge. And unfortunately, some lost their lives because of it.

In these types of catastrophies, it is always the poor that suffer the most. And I'm not talking about losing homes. I'm talking about basic survival, if that was possible for some.

SelesFan70
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:14 PM
Imagine being on a fixed income, or barely that, without transportation. Its the end of the month and you don't have any money left until the first of the month.

The mayor tells you to evacuate, but you have no money, no car, and cannot afford to go any place other than your home. It takes money to leave, and you can't afford to stay in a hotel somewhere else, even if you had money for a bus out of town.

Many of these people live day-to-day, sometimes going without food until their next check comes.

WHAT IN THE FUCK ARE THEY SUPPOSED TO DO?

For those who had the ability to leave and had insurance, they can rebuild their lives easily. For those who didn't, rebuilding and just surviving is a monstrous challenge. And unfortunately, some lost their lives because of it.

In these types of catastrophies, it is always the poor that suffer the most. And I'm not talking about losing homes. I'm talking about basic survival, if that was possible for some.

What's odd is that there ARE some many poor people in NOLA with all the tourist money the city attracts. Something is broken there. But let's not focus on just NOLA...Biloxi/Gulfport, MS was MORE devastated than NOLA...and not to mention the parishes outside and south of NOLA. :sad:

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:15 PM
However, I am going to send money because I'm sure "the International community" won't be helping us out....they never do. Ironic, huh? :o

http://www.redcross.org/

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:16 PM
Imagine being on a fixed income, or barely that, without transportation. Its the end of the month and you don't have any money left until the first of the month.

The mayor tells you to evacuate, but you have no money, no car, and cannot afford to go any place other than your home. It takes money to leave, and you can't afford to stay in a hotel somewhere else, even if you had money for a bus out of town.

It was mandatory evacuation.. Meaning that the goverment must have given everyone means to evacuate.. It must have been made as simple as jumping in the bus with some miminal bags taken with you.. Everyone who wanted to evacuate, managed to do that. That's I am quite sure about.

SelesFan70
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:17 PM
http://www.redcross.org/

:worship:

Tratree
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:17 PM
Wow...I never heard the "stupid" people of Banda Aceh chided because they lived along the coast. Ignorant people...didn't they know tsunamis could happen. And then we have degrading people because of how they voted (like they deserve not to get aid?) as if that mattered a hill of beans right now. The humanity is really underwhelming on this board sometimes.

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:21 PM
What's odd is that there ARE some many poor people in NOLA with all the tourist money the city attracts. Something is broken there. But let's not focus on just NOLA...Biloxi/Gulfport, MS was MORE devastated than NOLA...and not to mention the parishes outside and south of NOLA. :sad:

There are several dozen reported having lost their lives in Mississippi and Alabama.

Even more unfortunate will be estimated hundreds that lost their lives in the greater New Orleans area.

The devistation along the entire Gulf Coast is horrible. 1.3 million refugees who won't be allowed back for quite some. In most cases, there is nothing to return to.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:29 PM
Wow...I never heard the "stupid" people of Banda Aceh chided because they lived along the coast. Ignorant people...didn't they know tsunamis could happen.


Demagogy is an American virtue.. I've always thought so.. :lol: Do you put an equality sign between an earthquake that happens suddenly and the hurricane whose impact was precalculated days in advance and whose possible strength was known centuries in advance? Several leevies failed, several pumps failed.. Don't you think that even 1 billion taken from Iraqi war bill and directed to enhance those facilities would not have made it much less of a disaster? Living in a danger area is a gamble.. If you decide to live there without sufficient preparation , you are playing a Russian Roulette, and a Russian Roulette chances are always on your side, but sometimes you lose..

And then we have degrading people because of how they voted

Americans do find the mass murder of Hiroshima people a punishment appropriate enough for mere supporting of the Japanese government who ordered to attack Pearl-Harbour, don't they?

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:31 PM
Does anyone else find it ironic that those link-ads at the top of this thread, which apparently try to match the content of each post, are advertising New Orleans hotels and resorts?

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:34 PM
Does anyone else find it ironic that those link-ads at the top of this thread, which apparently try to match the content of each post, are advertising New Orleans hotels and resorts?

The prices for those are surely going down now..

Wigglytuff
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:35 PM
Here is what is known today:

1. The water continues to rise, as the 17th street levy was breached near the center city two blocks long, as water from Lake Ponchartrain continues to pour in.

2. 80% of New Orleans, Orleans Parish underwater. In some places, over 20 feet of water. Metairie, Kenner and Jefferson Parish is completely submerged. Over 40,000 homes in St. Bernard Parish has been completely destroyed and the Parish is submerged.

The less affected areas are the New Orleans Central Business district, Uptown and French Quarter (albeit, drier and less damage than other parts of the city).

3. New Orleans East is 100% submerged and totally destroyed. The twin spans (Interstate 10) which is the only major connection between New Orleans proper and the New Orleans East suburbs (heading toward MS, Fl, etc.) is totally destroyed. There is no longer an I-10 heading east out of New Orleans.

The lower 9th ward is completely devistated and destroyed...flooded.

4. The director of FEMA in New Orleans has said it is the worst devistation of a major metropolitan area he has seen as a result of natural disaster.

5. The Mayor of New Orleans has said that power will not be restored for at least 4-6 weeks. There is no drinking water in New Orleans and surrounding parishes.

6. The Mayor of New Orleans has said that widespread and catastropic loss of life has occured, as reported by Fire, Police and National Guard troops who have witnessed dead bodies floating in flood waters. It could take weeks to recover all the bodies.

7. The National Guard is in the process of setting up temporary morgues.

Of the people who stayed in New Orleans during Katrina in the face of mandatory evacuation are thousands of impoverished people who were too poor to afford transportation to leave the city. They had no resources. Unfortunately, these people are most likely the ones who have perished as a result of Hurricane Katrina.

For others who have also at one time lived in New Orleans, I know your heart is heavy today as well. New Orleans is a special place and if you've ever lived there, I don't need to explain why. :)

Please pray for those who have lost love ones as a result of Katrina and for the safety and well-being of the residents who are remaining in New Orleans, Biloxi, Gulfport, Slidell, Bay St. Louis, and any other municipality I've missed.
thats so much worse than i thought it would be. :(
:sad: :sad:

my prays definately go out to them.

Rocketta
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:40 PM
It was mandatory evacuation.. Meaning that the goverment must have given everyone means to evacuate.. It must have been made as simple as jumping in the bus with some miminal bags taken with you.. Everyone who wanted to evacuate, managed to do that. That's I am quite sure about.



Thousands Pack New Orleans' Superdome To Flee Katrina

August 28, 2005

By KOMO Staff & News Services (WebTeam@komo4news.com)
http://www.komotv.com/news/images/superdome_082805.jpg




NEW ORLEANS - For thousands of this city's poor, homeless and frail, just getting into the massive Louisiana Superdome and hunkering down was the hardest part.

The sickest among them didn't flee the 160-mph wrath of Hurricane Katrina on Sunday as much as they hobbled to safety on crutches, canes and on stretchers. Others lined up for blocks, clutching meager belongings and crying children as National Guardsman searched them for guns, knives and drugs.

"We just took the necessities," said Michael Skipper, who pulled a wagon loaded with bags of clothes and a radio. "The good stuff - the television and the furniture - you just have to hope something's there when you get back. If it's not, you just start over."

Then Katrina's rain began, heavy and steady, drenching hundreds of people still outside, along with their bags of food and clothing.

Eventually, the searches were moved inside to the Superdome floor, where some people wrapped themselves in blankets and tried to sleep. In the designated medical area, people in wheelchairs lined the corridors. Hundreds of others sat on the loading docks, their possessions around them, waiting to be taken elsewhere.

Gen. Hunt Downer of the National Guard estimated 25,000 to 35,000 refugees were in the dome, though arena official Doug Thornton said it was closer to 9,000 in the stands, with more on the floor.

Mary Francis Brooks had been there since 7:30 a.m., just waiting to get in. "I don't think the storm can be much worse than the buildup here," she said. "This has been a nightmare."

New Orleans' most frail residents got priority for placement in the makeshift Superdome shelter, by far the most solid of the Big Easy's 10 refuges of last resort for the estimated 100,000 city residents who don't have the means, or strength to join a mandatory evacuation. By nightfall, an estimated 25,000 to 35,000 heeded the call.

The dome, with its bare floor and stadium seats, is likely to end up their home for the next few days as the hurricane hits and the region deals with its aftermath.

"They told us not to stay in our houses because it wasn't safe," said 76-year-old Victoria Young, who sat amid plastic bags and a metal walker. "It's not safe anywhere when you're in the shape we're in."

Curtis Cockran, 54, a diabetic who recently had hip surgery, sat in his wheelchair on a loading dock at the dome while nurses, emergency technicians and doctors attended to refugees' needs.

"I just want a place I can be quiet and left alone," he said. "I don't know if I'll have a place to go back to, but there's no reason to worry about that now. For the time being I just want to be safe."

More serious cases had to be taken to other cities in Louisiana for medical care.

"There are some conditions we just can't handle here," said Dr. Kevin Stephens, Sr., head of New Orleans' health department. "Like dialysis. We can't do that, and they'll be here three or four days, so they'll need it before then."

The 77,000-seat stadium, home to the NFL's New Orleans Saints, provided few comforts but at least had bathrooms for the refugees and food donated by several charities.

"They may be here for a while," said Gen. Ralph Lupin, the National Guardsman in charge of the shelter. "The electricity will be out after the storm; streets will be almost impassable. So once they get here, they'll have to stay for the duration."

Guardsmen made able-bodied people clasp their hands behind their backs while they patted them down, feeling the seams and hems of clothing, then ran metal detectors over them. The backpacks, suitcases and plastic grocery bags that held their belongings were searched.

Alice George, 76, a homeless woman wearing shorts and a T-shirt with the word "Love" on the front, was searched for almost 10 minutes.

"They took my cigarettes and lighter," she said. "I guess I'll do without."

Joey Branson wasn't worried. The 42-year-old breezed through the search with just a fresh apple pie and a paperback mystery. "That's all I need," he said, smiling. "I'm set for the duration."

Rocketta
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:42 PM
Wow...I never heard the "stupid" people of Banda Aceh chided because they lived along the coast. Ignorant people...didn't they know tsunamis could happen. And then we have degrading people because of how they voted (like they deserve not to get aid?) as if that mattered a hill of beans right now. The humanity is really underwhelming on this board sometimes.

Yup it's sure not the people of Banda Aceh that's stupid...:tape:

Wigglytuff
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:46 PM
Thousands Pack New Orleans' Superdome To Flee Katrina

August 28, 2005

By KOMO Staff & News Services (WebTeam@komo4news.com)
http://www.komotv.com/news/images/superdome_082805.jpg




NEW ORLEANS - For thousands of this city's poor, homeless and frail, just getting into the massive Louisiana Superdome and hunkering down was the hardest part.

The sickest among them didn't flee the 160-mph wrath of Hurricane Katrina on Sunday as much as they hobbled to safety on crutches, canes and on stretchers. Others lined up for blocks, clutching meager belongings and crying children as National Guardsman searched them for guns, knives and drugs.

"We just took the necessities," said Michael Skipper, who pulled a wagon loaded with bags of clothes and a radio. "The good stuff - the television and the furniture - you just have to hope something's there when you get back. If it's not, you just start over."

Then Katrina's rain began, heavy and steady, drenching hundreds of people still outside, along with their bags of food and clothing.

Eventually, the searches were moved inside to the Superdome floor, where some people wrapped themselves in blankets and tried to sleep. In the designated medical area, people in wheelchairs lined the corridors. Hundreds of others sat on the loading docks, their possessions around them, waiting to be taken elsewhere.

Gen. Hunt Downer of the National Guard estimated 25,000 to 35,000 refugees were in the dome, though arena official Doug Thornton said it was closer to 9,000 in the stands, with more on the floor.

Mary Francis Brooks had been there since 7:30 a.m., just waiting to get in. "I don't think the storm can be much worse than the buildup here," she said. "This has been a nightmare."

New Orleans' most frail residents got priority for placement in the makeshift Superdome shelter, by far the most solid of the Big Easy's 10 refuges of last resort for the estimated 100,000 city residents who don't have the means, or strength to join a mandatory evacuation. By nightfall, an estimated 25,000 to 35,000 heeded the call.

The dome, with its bare floor and stadium seats, is likely to end up their home for the next few days as the hurricane hits and the region deals with its aftermath.

"They told us not to stay in our houses because it wasn't safe," said 76-year-old Victoria Young, who sat amid plastic bags and a metal walker. "It's not safe anywhere when you're in the shape we're in."

Curtis Cockran, 54, a diabetic who recently had hip surgery, sat in his wheelchair on a loading dock at the dome while nurses, emergency technicians and doctors attended to refugees' needs.

"I just want a place I can be quiet and left alone," he said. "I don't know if I'll have a place to go back to, but there's no reason to worry about that now. For the time being I just want to be safe."

More serious cases had to be taken to other cities in Louisiana for medical care.

"There are some conditions we just can't handle here," said Dr. Kevin Stephens, Sr., head of New Orleans' health department. "Like dialysis. We can't do that, and they'll be here three or four days, so they'll need it before then."

The 77,000-seat stadium, home to the NFL's New Orleans Saints, provided few comforts but at least had bathrooms for the refugees and food donated by several charities.

"They may be here for a while," said Gen. Ralph Lupin, the National Guardsman in charge of the shelter. "The electricity will be out after the storm; streets will be almost impassable. So once they get here, they'll have to stay for the duration."

Guardsmen made able-bodied people clasp their hands behind their backs while they patted them down, feeling the seams and hems of clothing, then ran metal detectors over them. The backpacks, suitcases and plastic grocery bags that held their belongings were searched.

Alice George, 76, a homeless woman wearing shorts and a T-shirt with the word "Love" on the front, was searched for almost 10 minutes.

"They took my cigarettes and lighter," she said. "I guess I'll do without."

Joey Branson wasn't worried. The 42-year-old breezed through the search with just a fresh apple pie and a paperback mystery. "That's all I need," he said, smiling. "I'm set for the duration."


:sad: :sad: :sad:

Avid Merrion
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:47 PM
take care everyone and stay safe :hug:

Wigglytuff
Aug 30th, 2005, 05:53 PM
i cant believe some of you are using this tragedy as soapbox from which to rant. i love soap boxing and ranting as much as the next person, but i do have boundaries and an understanding of the value of human lives.

dont be such evil pricks just because you dont know anyone who suffered because of this. those people are still human beings. seems like a stupid sentence, but some of you dont seem to get that.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 06:03 PM
i cant believe some of you are using this tragedy as soap to rant. i love soap boxing and ranting as much as the next person, but i do have boundaries and an understanding of the value of human lives.

dont be such evil pricks just because you dont know anyone who suffer because of this. those people are still human beings. seems like a stupid sentence, but some of you dont seem to get that.

Two things you can do about it..

If you can help them - do that. If you can't - the best you can do is draw some lesson from what happened to them.. so that won't happen to you or others..

I've seen much worse disasters than that.. thoiugh admittedly, we do not know the full scale of this one yet.. Basically, it seems to be a combination of people making wrong choices and monumental failure of the government to organize the evacuation in proper way. Failure on which level? I do not know.. Imagine that some terrorists would put a nuclear device in the middle of a city and say that it will be detonated in two days. In two days the city would be totally empty.. guaranteed.. Some people on all levels just failed to take this threat seriously.. and that's a bottomline..

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 06:09 PM
Personally, I think the main problem was that it started out as a chicken-shit storm and remained a tropical storm for too long a time, barely getting to Category 1 or a low 2 when it passed over South Florida causing relatively small damage and I think less than 10 deaths. When it strengthens at the last minute--as opposed to strengthening over the Eastern Caribbean--people are left dumbfounded.

SelesFan70
Aug 30th, 2005, 06:25 PM
Looting Begins in New Orleans
Aug 30 12:47 PM US/Eastern

By ALLEN G. BREED
Associated Press Writer


NEW ORLEANS
With much of the city emptied by Hurricane Katrina, some opportunists took advantage of the situation by looting stores.

At a Walgreen's drug store in the French Quarter, people were running out with grocery baskets and coolers full of soft drinks, chips and diapers.

When police finally showed up, a young boy stood in the door screaming, "86! 86!" _ the radio code for police _ and the crowd scattered.

Denise Bollinger, a tourist from Philadelphia, stood outside and snapped pictures in amazement.

"It's downtown Baghdad," the housewife said. "It's insane. I've wanted to come here for 10 years. I thought this was a sophisticated city. I guess not." :o

Around the corner on Canal Street, the main thoroughfare in the central business district, people sloshed headlong through hip-deep water as looters ripped open the steel gates on the front of several clothing and jewelry stores.

One man, who had about 10 pairs of jeans draped over his left arm, was asked if he was salvaging things from his store.

"No," the man shouted, "that's EVERYBODY'S store."

Looters filled industrial-sized garbage cans with clothing and jewelry and floated them down the street on bits of plywood and insulation as National Guard lumbered by.

Mike Franklin stood on the trolley tracks and watched the spectacle unfold.

"To be honest with you, people who are oppressed all their lives, man, it's an opportunity to get back at society," he said. :smash:

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 06:27 PM
What are they looting in, row boats?

I can understand looting the grocery store for food, though.

SelesFan70
Aug 30th, 2005, 06:38 PM
What are they looting in, row boats?

I can understand looting the grocery store for food, though.

Agreed. Is it "looting" if you're getting food for you and your family? The food is going to rot regardless. :shrug: However, the jeans and clothes are a little hard to justify, but they are probably all wet and mildewy and unsellable anyways. I'm not justifying looting, but this is a very, very, very bizarre case.

Barrie_Dude
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:02 PM
The French Quater and the Garden District survive! :woohoo:

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:08 PM
What are they looting in, row boats?

I can understand looting the grocery store for food, though.

And that's another mistake that authorities made. Seeing the level of disaster:

a) all items of first necessity should be taken from stores by authoriities and used as needed, they will be insured losses anyway..

b) curfew should have been declared, with remedy for any looting, like in any extreme situation, being a bullet between the eyes.. And after they could figure about who was oppressed and when..

Rtael
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:31 PM
Well my power went out for about a day and a half but I'm fine. I'm sure everyone is greatly relieved. :tape:

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:33 PM
Well my power went out for about a day and a half but I'm fine. I'm sure everyone is greatly relieved. :tape:

Good to know.. Must not have been a big deal..

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:34 PM
Well my power went out for about a day and a half but I'm fine. I'm sure everyone is greatly relieved. :tape:

I didn't know you were in the path, hon, glad you cheated death, literally.

Rtael
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:37 PM
Well I was pretty much right in the middle of the path, but I'm pretty far inland so it had weakened alot by the time it got here. Still lots of debris in the streets and a couple people died around here due to falling trees. :(

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:39 PM
Well I was pretty much right in the middle of the path, but I'm pretty far inland so it had weakened alot by the time it got here. Still lots of debris in the streets and a couple people died around here due to falling trees. :(

Did you tough it out at home? I was at home for a Category 3 once, it was scary as hell. I thought with every gust my roof would peel off or windows would start to break. It was awful.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:39 PM
Well I was pretty much right in the middle of the path, but I'm pretty far inland so it had weakened alot by the time it got here. Still lots of debris in the streets and a couple people died around here due to falling trees. :(

In which state you are?

Rtael
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:40 PM
Mississippi

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:42 PM
Mississippi

So, was it still a hurricane by the time it got to your place? How much of a wind was that?

Rtael
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:43 PM
I don't know, power was out so I couldn't watch the news, and I didn't feel like going outside and checking. :tape: I think it was atleast tropical storm force winds though, like 60+ MPH.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:54 PM
I don't know, power was out so I couldn't watch the news


batteries, batteries.. :)

and I didn't feel like going outside and checking. :tape: I think it was atleast tropical storm force winds though, like 60+ MPH.

That was a good choice.. But I would probably still opt to go out and check.. :)

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:56 PM
batteries, batteries.. :)



That was a good choice.. But I would probably still opt to go out and check.. :)

I went out during the eye once. I was ok with it for about 10 minutes and then I ran back inside. I wasn't scared of the wind picking me up, but slamming me to the ground and I didn't need a cut or scrape at that point. Plus, it's boring as hell sitting around inside a dark house, I had cabin fever!

Cam'ron Giles
Aug 30th, 2005, 07:56 PM
And that's another mistake that authorities made. Seeing the level of disaster:

a) all items of first necessity should be taken from stores by authoriities and used as needed, they will be insured losses anyway..

b) curfew should have been declared, with remedy for any looting, like in any extreme situation, being a bullet between the eyes.. And after they could figure about who was oppressed and when..

I would love to hear you suggestions to the Russian government about it's mafia problems.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:01 PM
I would love to hear you suggestions to the Russian government about it's mafia problems.

There is no suggestion that would work in this case .. as Russian mafia and Russian government are inseparable entities..

Rtael
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:01 PM
I went out during the eye once. I was ok with it for about 10 minutes and then I ran back inside. I wasn't scared of the wind picking me up, but slamming me to the ground and I didn't need a cut or scrape at that point. Plus, it's boring as hell sitting around inside a dark house, I had cabin fever!


I hear you. I was soooooo bored last night. :p

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:03 PM
I went out during the eye once. I was ok with it for about 10 minutes and then I ran back inside. I wasn't scared of the wind picking me up, but slamming me to the ground and I didn't need a cut or scrape at that point. Plus, it's boring as hell sitting around inside a dark house, I had cabin fever!

Well, 2 years ago I drove all the way of 100+ miles to South Jersey trying to get as close to Isabel's center as possible.. Honestly, it was not as impressive as I hoped it would be.. It weakened too much by then..

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:08 PM
Basically , if you live in a storm-affected areas, it is just a matter of having some necessary things..

I have a small TV that can last for a couple of days on my reserve of batteries.. My celly will provide me with some limited Internet connection. As any hiker, I have a gas stove and enough of gas to provide a supply of hot food for myself and few people else for a couple of days.. Some flashlights and headlamps with batteries for them are good too. Some gas lamp is good idea too. Having a pack of candles would not hurt either. Some fresh water and some basic medicine, and that's all. Everything else is what should be in any household..

Rtael
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:09 PM
Well my cell phone went down last night and is still out now...

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:11 PM
Basically , if you live in a storm-affected areas, it is just a matter of having some necessary things..

I have a small TV that can last for a couple of days on my reserve of batteries.. My celly will provide me with some limited Internet connection. As any hiker, I have a gas stove and enough of gas to provide a supply of hot food for myself and few people else for a couple of days.. Some flashlights and headlamps with batteries for them are good too. Some gas lamp is good idea too. Having a pack of candles would not hurt either. Some fresh water and some basic medicine, and that's all. Everything else is what should be in any household..

I have the TV and batteries. The next most important things to me are liquor and cigarettes. If you have to sit around a dark, hot house with no power for days, you need your smokes and booze. I mean, I'll go with cold canned fruit and stuff, but when I want my buzz, I want my buzz.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:11 PM
Well my cell phone went down last night and is still out now...

Well, that can not be helped, I guess..

Barrie_Dude
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:31 PM
Well my power went out for about a day and a half but I'm fine. I'm sure everyone is greatly relieved. :tape:Reports that we get up here is that some people will be w/o power for a couple months

Rtael
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:35 PM
Reports that we get up here is that some people will be w/o power for a couple months


Well that's only for the most devastated areas like New Orleans and the gulf coast. There really was not excessive damage in my area, just minor stuff. Some of the Mississippi coast and New Orleans got totally destroyed....majority of buildings knocked down and everything...so there's barely any buildings to restore power to.

ys
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:40 PM
I have the TV and batteries. The next most important things to me are liquor and cigarettes. If you have to sit around a dark, hot house with no power for days, you need your smokes and booze. I mean, I'll go with cold canned fruit and stuff, but when I want my buzz, I want my buzz.

Good point. But having a buzz .. with a mix of freshly cooked pasta and SPAM .. in those conditions .. is magic..:)

Helen Lawson
Aug 30th, 2005, 08:42 PM
Good point. But having a buzz .. with a mix of freshly cooked pasta and SPAM .. in those conditions .. is magic..:)

I may just cut the power tonight and re-live some good times! :D

jbone_0307
Aug 30th, 2005, 10:59 PM
Well that's only for the most devastated areas like New Orleans and the gulf coast. There really was not excessive damage in my area, just minor stuff. Some of the Mississippi coast and New Orleans got totally destroyed....majority of buildings knocked down and everything...so there's barely any buildings to restore power to.


Where are you?? We have these friends from Slidell. The I-10 bridge that connects Slidell and New Orleans is gone. Most of Slidell is homeless, (the eye wall passed over Slidell). I want to see pictures, etc. New Orleans is underwater!! New Orleans is an old, historical city. It will rebound most definately. :)

Rtael
Aug 30th, 2005, 11:15 PM
I'm in Madison, Mississippi, just north of Jackson.

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 01:42 AM
Now some people of New Orleans show their true colours, looting everything.. :(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/WEATHER/08/30/katrina/top.2103.looting.ap.jpg

CrossCourt~Rally
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:19 AM
I hope everything gets better down there very soon ...*PRAY* :worship:

ampers&
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:20 AM
This is just so sad...:sad:

Denise4925
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:29 AM
Now some people of New Orleans show their true colours, looting everything.. :(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/WEATHER/08/30/katrina/top.2103.looting.ap.jpg
How do you know it's looting? These people may have been flooded out of their home. How dare you judge these people.

I pray that the survivors of Katrina stay safe and find hope in a new day.

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:36 AM
How do you know it's looting? These people may have been flooded out of their home. How dare you judge these people.


1) CNN footer under this picture while it was on CNN main page was clearly saying "people looting local businesses:
2) the name of the picture file clearly says "looting"..

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:45 AM
1) CNN footer under this picture while it was on CNN main page was clearly saying "people looting local businesses:
2) the name of the picture file clearly says "looting"..

Reporters from CNN who in New Orleans have said that many are looting for survival. Even select Wal-Mart's have opened its doors, and are allowing people to take whatever they can.

You are a pathetic human being, without a soul.

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:48 AM
Reporters from CNN who in New Orleans have said that many are looting for survival. Even select Wal-Mart's have opened its doors, and are allowing people to take whatever they can.

You are a pathetic human being, without a soul.

I won't even try to judge you, poor animal..

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:51 AM
http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=1082070&page=2


The historic French Quarter appeared to have been spared the worst flooding, but its stores were getting the worst of human nature.

"The looting is out of control. The French Quarter has been attacked," Councilwoman Jackie Clarkson said. "We're using exhausted, scarce police to control looting when they should be used for search and rescue while we still have people on rooftops."


Yeah, "looting for survival" , your two lonely brain cells.. :retard:

Police should use weapons against looters firing on target without warning, it's curfew time.. Looters are worse than murderers..

BigB08822
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:57 AM
People are definitely looting for personal gain but not everyone. Those who do it will have to deal with it at some point, karma is a bitch.

Many stores, if they have any food at all, are opened and letting people have what they need. Marshal law is in effect so everything is available for everyone basically and they will hopefully be reimbursed by the gov't at some point when it is all said and done.

Denise4925
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:59 AM
Police should use weapons against looters firing on target without warning, it's curfew time.. Looters are worse than murderers..

Do you seriously think human beings should be killed for taking material things? You're one sick puppy. :tape:

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:02 AM
Marshal law is in effect so everything is available for everyone basically and they will hopefully be reimbursed by the gov't at some point when it is all said and done.

Exactly. That's the way to go. But I have problem believing that people need office supplies and antics for "survival".. I've been in a similar situation.. I still remember the sound of shots of AK-47 fired at looters at night.. but that's what they deserved..

ampers&
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:02 AM
Police should use weapons against looters firing on target without warning, it's curfew time.. Looters are worse than murderers..
This has to be one of the most :retard: and :cuckoo: posts I've seen here.

*adds ys to my list of morons*

Denise4925
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:03 AM
At 100 dead in Mississippi. :sad:

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:04 AM
Do you seriously think human beings should be killed for taking material things? You're one sick puppy. :tape:

As you can read - the looting creates chaos and prevents government forces from focusing on rescue operations. The looting translates into lives of innocent people. If you need to shoot a hundred of looters to scare other, that's the right thing to do..

Denise4925
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:05 AM
As you can read - the looting creates chaos and prevents government forces from focusing on rescue operations. The looting translates into lives of innocent people. If you need to shoot a hundred of looters to scare other, that's the right thing to do..
:speakles:

ampers&
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:06 AM
:speakles:
Exactly.

ivanovic
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:08 AM
Here is what is known today:

1. The water continues to rise, as the 17th street levy was breached near the center city two blocks long, as water from Lake Ponchartrain continues to pour in.

2. 80% of New Orleans, Orleans Parish underwater. In some places, over 20 feet of water. Metairie, Kenner and Jefferson Parish is completely submerged. Over 40,000 homes in St. Bernard Parish has been completely destroyed and the Parish is submerged.

The less affected areas are the New Orleans Central Business district, Uptown and French Quarter (albeit, drier and less damage than other parts of the city).

3. New Orleans East is 100% submerged and totally destroyed. The twin spans (Interstate 10) which is the only major connection between New Orleans proper and the New Orleans East suburbs (heading toward MS, Fl, etc.) is totally destroyed. There is no longer an I-10 heading east out of New Orleans.

The lower 9th ward is completely devistated and destroyed...flooded.

4. The director of FEMA in New Orleans has said it is the worst devistation of a major metropolitan area he has seen as a result of natural disaster.

5. The Mayor of New Orleans has said that power will not be restored for at least 4-6 weeks. There is no drinking water in New Orleans and surrounding parishes.

6. The Mayor of New Orleans has said that widespread and catastropic loss of life has occured, as reported by Fire, Police and National Guard troops who have witnessed dead bodies floating in flood waters. It could take weeks to recover all the bodies.

7. The National Guard is in the process of setting up temporary morgues.

Of the people who stayed in New Orleans during Katrina in the face of mandatory evacuation are thousands of impoverished people who were too poor to afford transportation to leave the city. They had no resources. Unfortunately, these people are most likely the ones who have perished as a result of Hurricane Katrina.

For others who have also at one time lived in New Orleans, I know your heart is heavy today as well. New Orleans is a special place and if you've ever lived there, I don't need to explain why. :)

Please pray for those who have lost love ones as a result of Katrina and for the safety and well-being of the residents who are remaining in New Orleans, Biloxi, Gulfport, Slidell, Bay St. Louis, and any other municipality I've missed.


did they pray for the kids in Iraq :rolleyes:

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:12 AM
I won't even try to judge you, poor animal..

Your words to view describe the kind of person you truly are. Its obvious you have the compassion of a serpant. There are thousands of people suffering and struggling for survival and your only inferred reply is, "they had a chance to leave, they deserve it."

One day, you will feel similar pain ten fold. People like you always learn the hard way. Similar to your parents that taught you a poor value system, its obvious that your upbringing lacks in substance.

Mother_Marjorie
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:14 AM
This has to be one of the most :retard: and :cuckoo: posts I've seen here.

*adds ys to my list of morons*

You're being too nice. Serpants don't have souls.

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:20 AM
did they pray for the kids in Iraq :rolleyes:

They don't know ones exist.. But they are not far , really..

"It's downtown Baghdad," said tourist Denise Bollinger, who snapped pictures of looting in the French Quarter. "It's insane."

"It's like being in a Third World country," said Mitch Handrich, a registered nurse manager at Charity Hospital, where nurses were ventilating patients by hand after the power and then the backup generator failed. Some 300 patients had yet to be evacuated, but the babies in intensive care had been flown out. "

And to think about it, they had 2 full days to prepare. And even more, as they admit, they expected much worse, they expected direct hit..

spokenword73
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:19 AM
This is so sad. :sad: The devestation is mind-boggling. I have a friend here in Cali with relatives in one of the cities in Mississippi that got flooded. She hasn't talked to them since Saturday when they were getting ready to leave their houses for safer ground. They said they had no electricity. She is worried sick. :sad:

Denise4925
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:20 AM
This is so sad. :sad: The devestation is mind-boggling. I have a friend here in Cali with relatives in one of the cities in Mississippi that got flooded. She hasn't talked to them since Saturday when they were getting ready to leave their houses for safer ground. They said they had no electricity. She is worried sick. :sad:
Oh my. Keep us posted.

spokenword73
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:26 AM
yep, I will. Her grandmother is 97 years old. :eek: But thank goodness she got out just her time. Grandma's house and all her things are probably washed away though. How do you rebuilt when you're almost 100??

Denise4925
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:39 AM
yep, I will. Her grandmother is 97 years old. :eek: But thank goodness she got out just her time. Grandma's house and all her things are probably washed away though. How do you rebuilt when you're almost 100??
Yeah, but if that idiot Bush declares it a state of emergency (he may have already, I don't know), there will be federal help people rebuild.

Portobello
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:44 AM
so sad :sad: :sad: :sad:
hoping things gonna be well after all :D :D :D

le bon vivant
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:46 AM
Anyone else think ys is insane?

ampers&
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:46 AM
Anyone else think ys is a lunatic?
*raises hand*

Denise4925
Aug 31st, 2005, 05:06 AM
Anyone else think ys is insane?
:lol: Justin you make things so hard for me in these trying times. :p

Wigglytuff
Aug 31st, 2005, 10:00 AM
People are definitely looting for personal gain but not everyone. Those who do it will have to deal with it at some point, karma is a bitch.

Many stores, if they have any food at all, are opened and letting people have what they need. Marshal law is in effect so everything is available for everyone basically and they will hopefully be reimbursed by the gov't at some point when it is all said and done.

yeah i looked it up you are they are in state of emergency, but this looting crap is all about media spin. a state of emergency after a disaster isnt as good a story as black people looting after a disaster. its fucked up but we all know american media is not above that.

anyway, its not looting, a state of emergency, allows people to take what they need.

Wigglytuff
Aug 31st, 2005, 10:05 AM
Police should use weapons against looters firing on target without warning, it's curfew time.. Looters are worse than murderers..
:rolleyes:
we get it! you have no soul. we got that. what we dont get is why you feel so forced to keep reminding us of this?

Infiniti2001
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:13 PM
Where the fuck is the President of the United States of America??? Oh I know on vacation on his ranch. :rolleyes: I just can't believe how selfish this man is. Why haven't he sent the military in? :fiery: Dead bodies are floating around and you see pics of him eating birthday cake :fiery:

And any fucking rigtwing braindead moron who goes "Well, what can he do?" I quickly remind them of how highly they praised Guiliani who rushed to ground zero to making encouraging noises after 9-11. That was the RIGHT thing to do. And it's what Bush should be doing.Only he CAN'T because he's a sociopath and doens't care about anyone who can't give him money.

Wigglytuff
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:20 PM
Where the fuck is the President of the United States of America??? Oh I know on vacation on his ranch. :rolleyes: I just can't believe how selfish this man is. Why haven't he sent the military in? :fiery: Dead bodies are floating around and you see pics of him eating birthday cake :fiery:

And any fucking rigtwing braindead moron who goes "Well, what can he do?" I quickly remind them of how highly they praised Guiliani who rushed to ground zero to making encouraging noises after 9-11. That was the RIGHT thing to do. And it's what Bush should be doing.Only he CAN'T because he's a sociopath and doens't care about anyone who can't give him money.

do you honestly expect bush jr. to care about a thousands of black and brown people? he never leaves his biweekly vacation to help anyone, (unless you are a white woman you who has been brain dead for a decade).

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:29 PM
Where the fuck is the President of the United States of America??? Oh I know on vacation on his ranch. :rolleyes: I just can't believe how selfish this man is. Why haven't he sent the military in? :fiery: Dead bodies are floating around and you see pics of him eating birthday cake :fiery:

That's indeed a very good question..:fiery: It's his failure too, failure of all line of command. Failure to properly evaluate the danger, to allocate resources to avoid losing life.. All of them - Bush, the governer, the mayor failed the people who elected them..

I remember back on Saturday afternoon I was at some small party, and, naturally, the subject turned to Katrina.. And then on TV they showed the idiot Mayor saying "we are ordering mandatory evacuations, we are doing everything possible".. And everyone in the room was just amazed - Everything possible? You should be screaming to all country, to your President, to everyone, because in few hours there will be no New Orleans, and everyone understands that and that mayor does not.. Or maybe he was afraid to be crying out loud for help because that could be considered as a sign of weakness, and what if there was nothing serious.. What's the point of calling the evacuation "mandatory" if you haev no power to enforce it?

There will be a lot of analysis about who is guilty, and finger-pointing among those responsible has already started as the amyor is already blaming engineers for failing to fix the leveeis..




And any fucking rigtwing braindead moron who goes "Well, what can he do?" I quickly remind them of how highly they praised Guiliani who rushed to ground zero to making encouraging noises after 9-11. That was the RIGHT thing to do. And it's what Bush should be doing.Only he CAN'T because he's a sociopath and doens't care about anyone who can't give him money.

There are plenty of leftwing braindead morons who do the same.. "Oh poor looters, they suffered so much, let them loot a bit".. And now there are reports coming through Europe (!!!) from Europeans who are calling and sayin that they are reportedly stranded on rooftops, but police is doing nothing to help them as they are too busy guarding ATMs and stores from looters.. Total absurd.. Back in 50s USA managed to put the whole city of Berlin, blocked by Soviets , on total supply by air.. This whole situation showed the whole world that USA are essentially no longer much different from third World Countries when it comes to organizing resources to handle the emergency and maintain an order.. And we seriously hope to get Iraq into some kind of order ?

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:33 PM
do you honestly expect bush jr. to care about a thousands of black and brown people? he never leaves his biweekly vacation to help anyone, (unless you are a white woman you who has been brain dead for a decade).

And some will always try to play race card, in every situation, taking advantage of anything, of any natural disaster.. Disgusting..

Wigglytuff
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:34 PM
That's indeed a very good question..:fiery: It's his failure too, failure of all line of command. Failure to properly evaluate the danger, to allocate resources to avoid losing life.. All of them - Bush, the governer, the mayor failed the people who elected them..

I remember back on Saturday afternoon I was at some small party, and, naturally, the subject turned to Katrina.. And then on TV they showed the idiot Mayor saying "we are ordering mandatory evacuations, we are doing everything possible".. And everyone in the room was just amazed - Everything possible? You should be screaming to all country, to your President, to everyone, because in few hours there will be no New Orleans, and everyone understands that and that mayor does not.. Or maybe he was afraid to be crying out loud for help because that could be considered as a sign of weakness, and what if there was nothing serious.. What's the point of calling the evacuation "mandatory" if you haev no power to enforce it?

There will be a lot of analysis about who is guilty, and finger-pointing among those responsible has already started as the amyor is already blaming engineers for failing to fix the leveeis..





There are plenty of leftwing braindead morons who do the same.. "Oh poor looters, they suffered so much, let them loot a bit".. And now there are reports coming through Europe (!!!) from Europeans who are calling and sayin that they are reportedly stranded on rooftops, but police is doing nothing to help them as they are too busy guarding ATMs and stores from looters.. Total absurd.. Back in 50s USA managed to put the whole city of Berlin, blocked by Soviets , on total supply by air.. This whole situation showed the whole world that USA are essentially no longer much different from third World Countries when it comes to organizing resources to handle the emergency and maintain an order.. And we seriously hope to get Iraq into some kind of order ?

ah, satan's little helper we have missed you :rolleyes:

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:35 PM
ah, satan's little helper we have missed you :rolleyes:

Oh, little braindead leftist racist, we didn't miss you..

Wigglytuff
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:39 PM
And some will always try to play race card, in every situation, taking advantage of anything, of any natural disaster.. Disgusting..
yes it is true that for a retard you are one heartless whore.

Infiniti2001
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:42 PM
Strain of Iraq War Means the Relief Burden Will Have to Be Shared

By Ann Scott Tyson
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, August 31, 2005; Page A14

With thousands of their citizen-soldiers away fighting in Iraq, states hit hard by Hurricane Katrina scrambled to muster forces for rescue and security missions yesterday -- calling up Army bands and water-purification teams, among other units, and requesting help from distant states and the active-duty military.

As the devastation threatened to overwhelm state resources, federal authorities called on the Pentagon to mobilize active-duty aircraft, ships and troops and set up an unprecedented task force to coordinate a wider military response, said officials from the Northern Command, which oversees homeland defense.




News From Iraq
More Than 600 Killed in Stampede Near Baghdad Shrine
Bush Calls Iraq War Moral Equivalent Of Allies' WWII Fight Against the Axis
The National Guard: Strain of Iraq War Means the Relief Burden Will Have to Be Shared
The President: Bush Cuts Texas Vacation Short to Oversee Hurricane Response
U.S. Warplanes Target Alleged Rebel Havens Along Iraq-Syria Border
More News
National Guard officials in the states acknowledged that the scale of the destruction is stretching the limits of available manpower while placing another extraordinary demand on their troops -- most of whom have already served tours in Iraq or Afghanistan or in homeland defense missions since 2001.

More than 6,000 Guard members were mobilized in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida when the storm struck on Monday, with the number rising to 8,000 yesterday and hundreds more expected to be called to active duty, National Guard officials said yesterday.

"Missing the personnel is the big thing in this particular event. We need our people," said Lt. Andy Thaggard, a spokesman for the Mississippi National Guard, which has a brigade of more than 4,000 troops in central Iraq. Louisiana also has about 3,000 Guard troops in Baghdad.

Mississippi has about 40 percent of its Guard force deployed or preparing to deploy and has called up all remaining Guard units for hurricane relief, Thaggard said. Those include the Army band based in Jackson, Miss. "They are mustering transportation to move them south," he said. Soldiers who have lost their homes are exempt, he said.

Mississippi has requested troops and aircraft from about eight other states -- including military police and engineers from Alabama, helicopters and crews from Arkansas and Georgia, and aircraft-maintenance experts from Connecticut, who are filling in for a Mississippi maintenance unit that is heading to the Middle East.

"This is the biggest disaster we've ever had, so we're going to need more aircraft than we've got," said Col. Bradly S. MacNealy, the Mississippi Army National Guard's aviation officer. Mississippi has had to borrow from Arkansas UH-60 Black Hawk helicopters fitted with hoists, using them together with the Coast Guard to pluck to safety several dozen people stranded by floodwaters, he said.

Chinook helicopters from Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi are flying the equivalent of 18 large truckloads of critical supplies -- including ice, water, food and chain saws for road-clearing crews -- to Mississippi's coast, he said.

In Alabama, all the major Guard units activated for the disaster have already served in Iraq, and some still have contingents there, said Alabama Guard spokesman Norman Arnold.

Capt. Richard Locke of the Guard's 1st Battalion 167th Infantry headed toward Mobile yesterday with a force of 400 soldiers cobbled together from four units because the rest of the battalion is in Iraq.

Carrying M-16 rifles and 9mm pistols, the soldiers are assigned to control traffic at unlighted intersections, and patrol in Humvees and on foot to prevent looting.

Recruiting and retention problems are worsening the strain on Guard forces in hurricane-ravaged states. Alabama's Army National Guard has a strength of 11,000 troops -- or 78 percent of the authorized number. "We're just losing too many out the back door," Arnold said.

Wigglytuff
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:49 PM
Where the fuck is the President of the United States of America??? Oh I know on vacation on his ranch. :rolleyes: I just can't believe how selfish this man is. Why haven't he sent the military in? :fiery: Dead bodies are floating around and you see pics of him eating birthday cake :fiery:

And any fucking rigtwing braindead moron who goes "Well, what can he do?" I quickly remind them of how highly they praised Guiliani who rushed to ground zero to making encouraging noises after 9-11. That was the RIGHT thing to do. And it's what Bush should be doing.Only he CAN'T because he's a sociopath and doens't care about anyone who can't give him money.

here is something interesting:

Bush Cuts Texas Vacation Short to Oversee Hurricane Response
Bush Cuts Short Vacation to Oversee Relief Efforts
By Nicole Gaouette and Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writers

WASHINGTON -- Government and private relief agencies scrambled today to cope with a worsening humanitarian crisis along the Gulf Coast , and President Bush decided to cut short his vacation and return to Washington to oversee the effort.

Officials in a host of federal agencies were organizing a massive federal response to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, dispatching thousands of rescue workers and medical personnel and mountains of food, tents, medical supplies and other emergency equipment to Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana.

ADVERTISEMENT

The American Red Cross launched what it called its biggest mission ever.

Before Katrina came ashore, the Federal Emergency Management Agency had deployed 23 disaster medical assistance teams from across the United States to staging areas in Alabama, Tennessee, Texas and Louisiana. Those teams moved into the impacted areas today.

The teams brought truckloads of medical equipment and supplies with them and are trained to handle trauma, pediatrics, surgery and mental health problems.

Two veterinary medical assistance teams were included as part of the deployed units to support and rescue pets, and provide veterinary medical care for rescue dogs.

FEMA has 500 trucks of ice, 500 trucks of water and 350 trucks of MREs (meals ready to eat) available for distribution over the next 10 days.

Seven urban search and rescue task forces and two incident support teams were moved into the area from their home bases in Florida, Indiana, Ohio, Maryland, Missouri, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

Meantime, more than 40 Coast Guard aircraft from units along the Eastern Seaboard, along with more than 30 patrol boats, cutters and other vessels, moved into positions on an arc stretching from Jacksonville, Fla., to Houston, and began conducting post-hurricane search, rescue and humanitarian aid operations, waterway impact assessments and waterway reconstitution operations .

"This morning our hearts and prayers are with our fellow citizens along the Gulf Coast who have suffered so much from Hurricane Katrina," Bush said. "The good folks in Louisiana and Mississippi and Alabama and other affected areas are going to need the help and compassion and prayers of our fellow citizens."

Bush is likely to tour some of the most heavily damaged areas this week, the White House said. He was to return to Washington on Wednesday.

----
now if was to return to work on wensday and starts going around to aid areas in need he didnt cut his vacation short at all. so just media spin. they could have meant next wensday, but they would have said so, no?

well either way, at least something is finally being done.

Infiniti2001
Aug 31st, 2005, 02:50 PM
That's indeed a very good question..:fiery: It's his failure too, failure of all line of command. Failure to properly evaluate the danger, to allocate resources to avoid losing life.. All of them - Bush, the governer, the mayor failed the people who elected them..

I remember back on Saturday afternoon I was at some small party, and, naturally, the subject turned to Katrina.. And then on TV they showed the idiot Mayor saying "we are ordering mandatory evacuations, we are doing everything possible".. And everyone in the room was just amazed - Everything possible? You should be screaming to all country, to your President, to everyone, because in few hours there will be no New Orleans, and everyone understands that and that mayor does not.. Or maybe he was afraid to be crying out loud for help because that could be considered as a sign of weakness, and what if there was nothing serious.. What's the point of calling the evacuation "mandatory" if you haev no power to enforce it?

There will be a lot of analysis about who is guilty, and finger-pointing among those responsible has already started as the amyor is already blaming engineers for failing to fix the leveeis..




[quote]
There are plenty of leftwing braindead morons who do the same.. "Oh poor looters, they suffered so much, let them loot a bit".. And now there are reports coming through Europe (!!!) from Europeans who are calling and sayin that they are reportedly stranded on rooftops, but police is doing nothing to help them as they are too busy guarding ATMs and stores from looters.. Total absurd.. Back in 50s USA managed to put the whole city of Berlin, blocked by Soviets , on total supply by air.. This whole situation showed the whole world that USA are essentially no longer much different from third World Countries when it comes to organizing resources to handle the emergency and maintain an order.. And we seriously hope to get Iraq into some kind of order ?

RUBBISH!!! Not one of them is president and is in power to deploy personnel to stop it.frankly, it's the 'leftwingmorons' who are helping the poor and needy, supporting the troops, fighting for the veterans.....we still have the resources and know-how but the head has been cut off at the top.

Bottom line: Experts knew this was coming, and all the preparations ground to a halt because Bush stole New Orleans' disaster preparation money so he could use it for his Iraq debacle

Read this article ys . http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1001051313 You really need to let go of all your :rolleyes: resentment

Infiniti2001
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:06 PM
Anyway, I am sick of fighting , I am heartbroken for the citizens of the area and urge everyone to donate whatever they can to the Red Cross. I just cleaned out my drawers and closets with the intention of dropping off the bags to Goodwill . NOT anymore :sad:

More than a million people have permanetly lost their jobs, their homes, and everything they own----- everything . And MANY have no way to replace it. :sad: :sad:
I figure half the people in the region like most of us in the US were living from paycheck to paycheck basically.Their entire neighborhoods are wiped out :sad: :sad: :sad: Some may have family they can go to, but a lot won't. :sad: :sad: :sad: They will have no place to go, no paycheck coming in, no way to even replace their fucking underware or toothbrush let alone everything they own. :sad: This is bad my friends :sad: :sad: :sad:

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:13 PM
Bottom line: Experts knew this was coming, and all the preparations ground to a halt because Bush stole New Orleans' disaster preparation money so he could use it for his Iraq debacle

Read this article ys . http://www.editorandpublisher.com/eandp/news/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1001051313

I would not argue with any of that. However, all of those events happened an year ago or earlier, yet after that the state of Louisiana overwhelmingly voted for Bush, meaning, that they supported his course of actions..

-Ph51-
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:22 PM
I would not argue with any of that. However, all of those events happened an year ago or earlier, yet after that the state of Louisiana overwhelmingly voted for Bush, meaning, that they supported his course of actions..
Some think they know it all...but they don't :)
Of course, Russia is well prepared for everything that could happen.

Veritas
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:31 PM
Even though a hurricane's unpredictable, I'm surprised the damage's so widespread. Didn't the mayor say that electricity won't be up and running until a month later? That seems pretty long, especially for a rich country like the U.S. :eek:

Helen Lawson
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:36 PM
Even though a hurricane's unpredictable, I'm surprised the damage's so widespread. Didn't the mayor say that electricity won't be up and running until a month later? That seems pretty long, especially for a rich country like the U.S. :eek:

80% of the city is flooded and some as high as 20 feet. You can't fix power lines in standing water and the pump system was antiquated and it'll take awhile to get it running so the water is going nowhere fast.
I think many not familiar with hurrianes live in denial. This lady I know who lived there for a couple of years ago, she'd evacuate when one was predicted to come because she was scared New Orleans was below sea level. Everyone there she knew just laughed, so that's sadly the mentality and that's why there isn't like an amazing pump system in place.

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:38 PM
Some think they know it all...but they don't :)
Of course, Russia is well prepared for everything that could happen.

Meaningless.. We do not have any kind of natural disasters that we know of days in advance. Earthquakes happen.. They happen everywhere..

Of course, brining up Russia was just what some fuckwit like Camron Giles would always do. Now he has a competition.. :lol:

And do not compare the resources of USA and Russia. USA could have easily allocated billions of dollars to handle this in proper way. And scary to think, they say that Katrina has actually spared New Orleans and they expected worse things.. What did they expect? City ground-leveled? They could not handle even *this* in any decent way..

I've been a part of dealing with a worse natural disaster than Katrina back in USSR.. With no warning given.. Yet, on the second day they had army patroling the area, maintaining order, dealing with any crime in the area by the law of field justice - just as it is supposed to be, food supply was probably 2 times bigger than it needed.. There was an order. And when there is an order, things inevitably go better.

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:44 PM
I think many not familiar with hurrianes live in denial. This lady I know who lived there for a couple of years ago, she'd evacuate when one was predicted to come because she was scared New Orleans was below sea level. Everyone there she knew just laughed, so that's sadly the mentality and that's why there isn't like an amazing pump system in place.

It's not "mentality". It is ignorance and stupidity.. And complete inability of authorities to bring the knowledge to the people.

From CNN's gallery of worst hurricanes, the gallery made year ago..

---------------------------------------

9. New Orleans, Louisiana 1915
New Orleans, Louisiana
September 1915
Death toll: 275

This Category 4 storm caused Lake Pontchartrain to overflow its banks, killing 275 people. That scenario is one that hurricane experts don't like to ponder because if the city, surrounded on three sides by water, is hit by a major hurricane, the storm surge might inundate the city

--------------------------

It was written on the wall.. It was bound to happen.. It was just a matter of time..

Cam'ron Giles
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:45 PM
Meaningless.. We do not have any kind of natural disasters that we know of days in advance. Earthquakes happen.. They happen everywhere..

Of course, brining up Russia was just what some fuckwit like Camron Giles would always do. Now he has a competition.. :lol:

And do not compare the resources of USA and Russia. USA could have easily allocated billions of dollars to handle this in proper way. And scary to think, they say that Katrina has actually spared New Orleans and they expected worse things.. What did they expect? City ground-leveled? They could not handle even *this* in any decent way..

I've been a part of dealing with a worse natural disaster than Katrina back in USSR.. With no warning given.. Yet, on the second day they had army patroling the area, maintaining order, dealing with any crime in the area by the law of field justice - just as it is supposed to be, food supply was probably 2 times bigger than it needed.. There was an order. And when there is an order, things inevitably go better.

We bring up Russia because you are quick to call other places around the world "uncivilized" while you remain a refugee in a country that you constantly put down and the land you love so much remains lawless and out of controle with criminal activities...:rolleyes: Now who is the fuckwit?

Cam'ron Giles
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:46 PM
I've been a part of dealing with a worse natural disaster than Katrina back in USSR.. With no warning given.. Yet, on the second day they had army patroling the area, maintaining order, dealing with any crime in the area by the law of field justice -

:haha: :haha: You are so stupid...:lol:

-Ph51-
Aug 31st, 2005, 03:47 PM
Meaningless.. We do not have any kind of natural disasters that we know of days in advance. Earthquakes happen.. They happen everywhere..

Of course, brining up Russia was just what some fuckwit like Camron Giles would always do. Now he has a competition.. :lol:

And do not compare the resources of USA and Russia. USA could have easily allocated billions of dollars to handle this in proper way. And scary to think, they say that Katrina has actually spared New Orleans and they expected worse things.. What did they expect? City ground-leveled? They could not handle even *this* in any decent way..

I've been a part of dealing with a worse natural disaster than Katrina back in USSR.. With no warning given.. Yet, on the second day they had army patroling the area, maintaining order, dealing with any crime in the area by the law of field justice - just as it is supposed to be, food supply was probably 2 times bigger than it needed.. There was an order. And when there is an order, things inevitably go better.
Russia would be prepared if all the money wasn't in corruption like your president and football club owners.
But tell me...what is Russia prepared for :scratch:

Josh
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:11 PM
Can we mabe stop the fighting and mutual reproaches?
Many people have died, are homeless or lost everything so I don't think they are helped with all the blaming in this thread. Yes it's true that mistakes have been made but what does that have to do with how Russia or Indonesia or whatever country would handle this situation. They are not the ones dealing with this disaster, the people who are affected are.

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:18 PM
Well...i know Russia better than you know Belgium...that's for sure.


First, it is not "for sure".. Second, the difference, I have not attempted to judge anything related to Belgium, have I? Unlike you.. But any kind of thinking ability seem to have abandoned you for good already..

Rocketta
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:20 PM
Can we mabe stop the fighting and mutual reproaches?
Many people have died, are homeless or lost everything so I don't think they are helped with all the blaming in this thread. Yes it's true that mistakes have been made but what does that have to do with how Russia or Indonesia or whatever country would handle this situation. They are not the ones dealing with this disaster, the people who are affecting are.

ohhh, I can answer the Russia part. Russia is bought up because the main person attacking those in this situation has at other times claimed such superiority of Russia and how they handle every and anything of course people will point out the hypocracy or should I say how assinine the poster is by showing he's talking out the side of his neck.

Maybe, someone should talk to him about his useless trolling in threads about tragedy?

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:20 PM
Yes it's true that mistakes have been made but what does that have to do with how Russia or Indonesia or whatever country would handle this situation. They are not the ones dealing with this disaster, the people who are affecting are.

Exactly. And unless those mistakes are identified and incompetent people are replaced with competent ones, it will happen again.. The waters of Atlantic and the Gulf are still way warmer than normal.. More hurricanes are to follow..

partbrit
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:37 PM
We evacuated St. Tammany Parish Sunday morning and are lucky to be staying in an old hotel in the central part of the state. Our house is not in a flood zone, but we a forest of pine trees, and one them could have fallen on our house. We have no way of knowing whether that happened, of course. There is no power there, and no one can enter the parish. When we are allowed to go back, we will see if we still have a house.

There are four of us--two humans and two cats--staying in this little room, but we have made ourselves comfortable. There is a large window that overlooks a courtyard, and the cats like to sit on the sill. I have USA Network so I'm watching the Open 'round the clock (I remembered to evacuate with my drawsheets!). The hotel staff is very nice and helpful.

The federal response to the crisis has been terrible. The National Guard didn't show up, and the Blackhawk helicopter scheduled to drop 3,000 sandbags to patch the 17th Street Canal levee didn't show up. I lived in New Orleans for 21 years and still cross the lake often--this is more heartbreaking than I can describe.

For the last couple of weeks, I've been a guest blogger for Mother Jones, and have continued to do that job since I got here, so you can get more reports there (http://motherjones.com/mojoblog), and on my blog, http://dedspace.blogspot.com.

Mrs. Peel
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:41 PM
I don't know about prayers but I wish that I could provide the physical help needed for such disasters! It is hard to watch this stuff on tv and not to be able to do anything about it except write a check! A financial contribution is definitely in order but then again I am limited in that capacity.:sad: They need so much more than my paltry dollars. I can't bear the thought of stranded children :tears: coming home to nothing, losing their parents. Ugh.

Cam'ron Giles
Aug 31st, 2005, 04:41 PM
We evacuated St. Tammany Parish Sunday morning and are lucky to be staying in an old hotel in the central part of the state. Our house is not in a flood zone, but we a forest of pine trees, and one them could have fallen on our house. We have no way of knowing whether that happened, of course. There is no power there, and no one can enter the parish. When we are allowed to go back, we will see if we still have a house.

There are four of us--two humans and two cats--staying in this little room, but we have made ourselves comfortable. There is a large window that overlooks a courtyard, and the cats like to sit on the sill. I have USA Network so I'm watching the Open 'round the clock (I remembered to evacuate with my drawsheets!). The hotel staff is very nice and helpful.

The federal response to the crisis has been terrible. The National Guard didn't show up, and the Blackhawk helicopter scheduled to drop 3,000 sandbags to patch the 17th Street Canal levee didn't show up. I lived in New Orleans for 21 years and still cross the lake often--this is more heartbreaking than I can describe.

For the last couple of weeks, I've been a guest blogger for Mother Jones, and have continued to do that job since I got here, so you can get more reports there (http://motherjones.com/mojoblog), and on my blog, http://dedspace.blogspot.com.

God bless you...hope your home is ok...Enjoy the tennis with the knowledge that you are alive and well...:kiss:

Wigglytuff
Aug 31st, 2005, 06:32 PM
We evacuated St. Tammany Parish Sunday morning and are lucky to be staying in an old hotel in the central part of the state. Our house is not in a flood zone, but we a forest of pine trees, and one them could have fallen on our house. We have no way of knowing whether that happened, of course. There is no power there, and no one can enter the parish. When we are allowed to go back, we will see if we still have a house.

There are four of us--two humans and two cats--staying in this little room, but we have made ourselves comfortable. There is a large window that overlooks a courtyard, and the cats like to sit on the sill. I have USA Network so I'm watching the Open 'round the clock (I remembered to evacuate with my drawsheets!). The hotel staff is very nice and helpful.

The federal response to the crisis has been terrible. The National Guard didn't show up, and the Blackhawk helicopter scheduled to drop 3,000 sandbags to patch the 17th Street Canal levee didn't show up. I lived in New Orleans for 21 years and still cross the lake often--this is more heartbreaking than I can describe.

For the last couple of weeks, I've been a guest blogger for Mother Jones, and have continued to do that job since I got here, so you can get more reports there (http://motherjones.com/mojoblog), and on my blog, http://dedspace.blogspot.com.

glad to here that you are ok. hopefully the responds and support should improve in the next few days as about 1350 truckloads of food and water are expected in the next few days

Denise4925
Aug 31st, 2005, 08:36 PM
We evacuated St. Tammany Parish Sunday morning and are lucky to be staying in an old hotel in the central part of the state. Our house is not in a flood zone, but we a forest of pine trees, and one them could have fallen on our house. We have no way of knowing whether that happened, of course. There is no power there, and no one can enter the parish. When we are allowed to go back, we will see if we still have a house.

There are four of us--two humans and two cats--staying in this little room, but we have made ourselves comfortable. There is a large window that overlooks a courtyard, and the cats like to sit on the sill. I have USA Network so I'm watching the Open 'round the clock (I remembered to evacuate with my drawsheets!). The hotel staff is very nice and helpful.

The federal response to the crisis has been terrible. The National Guard didn't show up, and the Blackhawk helicopter scheduled to drop 3,000 sandbags to patch the 17th Street Canal levee didn't show up. I lived in New Orleans for 21 years and still cross the lake often--this is more heartbreaking than I can describe.

For the last couple of weeks, I've been a guest blogger for Mother Jones, and have continued to do that job since I got here, so you can get more reports there (http://motherjones.com/mojoblog), and on my blog, http://dedspace.blogspot.com.
My heart goes out to your family and your situation. I'm sure the National Guard and the Military are doing everything they can, but I can only blame the president for allowing our troops to be killed daily in a senseless war when they could be of more service to their country here on the home front helping victims and survivors of natural disasters such as this one. :sad:

jbone_0307
Aug 31st, 2005, 09:06 PM
We evacuated St. Tammany Parish Sunday morning and are lucky to be staying in an old hotel in the central part of the state. Our house is not in a flood zone, but we a forest of pine trees, and one them could have fallen on our house. We have no way of knowing whether that happened, of course. There is no power there, and no one can enter the parish. When we are allowed to go back, we will see if we still have a house.

There are four of us--two humans and two cats--staying in this little room, but we have made ourselves comfortable. There is a large window that overlooks a courtyard, and the cats like to sit on the sill. I have USA Network so I'm watching the Open 'round the clock (I remembered to evacuate with my drawsheets!). The hotel staff is very nice and helpful.

The federal response to the crisis has been terrible. The National Guard didn't show up, and the Blackhawk helicopter scheduled to drop 3,000 sandbags to patch the 17th Street Canal levee didn't show up. I lived in New Orleans for 21 years and still cross the lake often--this is more heartbreaking than I can describe.

For the last couple of weeks, I've been a guest blogger for Mother Jones, and have continued to do that job since I got here, so you can get more reports there (http://motherjones.com/mojoblog), and on my blog, http://dedspace.blogspot.com.


Do you live in slidell?? We have friends from their staying here. Everybody is coming up to north louisiana!

Staticbeef
Aug 31st, 2005, 10:09 PM
My heart goes out to your family and your situation. I'm sure the National Guard and the Military are doing everything they can, but I can only blame the president for allowing our troops to be killed daily in a senseless war when they could be of more service to their country here on the home front helping victims and survivors of natural disasters such as this one. :sad:

The war that is going on in New Orleans is the type that makes one feel proud to serve his country and help is fellow man. I am sure if Mr. Bush would supply the logistics the whole country would volunteer in some way to help our brothers and sisters in La. & Miss, who are suffering at this very moment.

spokenword73
Aug 31st, 2005, 10:21 PM
Unfortunately, the media is focusing on the looting...
Someone who has relatives in NO said, bodies are washing up from the cemetaries?
Could that be true??? :eek:

If so, that would really be a major health concern, most worst than any petty thief-ing.

ys
Aug 31st, 2005, 10:31 PM
The war that is going on in New Orleans is the type that makes one feel proud to serve his country and help is fellow man. I am sure if Mr. Bush would supply the logistics the whole country would volunteer in some way to help our brothers and sisters in La. & Miss, who are suffering at this very moment.

Absolutely. But it would have been much more appreciated if all that would have been done BEFORE, not after it happened and people died.

partbrit
Aug 31st, 2005, 10:31 PM
Thanks to all of you for your concern. jbone, we live in Covington.

I haven't heard about bodies being washed up from cemeteries yet, though that could certainly happen; it did in the great flood of 1927. However, there are dead bodies floating in the water all over the place, according to the mayor of New Orleans.

And--to address another issue--the Louisiana National Guard has a serious equipment shortage because the equipment is in Iraq.

galadriel
Sep 1st, 2005, 09:13 AM
My heart is with this poor victims :hug:

Wigglytuff
Sep 1st, 2005, 01:36 PM
Unfortunately, the media is focusing on the looting...
Someone who has relatives in NO said, bodies are washing up from the cemetaries?
Could that be true??? :eek:

If so, that would really be a major health concern, most worst than any petty thief-ing.

yes it is. the deal, as i understand it, is that because NO is so far below sea level all or some of the cemetaries have to be above ground. but because of the hurricane that has spelled desaster.

yeah the media is fucking pissing me off, they have been very quiet about the fact a dozen nations have offered aid to the USA regarding this matter...and as i understand it, the aid has been refused. which (if true) of course is a complete disgrace and just plain evil as it would lead to more deaths than need be.

griffin
Sep 1st, 2005, 01:36 PM
Unfortunately, the media is focusing on the looting...
Someone who has relatives in NO said, bodies are washing up from the cemetaries?
Could that be true??? :eek:

If so, that would really be a major health concern, most worst than any petty thief-ing.

I don't know if it's happening, but since a lot of people are - or at least were- buried in above-ground crypts (for the same reason the place is in such trouble now - the city is mostly below sea level), it's possible and always been a major concern.

Much like I did after 9/11, I find myself watchng the news and looking at the pictures, and finding it almost impossible to comprehend the level of destruction, and the implications for those who've lived through it. My heart goes out to those on the Gulf Coast, and the families and friends that can do nothing now but sit and worry.

spokenword73
Sep 1st, 2005, 02:18 PM
I am glued to the t.v. too. It's heartbreaking...I am so :fiery:. It seems like poor people are forced to live on unstable grounds and when disaster hits, they are turned into refugee. Meanwhile, Bush gets on TV like a damn reporter telling us what we can see with our own eyes, but with no plan the ease the suffering of thousands of people.

Helen Lawson
Sep 1st, 2005, 02:22 PM
I haven't heard the cemetary stuff, but I have heard bodies are floating around everywhere, but I understood that to mean people who died in the storm. They also did a bit about how the alligators are loose now, I don't think they're like downtown eating people (yet??) but they're more prevalent now around people's homes because with more water, it's easier to move around. They showed some near a house where people were on the porch.
I hope everyone can get out of there fast!

Hagar
Sep 1st, 2005, 03:58 PM
When I hear and see what's happening there, I really feel like I'm watching a disaster movie.

Shane54
Sep 1st, 2005, 07:04 PM
I really feel for the people who are getting stuff to eat to survive. The ones I don't feel sorry for are the TRASH that are STEALING things like designer shoes, jewelry, cameras,etc. Those are not items needed for "survival".

And we seem to forget there was STEALING caught on tape when the storm had not really hit yet.

What a bunch of wild animals.

Not all people of South La. are like that!

Rtael
Sep 1st, 2005, 08:41 PM
The people in New Orleans are acting a mess. :(

Black Mamba.
Sep 1st, 2005, 08:51 PM
The people in New Orleans are dying by the minute. I've watched news reports all day where the people at the convention center have gone without food and water for 4 days now. The people are angry because they hear about all this aid coming their way, but reports from CNN, ABC, Fox News, etc show that the National guard and all this aid simply isn't there. How in the world can we airlift food and supplies to other countries, but we can't drop food and water to the folks at the convention center?

Hagar
Sep 1st, 2005, 09:03 PM
I think this whole thing might have one good consequence: big drop in popularity for the Republicans...
It's simply scandalous that there was no scenario foreseen for such a disaster. How could they expect poor people to be able to move out when they have no money or no way to go.

polishprodigy
Sep 1st, 2005, 09:27 PM
What I heard on the news was that George Bush reallocated funds from going to FETA (that organization that takes care of natural disasters) to the much broader "Homeland Security" to help finance the war in Iraq...

With respect to the looting, I have to say that this is a very desperate situation and that if I had no clothes or food, I would go in and get some food too. It is a matter of survival. What I cannot understand is the looting of tv's and non-essential stuff, but I guess people are thinking that now is there chance so why not get what they can. But I wanna know is...WHERE ARE THEY GONNA STORE THIS STUFF? there is no electricity anyway!

There is always a criminal element in society, so gangs are going to prey on people and there are those who wish to harm others in society. For those who are shooting at police and evacuation helicopters or attacking children's hospitals, they should be arrested and jailed. That is why I think that they should open the stores that have food so people can stock up (and I am happy to hear that they are doing this), but I am also glad that the National Guard is coming in to help restore order and to arrest those people who are using guns and causing violence and fear. The reason why so many guns were stolen from Wal-Mart is probably because those who are not criminals felt the need to protect themselves from criminal looters!

Rtael
Sep 1st, 2005, 09:44 PM
According to my local news there are reports that people in the convetion center are being raped and beaten. I hope the police start shooting on sight.

Staticbeef
Sep 1st, 2005, 09:51 PM
According to my local news there are reports that people in the convetion center are being raped and beaten. I hope the police start shooting on sight.

Ask yourself, WHY THE FUCK ARE THOSE PEOPLE STILL THERE?? New Orleans should be empty by now, Why are they still ther?????

Rocketta
Sep 1st, 2005, 10:06 PM
Ask yourself, WHY THE FUCK ARE THOSE PEOPLE STILL THERE?? New Orleans should be empty by now, Why are they still ther?????

with no air....ie no electricity! :sad:

Staticbeef
Sep 1st, 2005, 10:13 PM
with no air....ie no electricity! :sad:

The politicians are talking about how much help is on the way, how many plans they have. Where the fuck are they and when is this situation gonna be resolved. A caravan of electric workers left from New York City for New Orleans 3 days ago, they got there today, so don't fucking tell me food and medicine should not be there by now, damn those guys drove all the way from NYC. This is just horrible.

flyingmachine
Sep 1st, 2005, 10:14 PM
What a tragedy. :sad:
I just don't understand why the US goverment acting so slowly and so late. :rolleyes:

Rtael
Sep 1st, 2005, 10:28 PM
Ask yourself, WHY THE FUCK ARE THOSE PEOPLE STILL THERE?? New Orleans should be empty by now, Why are they still ther?????


ASK YOURSELF DOES THAT FUCKING JUSTIFY RAPING AND BEATING PEOPLE!? No, it doesn't. So shut the fuck up you dumbass tool.

Cam'ron Giles
Sep 1st, 2005, 10:40 PM
ASK YOURSELF DOES THAT FUCKING JUSTIFY RAPING AND BEATING PEOPLE!? No, it doesn't. So shut the fuck up you dumbass tool.

Disgraceful...Shame on you...:rolleyes:

Staticbeef
Sep 1st, 2005, 10:40 PM
ASK YOURSELF DOES THAT FUCKING JUSTIFY RAPING AND BEATING PEOPLE!? No, it doesn't. So shut the fuck up you dumbass tool.



I am going to make one attempt and one attempt only to speak to you. My point is, if these people were evacuated like they are supposed to be, this would not happen. I am not justifiying rape or any other crime, what I am doing is pointing out that people are dying in a situation that shouuld have been resolved 2 days ago. So if you think I am dumb because I can see the Forest and the trees, that my little grasshopper is your MAJOR MALFUCTION. I am talking about saving lives, while you .................ah fuck it..... you probably a effing eskimo and dont understand anyway.

Denise4925
Sep 1st, 2005, 10:49 PM
I am going to make one attempt and one attempt only to speak to you. My point is, if these people were evacuated like they are supposed to be, this would not happen. I am not justifiying rape or any other crime, what I am doing is pointing out that people are dying in a situation that shouuld have been resolved 2 days ago. So if you think I am dumb because I can see the Forest and the trees, that my little grasshopper is your MAJOR MALFUCTION. I am talking about saving lives, while you .................ah fuck it..... you probably a effing eskimo and dont understand anyway.


:lol:

Rocketta
Sep 1st, 2005, 10:53 PM
ASK YOURSELF DOES THAT FUCKING JUSTIFY RAPING AND BEATING PEOPLE!? No, it doesn't. So shut the fuck up you dumbass tool.

hmmm, yet you believe everything the media is feeding you and someone else is a dumbass tool. :lol:

topspin
Sep 1st, 2005, 11:16 PM
In my opinion, MSNBC and NBC have provided the best and the most fair coverage of the devastation from Hurricane Katrina. Yes, there is looting and there are evil people who are casting a bad light and shadow on a majority. But, which is more important? The majority of the coverage informing the world of the thousands in a state of suffering and desperation or the majority of the coverage on the hundreds who are taking advantage of horrific situation. ( ratings? )

One of the reporters on MSNBC had talked about how there were thousands of people who did the right thing and didn't resort to looting. These were the people who had made their way to the convention center. Word got back to them how the people in the Superdome were being transported to Houston, TX for relief and shelter. They had asked where was the relief for them. The reporter said they had the chance to interview some of the bus drivers waiting on the outskirts to enter the city. The bus drivers said they had saw and heard about the coverage of the lawlessness. They weren't going to take any chances to put themselves in danger.

The MSNBC reporter said from what he personally saw the areas where most of the desolate had gathered contained no looting or violence, just people waiting for help. He hinted how it was a shame the media coverage had an affect on what could be lost essential time between life and death.

This is what really gets me. The ones who loot KNOW how coverage is going to be more devoted to broadcasting the negative events. They KNOW how their actions are going to conjure up stereotypical images of "savages, animals, and thieves." They KNOW that the few of them who engaged in illegal activities are going to make it seem like thousands are doing it.

Someone made a good point about how the looting will have affect on the sympathy and the willingness of individuals to send or donate aid.

It always takes the actions of the few to hurt the plight of many.

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 12:58 AM
According to my local news there are reports that people in the convetion center are being raped and beaten. I hope the police start shooting on sight.
oh my god that is shocking and disturbing. :sad: :sad: :sad:
edit: if true

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 01:02 AM
my question is with all this going on, why is there no news updates, no shock, no anything regarding the refusal of the federal gov to accept international aid.

Infiniti2001
Sep 2nd, 2005, 01:28 AM
Absolutely. But it would have been much more appreciated if all that would have been done BEFORE, not after it happened and people died.

Yes, and guess who is to be blamed ys? Read this and tell me if you still think the Mayor should be assassinated :eek:

CHRONOLOGY....Here's a timeline that outlines the fate of both FEMA and flood control projects in New Orleans under the Bush administration. Read it and weep:


January 2001: Bush appoints Joe Allbaugh, a crony from Texas, as head of FEMA. Allbaugh has no previous experience in disaster management.


April 2001: Budget Director Mitch Daniels announces the Bush administration's goal of privatizing much of FEMA's work. In May, Allbaugh confirms that FEMA will be downsized: "Many are concerned that federal disaster assistance may have evolved into both an oversized entitlement program...." he said. "Expectations of when the federal government should be involved and the degree of involvement may have ballooned beyond what is an appropriate level."


2001: FEMA designates a major hurricane hitting New Orleans as one of the three "likeliest, most catastrophic disasters facing this country."


December 2002: After less than two years at FEMA, Allbaugh announces he is leaving to start up a consulting firm that advises companies seeking to do business in Iraq. He is succeeded by his deputy, Michael Brown, who, like Allbaugh, has no previous experience in disaster management.


March 2003: FEMA is downgraded from a cabinet level position and folded into the Department of Homeland Security. Its mission is refocused on fighting acts of terrorism.


2003: Under its new organization chart within DHS, FEMA's preparation and planning functions are reassigned to a new Office of Preparedness and Response. FEMA will henceforth focus only on response and recovery.


Summer 2004: FEMA denies Louisiana's pre-disaster mitigation funding requests. Says Jefferson Parish flood zone manager Tom Rodrigue: "You would think we would get maximum consideration....This is what the grant program called for. We were more than qualified for it."


June 2004: The Army Corps of Engineers budget for levee construction in New Orleans is slashed. Jefferson Parish emergency management chiefs Walter Maestri comments: "It appears that the money has been moved in the president's budget to handle homeland security and the war in Iraq, and I suppose that's the price we pay."


June 2005: Funding for the New Orleans district of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is cut by a record $71.2 million. One of the hardest-hit areas is the Southeast Louisiana Urban Flood Control Project, which was created after the May 1995 flood to improve drainage in Jefferson, Orleans and St. Tammany parishes.


August 2005: While New Orleans is undergoing a slow motion catastrophe, Bush mugs for the cameras, cuts a cake for John McCain, plays the guitar for Mark Wills, delivers an address about V-J day, and continues with his vacation. When he finally gets around to acknowledging the scope of the unfolding disaster, he delivers only a photo op on Air Force One and a flat, defensive, laundry list speech in the Rose Garden.


So: A crony with no relevant experience was installed as head of FEMA. Mitigation budgets for New Orleans were slashed even though it was known to be one of the top three risks in the country. FEMA was deliberately downsized as part of the Bush administration's conservative agenda to reduce the role of government. After DHS was created, FEMA's preparation and planning functions were taken away.

Actions have consequences. No one could predict that a hurricane the size of Katrina would hit this year, but the slow federal response when it did happen was no accident. It was the result of four years of deliberate Republican policy and budget choices that favor ideology and partisan loyalty at the expense of operational competence. It's the Bush administration in a nutshell.

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2005_09/007023.php

Staticbeef
Sep 2nd, 2005, 01:42 AM
:worship: :worship: :worship: Thank You :worship: :worship: :worship:

F-R-E-A-K
Sep 2nd, 2005, 04:31 AM
This is really awful. :sad: :sad: :sad:


Everything is all gone. :sad: The only thing I seen standing, was the Mc Donald's sign. :eek:
Poor people. :sad:

Epigone
Sep 2nd, 2005, 04:38 AM
Shoot to kill, troops told
As thousands wait to be rescued or receive aid, authorities have issued a "shoot to kill" order in a bid to stem the mounting lawlessness in the hurricane-ravaged city of New Orleans. Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco said a detachment of 300 National Guard troops, who have served in Iraq, had been authorised to shoot to kill "hoodlums" in the hurricane-ravaged city of New Orleans.

"Three hundred of the Arkansas National Guard have landed in the city of New Orleans," Blanco said.

"These troops are fresh back from Iraq, well-trained, experienced, battle-tested and under my orders to restore order in the streets," Blanco said.
"They have M-16s and they are locked and loaded.

"These troops know how to shoot and kill and they are more than willing to do so if necessary and I expect they will," said Blanco.
link (http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/shoot-to-kill-troops-told/2005/09/02/1125302714538.html)

Diesel
Sep 2nd, 2005, 05:14 AM
The people in New Orleans are acting a mess. :(

What do you expect :confused: They've been promised aide that hasn't gotten there. People are dying, people are hungry, homeless, without power. How should they be expected to act? This is America, not some country on the other side of the world but aide is so slow to come through. The president himself isn't giving people any hope or light. Some of the police are looting their own food, this when they are supposed to be worried about protecting people and property. People shouldn't be lawless and going to extremes like some have but this is outrageous how they are being treated and in the United States of America at that.

serenafan08
Sep 2nd, 2005, 05:20 AM
This is truly devastating. It's almost as bad as the tsunami that hit Asia last year. Luckily though, the death toll won't be nearly as high. Thank God!!! But seriously, I've been tracking this story since it came into fruition on Sunday morning. Katrina was a monster when she was still in the Gulf of Mexico - the top winds were 175 mph!!! :eek: When it hit land, the top wind speed was down to 155 mph, but it was still bad. What really upsets me is that there was ample time to evacuate people, and no one even flinched. I said in another thread that the Air Force could have used its jets to airlift people out, and the Navy could have sailed its ships up the Mississippi River to St. Louis with people. There were things that could have been done. I really hope everyone takes this as a sign that we need to get a natural disaster relief plan together, especially for hurricanes.

disposablehero
Sep 2nd, 2005, 05:26 AM
I think the whole thing is a disgrace. CNN had an expert in studio on Sunday with a doomsday scenario suggesting 100,000 people could die. What did Bush do? I have no idea, I didn't hear about any government assisted evacuation. It's easy to say that all these forces in Iraq have left them shorthanded, but that simply doesn't cut it. There are still Billions of dollars of military resources stationed in the US, much of it in the South. It was possible to get people out, period. And it didn't happen.

Now I am hearing about how they will be moving in 1400 military police per day for the next 3 days to deal with the anarchy. 1400? I work at medium sized car dealership, and if everyone got their spouse to help, we could move 1400 military personnel hundreds of miles in a day. And this is the best the most powerful country on Earth can do?

A disgrace. A failure in foresight and leadership. Again.

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 05:29 AM
link (http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/shoot-to-kill-troops-told/2005/09/02/1125302714538.html)
if this is true, its the most disgusting thing i have ever seem. people are dying and hunger all over the place and rather than sending aid, they send american troops to kill victims of a hurricane. i really hope thats not true.

ys
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:16 AM
link (http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/shoot-to-kill-troops-told/2005/09/02/1125302714538.html)

Finally.. they are turning to what they should have started with. They should have anticipated that there will be people who would want to take an advantage of lawlessness. They should have used force, they should been dealing with all lawlessness using the field justice from the very start. Many innocent people would not have been murdered, raped, mugged. Unless you stop lawlessness right away, the amount of blood it takes to stop it will only grow..

ys
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:18 AM
I think the whole thing is a disgrace. CNN had an expert in studio on Sunday with a doomsday scenario suggesting 100,000 people could die. What did Bush do? I have no idea, I didn't hear about any government assisted evacuation. It's easy to say that all these forces in Iraq have left them shorthanded, but that simply doesn't cut it. There are still Billions of dollars of military resources stationed in the US, much of it in the South. It was possible to get people out, period. And it didn't happen.

Now I am hearing about how they will be moving in 1400 military police per day for the next 3 days to deal with the anarchy. 1400? I work at medium sized car dealership, and if everyone got their spouse to help, we could move 1400 military personnel hundreds of miles in a day. And this is the best the most powerful country on Earth can do?

A disgrace. A failure in foresight and leadership. Again.

Finally, soemone agrees with me. I believe that the people responsible for extremely poor preparation - namely - the mayor, the governer, the president - should be prosecuted. Their incompetence and irresponsibility translated in thousands of lost lives..

ampers&
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:18 AM
Finally.. they are turning to what they should have started with. They should have anticipated that there will be people who would want to take an advantage of lawlessness. They should have used force, they should been dealing with all lawlessness using the field justice from the very start. Many innocent people would not have been murdered, raped, mugged. Unless you stop lawlessness right away, the amount of blood it takes to stop it will only grow..
You're fucking insane.

Hagar
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:27 AM
Finally, soemone agrees with me. I believe that the people responsible for extremely poor preparation - namely - the mayor, the governer, the president - should be prosecuted. Their incompetence and irresponsibility translated in thousands of lost lives..

When I see the images, I would think I'm watching some underdeveloped country in Africa. But this is the US of A.
The countries that were hit after the tsunami were much better organized than what we see in NO.
And Bush still has his smirk on his face.
This is what will sack the Republicans in the White House. At least one good thing will come out of this.

ys
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:31 AM
When I see the images, I would think I'm watching some underdeveloped country in Africa. But this is the US of A.
The countries that were hit after the tsunami were much better organized than what we see in NO.
And Bush still has his smirk on his face.
This is what will sack the Republicans in the White House. At least one good thing will come out of this.

AFAIK, that moron the mayor is democrat. Honestly? I don't care about what party are they? I agree, that area seems to have the level of management closer to Ruanda than to a developed country. It's incredible how even on Saturday they were not realising how grave the situation is. Everyone knew that. Not them..

ys
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:32 AM
You're fucking insane.

Then you are not insane and you obviously prefer this:
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/09/02/katrina.impact/index.html


"He described scenes of lawlessness and desperation, with people simply dragging corpses into corners.

"They have quite a few people running around here with guns," he said. "You got these young teenage boys running around up here raping these girls."

Elsewhere, groups of armed men wandered the streets, buildings smoldered and people picked through stores for what they could find."

ampers&
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:39 AM
Then you are not insane and you obviously prefer this:
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/09/02/katrina.impact/index.html


"He described scenes of lawlessness and desperation, with people simply dragging corpses into corners.

"They have quite a few people running around here with guns," he said. "You got these young teenage boys running around up here raping these girls."

Elsewhere, groups of armed men wandered the streets, buildings smoldered and people picked through stores for what they could find."
No, you moron, I don't prefer that.
But making an order to shoot to kill victims of this terrible disaster won't impede the violence, it’ll only increase the number of dead.

Zippy
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:39 AM
Here's a very imformative article about the happenings in New Orleans area and everything else dealing with the flood. It's very good, but pretty long too. But it's only long, because it covers so much. Check it out. Also I bolded a few things that interested me.Link to article (http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=514&u=/ap/20050902/ap_on_re_us/hurricane_katrina_62)


NEW ORLEANS - New Orleans descended into anarchy Thursday as corpses lay abandoned in street medians, fights and fires broke out, cops turned in their badges and the governor declared war on looters who have made the city a menacing landscape of disorder and fear.

"They have M-16s and they're locked and loaded," Gov. Kathleen Blanco said of 300 National Guard troops who landed in New Orleans fresh from duty in Iraq. "These troops know how to shoot and kill, and they are more than willing to do so, and I expect they will."

Four days after Hurricane Katrina roared in with a devastating blow that inflicted potentially thousands of deaths, the fear, anger and violence mounted Thursday.

"I'm not sure I'm going to get out of here alive," said Canadian tourist Larry Mitzel, who handed a reporter his business card in case he goes missing. "I'm scared of riots. I'm scared of the locals. We might get caught in the crossfire."

The chaos deepened despite the promise of 1,400 National Guardsmen a day to stop the looting, plans for a $10 billion recovery bill in Congress and a government relief effort President Bush called the biggest in U.S. history.

New Orleans' top emergency management official called that effort a "national disgrace" and questioned when reinforcements would actually reach the increasingly lawless city.

About 15,000 to 20,000 people who had taken shelter at New Orleans convention center grew ever more hostile after waiting for buses for days amid the filth and the dead. Police Chief Eddie Compass said there was such a crush around a squad of 88 officers that they retreated when they went in to check out reports of assaults.

"We have individuals who are getting raped, we have individuals who are getting beaten," Compass said. "Tourists are walking in that direction and they are getting preyed upon."

Col. Henry Whitehorn, chief of the Louisiana State Police, said he heard of numerous instances of New Orleans police officers — many of whom from flooded areas — turning in their badges.

"They indicated that they had lost everything and didn't feel that it was worth them going back to take fire from looters and losing their lives," Whitehorn said.

A military helicopter tried to land at the convention center several times to drop off food and water. But the rushing crowd forced the choppers to back off. Troopers then tossed the supplies to the crowd from 10 feet off the ground and flew away.

In hopes of defusing the situation at the convention center, Mayor Ray Nagin gave the refugees permission to march across a bridge to the city's unflooded west bank for whatever relief they could find. But the bedlam made that difficult.

"This is a desperate SOS," Nagin said in a statement. "Right now we are out of resources at the convention center and don't anticipate enough buses."

At least seven bodies were scattered outside the convention center, a makeshift staging area for those rescued from rooftops, attics and highways. The sidewalks were packed with people without food, water or medical care, and with no sign of law enforcement.

An old man in a chaise lounge lay dead in a grassy median as hungry babies wailed around him. Around the corner, an elderly woman lay dead in her wheelchair, covered up by a blanket, and another body lay beside her wrapped in a sheet.

"I don't treat my dog like that," 47-year-old Daniel Edwards said as he pointed at the woman in the wheelchair.

"You can do everything for other countries, but you can't do nothing for your own people," he added. "You can go overseas with the military, but you can't get them down here."

The street outside the center, above the floodwaters, smelled of urine and feces, and was choked with dirty diapers, old bottles and garbage.

"They've been teasing us with buses for four days," Edwards said. "They're telling us they're going to come get us one day, and then they don't show up."

Every so often, an armored state police vehicle cruised in front of the convention center with four or five officers in riot gear with automatic weapons. But there was no sign of help from the National Guard.

At one point the crowd began to chant "We want help! We want help!" Later, a woman, screaming, went on the front steps of the convention center and led the crowd in reciting the 23rd Psalm, "The Lord is my shepherd ..."

"We are out here like pure animals," the Issac Clark said.

"We've got people dying out here — two babies have died, a woman died, a man died," said Helen Cheek. "We haven't had no food, we haven't had no water, we haven't had nothing. They just brought us here and dropped us."

Tourist Debbie Durso of Washington, Mich., said she asked a police officer for assistance and his response was, "'Go to hell — it's every man for himself.'"

"This is just insanity," she said. "We have no food, no water ... all these trucks and buses go by and they do nothing but wave."

FEMA director Michael Brown said the agency just learned about the situation at the convention center Thursday and quickly scrambled to provide food, water and medical care and remove the corpses.

Speaking on CNN's "Larry King Live," Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said the evacuation of New Orleans should be completed by the end of the weekend.

At the hot and stinking Superdome, where 30,000 were being evacuated by bus to the Houston Astrodome, fistfights and fires erupted amid a seething sea of tense, suffering people who waited in a lines that stretched a half-mile to board yellow school buses.

After a traffic jam kept buses from arriving for nearly four hours, a near-riot broke out in the scramble to get on the buses that finally did show up, with a group of refugees breaking through a line of heavily armed National Guardsmen.

One military policeman was shot in the leg as he and a man scuffled for the MP's rifle, police Capt. Ernie Demmo said. The man was arrested.

Some of those among the mostly poor crowd had been in the dome for four days without air conditioning, working toilets or a place to bathe. An ambulance service airlifting the sick and injured out of the Superdome suspended flights as too dangerous after it was reported that a bullet was fired at a military helicopter.

"If they're just taking us anywhere, just anywhere, I say praise God," said refugee John Phillip. "Nothing could be worse than what we've been through."

By Thursday evening, 11 hours after the military began evacuating the Superdome, the arena held 10,000 more people than it did at dawn. National Guard Capt. John Pollard said evacuees from around the city poured into the Superdome and swelled the crowd to about 30,000 because they believed the arena was the best place to get a ride out of town.

As he watched a line snaking for blocks through ankle-deep waters, New Orleans' emergency operations chief Terry Ebbert blamed the inadequate response on the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

"This is not a FEMA operation. I haven't seen a single FEMA guy," he said. He added: "We can send massive amounts of aid to tsunami victims, but we can't bail out the city of New Orleans."

FEMA officials said some operations had to be suspended in areas where gunfire has broken out, but are working overtime to feed people and restore order.

A day after Nagin took 1,500 police officers off search-and-rescue duty to try to restore order in the streets, there were continued reports of looting, shootings, gunfire and carjackings — and not all the crimes were driven by greed.

When some hospitals try to airlift patients, Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Cheri Ben-Iesan said, "there are people just taking potshots at police and at helicopters, telling them, `You better come get my family.'"

Outside a looted Rite-Aid drugstore, some people were anxious to show they needed what they were taking. A gray-haired man who would not give his name pulled up his T-shirt to show a surgery scar and explained that he needs pads for incontinence.

"I'm a Christian. I feel bad going in there," he said.

Earl Baker carried toothpaste, toothbrushes and deodorant. "Look, I'm only getting necessities," he said. "All of this is personal hygiene. I ain't getting nothing to get drunk or high with."

Several thousand storm victims had arrived in Houston by Thursday night, and they quickly got hot meals, showers and some much-needed rest.

Audree Lee, 37, was thrilled after getting a shower and hearing her teenage daughter's voice on the telephone for the first time since the storm. Lee had relatives take her daughter to Alabama so she would be safe.

"I just cried. She cried. We cried together," Lee said. "She asked me about her dog. They wouldn't let me take her dog with me. ... I know the dog is gone now."

While floodwaters in the city appeared to stabilize, efforts continued to plug three breaches that had opened up in the levee system that protects this below-sea-level city.

Helicopters dropped sandbags into the breach and pilings were being pounded into the mouth of the canal Thursday to close its connection to Lake Pontchartrain, state Transportation Secretary Johnny Bradberry said. The next step called for using about 250 concrete road barriers to seal the gap.

In Washington, the White House said Bush will tour the devastated Gulf Coast region on Friday and has asked his father, former President George H.W. Bush, and former President Clinton to lead a private fund-raising campaign for victims.

The president urged a crackdown on the lawlessness.

"I think there ought to be zero tolerance of people breaking the law during an emergency such as this — whether it be looting, or price gouging at the gasoline pump, or taking advantage of charitable giving or insurance fraud," Bush said. "And I've made that clear to our attorney general. The citizens ought to be working together."

Donald Dudley, a 55-year-old New Orleans seafood merchant, complained that when he and other hungry refugees broke into the kitchen of the convention center and tried to prepare food, the National Guard chased them away.

"They pulled guns and told us we had to leave that kitchen or they would blow our damn brains out," he said. "We don't want their help. Give us some vehicles and we'll get ourselves out of here!"

Epigone
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:48 AM
Then you are not insane and you obviously prefer this:
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/09/02/katrina.impact/index.htmlOr this... (http://www.cnn.com/2005/WEATHER/09/01/katrina.hospital.sniper/index.html)The evacuation of patients from Charity Hospital was halted Thursday after the facility came under sniper fire twice.

and

Evacuations by boat were halted after armed looters threatened medics and overturned one of their boats.I don't think that they will be shooting people for simply looting, but if the looters are armed and threatening people, I think they'll be dealt with.

Hagar
Sep 2nd, 2005, 07:53 AM
AFAIK, that moron the mayor is democrat. Honestly? I don't care about what party are they? I agree, that area seems to have the level of management closer to Ruanda than to a developed country. It's incredible how even on Saturday they were not realising how grave the situation is. Everyone knew that. Not them..

Whatever party the mayor is from, you can't evacuate a big city like that if you don't have the appropriate means. This required state or federal intervention from the start.

RVD
Sep 2nd, 2005, 10:08 AM
Yes, and guess who is to be blamed ys? Read this and tell me if you still think the Mayor should be assassinated :eek:

CHRONOLOGY....Here's a timeline that outlines the fate of both FEMA and flood control projects in New Orleans under the Bush administration. Read it and weep:


January 2001: Bush appoints Joe Allbaugh, a crony from Texas, as head of FEMA. Allbaugh has no previous experience in disaster management.


April 2001: Budget Director Mitch Daniels announces the Bush administration's goal of privatizing much of FEMA's work. In May, Allbaugh confirms that FEMA will be downsized: "Many are concerned that federal disaster assistance may have evolved into both an oversized entitlement program...." he said. "Expectations of when the federal government should be involved and the degree of involvement may have ballooned beyond what is an appropriate level."


2001: FEMA designates a major hurricane hitting New Orleans as one of the three "likeliest, most catastrophic disasters facing this country."


December 2002: After less than two years at FEMA, Allbaugh announces he is leaving to start up a consulting firm that advises companies seeking to do business in Iraq. He is succeeded by his deputy, Michael Brown, who, like Allbaugh, has no previous experience in disaster management.


March 2003: FEMA is downgraded from a cabinet level position and folded into the Department of Homeland Security. Its mission is refocused on fighting acts of terrorism.


2003: Under its new organization chart within DHS, FEMA's preparation and planning functions are reassigned to a new Office of Preparedness and Response. FEMA will henceforth focus only on response and recovery.


Summer 2004: FEMA denies Louisiana's pre-disaster mitigation funding requests. Says Jefferson Parish flood zone manager Tom Rodrigue: "You would think we would get maximum consideration....This is what the grant program called for. We were more than qualified for it."


June 2004: The Army Corps of Engineers budget for levee construction in New Orleans is slashed. Jefferson Parish emergency management chiefs Walter Maestri comments: "It appears that the money has been moved in the president's budget to handle homeland security and the war in Iraq, and I suppose that's the price we pay."


June 2005: Funding for the New Orleans district of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is cut by a record $71.2 million. One of the hardest-hit areas is the Southeast Louisiana Urban Flood Control Project, which was created after the May 1995 flood to improve drainage in Jefferson, Orleans and St. Tammany parishes.


August 2005: While New Orleans is undergoing a slow motion catastrophe, Bush mugs for the cameras, cuts a cake for John McCain, plays the guitar for Mark Wills, delivers an address about V-J day, and continues with his vacation. When he finally gets around to acknowledging the scope of the unfolding disaster, he delivers only a photo op on Air Force One and a flat, defensive, laundry list speech in the Rose Garden.


So: A crony with no relevant experience was installed as head of FEMA. Mitigation budgets for New Orleans were slashed even though it was known to be one of the top three risks in the country. FEMA was deliberately downsized as part of the Bush administration's conservative agenda to reduce the role of government. After DHS was created, FEMA's preparation and planning functions were taken away.

Actions have consequences. No one could predict that a hurricane the size of Katrina would hit this year, but the slow federal response when it did happen was no accident. It was the result of four years of deliberate Republican policy and budget choices that favor ideology and partisan loyalty at the expense of operational competence. It's the Bush administration in a nutshell.

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2005_09/007023.phpUN-BEEEEEE-LIEV-ABLE!!

Than you for this information Infiniti2001. This truly answers many of my questions.
And a great big thank-you to George W. Bush. :fiery: :fiery: :fiery:

ys
Sep 2nd, 2005, 01:20 PM
Whatever party the mayor is from, you can't evacuate a big city like that if you don't have the appropriate means. This required state or federal intervention from the start.

Absolutely. That was the Mayor's primary fault. He failed to convince state and Federal governement to help on a required level. What happened was totally predictable. If theyd' been shown on Saturday the pictures of today, I am sure they would find a way to do much, much more.. they would have done a lot of things differently.. They simply didn't take it seriously enough.. And that was his joib - convincing them to take things seriously enough and help .. convincing them that the city can not handle it on its own.

griffin
Sep 2nd, 2005, 01:31 PM
Absolutely. That was the Mayor's primary fault. He failed to convince state and Federal governement to help on a required level.

Well then you should also blame every NO mayor going back a couple of decades. Because that's how long various people/agencies have been trying to fund projects that would either have helped protect the region from this kind of damage or help them better react to it.

What's frustrating too is that our emergency response is still so disjointed. You'd think 9/11 would have inspired us to create better, more efficient disaster-response systems.

Mother_Marjorie
Sep 2nd, 2005, 01:38 PM
What's frustrating too is that our emergency response is still so disjointed. You'd think 9/11 would have inspired us to create better, more efficient disaster-response systems.

Griffin, its just proof that the billions of dollars spent on "homeland security" was for naught. And this agency is supposed to protect and help us from terrorist attacks. VERY SCAREY.

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 01:45 PM
No, you moron, I don't prefer that.
But making an order to shoot to kill victims of this terrible disaster won't impede the violence, it’ll only increase the number of dead.
:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 01:53 PM
Whatever party the mayor is from, you can't evacuate a big city like that if you don't have the appropriate means. This required state or federal intervention from the start.
its required by state and federal law yes but its not FUNDED.

people were getting upset with me a few weeks ago when i posted about the 25 million dollar brigde to the alaskan mainland that would benefit all of 50 who live on that island, but this is the reason why that kind of shit should outrage americans. what do you do when 2 weeks later, you have something terrible like this happens, and people are dying left and right because massive chucks of the budget are tied you in fucking solid gold brigdes and other useless shit.

i dont think somethings would have gotten this bad under any other administration in american history, not even bush's own father would have allowed things to get like this.

Staticbeef
Sep 2nd, 2005, 02:07 PM
its required by state and federal law yes but its not FUNDED.

people were getting upset with me a few weeks ago when i posted about the 25 million dollar brigde to the alaskan mainland that would benefit all of 50 who live on that island, but this is the reason why that kind of shit should outrage americans. what do you do when 2 weeks later, you have something terrible like this happens, and people are dying left and right because massive chucks of the budget are tied you in fucking solid gold brigdes and other useless shit.

i dont think somethings would have gotten this bad under any other administration in american history, not even bush's own father would have allowed things to get like this.

President Bush, just left Washington, D.C. and is headed for the area affected by the Hurricane, at a press conference at the White House, he said the response for aid, so far is unacceptable. He has no plans to go to the city of N.O. because of security concerns. He will however, be on the ground in the Mississippi area where it is safer. At this moment there are now 2 fires burning in N.O., with no Firefighters, the buildings have to burn themselves out. It gets worse guys.

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 02:15 PM
President Bush, just left Washington, D.C. and is headed for the area affected by the Hurricane, at a press conference at the White House, he said the response for aid, so far is unacceptable. He has no plans to go to the city of N.O. because of security concerns. He will however, be on the ground in the Mississippi area where it is safer. At this moment there are now 2 fires burning in N.O., with no Firefighters, the buildings have to burn themselves out. It gets worse guys.

do you know what HE means by this? i know what i would mean, but what does he mean.

oh yeah security concerns so the news is report that rescue workers and supplies are waiting outside the city because these same security concerns. what kind of "rescue" workers are these, what kind of people these? what is wrong with this nation that so many people are so willing to LET an entire city go up in flames and water and prevent those who do want to help from helping?

Alvarillo
Sep 2nd, 2005, 02:50 PM
i can't understand how in the US after that, 4 days later there are people who hasn't recieved food or water, i can't understan why the militars aren't in the Superdome, in NO controlling what's happening, is the US! isn't Africa, it's :eek:

there's a Spaniard, member of the spanish parlament there, in the Superdome, with her family and is telling to the Spanish tvs and news that there are mafias who controls the little quantity of food, they are terribly scared, want to go out there but they simply can't do it, no one is going to rescue them!

it's it's ... i simply can't understand how a country who have countries controlled with their militars can't control a disaster inside its own frontiers!!!!!
Fucking Bush, go and help all the people is hungry and scared, leave your fucking holidays and put all the money to help them, people will die if you don't control that terrific situation!
this man i stupid or what? :mad:

Staticbeef
Sep 2nd, 2005, 03:06 PM
i can't understand how in the US after that, 4 days later there are people who hasn't recieved food or water, i can't understan why the militars aren't in the Superdome, in NO controlling what's happening, is the US! isn't Africa, it's :eek:

there's a Spaniard, member of the spanish parlament there, in the Superdome, with her family and is telling to the Spanish tvs and news that there are mafias who controls the little quantity of food, they are terribly scared, want to go out there but they simply can't do it, no one is going to rescue them!

it's it's ... i simply can't understand who a country who have countries controlled with their militars can't control a disaster inside its own frontiers!!!!!
Fucking Bush, go and help all the people is hungry and scared, leave your fucking holidays and put all the money to help them, people will die if you don't control that terrific situation!
this man i stupid or what? :mad:


Te oigo hermano,alli son gente de todos classes dentro de esse edificio.estamos rogando para todos.y, muchas gracias por su preocupación.

ivanovic
Sep 2nd, 2005, 03:11 PM
This is a very sad thing thats happening in New Orlenes, I hope the young children are safe and that everything becomes fine again. I think BUSH should have reacted quickly, he can react quickly in waging a war but is incompetant in helping his own people, I do feel sorry for the people affected and wish it never happened BUT I cannot help but think what goes around comes around.

btw, why are there so many African American people there, I mean I'm yet to see a white person, strange??

"Sluggy"
Sep 2nd, 2005, 03:16 PM
[QUOTE=ivanovic] I do feel sorry for the people affected and wish it never happened BUT I cannot help but think what goes around comes around./QUOTE]

You mean like what Malcolm X said after Kennedy's assasination " the chickens are just coming home to roost "? Seriously, why would innocent people be suffering if Bush is just getting his just due. The people didnt do anything wrong. Justice would be better served if Bush got struck by lightning, not by creating choas in one of our most wonderful cities. :wavey:

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 03:17 PM
This is a very sad thing thats happening in New Orlenes, I hope the young children are safe and that everything becomes fine again. I think BUSH should have reacted quickly, he can react quickly in waging a war but is incompetant in helping his own people, I do feel sorry for the people affected and wish it never happened BUT I cannot help but think what goes around comes around.

btw, why are there so many African American people there, I mean I'm yet to see a white person, strange??
the first part of your statement is just evil. how can you blame the poorest citizens for not being able to leave a hurricane area because of a war most of them dont even support and a president they didnt even vote for. :fiery:

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 03:18 PM
[QUOTE=ivanovic] I do feel sorry for the people affected and wish it never happened BUT I cannot help but think what goes around comes around./QUOTE]

You mean like what Malcolm X said after Kennedy's assasination " the chickens are just coming home to roost "? Seriously, why would innocent people be suffering if Bush is just getting his just due. The people didnt do anything wrong. Justice would be better served if Bush got struck by lightning, not by creating choas in one of our most wonderful cities. :wavey:

you dont know shit about malcolm x. period.

Staticbeef
Sep 2nd, 2005, 03:24 PM
the first part of your statement is just evil. how can you blame the poorest citizens for not being able to leave a hurricane area because of a war most of them dont even support and a president they didnt even vote for. :fiery:

You, may have just stumbled on the answer

"Sluggy"
Sep 2nd, 2005, 03:42 PM
[QUOTE=SlugPiss]

you dont know shit about malcolm x. period.

JP, wtf do you know what i know? anybody who can read his autobiograph or watch his movie can know about Malcolm, or you can just take a black history class like anyone else. Whats gotten you pissy at ME today? :angel:

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 04:13 PM
[QUOTE=Jigglypuff]

JP, wtf do you know what i know? anybody who can read his autobiograph or watch his movie can know about Malcolm, or you can just take a black history class like anyone else. Whats gotten you pissy at ME today? :angel:
this really isnt the topic to get into this, i said what i had to say. you dont know anything about him or life if you did you what not have said what you did. if you want me to break it down word for word and in minute detail why it is that you dont know shit about Brother Malcolm, i would be more than happy to in another thread.

Denise4925
Sep 2nd, 2005, 04:19 PM
Plain and simple, Bush is a socio-pathic murderer.

Rtael
Sep 2nd, 2005, 04:56 PM
hmmm, yet you believe everything the media is feeding you and someone else is a dumbass tool. :lol:


And where do you get your information from, if not the media? Psychics?

SelesFan70
Sep 2nd, 2005, 04:58 PM
Here's a link to a satelite view of the flooded city... :eek:

http://hosted.ap.org/specials/neworleanssatellite/index.html


New Orleans has been vulnerable for years to this type of disaster. You don't have a city of 500,000 sitting 18ft below sea level and not expect at some point for something to come along and destroy it. It seems to me that all you liberals would be rejoicing to see so many people so dependent on big government to help them. That's what you want, isn't?!?! People as wards of the state?!?! Big government has let generation after generation after generation of poor people of all races down for a very long time. Now, that being said...

The response has been just bizarre. Why is the media not telling these people that major help is on the way. Hell, how can the media get in and out and the military can't? Why are they plugging levees? The city is flooded, and that water has crested so you use those helicopters to at least drop food and water!!! Worry about the floods later! Someone needs to step up and be a leader...mayor Nagin hasn't, governor Blanco hasn't, FEMA hasn't, Bush hasn't...who will it be? :mad:

I guess the next hard questions will be: Do we rebuild New Orleans as it was, or "move the entire city north of Lake Ponchotrain" as was suggested by an "expert" on one the cable news shows I watching...MSNBC I think. I dunno, it seems awfully foolish to rebuild it in the same spot. We can build levees to the high heavens, but natural disasters happen. All of the buildings will have to be demolished...even the skyscrapers...because the foundations are gone. Bank records, safe deposit boxes, business records...and most importantly LIVES have been destroyed. I can't watch it anymore. I feel depressed and I cry when I watch it. I feel stressed out and angry because I think most of us could do better than what the government is doing so far :sad:

But this IS America. We will bounce back. :yeah:

Denise4925
Sep 2nd, 2005, 05:29 PM
It seems to me that all you liberals would be rejoicing to see so many people so dependent on big government to help them. That's what you want, isn't?!?! People as wards of the state?!?! Big government has let generation after generation after generation of poor people of all races down for a very long time. Now, that being said...

:speakles: No one wants anyone dependant on the Government. However, situations like this is what the government is what people pay taxes for. This is an emergency and what Bush has done is a crime. Do we pay taxes just to fund big business' tax relief, go to war and aide other countries in crisises? No, these things are secondary and last if at all regarding tax relief to big business, but this is what you apparently voted for when you voted Bush back in office. This has been the most disastrous and destructive administration since Herbert Hoover. I'm sick to my stomach about the state this country is in and how many innocent lives have suffered and died at the hands of GW Bush.

The response has been just bizarre. Why is the media not telling these people that major help is on the way. Hell, how can the media get in and out and the military can't? Why are they plugging levees? The city is flooded, and that water has crested so you use those helicopters to at least drop food and water!!! Worry about the floods later! Someone needs to step up and be a leader...mayor Nagin hasn't, governor Blanco hasn't, FEMA hasn't, Bush hasn't...who will it be? :mad:

Bizarre is the understatement of the century. What good would it do for the media tell these people help is on the way? The reason these people are frantic and angry is because that's all they've been hearing since they were abandoned in the Superdome without food, water and security. Is help on the way? Why is it on the way and not in progress?

They are plugging levees because there are people still in the City and if they don't plug the levees, water will continue to flood the City and the people left will be doomed because the "help that's on the way" wouldn't be able to get to them and they all will surely perish.

Lead what? There's nothing to lead. Bush took the funds away from any agency that could organize any type of relief effort to fund a senseless war, where all of the available military are fighting and dying, when they could be here helping where they are needed.

I guess the next hard questions will be: Do we rebuild New Orleans as it was, or "move the entire city north of Lake Ponchotrain" as was suggested by an "expert" on one the cable news shows I watching...MSNBC I think. I dunno, it seems awfully foolish to rebuild it in the same spot. We can build levees to the high heavens, but natural disasters happen. All of the buildings will have to be demolished...even the skyscrapers...because the foundations are gone. Bank records, safe deposit boxes, business records...and most importantly LIVES have been destroyed. I can't watch it anymore. I feel depressed and I cry when I watch it. I feel stressed out and angry because I think most of us could do better than what the government is doing so far :sad:

This question is irrelevant until the people left are removed and secured in a safe place. What does it matter what happens to NO at this point?

Please tell us what we all could doing better? Do you have a plan? If so, lay it on us. Organize and alert the media so that others can volunteer.

But this IS America. We will bounce back. :yeah:

What the hell does this mean to the people who's lost loved ones, everything they own and their livlihood? Especially since you're not in favor of government lending a hand. What are they going to do? What are they going to bounce back to? Forgive me, but it's hard to be optimistic in light of the dire situation and the current administration.

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 05:43 PM
It seems to me that all you liberals would be rejoicing to see so many people so dependent on big government to help them. That's what you want, isn't?!?! People as wards of the state?!?!

you are officially as sick and demented as ys.

that you would even imply that people would want thousands of americans to DIE like this, that I would want this. you are just plain sick.

griffin
Sep 2nd, 2005, 06:51 PM
btw, why are there so many African American people there, I mean I'm yet to see a white person, strange??

I've actually seen a number of whites still there (including one old coot and his family who are living in the top floor of his house and refuse to leave), and I'm not even watching that much coverage - so I don't know why you're not seeing any.

But I suspect poverty and lack of access to resources has a lot to do with who could and couldn't get out of the city.

*JR*
Sep 2nd, 2005, 07:33 PM
Two sad ironies: people were taken by bus to Houston (taking up to 12 hours on roads with so many abandoned vehicles, etc. not the usual 6). Many were afraid to enter the Astrodome after what they went thru in the Superdome back home. Then the Astrodome reached its capacity and others were turned away to go to???

And for NO cops to turn in their badges in disgust, you know this was what soldiers call a "cluster fuck". (Basically, that everyone who could fuck something up did so). :(

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 07:39 PM
Two sad ironies: people were taken by bus to Houston (taking up to 12 hours on roads with so many abandoned vehicles, etc. not the usual 6). Many were afraid to enter the Astrodome after what they went thru in the Superdome back home. Then the Astrodome reached its capacity and others were turned away to go to???

And for NO cops to turn in their badges in disgust, you know this was what soldiers call a "cluster fuck". (Basically, that everyone who could fuck something up did so). :(
if i had been raped at the superdome there is no way you would get me into the astrodome. :sad: so i dont blame them :sad:

Jackaboo
Sep 2nd, 2005, 07:39 PM
It seems to me that all you liberals would be rejoicing to see so many people so dependent on big government to help them. That's what you want, isn't?!?!

I can't beleive you wrote this. Is that really what you think?

SelesFan70
Sep 2nd, 2005, 08:12 PM
:speakles:

What the hell does this mean to the people who's lost loved ones, everything they own and their livlihood? Especially since you're not in favor of government lending a hand. What are they going to do? What are they going to bounce back to? Forgive me, but it's hard to be optimistic in light of the dire situation and the current administration.

It means that these people (not only in New Orleans, but in Mississippi and Alabama) are my fellow American citizens and I'm sure once the fog and dire needs wear off we and they will bounce back whether they live in New Orleans or not. Lives, livlihoods, and pride have been lost, but as time goes on we will heal. Obviously, I'm not opposed to government intervention. :smash: The full force and brunt of the Federal government is needed here.

As far as you critiquing my other statements...OF COURSE no one wants to see this suffering! The majority of these folks were too poor to leave, so they ARE dependent on the government at this time...local, state, and federal which have let them down until today when some help arrived. We all have opinions and want to see a better job done in helping everyone, and, yes, it's easy to be a Monday morning quarterback, but blaming Bush for every thing from causing the hurricane to improper federal funding isn't helping either. There's a LOT of blame to go around to everyone. The priority should be getting the people out and getting supplies to those cities that the people are being sent to so that the cities they are going to can accomodate them because if you don't you're gonna have the same problems all over again...only in different cities.

On a related note, I'm tired of my fellow citizens being called "refugees".

Alvarillo
Sep 2nd, 2005, 08:19 PM
Spanish government has sent its security services of the Spanish embassy in Washington to rescue 2 Spanish families who can't go out from N. Orleans.
1 in a hotel, another one in the Convention centre, the third spanish family has reached the N.O. airport and they tell that is a secure place and are waiting to leave the States as soon as posibble

i hope they comeback home soon and healthy ;)

Wigglytuff
Sep 2nd, 2005, 08:30 PM
As far as you critiquing my other statements...OF COURSE no one wants to see this suffering! The majority of these folks were too poor to leave, so they ARE dependent on the government at this time...local, state, and federal which have let them down until today when some help arrived.

thats NOT that you said before

It seems to me that all you liberals would be rejoicing to see so many people so dependent on big government to help them. That's what you want, isn't?!?! People as wards of the state?!?!

at this point, i dont really think, feel i can take you seriously.

lakeway11
Sep 2nd, 2005, 09:10 PM
And Bush still has his smirk on his face.
This is what will sack the Republicans in the White House. At least one good thing will come out of this.

not to mention playing around on the guitar when Katrina was strinking...if some good come out of this disaster it will to wake up the treasoness bastards we have all in Congress to forget the imperialistic notions the neocons and NWO types have and start having a Republic again as the founders desired

lakeway11
Sep 2nd, 2005, 09:26 PM
The Book of I Kings reads: “Behold, the Lord passed by, and a great and strong wind rent the mountains, and broke in pieces the rocks before the Lord; but the Lord was not in the wind: and after the wind and earthquake; but the Lord was not in the earthquake: And after the earthquake a fire; but the Lord was not in the fire: and after the fire a still small voice.”

...alternate view of the divine to those who believe that God had an active hand in punishing the immoral elements of New Orleans. It is more likely an act of war by those who can manipulate weather patterns, which is Satan at work...

yes, pray :sad:

Denise4925
Sep 2nd, 2005, 09:52 PM
For those in the Texas area:

Six Flags AstroWorld
Loop 610 South across from Reliant Park
Six Flags Splashtown
21300 IH 45 North at the Louetta exit in Spring
713-799-1234
<http://sixflags.com/> www.sixflags.com
Families displaced by Hurricane Katrina are invited to enjoy the parks free
of charge this Saturday, Sunday and Labor Day Monday. Residents of
Louisiana, Mississippi or Alabama can present a valid state issued ID at the
Six Flags AstroWorld and Six Flags SplashTown front gates to receive free
admission for up to four people per ID.
Houston residents can take advantage of free admission to Six Flags
AstroWorld on Monday, September 5 by bringing a new, unwrapped toy valued at
$10 or more to the Six Flags AstroWorld front gate starting at 9:00 a.m. for
the non-profit Project Love-Santa's Angels "Santa in September" Toy Drive.
One free admission ticket per person per donated toy.




Do you know anyone in Texas as an evacuee from any of the three states
Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama? If so, the Texas Department of Health
and Human Services will give them 2 months of Food Stamps with no questions
asked. All they need to show is a driver's license. This agency will also
give you information and locations where they can receive FREE GAS. Also,
if you are housing anyone from one of these states you can call FEMA at
(800) 621-3362 to file a claim and receive assistance for your help. This
is valid information directly from TDHHS.

Keep passing the info....keep passing the info....

> In an effort to assist the residents of Louisiana that have fallen
> victim to the Hurricane Katrina, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. is
> partnering with Council Member Ronald C. Green to sponsor a relief
> drive at the Golden Corral located at 3033 South Loop West 610 and South

> Main on Friday September 2nd from 7:30 to 12 noon. The relief
> supplies collected will
be
> delivered to victims on Saturday September 3rd. We are shooting to
> collect sufficient supplies to fill at least two 18 wheeler trailers
> to meet the extraordinary needs of our families and friends from
Louisiana.
>
> We are asking to to support this effort by bringing, non-perishable
> food items, water, clothing and other supplies to the Golden Corral
> on Saturday and show your support and commitment to helping others
> less fortunate then we are.
>
> Please share this information with your staff, friends and family as
> we want this effort to be a big success and show of love.
>
>







Hey guys, my friend found this.
Hey I just found out that there is an apt complex that is letting families
stay for 3 mos free & to call 281 590 1502.
Here is more info if you know anyone looking for a job or even to help:
Dear All,
By now you may have heard that Carlton Hospitality Services is staffing wait
staff for the Astrodome as it becomes home to the Katrina refugees. First of
all, thank you for your overwhelming response, as we work as a TEAM to fill
this important order. Here's what you should know at this point.
Starting tomorrow we will need 50 employees per shift to work 3 shifts,
everyday: Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour.
6:30am - 10:30am 10:30am - 4:30pm 4:30pm - 8:30pm
You may call people on assignment because Carlton Hospitality Services is a
differ company than Carlton Staffing. Therefore there will be no overtime.
The dress code is black pants, white oxford (button down) shirt and
comfortable street shoes.
Please email details to Ginger at gbailey@carltonstaffing.com; the name,
phone number and the day your employee has committed to, ASAP. If you have
any questions, please don't hesitate to call (713) 691-2000 and speak with
Julie Eisen (24 Greenway Plaza, Suite 1205) (713) 358-7175 ofc (713)957-3680
fax


FYI

Construction company hiring 1000 people to help with hurricane clean up.
$10/hr, 80-90 hrs weekly, food, lodging, transportation to area. Start
immediately, could go on for 1-2 yrs. Anyone interested can call directly
to LVI Svcs, 713-991-0480, 10500 Telephone Rd.



Hello fellow Brothas & Sistas:

Although I may not know many of you personally I would like to extend a
request to you and all others to gather Friday morning to bring clothing and
any non- perishable food items to take to those New Orleans refugees coming
to the Astrodome- if we can join sooner great! But ultimately we are looking
at Friday. We all have been so blessed and we are able to sleep in our own
homes, we are making plans to party this weekend while our neighbors are
making plans to start their lives over, that is those who's lives were
spared by Katrina. As we celebrate this weekend let us remember those among
us who are in need- Please send a email blast out to all of your friends and
your data base of party-goers reflecting a day of prayer & fasting for those
who are with out. While I realize that many of us dint understand the power
of prayer! r and fasting. I not asking for all to give up food- but to give
prayers of hope and faith and healing to the survivors of Katrina and their
families. Also to give up things that we take for granted- such as our
money, food, clothing, cars, television- un-necessary spending.

For those of you who have church homes contact your Pastors/Ministers to
gain more knowledge in fasting. Also, get involved this could have easily
been Houston- and keep in mind that there is another storm in the Gulf as we
read this email.

Thank you for your audience and any efforts you can afford to bring us
together as a community not only to gather in celebration each week- but to
gather in love for one another and help where and when we can.

Drop off location for Friday, September 2, 2005 7:30 am to 1:00 pm 161314
South Post Oak.

I have been in contact with Vaughn Taylor , owner of Club Kartel and he has
said that we could use his facility as a drop off point Friday 7:30 am until
1pm and later if needed. The address again is 16314 S. Post Oak, Houston,
TX their phone number is 713.728.9800

We will not accept cash donations- ALL monetary donations should be directed
to the Red Cross or Star of Hope of Houston Internet users can make a secure
online credit card contribution by visiting <http://www.redcross.org/>
www.redcross.org or <http://www.houstonredcross.org/>
www.houstonredcross.org.

Items Needed:
* Food and drinks

* Clothing

* Disposable diapers

* Games and toys

* Sheets and blankets

* Monetary donations -

* For our purposes we will only except clothing and non-perishable
food items, Pampers and baby formula, medical supplies, such as syringes for
diabetics, aspirin, band aids, etc.
Finally, I have joined forces with the Star of Hope Houston, and they will
be my point of contact for donations. Feel free to contact them directly at

Star of Hope Homeless Shelter Programs
Transitional Living Center
6897 Ardmore St
Houston, TX 77054-2307 Phone: (713) 748-7242
God Bless all the readers of this email and their families.





In lieu of the recent events devastating our Gulf Coast several
organizations have opened their doors to help those in need. My fiancé is
an apartment manager for Brookbend Apartments on the southwest side of town
and is one of these individuals. Currently they are offering no deposit, no
application fees and no rent until October 1st for all who have been
displaced.
Electricity to these units will also be provided until October 1st as well.
Upon this date, it will be up to the individual to decide if they wish to
stay or not.
Should you know anyone who this may help please donÆt hesitate to contact
the number below. Let them know that you have received this message from
Justin @ Maersk Sealand in The Woodlands.

CTC:Erica Chesik
Brookbend Apartments
12265 Fondren
Houston, TX 77035
713-729-4036


Braeswood Oaks (SW Houston)
10555 Fondren
Houston,TX 77096
713-772-8650

Canterbury Court (NW Houston)
3910 Sherwood Lane
Houston,TX 77092
713-681-8617

Stone Forest (NW Houston)
9801 Fondren
Houston,TX 77096
713-772-2271

Willow Tree (SE Houston)
4910 Allendale
Houston,TX 77017
713-943-8310

Woodcreek (NW Houston)
5800 Hollister
Houston,TX 77040
713-462-8860



>
> The following Houston-based companies are offering jobs immediately to
evacuees in the Houston area:
> ----------
> RKI, Inc., A truck equipment manufacturing facility has 38 positions
available. The company is looking for laborers, welders, engineers and CAD
operators. It is locate at 2301 Central Parkway in northwest Houston. The
contact is: Bradley Rawson, manufacturing manager and he can be reached at:
713-688-4414.
> ----------
> Memorial Hermann Healthcare System has positions available for RNs,
pharmacy, rehab/PT, imaging and respiratory. Anyone interested should call:
713-448-6200.
> ----------
> The U.S. Postal Service Houston Branch is offering work to any postal
workers from the New Orleans area that had to evacuate to Houston. For
information call: 713-226-3801.
> ----------
> ACS (Affiliated Computer Services) has openings for Membership Retention
Specialist, Customer Service Agent, IT Helpdesk Support, Security Guard,
Supervisors and an Operations Manager.
> Applications will be accepted at:
> ACS
> 3100 Hayes Road
> Houston, TX 77082 (between Richmond and Westheimer) in the southwest area
> or fax to 832-486-8327
My prayers go out to everyone in need.

Denise4925
Sep 2nd, 2005, 09:58 PM
Two sad ironies: people were taken by bus to Houston (taking up to 12 hours on roads with so many abandoned vehicles, etc. not the usual 6). Many were afraid to enter the Astrodome after what they went thru in the Superdome back home. Then the Astrodome reached its capacity and others were turned away to go to???

And for NO cops to turn in their badges in disgust, you know this was what soldiers call a "cluster fuck". (Basically, that everyone who could fuck something up did so). :(
We are taking in "refugees" here in San Antonio. We have former Air Force bases, i.e. Kelly USA that are taking in the people who could not get into Houston.

If you live here in San Antonio, we are asking for volunteers to do intake at Kelly USA.

Denise4925
Sep 2nd, 2005, 10:02 PM
if i had been raped at the superdome there is no way you would get me into the astrodome. :sad: so i dont blame them :sad:
They are prepared at the Astrodome, they have supplies, wash rooms, food and water and there is security. It's better than being on the street.

Hagar
Sep 2nd, 2005, 10:05 PM
They are prepared at the Astrodome, they have supplies, wash rooms, food and water and there is security. It's better than being on the street.

Denise, good to see that people are trying to help. Thanks for posting this positive news.

Denise4925
Sep 2nd, 2005, 10:08 PM
It means that these people (not only in New Orleans, but in Mississippi and Alabama) are my fellow American citizens and I'm sure once the fog and dire needs wear off we and they will bounce back whether they live in New Orleans or not.

:retard:

but blaming Bush for every thing from causing the hurricane to improper federal funding isn't helping either. There's a LOT of blame to go around to everyone.

The question is when are his "devotees" going to make him accountable for SOMETHING????

The priority should be getting the people out and getting supplies to those cities that the people are being sent to so that the cities they are going to can accomodate them because if you don't you're gonna have the same problems all over again...only in different cities.



That's all you had to say in the first place, instead of trying to throw the blame on the "liberals". :smash:

topspin
Sep 3rd, 2005, 02:45 PM
MSNBC pointed out something very interesting. They wondered how their newscrew were able to get access inside the damaged areas when there were talk of inaccessiblity to deliver assistance due to flooded areas, risks of contaimiantion, diseases, road hazards, and fears of violence.

The MSNBC reporter, John Quintella (sp?), showed how he was able to drive a SUV throughout certain areas. He also talked about the "supposed" dangers of rioting there would be by the stranded victims at the Convention Center due to not acquring assistance ( food and water ) for four days. He said is was the quite the opposite. The people were not angered or mad about not receiving aid. They were calm. They just wanted food and to be evacuated.

Wigglytuff
Sep 3rd, 2005, 03:41 PM
They are prepared at the Astrodome, they have supplies, wash rooms, food and water and there is security. It's better than being on the street.

no, i completely understand. it must be just so phycologically(sp?) traumatic for those people going from the terror of the superdome to another "dome" if you will. i was just saying i can understand peoples apprehensiveness.

i am so glad that such much is finally being done though. and am really impressed by all that texas is offering and doing.

:worship: :worship: :worship:

Wigglytuff
Sep 3rd, 2005, 03:43 PM
For those in the Texas area:

Six Flags AstroWorld
Loop 610 South across from Reliant Park
Six Flags Splashtown
21300 IH 45 North at the Louetta exit in Spring
713-799-1234
<http://sixflags.com/> www.sixflags.com
Families displaced by Hurricane Katrina are invited to enjoy the parks free
of charge this Saturday, Sunday and Labor Day Monday. Residents of
Louisiana, Mississippi or Alabama can present a valid state issued ID at the
Six Flags AstroWorld and Six Flags SplashTown front gates to receive free
admission for up to four people per ID.
Houston residents can take advantage of free admission to Six Flags
AstroWorld on Monday, September 5 by bringing a new, unwrapped toy valued at
$10 or more to the Six Flags AstroWorld front gate starting at 9:00 a.m. for
the non-profit Project Love-Santa's Angels "Santa in September" Toy Drive.
One free admission ticket per person per donated toy.




Do you know anyone in Texas as an evacuee from any of the three states
Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama? If so, the Texas Department of Health
and Human Services will give them 2 months of Food Stamps with no questions
asked. All they need to show is a driver's license. This agency will also
give you information and locations where they can receive FREE GAS. Also,
if you are housing anyone from one of these states you can call FEMA at
(800) 621-3362 to file a claim and receive assistance for your help. This
is valid information directly from TDHHS.

Keep passing the info....keep passing the info....

> In an effort to assist the residents of Louisiana that have fallen
> victim to the Hurricane Katrina, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. is
> partnering with Council Member Ronald C. Green to sponsor a relief
> drive at the Golden Corral located at 3033 South Loop West 610 and South

> Main on Friday September 2nd from 7:30 to 12 noon. The relief
> supplies collected will
be
> delivered to victims on Saturday September 3rd. We are shooting to
> collect sufficient supplies to fill at least two 18 wheeler trailers
> to meet the extraordinary needs of our families and friends from
Louisiana.
>
> We are asking to to support this effort by bringing, non-perishable
> food items, water, clothing and other supplies to the Golden Corral
> on Saturday and show your support and commitment to helping others
> less fortunate then we are.
>
> Please share this information with your staff, friends and family as
> we want this effort to be a big success and show of love.
>
>







Hey guys, my friend found this.
Hey I just found out that there is an apt complex that is letting families
stay for 3 mos free & to call 281 590 1502.
Here is more info if you know anyone looking for a job or even to help:
Dear All,
By now you may have heard that Carlton Hospitality Services is staffing wait
staff for the Astrodome as it becomes home to the Katrina refugees. First of
all, thank you for your overwhelming response, as we work as a TEAM to fill
this important order. Here's what you should know at this point.
Starting tomorrow we will need 50 employees per shift to work 3 shifts,
everyday: Pay Rate: $9.00 per hour.
6:30am - 10:30am 10:30am - 4:30pm 4:30pm - 8:30pm
You may call people on assignment because Carlton Hospitality Services is a
differ company than Carlton Staffing. Therefore there will be no overtime.
The dress code is black pants, white oxford (button down) shirt and
comfortable street shoes.
Please email details to Ginger at gbailey@carltonstaffing.com; the name,
phone number and the day your employee has committed to, ASAP. If you have
any questions, please don't hesitate to call (713) 691-2000 and speak with
Julie Eisen (24 Greenway Plaza, Suite 1205) (713) 358-7175 ofc (713)957-3680
fax


FYI

Construction company hiring 1000 people to help with hurricane clean up.
$10/hr, 80-90 hrs weekly, food, lodging, transportation to area. Start
immediately, could go on for 1-2 yrs. Anyone interested can call directly
to LVI Svcs, 713-991-0480, 10500 Telephone Rd.



Hello fellow Brothas & Sistas:

Although I may not know many of you personally I would like to extend a
request to you and all others to gather Friday morning to bring clothing and
any non- perishable food items to take to those New Orleans refugees coming
to the Astrodome- if we can join sooner great! But ultimately we are looking
at Friday. We all have been so blessed and we are able to sleep in our own
homes, we are making plans to party this weekend while our neighbors are
making plans to start their lives over, that is those who's lives were
spared by Katrina. As we celebrate this weekend let us remember those among
us who are in need- Please send a email blast out to all of your friends and
your data base of party-goers reflecting a day of prayer & fasting for those
who are with out. While I realize that many of us dint understand the power
of prayer! r and fasting. I not asking for all to give up food- but to give
prayers of hope and faith and healing to the survivors of Katrina and their
families. Also to give up things that we take for granted- such as our
money, food, clothing, cars, television- un-necessary spending.

For those of you who have church homes contact your Pastors/Ministers to
gain more knowledge in fasting. Also, get involved this could have easily
been Houston- and keep in mind that there is another storm in the Gulf as we
read this email.

Thank you for your audience and any efforts you can afford to bring us
together as a community not only to gather in celebration each week- but to
gather in love for one another and help where and when we can.

Drop off location for Friday, September 2, 2005 7:30 am to 1:00 pm 161314
South Post Oak.

I have been in contact with Vaughn Taylor , owner of Club Kartel and he has
said that we could use his facility as a drop off point Friday 7:30 am until
1pm and later if needed. The address again is 16314 S. Post Oak, Houston,
TX their phone number is 713.728.9800

We will not accept cash donations- ALL monetary donations should be directed
to the Red Cross or Star of Hope of Houston Internet users can make a secure
online credit card contribution by visiting <http://www.redcross.org/>
www.redcross.org or <http://www.houstonredcross.org/>
www.houstonredcross.org.

Items Needed:
* Food and drinks

* Clothing

* Disposable diapers

* Games and toys

* Sheets and blankets

* Monetary donations -

* For our purposes we will only except clothing and non-perishable
food items, Pampers and baby formula, medical supplies, such as syringes for
diabetics, aspirin, band aids, etc.
Finally, I have joined forces with the Star of Hope Houston, and they will
be my point of contact for donations. Feel free to contact them directly at

Star of Hope Homeless Shelter Programs
Transitional Living Center
6897 Ardmore St
Houston, TX 77054-2307 Phone: (713) 748-7242
God Bless all the readers of this email and their families.





In lieu of the recent events devastating our Gulf Coast several
organizations have opened their doors to help those in need. My fiancé is
an apartment manager for Brookbend Apartments on the southwest side of town
and is one of these individuals. Currently they are offering no deposit, no
application fees and no rent until October 1st for all who have been
displaced.
Electricity to these units will also be provided until October 1st as well.
Upon this date, it will be up to the individual to decide if they wish to
stay or not.
Should you know anyone who this may help please donÆt hesitate to contact
the number below. Let them know that you have received this message from
Justin @ Maersk Sealand in The Woodlands.

CTC:Erica Chesik
Brookbend Apartments
12265 Fondren
Houston, TX 77035
713-729-4036


Braeswood Oaks (SW Houston)
10555 Fondren
Houston,TX 77096
713-772-8650

Canterbury Court (NW Houston)
3910 Sherwood Lane
Houston,TX 77092
713-681-8617

Stone Forest (NW Houston)
9801 Fondren
Houston,TX 77096
713-772-2271

Willow Tree (SE Houston)
4910 Allendale
Houston,TX 77017
713-943-8310

Woodcreek (NW Houston)
5800 Hollister
Houston,TX 77040
713-462-8860



>
> The following Houston-based companies are offering jobs immediately to
evacuees in the Houston area:
> ----------
> RKI, Inc., A truck equipment manufacturing facility has 38 positions
available. The company is looking for laborers, welders, engineers and CAD
operators. It is locate at 2301 Central Parkway in northwest Houston. The
contact is: Bradley Rawson, manufacturing manager and he can be reached at:
713-688-4414.
> ----------
> Memorial Hermann Healthcare System has positions available for RNs,
pharmacy, rehab/PT, imaging and respiratory. Anyone interested should call:
713-448-6200.
> ----------
> The U.S. Postal Service Houston Branch is offering work to any postal
workers from the New Orleans area that had to evacuate to Houston. For
information call: 713-226-3801.
> ----------
> ACS (Affiliated Computer Services) has openings for Membership Retention
Specialist, Customer Service Agent, IT Helpdesk Support, Security Guard,
Supervisors and an Operations Manager.
> Applications will be accepted at:
> ACS
> 3100 Hayes Road
> Houston, TX 77082 (between Richmond and Westheimer) in the southwest area
> or fax to 832-486-8327
My prayers go out to everyone in need.


:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:

Denise4925
Sep 3rd, 2005, 08:17 PM
:worship: :worship: :worship: :worship:
Jiggly :smooch: