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View Full Version : Dave Chappelle in Mental Health Clinic, says "Entertainment Weekly"


SelesFan70
May 12th, 2005, 02:36 PM
:sad:

http://as.ucsb.edu/aspb/pics/dave_chappelle.jpg

Chappelle Checks Into Mental Health Clinic
Thursday, May 12, 2005

NEW YORK — Comedy Central star Dave Chappelle has checked himself into a mental health facility in South Africa, the magazine Entertainment Weekly reported on Wednesday.

The comedian's whereabouts and condition have been unknown since Comedy Central abruptly announced last week that the planned May 31 launch of the third season of "Chappelle's Show" had been postponed and production halted.

Chappelle flew from Newark, N.J., to South Africa on April 28 for treatment, said the magazine, quoting a source close to the show it would not identify. Entertainment Weekly said it had corroborating sources for its story.

"We don't know where he is," Comedy Central spokesman Tony Fox said. "We've heard about South Africa. We don't know. We haven't talked to Dave."

Chappelle's spokesman, Matt Labov, would not comment on the magazine's story.

"It seems like the issues he's contending with are really quite serious," said Dade Hayes, a senior editor at Entertainment Weekly. "It isn't a case of him spending a weekend someplace recuperating from exhaustion."

The magazine's sources say Chappelle is still in the facility, which was not named, Hayes said. Chappelle's representatives have denied that the comedian was abusing drugs.


Too bad...his show was outrageouly funny. The funniest skit I ever saw was the original one with the blind black guy being a grand wizard of the KKK...OMG...it was sooooo funny! And when he took the hood off the white people fell out... :lol: But if you didn't see the skit, you may think it wasn't so funny :scared: :shrug: But it was..and the one where he showed the differences between how white, black, and hispanic people dance was good, too!

harloo
May 12th, 2005, 02:39 PM
He was under extreme pressure to deliver the third season so I can imagine him having a breakdown. Once a show of his nature is successful he has to improve every season, and considering all the skits he is involved in it became too much. That's the reason Comedy Central postponed the third season. I hope he is alright, it would be a shame if he does not come back.:sad:

Rocketta
May 12th, 2005, 02:51 PM
wow that's a shame I wouldn't be surprised if drugs weren't involved as well as he always looked high on his show. :lol:

The KKK sketch is the funniest of all time especially at the end when they say the guy divorced his wife cause she was a "N*gg*r lover".. :haha:

kabuki
May 12th, 2005, 02:55 PM
:sad: My Bf and I watch it all the time. I hope he is OK.

Infiniti2001
May 12th, 2005, 02:57 PM
Too bad-- it's all the pressure to succeed :sad: . I hope he gets back to being his old self soon, because that show really rocks. I'm not too crazy about comedy, but he has really sucked me in. And yes, he always looks high Rocketta :lol:

Experimentee
May 12th, 2005, 04:44 PM
Why South Africa? Seems a weird place to voluntarily go to.

I didnt think his show was that funny, it seemed to be focused a lot on black culture so maybe I didnt understand some stuff. I thought the one where he visited a cancer patient in hospital and beat him on the Playstation was the funniest one.

harloo
May 12th, 2005, 04:47 PM
He talks about smoking weed in his interviews all the time. Maybe he was doing something else and needs some extra help?

harloo
May 12th, 2005, 04:50 PM
His Rick James impersonations are the best. It was so funny when Rick James appeared on The BET Awards and said, "I'm Rick James B#$@!". RIP Rick!:sad:

Rocketta
May 12th, 2005, 05:28 PM
His Rick James impersonations are the best. It was so funny when Rick James appeared on The BET Awards and said, "I'm Rick James B#$@!". RIP Rick!:sad:

Ohh yeah the skit where he was prince playing basketball was really funny too... :rolls:

Dawn Marie
May 12th, 2005, 05:34 PM
Maybe he is in YellowSprings, Ohio where he grew up which is like a "liberal" town that is lilike a bike ride away from me. Antioch College is in YellowSprings and I am happy to say that Coretta Scott King graduated from there as well as Rod Sterling, from the Twilight Zone.:) Anyway, I hope he gets the help he needs and deserves.:)

Da Bizzness
May 12th, 2005, 06:21 PM
funny, i told my bro last year that he didn't look in good health. something about his body language said that he was under a lot of pressure, and it was really getting to him.

you know who he reminded me of? Jimi Hendrix, before he passed away.

Steam
May 13th, 2005, 01:49 AM
This is a shame because Chappelle had been fighting neck and neck with Will Ferrell for the title of "Funniest Person Alive" and with Ferrell still going strong Chappelle can ill afford to get sick.

I hope that he gets better since he is one of the great comic voices of our time and seems like a standup guy.

But if this is the end, I will always remember him as Prince serving Charlie Murphy pancakes after beating that ass in basketball.

Knizzle
May 13th, 2005, 01:52 AM
This is a shame because Chappelle had been fighting neck and neck with Will Ferrell for the title of "Funniest Person Alive" and with Ferrell still going strong Chappelle can ill afford to get sick.



:tape: :spit:

yukon145
May 13th, 2005, 02:45 AM
get well soon Dave, hes so damn funny!

Rtael
May 13th, 2005, 03:27 AM
It's sad about him being sick, if he is. However, I thought his show was not funny at all...

PaulieM
May 13th, 2005, 03:37 AM
wow that's a shame I wouldn't be surprised if drugs weren't involved as well as he always looked high on his show. :lol:

The KKK sketch is the funniest of all time especially at the end when they say the guy divorced his wife cause she was a "N*gg*r lover".. :haha:
:lol: that's one of my favorites. i also love the one with the racial draft :haha:
aww i hope he's ok, dave is just too fucking funny. i love his show :sad:

decemberlove
May 13th, 2005, 03:41 AM
his show was hilarious, but even better was the stand-up he did that was on hbo "killin them softly". it was a classic. i still laugh just as hard as i did the first time i saw it. i cant look at sesame street the same way again.

i hope he gets better. hes under a lot of pressure with a $25m season coming up. i hope it's not drugs and just exhaustion.

his best skit on the show was the r.kelly one... too catchy.

i prefer the half-baked/killin them softly dave better thou.

he has a comedy/music/documentary coming out. michel gondry [the director of eternal sunshine of the spotless mind] is directing.
with eryak badu . common . talib . dead prez . big daddy kane . lauryn hill . mos def . wyclef jean ... on and on and on... it's from that summer block party he had.

Steam
May 13th, 2005, 03:51 AM
his show was hilarious, but even better was the stand-up he did that was on hbo "killin them softly". it was a classic. i still laugh just as hard as i did the first time i saw it. i cant look at sesame street the same way again.

i hope he gets better. hes under a lot of pressure with a $25m season coming up. i hope it's not drugs and just exhaustion.

his best skit on the show was the r.kelly one... too catchy.



It's the remix edition of the song about pissin'.

I still remember the first time that I saw "Killin them softly". It was the summer of 2000. I had graduated college and was aimless for the summer. I would wake up at noon and go to bed at five in the morning. I didn't really go out and just sat around watching tv and playing video games. Anyway, one night HBO was replaying it and I couldn't stop laughing. I had seen Chappelle before (most notably, of course, in "Half Baked") and thought that he was funny but this just launched him up in my mind (HBO specials have a habit of doing that, same thing happened with Robert Schimmel). The bit about the white friend (I did know that I couldn't do that), black slang (Zip it up and Zip it out), the drug dealing baby, etc etc just all were homeruns thanks to his brilliant delivery coupled with the aw shucks facial expressions that he is a master of. As soon as it was released on DVD I had to own it and have watched it a number of times since (still waiting for the DVD of the Showtime special that I wasn't able to see).

Hopefully, he gets better and everything works out. With so many schlock comedians out there (we're looking at you, Ant) we need all the brilliant ones we can find.

brickhousesupporter
May 13th, 2005, 11:23 AM
It is official, If you play multiple characters in your television show, then you are crazy and going to have a nervous breakdown. There are just to many people who have fallen into this pattern. Martin Lawrence, Eddie Murphy, and now Dave Chappelle. Hey maybe it is a black thing, I need to work that into the equation.

The new math
Plays multiple characters on one show + Black = It puts the lotion on its skin.

Cybelle Darkholme
May 13th, 2005, 03:00 PM
Yes, he's funny.

However I find it disturbing that largely his comedy reinforces negative stereotypes about black people. Not all of comedy, just most of it.

People say he targets everyone but no he doesn't. Here's a sample of his topics...

black people are crazy
black people dont pay their bills
black people make bad fathers
black people are crack heads
black people are slackers
black people are loud and obnoxious and ready to fight

Just look at his skit of the real world to see what I mean.

Knizzle
May 13th, 2005, 04:31 PM
Yes, he's funny.

However I find it disturbing that largely his comedy reinforces negative stereotypes about black people. Not all of comedy, just most of it.

People say he targets everyone but no he doesn't. Here's a sample of his topics...

black people are crazy
black people dont pay their bills
black people make bad fathers
black people are crack heads
black people are slackers
black people are loud and obnoxious and ready to fight

Just look at his skit of the real world to see what I mean.

Well black people are who he knows best obviously. He goes at white people and latinos also.

kiwifan
May 13th, 2005, 05:54 PM
Yes, he's funny.

However I find it disturbing that largely his comedy reinforces negative stereotypes about black people. Not all of comedy, just most of it.

People say he targets everyone but no he doesn't. Here's a sample of his topics...

black people are crazy
black people dont pay their bills
black people make bad fathers
black people are crack heads
black people are slackers
black people are loud and obnoxious and ready to fight

Just look at his skit of the real world to see what I mean.

The first time I saw the Black Real World, I thought that...but by the 25th time seeing...

...you note that his preface to the skit is that the Real World puts a black person is the the most fucked up white people they can find and they act suprised when the black person looses thier shit...

...so what would happen if you put one white person with the most fucked up black people...

...I'll look and see if I can find a transcript to get the exact words (I won't look very hard but I'll look) ;)

kiwifan
May 13th, 2005, 06:03 PM
Black Comedy
Why is Dave Chappelle's malice so winning?
By Matt Feeney
Posted Thursday, March 4, 2004, at 10:42 AM PT

http://img.slate.msn.com/media/1/123125/122958/2093267/2096416/040303_Chappelle.jpg (http://%5Bimg%5Dhttp://img.slate.msn.com/media/1/123125/122958/2093267/2096416/040303_Chappelle.jpg%5B/img%5D)Mining humor from the racial divide

(http://Mining%20humor%20from%20the%20racial%20divide%3Cbr %20/%3E%0A%3Cbr%20/%3E)If comedian Dave Chappelle's eponymous showisn't the funniest half-hour on television, it is only for the inconsistency from which all sketch comedy suffers. Now in its second season (with the first season available—uncensored—on DVD), Chappelle's Show (Comedy Central, Wednesdays, 10:30 p.m. ET)certainly provides some of the funniest moments on television.

A challenge, though, when watching Chappelle's Show,is to resist the temptation to grant it—because Chappelle is black, and because he deals in harsh racial caricatures, and because you're laughing your ass off, and because you want to believe you're a progressive person—a political significance that it doesn't have. New York Press film critic Armond White (http://www.africana.com/articles/daily/mtv20030101best.asp), for example, credits Chappelle's Show with "subverting racism, sexism, and the clichés you might call blackism." But Chappelle doesn't "subvert" these things—he exploits them. That is, he takes eager advantage of an obvious double standard: White comedians have either to avoid race or treat it with exquisite caution, but black comedians like Chappelle are able to extract laughs from America's racial hang-ups, not necessarily from a solemn underlying commitment to racial justice, but often with an unfettered and indiscriminate comic malice. I'm not complaining, though. At least somebody gets to do it.

Chappelle—a tall, lean D.C. native whose stand-up act is delivered in a languid drawl that evokes the much deeper South—grounds his comedy in America's Big Problem. But, stylistically, it is reminiscent less of the politically circumscribed satire of Lenny Bruce or Dick Gregory than of the gleeful, cruel slapstick of the Three Stooges—the jarring, unwarranted violence of poked eyes and conked heads. Of course, Chappelle addresses a more complex set of realities than the Stooges, but his funniest stuff relies on pretty much the same comic method: smashing these realities heedlessly together.

Chappelle's attempts to justify his comedy are fairly weak, generally withering in the unsparing philosophical light cast by your baby sitter when she told you that two wrongs don't make a right. Responding, on the show, to a letter complaining about negative portrayals of white people, Chappelle replied that there are plenty of positive portrayals of white people on television, so he's just balancing accounts. He was joking, sort of; in interviews he says much the same thing. People complaining about hostility toward whites in his sketches, he told USA Today, "are probably under the assumption racism is over."

Now, African-Americans can obviously be accountable for their portrayals of white people, even if racism persists. Two wrongs and all that. But for a host of complicated reasons having to do with American history and the nature of comedy, our powerful desire to laugh, and our commendable willingness to laugh at ourselves, African-American comedians get a special dispensation, and the white folks who feign injury at their racial burlesque end up looking like humorless idiots and tiresome, reverse-PC litigants.

Chappelle's sketches are about way more than white people, though. They range across ethnic America, devoting special attention to the freaky underbelly of black popular music. The first season featured a delirious, revolting sendup of R. Kelly's sexual quirks, and a recent episode offered a riotous and oddly gripping account of Rick James' lunatic cokehead years—an inspired hybrid of straight documentary and the wildest comic overstatement.

But the show is most reliably funny when Chappelle immerses himself in the sublime disaster of black-white relations. A sketch from the new season, about a "racial draft"—in which the major American ethnicities select, like sports teams, ethnically ambiguous celebrities like Derek Jeter and Mariah Carey as their permanent own—is mostly a dud, until the black team drafts Tiger Woods. Woods is, by his own description, ethnically "Cablinasian" (Caucasian/Black/American-Indian/Asian), but Chappelle plays him as a standard white nerd, grooveless and fawning. Though it can only highlight his indelible, asinine whiteness, Chappelle's Tiger gratefully embraces his new, official blackness: "I've always wanted to say this," he announces, jerking about at the podium and chewing dutifully on his consonants in every black comic's version of white speech, " … fershizzle." That this brief moment is not just amusing but startlingly funny testifies to the show's secret, indispensable ingredient: Chappelle's masterly physical comedy—at once cruelly exaggerated and dead-on—which is somewhat surprising coming from a comic best known for a relaxed, almost drowsy stand-up act.

Perhaps the most fully realized sketch of all is from last season, a takeoff on MTV's The Real World. Instead of one African-American tossed in with "a bunch of crazy white people," a single white guy named (of course) Chad moves into a sprawling apartment filled with angry black people. (Chappelle's goal—to reverse The Real World's invidious racial alchemy—nicely expresses his retributive itch that, in interviews, he seems to mistake for a sense of justice.) The escalating abuses and misunderstandings climax when roommate Tyree, a feral ex-con played by Eddie Murphy's brother Charlie, stabs Chad's visiting father with a prison-style shiv. This sketch riffs off a black guy's view of a white guy's worst nightmare—the willful misunderstanding, the (literal) whiff of drugs and violence, the scalding indifference to white-bread niceness, the threat of sexual humiliation. Gentle and high-voiced, wide-hipped and pudgy, Chad arrives emasculated, and so, by the ineluctable logic of this nightmare, his cute and busty girlfriend ditches him to sleep with both Tyree and Tyree's prison buddy, Lysol.

In using this harmless eunuch as a foil, Chappelle vaults clear over any edifying satirical point about the way in which racism begets paranoia or whatever. Here, the animating sentiment is not disapproval or disappointment. It's contempt—not necessarily toward white people, but certainly toward white people as they appear in the black guy's view of a white guy's worst nightmare. Let's face it, Chad is a tool, and his dad, short and nice and preppy in a pink Ralph Lauren shirt, is virtually begging for a shiv. The sketch concludes with a Real World standby, the banishment scene, in which the black roommates boot Chad because they don't "feel safe" around him. He, incredulously, impotently, rejoins—as his girlfriend watches, laughing, from Lysol's lap—"But, Tyree, you stabbed my dad." This sketch is both hilarious and discomfiting. But if you find a redemptive satirical point in it, or some determinate subversive meaning, you put it there yourself.

What Chappelle's Show illustrates is that black-white relations, and the complex feelings that can accompany them—incomprehension, anger, guilt, fear, loathing—function like a hall of fun house mirrors. Once we enter (and we can't not enter), we all end up as caricatures and distortions, not only in other people's eyes, but in our own as well. This may not describe a multiracial society on the path to healing (though willingly participating in other people's caricatures of us, for the higher goal of comedy, might be a postmodern substitute for the old liberal ideal of mutual understanding). But it does describe a society that—under the ministrations of someone like Dave Chappelle—is capable of generating a lot of extremely funny shit.

Matt Feeney is a freelance writer in Oakland, Calif.
Still from Chappelle's Show by Danielle Levitt © 2004 Comedy Partners Inc.

harloo
May 13th, 2005, 06:15 PM
Yes, he's funny.

However I find it disturbing that largely his comedy reinforces negative stereotypes about black people. Not all of comedy, just most of it.

People say he targets everyone but no he doesn't. Here's a sample of his topics...

black people are crazy
black people dont pay their bills
black people make bad fathers
black people are crack heads
black people are slackers
black people are loud and obnoxious and ready to fight

Just look at his skit of the real world to see what I mean.

I feel you somewhat Cybelle. When I first starting watching the show I was sort of dissapointed with the crackhead skit, and I was also bothered how Dave used the "N" word repeatedly. I really did not watch the show that often because of that fact. He does funny stuff but it can also be interpreted as a show full of stereotypes.

What made me start watching it again was the R Kelly skits, Lil John impersonation, and of course Rick James. The black real world was funny as hell, I still can watch that one over and over. It's so true because you always have one black person on the RW who is just angry as hell. :lol:

Cybelle Darkholme
May 16th, 2005, 01:55 AM
Thanks for that post Kiwi it gives me something to think about.

Also I'd like to point out this recent article

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/2005-05-15-chappelle-interview_x.htm

Helen Lawson
May 17th, 2005, 04:51 PM
I remember when going to the nuthouse was shameful in Hollywood and kept away from the press. Even a hint of a RELATIVE going into the nuthouse was enough to ruin your career. I remember once when Florence lost it and I had to lock her up in Payne Whitney, it was awful. That Florence was such a taker! Take, take, take! You'd think she was the Oscar-winning movie star in the family the way she demanded Cadillacs and fur coats!

Rocketta
May 17th, 2005, 05:33 PM
wow, long time no see Helen! :wavey:

Helen Lawson
May 17th, 2005, 05:34 PM
Hi Rocketta!