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View Full Version : Democrats Booted From Church Over Politics


Infiniti2001
May 7th, 2005, 06:14 PM
WAYNESVILLE, N.C. (May 7) - Some in Pastor Chan Chandler's flock wish he had a little less zeal for the GOP. Members of the small East Waynesville Baptist Church say Chandler led an effort to kick out congregants who didn't support President Bush. Nine members were voted out at a Monday church meeting in this mountain town, about 120 miles west of Charlotte.

"He's the kind of pastor who says do it my way or get out,'' said Selma Morris, the church treasurer who was among those voted out. "He's real negative all the time.''

Chandler didn't return a message left by The Associated Press at his home Friday, and several calls to the church went unanswered. He told WLOS-TV in Asheville that the actions were not politically motivated.

The station also reported that 40 others in the 100-member congregation resigned in protest after Monday's vote.

During the presidential election last year, Chandler told the congregation that anyone who planned to vote for Democratic Sen. John Kerry should either leave the church or repent, said former member Lorene Sutton.

Some church members left after Chandler made his ultimatum in October, Morris said.

George Bullard, associate executive director-treasurer for Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, told the Asheville Citizen-Times that a pastor has every right to disallow memberships if a church's bylaws allow for the pastor to establish criteria for membership.

"Membership is a local church issue,'' he said. "It is not something the state convention would enter into.''

He added that the nine members were not legally terminated because Monday's meeting was supposed to be a deacons meeting, not a business meeting. They have a lawyer looking into the situation, he said.

The head of the North Carolina Democratic Party sharply criticized the pastor Friday, saying Chandler jeopardized his church's tax-free status by openly supporting a candidate for president.

Yep , that couldn't be a clearer violation of a church's non-profit status and the IRS better be all up his ass for it.


"If these reports are true, this minister is not only acting extremely inappropriately by injecting partisan politics into a house of worship, but he is also potentially breaking the law,'' Chairman Jerry Meek said.

Doris Wilson, one of Chandler's neighbors and a member of First Baptist Church in Waynesville, said God doesn't play partisan politics.

"I hate to see the church suffer like that,'' she said. "God doesn't care whether you're a Republican or a Democrat. It just hurts to see that going on.''

SelesFan70
May 7th, 2005, 07:59 PM
I hope they investigate all those churches Kerry and Clinton went to with the "Rev" Jesse Jackson and the "Rev" Al Sharpton, too. In fact, just tax all churches/synagogues/mosques and get it over with. :wavey:

Scotso
May 8th, 2005, 01:36 AM
SelesFan, there is no ban on political leaders going to churches. They all do it.

But a church openly supporting a candidate is illegal, and they should all lose their tax-exempt status.

And don't put Rev in quotes, they are reverends, whether or not you like it.

JustineTime
May 8th, 2005, 05:52 AM
I agree with his sentiments against John Kerry, but I also agree with his parishioners' sentiments against George Bush. :shrug:

What's a partisan to do? :confused:

God doesn't care whether you're a Republican or a Democrat.

Amen! :)

VSFan1 aka Joshua L.
May 8th, 2005, 02:40 PM
I hope they investigate all those churches Kerry and Clinton went to with the "Rev" Jesse Jackson and the "Rev" Al Sharpton, too. In fact, just tax all churches/synagogues/mosques and get it over with. :wavey:
Before you post something outlandish like that, perhaps you should get your facts right and not make wrong statements.

When you see candidates at churches the other party often invited to attend, but does not. Particularly with George W. Bush who has people filtering out his crowds so he doesn't have any naysayers at his public events.

harloo
May 8th, 2005, 03:15 PM
Religion gains control of U.S.

From Darrell Hutchins,
Conway:

Twenty-five years ago, James Adams, ethics professor at Harvard Divinity School, warned that we now would be fighting "Christian fascists." He said this when Pat Robertson and other prominent evangelists began speaking of a new political religion intending to take control of all major American institutions, including mainstream denominations and the government, so as to transform the United States into a global Christian empire.

Adams' prediction has come true with the rise of a new and particularly militant movement in Christian politics, known as Dominionism, made up of Christian evangelicals obsessed with political power. Focus on the Family, New Life and National Religious Broadcasters are some of the organizations comprising the movement which calls for Christian dominion over the U.S. and, eventually, over the whole world, using all means, including military.

It was hard to take Adams seriously at the time he spoke. But fascism, he said, would not return wearing swastikas and brown shirts. Its ideological inheritors would adopt the language of the Bible, come carrying crosses, and chanting the Pledge of Allegiance.

Indeed, similarities between Dominionism and Nazism are striking. In Nazi Germany, many government functions started with prayer. Every school day started with prayer and every child was taught Christianity, especially the Ten Commandments in school. Hitler ended many of his speeches with prayer. He reached out to the churches, declaring that Germany had clear Christian roots, any nation not openly supporting religion was morally bankrupt, and that his administration would provide moral and financial support to initiatives based on faith to provide social services.

Dominionists preach that Jesus has called them to build the kingdom of God in the here and now. America becomes, in this militant biblicism, an agent of God, and all political and intellectual opponents of America's Christian leaders are viewed as agents of Satan. Under Christian dominion, America will no longer be a sinful and fallen nation. Instead, the Ten Commandments will form the basis of our legal system and Creationism and Christian values the basis of our educational system. The media and government will proclaim the "Good News" to all.

Aside from proselytizing , the federal government will serve only to protect property rights and provide homeland security. Some Dominionists would further require all citizens to pay tithes to churches empowered by the government to run social welfare agencies, and a number of influential Dominionists advocate the death penalty for a host of moral crimes, including apostasy, blasphemy, sodomy and witchcraft. The only public voices allowed will be Christian. All others will be silenced.

Traditional evangelicals, of Billy Graham's mold, are not comfortable with the direction taken by the Dominionists who now control most of America's major evangelical organizations. But Christians who challenge Dominionists tend to be ruthlessly thrust aside.

The Dominionist movement poses a very serious threat to the America we know and love. If Dominionist goals do not amount to unconstitutional establishment of religion, then I don't know what would.

flyingmachine
May 8th, 2005, 09:52 PM
Religion gains control of U.S.

From Darrell Hutchins,
Conway:

Twenty-five years ago, James Adams, ethics professor at Harvard Divinity School, warned that we now would be fighting "Christian fascists." He said this when Pat Robertson and other prominent evangelists began speaking of a new political religion intending to take control of all major American institutions, including mainstream denominations and the government, so as to transform the United States into a global Christian empire.

Adams' prediction has come true with the rise of a new and particularly militant movement in Christian politics, known as Dominionism, made up of Christian evangelicals obsessed with political power. Focus on the Family, New Life and National Religious Broadcasters are some of the organizations comprising the movement which calls for Christian dominion over the U.S. and, eventually, over the whole world, using all means, including military.

It was hard to take Adams seriously at the time he spoke. But fascism, he said, would not return wearing swastikas and brown shirts. Its ideological inheritors would adopt the language of the Bible, come carrying crosses, and chanting the Pledge of Allegiance.

Indeed, similarities between Dominionism and Nazism are striking. In Nazi Germany, many government functions started with prayer. Every school day started with prayer and every child was taught Christianity, especially the Ten Commandments in school. Hitler ended many of his speeches with prayer. He reached out to the churches, declaring that Germany had clear Christian roots, any nation not openly supporting religion was morally bankrupt, and that his administration would provide moral and financial support to initiatives based on faith to provide social services.

Dominionists preach that Jesus has called them to build the kingdom of God in the here and now. America becomes, in this militant biblicism, an agent of God, and all political and intellectual opponents of America's Christian leaders are viewed as agents of Satan. Under Christian dominion, America will no longer be a sinful and fallen nation. Instead, the Ten Commandments will form the basis of our legal system and Creationism and Christian values the basis of our educational system. The media and government will proclaim the "Good News" to all.

Aside from proselytizing , the federal government will serve only to protect property rights and provide homeland security. Some Dominionists would further require all citizens to pay tithes to churches empowered by the government to run social welfare agencies, and a number of influential Dominionists advocate the death penalty for a host of moral crimes, including apostasy, blasphemy, sodomy and witchcraft. The only public voices allowed will be Christian. All others will be silenced.

Traditional evangelicals, of Billy Graham's mold, are not comfortable with the direction taken by the Dominionists who now control most of America's major evangelical organizations. But Christians who challenge Dominionists tend to be ruthlessly thrust aside.

The Dominionist movement poses a very serious threat to the America we know and love. If Dominionist goals do not amount to unconstitutional establishment of religion, then I don't know what would.
:eek: It seems things in the USA is going that way. :rolleyes:

SelesFan70
May 9th, 2005, 05:01 AM
Before you post something outlandish like that, perhaps you should get your facts right and not make wrong statements.

When you see candidates at churches the other party often invited to attend, but does not. Particularly with George W. Bush who has people filtering out his crowds so he doesn't have any naysayers at his public events.

Still doesn't negate the fact that NO church/synagogue/mosque should have a politcal candidate visit their church in a political manner, or as a fund raiser for said candidate(s). And no church should oust members for having a free-thinking mind...which is why I left my church voluntarily. :angel:

Szymanowski
May 9th, 2005, 12:09 PM
Well, I think it's appauling if they were excluded for that, if that's the true reason. It's sad to think that if I happened to live there in that parish, I would no longer be a church member:sad:

griffin
May 9th, 2005, 03:32 PM
Still doesn't negate the fact that NO church/synagogue/mosque should have a politcal candidate visit their church in a political manner, or as a fund raiser for said candidate(s).

In fact, they are NOT allowed to host/assist with fundraisers for political candidates.

Religious institutions can (and imo should be allowed to) let candidates speak to their congregations, and voice opinions on political issues (war, abortion, civil/human rights, the death penalty), what they are not allowed to do is tell congregations how to vote or who to vote for.

They rarely get called on it, though.

If that were my church, I'd either have this guy fired, or find myself another church - no matter which party's candidate he was insisting I vote for.