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Sam L
May 2nd, 2005, 01:05 PM
No, don't say "War and Peace". :p

Yes, other than that... please suggest to me some Russian literature.

Preferably, a novel but I don't mind plays either, and preferably set during or before the Russian Revolution.

Would prefer family stories or romances, but has to have a strong female character. Like it can't be just a story about men.

Thanks if anyone literature fans, Russians or curious bypassers can help me out. :p ;)

Sevenseas
May 2nd, 2005, 01:25 PM
“Crime and Punishment” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (my all-time favorite Russian novelist and novel with no doubt :worship: )

“Anna Karenina” by Leo Tolstoy

“The Gambler” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

“The Idiot” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky


and many more… :)

Sam L
May 2nd, 2005, 01:38 PM
“Crime and Punishment” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky (my all-time favorite Russian novelist and novel with no doubt :worship: )

“Anna Karenina” by Leo Tolstoy

“The Gambler” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

“The Idiot” by Fyodor Dostoyevsky


and many more… :)
Thanks but I'm looking for non-classics, I know about and have read some of them.

Especially literature that's recent or not that well known would be good.

Sevenseas
May 2nd, 2005, 02:12 PM
Oh yes, it’s probably because I prefer reading classics more. :) :angel: But as you implied Russian posters would be a lot more helpful as far as more recent novels are concerned. Have fun with your reading! :)

cellophane
May 2nd, 2005, 03:42 PM
Well, my parents just got back from Moscow with a novel by Ludmila Ulitskaya. They brought "Sonechka : A Novella And Stories" but here are all of her books that have been translated into English -
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/search-handle-url/index=books-uk&field-author=Ulitskaya%2C%20Ludmila/202-1363929-9895865 Apparently, she's great and won the Russian Booker Prize (whatever that means now), but it might be just the sort of thing you are looking for. :)

You might also like this book, but I found it randomly by looking at that website (which I got to by searching for info on Ulitskaya), so check out the page and the website (might be useful, because it has other titles by modern Russian writers) -

http://www.russianpress.com/glas/glas%2022.html

And here is a short description of "Sonechka..."

http://www.russianpress.com/glas/glas%2017.html

cellophane
May 2nd, 2005, 03:48 PM
I didn't recommend either Nabokov or Bulgakov, because I thought you might have already read their stuff, but if not, do that... :)

CooCooCachoo
May 2nd, 2005, 03:59 PM
Vladimir Sorokin's 'Obelisk'. I don't know its English title; Obelisk is the original Russian title.

In Dutch it is called De Wedstrijd (The Match). It is a collection of short, somewhat absurd stories about Russia during the Soviet regime. I only read a few, but they were quite interesting and very absurd(istic). You might like his work.

Shonami Slam
May 2nd, 2005, 04:30 PM
all of chekhov's works are great.
his short stories are smart, and witty and god-damn depressing.
he's one of the best play-writers IMO, side to brecht, Ionesco and Beckett.

cellophane
May 2nd, 2005, 04:33 PM
all of chekhov's works are great.
his short stories are smart, and witty and god-damn depressing.
he's one of the best play-writers IMO, side to brecht, Ionesco and Beckett.

Chekhov is great, but I thought he was maybe too well-known as well. :lol: :angel: Sorry about not replying to your PM, btw - I've been a little tired, but I will soon.

CooCooCachoo
May 2nd, 2005, 05:44 PM
all of chekhov's works are great.
his short stories are smart, and witty and god-damn depressing.
he's one of the best play-writers IMO, side to brecht, Ionesco and Beckett.

Eugène Ionesco is a great playwright. I also think Voltaire is a good one. But Ionesco's La cantatrice chauve is really witty. Le théatre de l'Absurde is a great genre in French literature, IMO. This also includes Samuel Beckett, cause he wrote Waiting for Godot in French as a foreign writer. The original title is En attendant Godot.

Shonami Slam
May 2nd, 2005, 08:13 PM
Eugène Ionesco is a great playwright. I also think Voltaire is a good one. But Ionesco's La cantatrice chauve is really witty. Le théatre de l'Absurde is a great genre in French literature, IMO. This also includes Samuel Beckett, cause he wrote Waiting for Godot in French as a foreign writer. The original title is En attendant Godot.

becky was a wierd one.
irish man teaching french, writing in french but running back home every few years to write.
i really like him :) i have alot of plays, i enjoy the genre.

Grachka
May 2nd, 2005, 08:27 PM
Its a classic, but I would recommend Bulgakov's "Master and Margerita" an original and one of the best books I have ever read :)

I don't really like most of the contemporary stuff.

Hulet
May 2nd, 2005, 08:36 PM
WTAWorld these days is running smart ads (The ad in this thread links to "Anna Karenina" essays) or is it the threads that became smarter to match the ads? ;)

Anyways, last two books I read were Russian, no, not Russian :sad:, but translated from Russian. Pretty good books, but they are about Soviet Russia (published in the 50's and 60's ) so I don't know if they are recent enough:
- "One day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich", b Alexander solzhenistin(sp?)
- "The master and margarita", by Mikhael Bulkagov

For family saga set during the early days of the revolution with a strong female character, may be you might want to try "Dr Zhivago" by Boris Pasternak - only watched the movie but I heard the book is pretty good too.

Any Gogol fan in this thread?

Hulet
May 2nd, 2005, 08:40 PM
I didn't recommend either Nabokov or Bulgakov, because I thought you might have already read their stuff, but if not, do that... :)
Nabokov is freaking hard to read, I started both "Lolita" and "Pale Fire" by him, but gave them up quickly because I can't make head or tail out of the stories. :(

cellophane
May 2nd, 2005, 08:55 PM
Nabokov is freaking hard to read, I started both "Lolita" and "Pale Fire" by him, but gave them up quickly because I can't make head or tail out of the stories. :(

I've never actually read any of his books. So much for being Russian. :o But then I haven't read in ages, literally. :o

From modern writers, Ludmila Petrushevskaya is good, but I don't know if her stuff has been translated.

cellophane
May 2nd, 2005, 08:58 PM
Its a classic, but I would recommend Bulgakov's "Master and Margerita" an original and one of the best books I have ever read :)

I don't really like most of the contemporary stuff.

Are you still in St. Petersburg? :wavey: I remember you were going there, but that was some time ago. :)

Grachka
May 2nd, 2005, 11:09 PM
Are you still in St. Petersburg? :wavey: I remember you were going there, but that was some time ago. :)
yup still here! :wavey: I wonder where that Russian thread went :p

Scary to think I've been here for 8 months already! :eek: and only two more left ;)

MisterQ
May 2nd, 2005, 11:11 PM
It doesn't really have a strong female character... but you have to read Gogol's The Nose! It's so funny and bizarre --- I laughed out loud. It seems very modern considering when it was written. :cool: Just a short story, a quick read. :)

Joana
May 2nd, 2005, 11:42 PM
Its a classic, but I would recommend Bulgakov's "Master and Margerita" an original and one of the best books I have ever read :)

I don't really like most of the contemporary stuff.

:worship:
That is a masterpiece. Enough said!

Oh, and don't read "Silent Don". It's crap. I really don't know why it became so popular.

tennisjam
May 3rd, 2005, 12:40 PM
the choice is great...

try Alexandr SOLJENITSYNE...so human...:)

it is post-revolution but still deeply russian...