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tennisIlove09
Jan 11th, 2005, 01:04 AM
Courier, Noah, Novotna, Buchholz Elected To Tennis Hall Of Fame
http://www.sportsmediainc.net/tennisweek/NoahM[1].Baz.jpg
Photo By Michael Baz By Tennis Week
01/12/2005

A pair of former French Open champions
headline the International Tennis Hall of Fame's Class of 2005. Former No. 1
Jim Courier and French tennis hero Yannick Noah, who captured Roland Garros
crowns, Wimbledon winner Jana Novotna and noted tennis professional pioneer
Earl "Butch" Buchholz, Jr., who founded the Nasdaq-100 Open, have
been elected for induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame.
Grand Slam champion Tony Trabert, president of the International Tennis Hall of Fame, formally announced the class of 2005 today.

"We experienced an incredible year last year in celebrating the Hall of Fame's 50th anniversary," Trabert said. "That momentum continues as we celebrate the careers of four new champions of tennis this July. It is my great honor to announce that Jim Courier, Yannick Noah, Jana Novotna and Butch Buchholz will represent the International Tennis Hall of Fame's Induction Class of 2005."

The Class of 2005 induction ceremony is slated for Saturday, July 9th, in conjunction with the Campbellís Hall of Fame Tennis Championships in Newport, Rhode Island. The The International Tennis Hall of Fame (http://www.tennisfame.com/) has inducted 186 people representing 18 countries since its establishment in 1954. The International Tennis Hall of Fame is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving the history and heritage of tennis and its champions.

The 34-year-old Courier turned pro in 1988 and during his 13-year career he captured 23 singles titles and six doubles titles. He won consecutive Australian Open championships in 1992-93 and successive singles championships at Roland Garros 1991-1992. He was also a finalist at Roland Garros and Wimbledon in 1993 and a U.S. Open finalist in 1991, falling to Stefan Edberg. His career win-loss record in singles Grand Slam match play stands at 118-37. In 1992, he became only the 10th player to reach the World No. 1 ranking since the ranking system was implemented in 1973. Overall, Courier spent a total of 58 weeks (non-consecutive) at No. 1, finishing 1992 as the No. 1 player in the world. He spent four years in the World Top 10 (1991, 1992, 1993, 1995) and was named the ATP Player of the Year in 1992. In Davis Cup, Courier played seven years for the USA, helping the Americans to win the Cup in 1992 and 1995. He competed in 14 ties, posting an overall win-loss record of 17-10 (16-10 singles; 1-0 doubles). A consistent player on all surfaces, the right-handed Courier was known for brandishing brutal groundstrokes in defeating his opponents.

In 1983, Noah became Franceís new tennis hero, as he descended upon Roland Garros serving and volleying his way to the singles crown. Surrendering only one set during the fortnight, he became the first Frenchman in 37 years to capture the menís singles title. During his 12-year career he captured 23 singles titles and 16 doubles titles, and had an overall singles Grand Slam event win-loss record of 85-35. He reached his career high singles ranking of No. 3 in 1986, and was ranked in the World Top 10 six times (1982-87). In doubles, Noah won the 1984 title at Roland Garros (with Leconte); he also reached the 1985 U.S. Open doubles final (with Leconte) and the 1987 French Open doubles final (with Guy Forget). In August of 1986 he earned the No. 1 doubles ranking, holding it for a total of 19 weeks (non-consecutive). Born May 18th, 1960 in Sedan, France, Noah was a member of Franceís Davis Cup team for eleven years, playing in 22 ties and posting an overall 39-22 win-loss record (26-15 singles; 13-7 doubles). In 1991, Noah captained Franceís Davis Cup team to victory, as the French reclaimed the Cup after 59 years, and then won again in 1996. In 1997, Noah also captained Franceís Fed Cup team to their first-ever Fed Cup victory.

The 35-year-old Novotna of the Czech Republic, captured the womenís singles championship at Wimbledon in 1998 after reaching the final in both 1993 and 1997. In addition, she won 12 major womenís doubles championships: two Australian Open titles (1990, 1995); three French Open championships (1990-91, 1998); four Wimbledon titles (1989-90, 1995, 1998) and three U.S, Open championships (1994, 1997-98). In addition, Novotna won four major mixed doubles championships: two Australian Open titles (1988-89) Wimbledon (1988) and the 1987 U.S. Open. In a career spanning 12 years, Novotna captured 24 singles titles and 76 doubles titles, reaching a career high singles ranking of No. 2 in 1997. She was ranked in the World Top 10 seven times between 1991 and 1998. Her career win-loss record stands at 568-223 in singles and 697-152 in doubles. Her doubles career took her to No. 1 eleven times, earning five WTA Doubles Team of the Year honors (1989-90 with Helena Sukova; 1991 with Gigi Fernandez; 1996 with Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario; 1998 with Martina Hingis) and an International Tennis Federation Doubles Team of the Year honor (1997 with Lindsay Davenport). She played Fed Cup for 11 years (1987-93, 1995-98), competing in 33 ties and posting an overall win-loss record of 33-12 (22-7 singles; 11-5 doubles), and was a member of the 1988 winning Cup team. A serve and volley player, Novotna won the doubles silver medal in the 1988 Olympics, and went on to capture the singles bronze and doubles silver medals in the 1996 Olympics.

Earl "Butch" Buchholz, Jr., who was born September 16th, 1940 in St. Louis, Missouri, has been elected to the Hall of Fame in the Contributor category. He has played key roles in the evolution of both professional and amateur tennis since 1963 when he became a founding member of the first menís players association. He has been a pioneer in developing both menís and womenís tennis, using his expertise in fundraising, sponsorship and marketing to help create a wider audience for numerous events throughout the world. He has served tennis in many professional and administrative capacities including Commissioner of World Team Tennis (1977-78), ATP Executive Director (1981-82) and member of the menís pro council (1981-83), as well as Tournament Director for numerous events, including the prestigious Nasdaq-100 Open in Miami, which he founded in 1985. He helped create Altenis, the management company which oversees tournaments in Latin America and secured the continuation of the Orange Bowl International Tennis Tournament, a prominent junior tournament. He was also instrumental in setting up an ATP International Series event played in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He teamed with Arthur Ashe in 1992 to form the "Good Life Mentoring Program" benefiting hundreds of elementary and middle school children in the greater Miami area. As a player, Buchholz was the world No. 5 ranked player in 1960, was ranked four times in the US Top 10, played as a touring pro 1961-67 (U.S. Pro Champ 1962) and played Davis Cup 1959-60.

"These individuals continue to give to our sport on every level," Trabert said. "Their individual talents made them great champions, while their love for the game has kept them involved in tennis, sharing their knowledge, experience and expertise with players, administrators and fans worldwide. We are proud to honor Jana, Jim, Yannick and Butch as they take their place among the legends of tennis."

Nominees who did not receive the 75 percent favorable vote for election from the panel of international tennis media include: Christine Truman Janes, Patricia Canning Todd and Eiichi Kawatei. Janes was crowned the Wimbledon Junior Champion in 1956 (at age 15), and went on to become the youngest woman to win the French singles championships in 1959 at age 18. Todd captured the 1947 French singles championship and the 1948 French doubles and mixed doubles championships. She also claimed the 1947 Wimbledon doubles title. Kawatei is the former tournament director for the Japan Open and Asian Open (both 1977-1986) and founder of the International Club of Japan (1978).

For more information regarding the The International Tennis Hall of Fame (http://www.tennisfame.com/) Class of 2005 inductees, Hall of Fame Weekend 2005, the Campbell's Hall of Fame Tennis Championships or the International Tennis Hall of Fame and Museum, please phone (401) 849-3990 or visit The International Tennis Hall of Fame (http://www.tennisfame.com/) web site.

mboyle
Jan 11th, 2005, 01:18 AM
Yannik Noah? Other people.

Julia1968
Jan 11th, 2005, 01:22 AM
Its a long time coming for Noah's induction, in my opinion. Not surprised about Courier, but I thought it was quick for Novotna's induction.

Venus Forever
Jan 11th, 2005, 01:25 AM
I don't think Noah or Novotna deserve to be in the Hall of Fame.

Only 2 GS's between them, and neither reached #1. I don't think that's exactly Hall of Fame worthy.

Next thing you know, Iva Majoli will be in the Hall of Fame.

ArgentineTennis
Jan 11th, 2005, 01:28 AM
I also think that Noah should've been inducted a long time ago. He's waited the longest out of all the nominated players.

Crazy Canuck
Jan 11th, 2005, 01:30 AM
Well, by including Noah, that will make it pretty hard to reject Chang down the line, no?

darrinbaker00
Jan 11th, 2005, 01:30 AM
I don't think Noah or Novotna deserve to be in the Hall of Fame.

Only 2 GS's between them, and neither reached #1. I don't think that's exactly Hall of Fame worthy.

Next thing you know, Iva Majoli will be in the Hall of Fame.
Novotna got in by virtue of her 12 doubles majors. She has Pam Shriver to thank for that. I'd bet everything I own that Gigi Fernandez, Natalia Zvereva and Sergi Bruguera are all doing cartwheels right now.

Venus Forever
Jan 11th, 2005, 01:32 AM
Novotna got in by virtue of her 12 doubles majors. She has Pam Shriver to thank for that. I'd bet everything I own that Gigi Fernandez, Natalia Zvereva and Sergi Bruguera are all doing cartwheels right now.
Novotna was/is still up for grabs with me. I see that point, but I don't know. I guess she is pretty qualified.

Noah, however, I don't see a very valid reason as to why he was inducted.

CoryAnnAvants#1
Jan 11th, 2005, 02:08 AM
Novotna got in by virtue of her 12 doubles majors. She has Pam Shriver to thank for that. I'd bet everything I own that Gigi Fernandez, Natalia Zvereva and Sergi Bruguera are all doing cartwheels right now.
Why Sergi? He couldn't play doubles to save his life...he has no chance of making it.

Jana got in because she was a top level singles AND doubles player. The Hall of Fame is wisely making the decision to include all time great doubles players into the Hall of Fame now. And why shouldn't they? It's just as hard to reach #1 in doubles as it is in singles.

Gigi and Natasha will eventually make it in for being (arguably) the greatest doubles team of all time, or at the very least #2 behind Navratilova/Shriver. I'd also bet that Ruano Pascual and Suarez will also be inducted at some stage 5 years after that retirement (especially if they manage to win Wimby before they retire).

Julia1968
Jan 11th, 2005, 02:26 AM
Novotna got in by virtue of her 12 doubles majors. She has Pam Shriver to thank for that. I'd bet everything I own that Gigi Fernandez, Natalia Zvereva and Sergi Bruguera are all doing cartwheels right now.

Pam Shriver every bit deserves to be in the Hall of Fame. How many women can you count on one hand that have had better doubles success????