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Great Seles
Dec 7th, 2004, 06:19 PM
Teddy was infamous on many levels and for many things; his fashions were his signature and things like the Gussy Moran bloomers (which got him banned from Wimbledon for something like 20 years!) were indicative of his marvelously mischievous personality. It was actually Ted's fault the "all-white" rule happened ... he designed white dresses with a color trim for the British Wightman cup team one year. It was the AMERICANS who were scandalized and filed an objection. In addition to Gussy's bloomers, he designed gold lame panties for Karol Fagero who was nearly thrown off the grounds. I'll have to check my file, but I'm fairly certain that Fagero was the first Caucasian player who agreed to play doubles with the great Althea Gibson. Teddy wore a diamond earring well before it became a male trend to wear an earring and he entertained everyone with stories and gossip. He was also an occasional movie and soap opera actor.

The early Virginia Slims logo with a thin woman holding a cigarette in one hand and a tennis racquet in the other (and the words, "You've Come A Long Way Baby" underneath) was a Tinling design as well.

Tinling's involvement in tennis began as a ballboy to Suzanne Lenglen and he became friendly with just about every top player through his death in the early 1990s. The last 2 players he fawned over were Angelica Gavaldon (a Mexican American who loved bright colors and huge jewelry but didn't make the most of her tennis talents) ... and Monica Seles. He thought she was utterly fabulous and glamorous and she was quickly becoming his favorite all-time player since Lenglen. If you read John Feinstein's "Hard Courts" you'll find the very sad tale of how after he died there was a memorial service for him at the start of Wimbledon and most of the top tennis players didn't bother to show up with very few exceptions ... one of them being Monica Seles.

Great Seles
Dec 7th, 2004, 06:22 PM
Teddy was infamous on many levels and for many things; his fashions were his signature and things like the Gussy Moran bloomers (which got him banned from Wimbledon for something like 20 years!) were indicative of his marvelously mischievous personality. It was actually Ted's fault the "all-white" rule happened ... he designed white dresses with a color trim for the British Wightman cup team one year. It was the AMERICANS who were scandalized and filed an objection. In addition to Gussy's bloomers, he designed gold lame panties for Karol Fagero who was nearly thrown off the grounds. I'll have to check my file, but I'm fairly certain that Fagero was the first Caucasian player who agreed to play doubles with the great Althea Gibson. Teddy wore a diamond earring well before it became a male trend to wear an earring and he entertained everyone with stories and gossip. He was also an occasional movie and soap opera actor.

The early Virginia Slims logo with a thin woman holding a cigarette in one hand and a tennis racquet in the other (and the words, "You've Come A Long Way Baby" underneath) was a Tinling design as well.

Tinling's involvement in tennis began as a ballboy to Suzanne Lenglen and he became friendly with just about every top player through his death in the early 1990s. The last 2 players he fawned over were Angelica Gavaldon (a Mexican American who loved bright colors and huge jewelry but didn't make the most of her tennis talents) ... and Monica Seles. He thought she was utterly fabulous and glamorous and she was quickly becoming his favorite all-time player since Lenglen. If you read John Feinstein's "Hard Courts" you'll find the very sad tale of how after he died there was a memorial service for him at the start of Wimbledon and most of the top tennis players didn't bother to show up with very few exceptions ... one of them being Monica Seles.


Ted Tinling wrote an autobiography called "Love and Faults" which you can probably find through Amazon or someplace like that and he's mentioned in a number of tennis histories such as "Hard Courts" and Bud Collins "Encyclopedia of Tennis".... :)