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Duramont
Dec 4th, 2004, 12:20 PM
The name tennis comes from the French word tenez which means in English take!


And here some history of the sport:

The game of tennis is the same everywhere. The name given to the game differs in different countries. In Great Britain it is called Tennis or, to distinguish it from Lawn Tennis, Real Tennis or Royal Tennis. In the USA it is called Court Tennis: in France Jeu de Paume (hand ball): and in Australia Royal Tennis. The various names throw light on the development of the game. Tennis wasy played in 5th century Tuscany when villagers used to strike balls up and down the streets with bare hands.

In Great Britain, as in France, royal patronage ensured the continued popularity of the game. French Kings in the 16th century and Stuart Kings in the 17th century were enthusiastic players. George IV (1763-1830), Prince Albert (1819-1861) - there is a locker in the changing room at Hampton Court Palace which still bears his name - Edward VII (1842-1910) and George V (1866-1936) have all supported the game.

Lawn Tennis, which derived from Real Tennis in about 1874, is played on a marked-out surface without side or end walls. Court Tennis, to use the American name for Tennis, indicates that Tennis is played in a specially court with walls on four sides.

Caz
Dec 4th, 2004, 12:54 PM
Yep, to add some more to the linguistic explanation, according to the Collins English dictionary, the word tennis dates back to the 14th century Anglo-French "tenetz" which was the imperative form of "hold", which came from old French "tenir" to hold, and from Latin "tenere".

^bibi^
Dec 4th, 2004, 01:10 PM
Yep, to add some more to the linguistic explanation, according to the Collins English dictionary, the word tennis dates back to the 14th century Anglo-French "tenetz" which was the imperative form of "hold", which came from old French "tenir" to hold, and from Latin "tenere".
tenir is not old french, it's still exists and is still a usual word lol (tenez, not tenetz).. i think the expression 6-love also comes from french, but i don't remember from where exactly

Chunchun
Dec 4th, 2004, 01:14 PM
interesting :)

thx for the info

Duramont
Dec 4th, 2004, 01:31 PM
tenir is not old french, it's still exists and is still a usual word lol (tenez, not tenetz).. i think the expression 6-love also comes from french, but i don't remember from where exactly

Yes tenez is the imperativ in French of the verb tener, which means hold and take. ;)


But does anybody knows where the notion Grand Slam comes from? I searched in the dictonary and there was written that to slam means close violenty. But what does this have to do with the Grand Slam in tennis? Does it comes from French Grand Chalem?

And another interesting question is why you say in English for 15:0 or 1:0 for example 15 love or 1 games to love?

^bibi^
Dec 4th, 2004, 01:38 PM
Tenir does not mean take... takeis "prendre", but tenir just means hold...

^bibi^
Dec 4th, 2004, 01:39 PM
abut the lvoe thing i made some research ad found this.. one of the explanation is that it would come from french l'ouef, which means the egg cos a zero looks like an egg (i know it sounds silly), then l'ouef, would have become love in english...

Duramont
Dec 4th, 2004, 01:55 PM
abut the lvoe thing i made some research ad found this.. one of the explanation is that it would come from french l'ouef, which means the egg cos a zero looks like an egg (i know it sounds silly), then l'ouef, would have become love in english...

First you are right with tenir! I wrote something wrong. ;)

So l'oeuf is becoming love. :lol: :yeah:


And does the expression deuce comes from the Frensch deux?
Because the two players have the same result. :p

Caz
Dec 4th, 2004, 02:16 PM
tenir is not old french, it's still exists and is still a usual word lol (tenez, not tenetz).. i think the expression 6-love also comes from french, but i don't remember from where exactlyYeah, that confused me a bit too, but it's what the dictionary says. I think perhaps it means that "tenetz" (with a "t") was the old French imperative of "Tenir", but I may be wrong! I don't exactly know much about old French! lol! ;)

Yonge
Dec 4th, 2004, 06:11 PM
My coach told me that the scoring was "inspired" by the clock! Every score is a quarter of an hour (15, 30, 45, and then game) but he can't explain why we say 40 instead of 45.

¤CharlDa¤
Dec 4th, 2004, 06:23 PM
The scoring system actualy has a different origin...When there were some tennis amtches at the start, when a player was winning a point, he was going up 15 feet (don,t think it was feet but more another unity i don't remember!) After, he went up another 15 feet, to go to 30 and would play the point there....Then he would go up 10 feet only, cause it would be the distance to the net....So actully, to win a game, you had to win a point at the net!

hablo
Dec 4th, 2004, 06:29 PM
My coach told me that the scoring was "inspired" by the clock! Every score is a quarter of an hour (15, 30, 45, and then game) but he can't explain why we say 40 instead of 45.

This is what I've heard too !

GoDominique
Dec 4th, 2004, 06:39 PM
I thought the scoring is because they played for certain amounts of money (15 on the first point, 30 on the 2nd etc.).
And they have 40 instead of 45 because it was easier to pronouce in English. ;)

^bibi^
Dec 4th, 2004, 06:39 PM
About the 15-30-40 what cdpoulin is right, but is coming from antoher ancient sport.. about the deuce thing i really don't know.. in franch now we say either "égalité" or "40a", 30a" or "15a"

pav
Dec 4th, 2004, 08:47 PM
Tennis


T to
E entertain
N numbskull
N no name
I ignorant
S shitheads like Me!

vettipooh
Dec 4th, 2004, 10:17 PM
Tennis


T to
E entertain
N numbskull
N no name
I ignorant
S shitheads like Me!:lol: :lol: :lol:

Brian Stewart
Dec 5th, 2004, 09:14 AM
The phrase "Grand Slam" was borrowed from the card game Bridge.

moby
Dec 5th, 2004, 09:25 AM
The phrase "Grand Slam" was borrowed from the card game Bridge.
because you had to bid on the 7 level for a grand slam in bridge
just like you've to win 7 matches to win a slam?
*tries to look intelligent*

moby
Dec 5th, 2004, 09:37 AM
i got this from a book:

"These days when there is so much concern about the dominance of power in the game, it is fascinating to discover that there was similar anxiety at the end of the first Wimbledon. Henry Jones decided to carry out an analysis of all the scorecards and concluded from the high proportion of service games won that the service was far too powerful for the long-term good of the game. Three remedies were suggested. One was to heighten the net in the middle, another was to do away with second serves and the third was to move the service line closer to the net. The majority of players, we are led to believe, favoured limiting players to one serve. The All England Club opted instead for reducing the size of the service court to 22ft."

Duramont
Dec 5th, 2004, 10:22 AM
because you had to bid on the 7 level for a grand slam in bridge
just like you've to win 7 matches to win a slam?
*tries to look intelligent*

Thanks for the info moby. :wavey:


I read in the dictionnary that deuce means in the card games two. So probably the expression is coming from the card game.

Like the notion Ace which is the One in the card game. It is the highest card and in tennis it is somehow the best point you can make. And you know certainly the expression to have an ace up one's sleeve.

moby
Dec 5th, 2004, 11:15 AM
Thanks for the info moby. :wavey: oh no, that's just conjecture on my part :o
i don't really know how grand slam comes about... back in those days, they probably didn't have to play 7 matches cause the draw was smaller

besides grand slam is also used in other sports like baseball :shrug:

"a winning of all tricks in a card game," 1621, used especially in whist, of obscure origin. Grand slam in bridge first recorded 1892; earlier in related card games from 1814; fig. sense of "complete success" is attested from 1920; in baseball sense from 1940." www.etymonline.com (http://www.etymonline.com)

Yonge
Dec 6th, 2004, 05:21 PM
The scoring system actualy has a different origin...When there were some tennis amtches at the start, when a player was winning a point, he was going up 15 feet (don,t think it was feet but more another unity i don't remember!) After, he went up another 15 feet, to go to 30 and would play the point there....Then he would go up 10 feet only, cause it would be the distance to the net....So actully, to win a game, you had to win a point at the net!

Wow, so if you were serving, and up 40-0, you'd be serving at the net!

¤CharlDa¤
Dec 7th, 2004, 12:10 AM
Well considering you weren't playing with rackets but your bare hands, im not sure the *serve* part was invited by then, i guess you were jsut putting the ball in play!