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lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:31 AM
Updated: 04:45 AM EST
'Desperate' deed raises NFL's ire
By Paul J. Gough, Reuters

NEW YORK (Hollywood Reporter) - ABC Sports has apologized for airing a steamy locker room scene between a "Desperate Housewives" star and Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Terrell Owens at the beginning of "Monday Night Football."
The short taped segment at the top of the broadcast paired two of ABC's highest-rated shows. It features "Desperate Housewives" co-star Nicolette Sheridan, clad only in a towel, meeting Owens in a locker room. Sheridan tries to get Owens to skip the game and drops the towel, showing for a moment her bare back. Owens protests that he has to play the Cowboys but changes his mind, saying, "Aww, hell, the team's going to have to win without me," as Sheridan jumps into his arms.

"The placement of the opening 'Monday Night Football' segment was inappropriate, and we apologize," ABC Sports spokesman Mark Mandel said. He declined comment about how the segment was created or who decided to run with it.

The NFL has no control over what ABC runs during that opening, which is usually a musical number or celebrities expressing excitement for football. An NFL source said some league execs knew that "Desperate Housewives" would be somehow worked into Monday night's segment but weren't consulted and were shocked at the final product.

"ABC's opening was inappropriate and unsuitable for our 'Monday Night Football' audience," the NFL said in a statement released Tuesday afternoon. "While ABC may have gained attention for one of its other shows, the NFL and its fans lost."

Monday night was another content-related snafu for the image-conscious NFL, which is still smarting from the "wardrobe malfunction" during the Super Bowl halftime show in February. In the wake of the MTV-produced show featuring a partial bearing of Janet Jackson's breast, the NFL put strict guidelines during all league-produced entertainment. It includes full approval of content during all NFL-produced entertainment.

But those guidelines didn't help Monday night because the top of the show is produced by ABC. That is likely to change, a source said. "It's something that has been brought up in the past," the source said.

The FCC received an unspecified amount of complaints about the segment, though it remains to be seen whether the commission would launch an investigation on broadcast indecency. The NFL received dozens of complaints Tuesday.

Owens is no stranger to controversy on or off the field. He's known as one of the league's most showy players, with sometimes-outrageous performances after touchdowns. His employers, the Philadelphia Eagles, weren't pleased by the segment.

"It is normal for teams to cooperate with ABC in the development of an opening for its broadcast," the Eagles said in a statement released Tuesday afternoon. "After seeing the final piece, we wish it hadn't aired."

One source who didn't want to be identified suggested that ABC knew it would cause a stir with the spot.

"You'd think that after the Super Bowl, everybody would be clear on procedure going forward," the source said. "Obviously, that didn't happen."

In Monday night's game, Owens led the Eagles past the Dallas Cowboys, 49-27. More than 17.1 million viewers tuned in to the three-hour game, according to data released Tuesday afternoon by Nielsen Media Research.

Reuters/Hollywood Reporter



11/17/04 04:21 ET

Copyright 2004 Reuters Limited.

Cam'ron Giles
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:36 AM
These people needs to lighten up...what the fuck? So she had a bare back and it was suggestive? Big fucking deal...:rolleyes: ...is the real issue that cute blond Nicollete or whatever did the skit with a black man? :tape:

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:37 AM
BTW, I think the outrage was manufactured by the following people:

Right wing talk radio
So-called outraged parents
Hypocrites from the Midwest and South

I didn't want to bring this up, but a local radio sports broadcaster where I live brought up the race factor. He doesn't think there would have been a lot outrage if the football player would have been (Green Bay Packer) Brett Farve or (New York Giant) Jeremy Shockey or if the actress in question was black. I happen to agree with him. For all the so-called outrage over this clip, I have seen it more today than I did when it orginally aired. I also think the promo should have been aired near the end of the game to promote next week's game. At that point, many children would have been in bed and would not have seen it.

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:39 AM
These people needs to lighten up...what the fuck? So she had a bare back and it was suggestive? Big fucking deal...:rolleyes: ...is the real issue that cute blond Nicollete or whatever did the skit with a black man? :tape:

That's what I think.

~CANUCK~
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:48 AM
I loved that ad, some people are just fucking stupid. You didn't see anything bad, besides her back :rolleyes: i can't believe the things that america wines about that would be totally ok here in canada. Every time i think the world progresses, something stupid as having a black man running off with a white woman causes an uproar.

Cam'ron Giles
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:53 AM
Look, the shit they do and talk about on say Survivor is way worst and that show comes on at 8pm in the evening before kids go to bed...It's simply about race...:rolleyes:

Rocketta
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:53 AM
seems to me that promo spot is right up the alley of the usual Monday night football crowd? What's the problem? :lol: Why do they bother showing the half naked cheerleader? Cause it appeals to the majority of the crowd watching...:lol:

I do believe...this uproar has something to do with the participants...:tape:

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:57 AM
I loved that ad, some people are just fucking stupid. You didn't see anything bad, besides her back :rolleyes: i can't believe the things that america wines about that would be totally ok here in canada. Every time i think the world progresses, something stupid as having a black man running off with a white woman causes an uproar.
You forget htat we are living in Jesusland right now after Bush was re-elected.

Did you know on Veteran's Day that 66 ABC stations didn't air the war movie "Saving Private Ryan" because of the cursing and excessive voilence? These are the same people who had NO problem with the airing of "The Passion of the Christ" which is more violent than "SPR".:rolleyes:

~CANUCK~
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:03 AM
You forget htat we are living in Jesusland right now after Bush was re-elected.

Did you know on Veteran's Day that 66 ABC stations didn't air the war movie "Saving Private Ryan" because of the cursing and excessive voilence? These are the same people who had NO problem with the airing of "The Passion of the Crist" which is more violent than "SPR".:rolleyes:

i feel sorry for all of you in jesusland, SPR is an incredibly good movie, and has its extreme moments, but the passion is just as bad. I find something completely wrong when there is double standards like that. If you are gonna show a movie like that all you have to do is put up the warnings and then you are fine. But to show one movie becoz it has to do with christ and not the other is wrong.

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:11 AM
i feel sorry for all of you in jesusland, SPR is an incredibly good movie, and has its extreme moments, but the passion is just as bad. I find something completely wrong when there is double standards like that. If you are gonna show a movie like that all you have to do is put up the warnings and then you are fine. But to show one movie becoz it has to do with christ and not the other is wrong.

The problem is that they did show a parental advisory not only before the movie aired on Thrusday but during the commercials leading up to the airing of the movie.

~CANUCK~
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:12 AM
The problem is that they did show a parental advisory not only before the movie aired on Thrusday but during the commercials leading up to the airing of the movie.
So then whats the big deal, you don't want your kids watching violence don't use a tv as a babysitter. Simple as that. :rolleyes:

Hulet
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:13 AM
Don't you guys think the ad was a bit racist? A black professional saw a white girl naked and abandoned his job. That makes me cringe for some reason.

~CANUCK~
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:15 AM
Don't you guys think the ad was a bit racist? A black professional saw a white girl naked and abandoned his job. That makes me cringe for some reason.
See the whole thing is, its a big joke, on the show she plays the big whore that gets any man she wants. It had nothing to do with race. Even at the end of the ad you had terri saying this is crap lets watch football.

Hulet
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:17 AM
Don't know canuck, may be I am a bit sensitive to those kind of "jokes".

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:19 AM
So then whats the big deal, you don't want your kids watching violence don't use a tv as a babysitter. Simple as that. :rolleyes:
That makes sense, but you are assuming that many of these parents have some common sense, which they don't.

~CANUCK~
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:20 AM
Well im sorry to hear that the ad offended you. i think i was really funny, and did its job for both football and housewives.

harloo
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:23 AM
See the whole thing is, its a big joke, on the show she plays the big whore that gets any man she wants. It had nothing to do with race. Even at the end of the ad you had terri saying this is crap lets watch football.

Dungy: 'MNF' intro racially offensive
The Associated Press / Associated Press
Posted: 3 hours ago

If ABC hoped to generate a little bit more buzz for "Monday Night Football" and "Desperate Housewives," its steamy intro to the Dallas-Philadelphia game sure did the trick.


Two days after the network aired the segment featuring Eagles (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67058) star receiver Terrell Owens (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/player/70702) and actress Nicollette Sheridan, coaches and players were still talking about it.


Reaction ranged from amusement to anger. Indianapolis Colts (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67048) coach Tony Dungy found it racially offensive.

"To me that's the first thing I thought of as an African-American," Dungy said Wednesday.

"I think it's stereotypical in looking at the players, and on the heels of the Kobe Bryant incident I think it's very insensitive. I don't think that they would have had Bill Parcells or Andy Reid or one of the owners involved in that," he added, a reference to the coaches in the game.

ABC's intro showed Sheridan wearing only a towel and provocatively asking Owens to skip the game for her as the two stood alone in a locker room. She drops the towel and jumps into Owens' arms. Owens is black and Sheridan is white.

"If that's what we have to do to get ratings, I'd rather not get them," Dungy said. "I realize that ratings pays us in this league, but if that's what we have to do, I'm willing to take a pay cut."

Philadelphia quarterback Donovan McNabb (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/player/70412) wasn't quite as vocal, saying he didn't find the segment offensive and believed people were overreacting. (Owens wasn't at practice Wednesday, excused for what the team said were personal reasons.)

"Some people do different things," McNabb said. "Not saying that my wife would allow me to do that, but it's just something that was done, and you move on."


Michael Powell, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, had a different view, questioning ABC's judgment in airing the scene.

"I wonder if Walt Disney would be proud," he said.

ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co. The FCC will review complaints and decide whether or not to open an investigation that could result in a fine against the network.

"It would seem to me that while we get a lot of broadcasting companies complaining about indecency enforcement, they seem to be continuing to be willing to keep the issue at the forefront, keep it hot and steamy in order to get financial gains and the free advertising it provides," Powell told CNBC.

The segment drew complaints from viewers and the NFL. ABC Sports apologized for using the introduction to promote its show, "Desperate Housewives." Dungy's comment, however, was the first that mentioned race. He also said the segment played off stereotypes of athletes.

"That athletes are sexual predators and that that stuff is more important than what's going on on the field. That he (Owens) was more concerned with that than the game, that's a terrible message to send," Dungy said. "I'm particularly sensitive to that. It could have been any player and I would have been outraged, but being an African-American, it particularly hurt me."

A decade ago Dungy was outspoken about the lack of black coaches in the NFL. There are currently five, including Dungy and Lovie Smith, whose Bears (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67040) will face Dungy's Colts (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67048) on Sunday.

"It shouldn't have happened, and I couldn't believe it did happen," Smith said.

Dungy said ABC had asked the Colts (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67048), who played on Monday night last week, "to do some things I thought would make our players look a little bit silly (although) nothing like that."

"We kind of declined," he said.

Some players were also shocked.

"My mouth dropped when I saw that," said Washington tight end Mike Sellers, who was watching the game with his wife. "I said, 'Did they actually plan this on TV?"' But at least one of his teammates wasn't bothered. "I thought it was kind of cool, myself," linebacker Marcus Washington (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/player/69783) said. "I enjoyed the skit."

~CANUCK~
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:27 AM
Ok let me reword what i mean. The creaters of the ad were not trying to create a race issue, thats obviously what it turned out to be. But that wasn't there intention. And like they say bad press is good press, they rather have people talking about it then no one talking about it, whether it be good or bad talk.

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:28 AM
Dungy: 'MNF' intro racially offensive
The Associated Press / Associated Press
Posted: 3 hours ago

If ABC hoped to generate a little bit more buzz for "Monday Night Football" and "Desperate Housewives," its steamy intro to the Dallas-Philadelphia game sure did the trick.


Two days after the network aired the segment featuring Eagles (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67058) star receiver Terrell Owens (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/player/70702) and actress Nicollette Sheridan, coaches and players were still talking about it.


Reaction ranged from amusement to anger. Indianapolis Colts (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67048) coach Tony Dungy found it racially offensive.

"To me that's the first thing I thought of as an African-American," Dungy said Wednesday.

"I think it's stereotypical in looking at the players, and on the heels of the Kobe Bryant incident I think it's very insensitive. I don't think that they would have had Bill Parcells or Andy Reid or one of the owners involved in that," he added, a reference to the coaches in the game.

ABC's intro showed Sheridan wearing only a towel and provocatively asking Owens to skip the game for her as the two stood alone in a locker room. She drops the towel and jumps into Owens' arms. Owens is black and Sheridan is white.

"If that's what we have to do to get ratings, I'd rather not get them," Dungy said. "I realize that ratings pays us in this league, but if that's what we have to do, I'm willing to take a pay cut."

Philadelphia quarterback Donovan McNabb (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/player/70412) wasn't quite as vocal, saying he didn't find the segment offensive and believed people were overreacting. (Owens wasn't at practice Wednesday, excused for what the team said were personal reasons.)

"Some people do different things," McNabb said. "Not saying that my wife would allow me to do that, but it's just something that was done, and you move on."


Michael Powell, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, had a different view, questioning ABC's judgment in airing the scene.

"I wonder if Walt Disney would be proud," he said.

ABC is owned by The Walt Disney Co. The FCC will review complaints and decide whether or not to open an investigation that could result in a fine against the network.

"It would seem to me that while we get a lot of broadcasting companies complaining about indecency enforcement, they seem to be continuing to be willing to keep the issue at the forefront, keep it hot and steamy in order to get financial gains and the free advertising it provides," Powell told CNBC.

The segment drew complaints from viewers and the NFL. ABC Sports apologized for using the introduction to promote its show, "Desperate Housewives." Dungy's comment, however, was the first that mentioned race. He also said the segment played off stereotypes of athletes.

"That athletes are sexual predators and that that stuff is more important than what's going on on the field. That he (Owens) was more concerned with that than the game, that's a terrible message to send," Dungy said. "I'm particularly sensitive to that. It could have been any player and I would have been outraged, but being an African-American, it particularly hurt me."

A decade ago Dungy was outspoken about the lack of black coaches in the NFL. There are currently five, including Dungy and Lovie Smith, whose Bears (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67040) will face Dungy's Colts (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67048) on Sunday.

"It shouldn't have happened, and I couldn't believe it did happen," Smith said.

Dungy said ABC had asked the Colts (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/team/67048), who played on Monday night last week, "to do some things I thought would make our players look a little bit silly (although) nothing like that."

"We kind of declined," he said.

Some players were also shocked.

"My mouth dropped when I saw that," said Washington tight end Mike Sellers, who was watching the game with his wife. "I said, 'Did they actually plan this on TV?"' But at least one of his teammates wasn't bothered. "I thought it was kind of cool, myself," linebacker Marcus Washington (http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/player/69783) said. "I enjoyed the skit."

I can see his point.

BTW, I didn't know he was black.

harloo
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:33 AM
Let me just say that I saw the originally aired intro during MNF and I knew that white folks would have a problem with it. Putting someone like Terrell Owens in a commercial with Nicolette Sheridan was bound to get some overraction.

The skit had nothing to do with race, but the image of that black man ooohing and awwing over a white piece of meat was a recipe for disaster. I thought it was quite funny, but I knew that their would be so much controversy over this stupid commercial.

After the skit finished I told my boy that this would be the new Janet and Justin scandal for white middle america. He thought I was joking but I'm rarely wrong about stuff like this. Some people have nothing better to do than to be outraged about nothing.

I do agree that the skit could of been presented at a different time, maybe a little later after the game ended but to me it's still much ado about nothing.:rolleyes:

canadian_bass_2
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:36 AM
Everyone down there in "Jesusland" as someone hilariously put it is just far too uptight. I didn't see the commercial myself, nor do I follow either football or Dangerous Housewives, but, I think it's fair to say that if you can put The Passion of the Christ on TV, you put whatever the hell you want on there.

The Passion is one of the most disgusting movies I've ever seen...and it didn't make me want to believe in Jesus. It only made me think "How truly fucked must you be to actually think of showing this torture?" 'See the Grace and the Beauty' they said...more like "See Roman Guards take chunks out of Jesus' side"...

Alas, I got side-tracked...

Original point: LOOSEN UP!!!!! Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you :lol:

kiwifan
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:37 AM
I thought it was a funny skit.

I don't know anyone who was offended by it (although I can see the point when your 7 year old who just wants to watch football has to deal with creepy looking Nicholette)

The "controversy" is a tempest in a teapot. :p

If you look hard enough you can infer racism into almost any interaction; this isn't where I'd choose to make my "Malcolm X" stand. :shrug:

In fact you could make the exact opposite argument that the "beautiful" blonde throwing herself at T.O. in primetime without reference to race is a sign of racial progress. :angel:

Black Mamba.
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:38 AM
Let me just say that I saw the originally aired intro during MNF and I knew that white folks would have a problem with it. Putting someone like Terrell Owens in a commercial with Nicolette Sheridan was bound to get some overraction.

The skit had nothing to do with race, but the image of that black man ooohing and awwing over a white piece of meat was a recipe for disaster. I thought it was quite funny, but I knew that their would be so much controversy over this stupid commercial.

After the skit finished I told my boy that this would be the new Janet and Justin scandal for white middle america. He thought I was joking but I'm rarely wrong about stuff like this. Some people have nothing better to do than to be outraged about nothing.

I do agree that the skit could of been presented at a different time, maybe a little later after the game ended but to me it's still much ado about nothing.:rolleyes:


:lol: :lol: You speak the truth there. A big black man wooing over a white woman is always a recipe for disaster in our society.

vogus
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:52 AM
the people at ABC knew exactly what they were doing beforehand, and they deliberately made the skit with a white woman and a black football star so that when they got hit with the criticism they knew would be coming, they could claim that it wasn't the sexual nature of the skit, but the race factor that is behind the criticism. Of course they planned the whole thing. If it had not been a mixed race situation, they couldnt have gotten away with it. They were deliberately goading the racist right-wing talk show hosts - the types who cant handle the sight of a black man seducing a white woman. I hope a lot of Christian right winger football fans wet their pants.

kiwifan
Nov 18th, 2004, 04:10 AM
They were deliberately goading the racist right-wing talk show hosts - the types who cant handle the sight of a black man seducing a white woman. I hope a lot of Christian right winger football fans wet their pants.
Most people in TV aren't that well thought out (I know people who work with MNF) :lol: :tape:

That said, if that's the end effect...:yeah:

Peter M
Nov 18th, 2004, 06:17 AM
People need to lighten up. I can't believe they apologized? :eek: wtf did they do wrong? :rolleyes:

After Janet's tit was exposed, people have lost their minds. The US needs to get with the times.

bee
Nov 18th, 2004, 11:03 AM
I didn't find anything offensive about the skit...

People should just lighten up... :)

Cam'ron Giles
Nov 18th, 2004, 12:36 PM
People need to lighten up. I can't believe they apologized? :eek: wtf did they do wrong? :rolleyes:

After Janet's tit was exposed, people have lost their minds. The US needs to get with the times.
Do you think Janet's tits cost the DEMS the election? :scratch:

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 01:03 PM
the people at ABC knew exactly what they were doing beforehand, and they deliberately made the skit with a white woman and a black football star so that when they got hit with the criticism they knew would be coming, they could claim that it wasn't the sexual nature of the skit, but the race factor that is behind the criticism. Of course they planned the whole thing. If it had not been a mixed race situation, they couldnt have gotten away with it. They were deliberately goading the racist right-wing talk show hosts - the types who cant handle the sight of a black man seducing a white woman. I hope a lot of Christian right winger football fans wet their pants.

And they got their wish.

On CNN last night on Paula Zhan's show, some right wing nut named JT The Brick hada look on his face like he wanted to hang Terrell Owens. He mentioned twice that he didn't need to see a naked blonde jumping into the arms of a football players. Sean Hannity wasn't as bad, but was close and Rush Limbaugh had the nerve to bring Donovan McNabb into the whole controversy.:rolleyes:

"Sluggy"
Nov 18th, 2004, 01:13 PM
Boring... id like to see more sex, and less violence on American TV. it is silly to me.

cheesestix
Nov 18th, 2004, 01:21 PM
I can see his point.

BTW, I didn't know he was black.

That's because you don't listen to anyone but yourself! :rolleyes:

I told you this about a week ago, but you insisted that he wasn't black. :rolleyes:

Guess you were wrong. What a surprise! :lol:

BTW, I thought the intro ROCKED! Terrell Owens ROCKS!

Peter M
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:59 PM
Do you think Janet's tits cost the DEMS the election? :scratch:
Good question. They said that a major number of people went to the polls this year to protect the country's "morals." :rolleyes: And the whole "moral" debate was triggered, in large part, by that fool Micheal Powell after the super bowl.

So, I bet Janet's tit plyed a major roll in bringing people to the polls.

Man, that girl packs some power in her rack. :eek:

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:32 PM
That's because you don't listen to anyone but yourself! :rolleyes:

I told you this about a week ago, but you insisted that he wasn't black. :rolleyes:

Guess you were wrong. What a surprise! :lol:

BTW, I thought the intro ROCKED! Terrell Owens ROCKS!


Sorry, but Tony Dungy looks to be mixed to me.

BTW, I think we were talking about Herm Edwards, not Tony Dungy.

harloo
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:56 PM
Good question. They said that a major number of people went to the polls this year to protect the country's "morals." :rolleyes: And the whole "moral" debate was triggered, in large part, by that fool Micheal Powell after the super bowl.

So, I bet Janet's tit plyed a major roll in bringing people to the polls.

Man, that girl packs some power in her rack. :eek:
Janet's boob had nothing to do with George W Bush being re-elected. The lie that gay marriage would be legalized under Kerry(when Kerry was for civil unions), and the mentioning of nuclear weapons in every other debate was what the Bush administration used effectively. Not to mention his grandstanding and making sure he mentioned that Kerry is in love with the terrorists.:rolleyes: FEAR

Rove and the GOP are masterminds. They single handedly convinced enough U.S Citizens to look the other way concerning more important issues such as the budget, health care, the enviornment, education etc. ;)

darrinbaker00
Nov 18th, 2004, 04:12 PM
That's because you don't listen to anyone but yourself! :rolleyes:

I told you this about a week ago, but you insisted that he wasn't black. :rolleyes:

Guess you were wrong. What a surprise! :lol:

BTW, I thought the intro ROCKED! Terrell Owens ROCKS!
You're a fan of the NFL's most obnoxious player? I, for one, am shocked.

cheesestix
Nov 18th, 2004, 05:57 PM
You're a fan of the NFL's most obnoxious player? I, for one, am shocked.

You stalking me again? I, for one, am shocked. :eek:

TO may be obnoxious. But he backs it up. 3 TDs on MNF. :eek:

Personally, I think TO gets a bad rap. He may talk a little trash, but outside of football you never hear anything negative about him.

cheesestix
Nov 18th, 2004, 06:02 PM
These people needs to lighten up...what the fuck? So she had a bare back and it was suggestive? Big fucking deal...:rolleyes: ...is the real issue that cute blond Nicollete or whatever did the skit with a black man? :tape:

For once, I may actually have to agree with you. :unsure:

I don't know for sure if that's the case, but I agree it's a possibility.

I just saw a news article that he apologized if it had offended anyone. That's BS! WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL??? :rolleyes: He shouldn't have to apologize for that. Geez! I think they're just blowing this thing out of proportion. But also, I think TO gets picked on no matter what he does. :mad:

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 06:26 PM
For once, I may actually have to agree with you. :unsure:

I don't know for sure if that's the case, but I agree it's a possibility.

I just saw a news article that he apologized if it had offended anyone. That's BS! WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL??? :rolleyes: He shouldn't have to apologize for that. Geez! I think they're just blowing this thing out of proportion. But also, I think TO gets picked on no matter what he does. :mad:

For once I have to agree with you. He is apologizing because this issue isn't going away any time soon because the black/white issue is still a problem for most people though they won't admit it and the meida is exploiting it. I was listening to a sports show this morning and most of the show was about this skit and race relations.

darrinbaker00
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:07 PM
For once I have to agree with you. He is apologizing because this issue isn't going away any time soon because the black/white issue is still a problem for most people though they won't admit it and the meida is exploiting it. I was listening to a sports show this morning and most of the show was about this skit and race relations.
I don't think ABC had the racial issue in mind when they did the skit, but that's certainly how it turned out; that was the first thing I thought of when I saw it ("Forgets my job! I gots me a nekkid white woman!"). As for Owens' apology, I think it's a good move, because for better or worse, people were offended by the skit, and he was a part of it. Lastly, am I the only one who thought that Owens was the better actor of the two?

cheesestix
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:20 PM
I don't think ABC had the racial issue in mind when they did the skit, but that's certainly how it turned out; that was the first thing I thought of when I saw it ("Forgets my job! I gots me a nekkid white woman!").

I didn't even think of it that way. I guess it's because in the back of my mind I'm thinking "I'm sure that he already has access to plenty of hot women!"...he's rich, and he's not bad looking (no gayness intended). Sounds like you kinda thought of it the same way that Tony Dungy thought about it though. I didn't even think of the racial thing until I heard someone mention it on the radio.

As for Owens' apology, I think it's a good move, because for better or worse, people were offended by the skit, and he was a part of it. Lastly, am I the only one who thought that Owens was the better actor of the two?

You're probably right about the apology. But you know in the back of his mind he's gotta be thinking "This is so stupid." But I still think TO just gets targeted because he's TO.

lizchris
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:32 PM
I don't think ABC had the racial issue in mind when they did the skit, but that's certainly how it turned out; that was the first thing I thought of when I saw it ("Forgets my job! I gots me a nekkid white woman!"). As for Owens' apology, I think it's a good move, because for better or worse, people were offended by the skit, and he was a part of it. Lastly, am I the only one who thought that Owens was the better actor of the two?

:lol: :lol: :lol:
I'm sorry; I had to laugh when I read that initially, but in the end, it isn't funny because I think that is what most people are thinking in the back of their ninds, though they wouldn't dare say it. Add in the fact that his English isn't the best, it just makes it worse.

darrinbaker00
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:37 PM
I didn't even think of it that way. I guess it's because in the back of my mind I'm thinking "I'm sure that he already has access to plenty of hot women!"...he's rich, and he's not bad looking (no gayness intended). Sounds like you kinda thought of it the same way that Tony Dungy thought about it though. I didn't even think of the racial thing until I heard someone mention it on the radio.



You're probably right about the apology. But you know in the back of his mind he's gotta be thinking "This is so stupid." But I still think TO just gets targeted because he's TO.
If they had used Donovan McNabb instead of Terrell Owens, the reaction wouldn't have been any different. The bottom line is that ABC got their intended response, and whoever thought of the skit will probably get a raise and a corner office.

As far as Owens being targeted, you have to admit that most of it is his own doing. The touchdown celebrations are bad enough (although I thought the skating bit was funny), but going off on coaches and teammates on the sidelines AND publicly questioning an ex-teammate's sexual preference is way over the top. With the way he plays, he doesn't need to do anything else to draw attention to himself.

darrinbaker00
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:50 PM
:lol: :lol: :lol:
I'm sorry; I had to laugh when I read that initially, but in the end, it isn't funny because I think that is what most people are thinking in the back of their ninds, though they wouldn't dare say it. Add in the fact that his English isn't the best, it just makes it worse.
I'm 101 percent positive that people have that in the back, front, and sides of their minds. My cousin and his wife get funny looks from people when they go out, and it's not because he's 6'6" and she's 4'11". We've done a lot through legislation to curtail racist behavior, but you can't legislate how a person thinks. As long as people believe that skin color or ethnic origin makes them superior to other people, and they pass that belief to their offspring, we will always have a problem.

ptkten
Nov 18th, 2004, 09:03 PM
Here's another article about how race is involved

I should've known this latest Terrell Owens story wouldn't vanish quickly. It involves sex, money, sports and, most critically, race. These are topics that make for a lively debate and I doubt that T.O. has any idea what kind of Pandora's Box he jolted open when Nicollette Sheridan vaulted into his arms on Monday night. ABC and anybody else who makes money off Desperate Housewives, is still reveling in all the publicity generated from the segment.

Personally, the skit didn't bother me one bit. What the segment did do, however, was make me wonder if America was ready to see a naked, blonde, white woman with her arms wrapped around an outspoken, controversial, highly paid black man. From what I can tell from everybody's reaction, the country definitely wasn't.

Isn't that what this is really all about? Once we get past all the people complaining about how inappropriate the skit was for the Monday Night Football audience and how so many children will be scarred after being exposed to such a tawdry scene before their bedtime and all the decision-makers in the NFL who have raced away from this topic as if it were a time bomb, this is an issue that comes down to race. Aside from Tony Dungy, nobody wants to talk about that aspect of the story, because that's the really scary part. It might tell us something about ourselves, that our country hasn't come as far in the area of race relations as we'd like to believe. Even now, with so many people still talking about Owens and Sheridan, I doubt we can fully address it like it needs to be addressed.


It's the one issue in this country that remains difficult for us to talk about. If you're black -- or any other minority -- you deal with race every day. It's a fact. If you're white, you deal with race mostly as it impacts you. It's a choice. Moments like the one that occurred on Monday night force us to come face-to-face with how we really feel about the subject and that is a good thing. In fact, I tell you what's been the most amazing moment for me since Monday night. It was a friend telling me that one of his buddies was shocked by the suggestion that all this controversy could've had anything to do with racial attitudes. As my friend's friend said, "Aren't we past the days when we have to think like that?"
No, we aren't. If you want to know how touchy the subject of black men hooking up with white women is, take a quick poll of America. There are plenty of black women who will have something to say about it. There are still plenty of interracial couples who know what it feels like to be stared at when they're out together. And there are plenty of parents, black and white, who are petrified by the thought of their sons and daughters proclaiming their love (http://www.adsrve.com/linkredirect.php?h=10,38206015,cnn.com,0) for somebody with a skin color different from their own. And when it comes to sports, there are plenty of people uncomfortable with the notion of a black man bedding a white woman.

I guarantee you that if Peyton Manning had been the man Sheridan jumped on, there wouldn't be half the controversy. If it had been Eva Longoria, the Latina co-star of Desperate Housewives, there also wouldn't be as much of an outcry. Two minorities locked in a sexual embrace isn't as shocking a thought in some of those red states. This is the same type of thinking that is all around Hollywood. When's the last time you saw Will Smith, Taye Diggs or Denzel Washington smooch a white woman? I can't recall it either because the people who make movies know they'd face the same response as ABC is dealing with now.

Everything I'm talking about here points to one central issue -- how comfortable America is with black men as sexual objects. Dungy had that part right when he talked about the Owens segment reinforcing the racial stereotype of a black sexual predator being chased by a fawning white woman. But I think it's deeper than that. Americans celebrate the black athlete and pay him huge sums of money (http://www.adsrve.com/linkredirect.php?h=16,38206015,cnn.com,0) but many people still have issues when it comes to his sex life. It's too salacious, too disturbing, just too much. But thanks to T.O., we've got an opportunity to openly talk about how we feel about it. I only wonder when we'll all realize that.



Jeffri Chadiha covers the NFL for Sports Illustrated and is a frequent contributor to SI.com.

kiwifan
Nov 18th, 2004, 09:44 PM
I'll respectfully restate that I think that it is a positive racial sign that a skit like this would appear before (a iconic national TV program like) Monday Night Football. Whether sexually it was appropriate is a fair debate. :cool:

I'd also like to point out that T.O. was not Mandingo or playing some sexual predator; he was the "straight man" of the skit while Nicollette (sp) was the only one who was "making a fool of herself (in character)".

While there are those who are mentally predisposed to see the negative, those people will always be that way; if the media was to pander to them I can think of 100 ground breaking programs that never would have seen the light of day [from All In the Family (which gave us the Jeffersons and Good Times as spin offs) to SOAP (gave us Benson as a spin off) to Married w/ Children (black man is co-creator) to the Simpsons (best blatant social commentary in popular TV these days] so...

...fuck 'em. :devil:

Martian Willow
Nov 18th, 2004, 10:00 PM
Oh my, someone seems to be suggesting certain people on this board are a little too quick to read racism into certain situations. Goodness me.

Volcana
Nov 18th, 2004, 11:18 PM
ABC isn't stupid. They knew the racial angle would get some people up in arms. They knew that Monday Night Football comes on at 6:00pm on the West Coast, and some that some viewers would be offended by anything risque at that hour. They knew the religious right would scream and shout.

And they were betting that the next day people would still be talking about it. Well, it three days later and ABC and the NFL have gotten MILLIONS of dollars of free publicity out of this. The FCC can fine them a million dollars and it's a big 'so what'?

'Desperate Housewives' already the #2 show in America, is going to have it's highest rating ever this Sunday.

They have the same democraphic as another ABC show, Monday Night Football, and of you know what that means?

It means ABC has just stuck a shiv into ESPN.

ABC's Monday Night Football also has the same demographic as ESPN's SUNDAY Night Football.

'Sunday Night Football' that goes head to head with 'Desperate Housewives' 9:00pm Sunday. SO guess where new viewers of 'Desperate Housewives' comes from?

Anyone who think ABC cares about this apology is nuts. They got everything they wanted and then some. Not much can pry football fans away from football. Illicit sex, however, IS one of those things. Of COURSE you use a white actress and black player for this stunt. It titillates more people. Taboo sells. The racial angle here is bogus. ABC exploited the fact that a lot of people can't stand seeing white women and black men to create controversy. That's incredibly fucking cynical, but it isn't bigoted or biased in any way.

Someone got a FAT bonus over this stunt at ABC. And somebody at ESPN is ranting that the NFL screwed them because ABC is a network, and thus has many more viewers, than ESPN, which is cable. And that somebody at ESPN is right.

ptkten
Nov 18th, 2004, 11:47 PM
well, ESPN and ABC are owned by the same company, Disney, and show games on the networks interchangeably. I know that if it's a Sunday Night game on ESPN that is showing the local team, ABC will pick up the game as well, so people who don't have cable get to watch it so I don't think that ESPN is going to be too upset about this. Plus, the demographics for Desperate Housewives is not the same as Sunday Night Football. The majority of people that watch that show are women.

lizchris
Nov 19th, 2004, 12:58 AM
Here's another article about how race is involved

I should've known this latest Terrell Owens story wouldn't vanish quickly. It involves sex, money, sports and, most critically, race. These are topics that make for a lively debate and I doubt that T.O. has any idea what kind of Pandora's Box he jolted open when Nicollette Sheridan vaulted into his arms on Monday night. ABC and anybody else who makes money off Desperate Housewives, is still reveling in all the publicity generated from the segment.

Personally, the skit didn't bother me one bit. What the segment did do, however, was make me wonder if America was ready to see a naked, blonde, white woman with her arms wrapped around an outspoken, controversial, highly paid black man. From what I can tell from everybody's reaction, the country definitely wasn't.

Isn't that what this is really all about? Once we get past all the people complaining about how inappropriate the skit was for the Monday Night Football audience and how so many children will be scarred after being exposed to such a tawdry scene before their bedtime and all the decision-makers in the NFL who have raced away from this topic as if it were a time bomb, this is an issue that comes down to race. Aside from Tony Dungy, nobody wants to talk about that aspect of the story, because that's the really scary part. It might tell us something about ourselves, that our country hasn't come as far in the area of race relations as we'd like to believe. Even now, with so many people still talking about Owens and Sheridan, I doubt we can fully address it like it needs to be addressed.


It's the one issue in this country that remains difficult for us to talk about. If you're black -- or any other minority -- you deal with race every day. It's a fact. If you're white, you deal with race mostly as it impacts you. It's a choice. Moments like the one that occurred on Monday night force us to come face-to-face with how we really feel about the subject and that is a good thing. In fact, I tell you what's been the most amazing moment for me since Monday night. It was a friend telling me that one of his buddies was shocked by the suggestion that all this controversy could've had anything to do with racial attitudes. As my friend's friend said, "Aren't we past the days when we have to think like that?"
No, we aren't. If you want to know how touchy the subject of black men hooking up with white women is, take a quick poll of America. There are plenty of black women who will have something to say about it. There are still plenty of interracial couples who know what it feels like to be stared at when they're out together. And there are plenty of parents, black and white, who are petrified by the thought of their sons and daughters proclaiming their love (http://www.adsrve.com/linkredirect.php?h=10,38206015,cnn.com,0) for somebody with a skin color different from their own. And when it comes to sports, there are plenty of people uncomfortable with the notion of a black man bedding a white woman.

I guarantee you that if Peyton Manning had been the man Sheridan jumped on, there wouldn't be half the controversy. If it had been Eva Longoria, the Latina co-star of Desperate Housewives, there also wouldn't be as much of an outcry. Two minorities locked in a sexual embrace isn't as shocking a thought in some of those red states. This is the same type of thinking that is all around Hollywood. When's the last time you saw Will Smith, Taye Diggs or Denzel Washington smooch a white woman? I can't recall it either because the people who make movies know they'd face the same response as ABC is dealing with now.

Everything I'm talking about here points to one central issue -- how comfortable America is with black men as sexual objects. Dungy had that part right when he talked about the Owens segment reinforcing the racial stereotype of a black sexual predator being chased by a fawning white woman. But I think it's deeper than that. Americans celebrate the black athlete and pay him huge sums of money (http://www.adsrve.com/linkredirect.php?h=16,38206015,cnn.com,0) but many people still have issues when it comes to his sex life. It's too salacious, too disturbing, just too much. But thanks to T.O., we've got an opportunity to openly talk about how we feel about it. I only wonder when we'll all realize that.



Jeffri Chadiha covers the NFL for Sports Illustrated and is a frequent contributor to SI.com.

Thank you for posting the article.

Martian Willow
Nov 19th, 2004, 01:24 AM
Dungy had that part right when he talked about the Owens segment reinforcing the racial stereotype of a black sexual predator being chased by a fawning white woman.

Slightly confused by this sentence. Surely the person doing the chasing is the 'predator'? And surely someone has to chase someone, so where does the 'stereotype' come into it?

Also I seem to recall that for the most part it isn't white posters on this board who have bitched and moaned about black man/white woman relationships, so who is it with the issues?

That's all for now. :)

Volcana
Nov 19th, 2004, 02:09 AM
well, ESPN and ABC are owned by the same company, Disney, and show games on the networks interchangeably. I know that if it's a Sunday Night game on ESPN that is showing the local team, ABC will pick up the game as well, so people who don't have cable get to watch it so I don't think that ESPN is going to be too upset about this. Plus, the demographics for Desperate Housewives is not the same as Sunday Night Football. The majority of people that watch that show are women.'Desperate Housewives' is the #3 in the TV rating of most watched shows for males 18-49 behind 'Monday Night Football' and 'CSI'. A lot of women watch Monday NIght Football. A lot of men watch 'Desperate Housewives', which get much better ratings than 'Sunday Night Football'. That's network vs cable though, so that's not really a fair comparison.

BlazeII
Nov 19th, 2004, 02:14 AM
Take the hottest player in football and put him with a star of the hottest show on TV and what do you get? High Ratings.
By the way, I read an article today that said 40% of the viewers of Desperate Housewives are men. Combine this with those men who were watching football on Monday and saw this skit and might want to check out more hot women. ABC just score herself a winner

tterb
Nov 19th, 2004, 05:01 AM
I guess I'd have to agree with Volcana. I don't know how anybody could conceive this skit and air it at that time slot without knowing there would be repercussions. People can't possibly be THAT oblivious. (well, nevermind... ;))

That said, I don't see the big deal. Possibly exposing children to a woman's bare back and a sexual situation? *gasp* Oh, the horror. Please, America. The kids discuss much worse things at school every day, whether you like it or not.

I would agree that the skit could have been pushed to a later time, but your kids are not going to be traumatized. At the very worst, maybe it brought up an opportunity to talk to your kids about sex and your stance on sexual behavior. It wasn't like the skit was over-the-top graphic or lurid. So quit bitching and turn the situation into a tool for responsible parenting.

As for the racial component... I myself didn't notice it. I see it now, but it didn't cross my mind when I first saw the skit. It could have been any athlete and it would have still been the same mildly amusing skit to me. I don't know what everyone believes are the sexual stereotypes about black athletes, but my stereotype for famous athletes is all-encompassing regardless of race. My first general thought when the concept "famous athlete" is brought up is someone who is overpaid relative to their job importance, followed closely by my assumption that many athletes live the high life, with lots of partying, drinking, and sex... So the skit played into that stereotype of mine, but I hold that for most athletes. I certainly don't consider black men "sexual predators," and could care less if people from different races want to hook up, although I know many people do care. It's too bad that of all the crap in the world, people focus on non-issues like this. It's sad that anyone would view this commercial and have race immediately pop to mind, but I guess we aren't aren't even close to past that stage yet.