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Steffica Greles
Nov 17th, 2004, 04:25 PM
Here's mine. There's a few rules:

-No more than 10 are allowed, otherwise we could all name a ridiculous amount.

- They must have played in YOUR lifetime, and more than that, you have to have a clear memory of them. e.g Chris Evert played in my lifetime, but I never saw her play at her peak - only in videos. I never felt the emotion of her 1985 RG win, or admired her career as a contemporary. So, I can't include her.

- They must be suitably famous. I'll leave individuals to decide what that means, but if people are putting in Tanasugarn, Frazier, Raymond, or even Majoli (useful players though they are), then really it makes a mockery of "Hall of Fame". They don't have to be slam winners, but prominent in respect of either their charisma, style or achievements, and of an era.

- Write just a little about what they mean/meant to you.

Mine...

MONICA SELES

One thing's for certain, there'll never be another Monica Seles. Since 1990, there have been many reminiscent in hitting style, grunting decibels, ferocity, intensity, etc. They continue to roll off the conveyor belt, and from around the world: Europe and America. But watch the Monica of the early 90s and you'll see that there emerged a truly unique phenomenon, a player who changed the style of women's tennis. Seles' nerves were like steel, her timing and accuracy pin-point, her spirit indomitable. Her fearless resolve to "hit-out" under the most enormous of pressue has become legendary.

When we see so many players victims of their own success through injuries, never quite recapturing the form of old, it reminds us just how strong Seles has been. Had she not returned, perhaps her record of near invincibility would have secured her a higher place in the history books. But to come back to top-level tennis, to even show glimpses of her old self, and leave us with yet more poignant moments, shows her strength. Not many could have achieved such feats having missed almost 3 years from the mental and physical effects of a stab wound. Six months out with athletic injuries is enough to interrupt most careers these days.

And lastly, Seles was the only player to ever consistently hold the edge over Steffi Graf. The eminent German dominated Evert, Navratilova and Sabatini in the late 80s, and Sanchez-Vicario in the mid-90s before injuries set in. She then returned in the late 90s with wins over the Williams', Hingis, Davenport - most of the next generation.

Seles was the only player Graf ever feared, and that was because Seles had the mental edge over her in major tournaments - something nobody else ever really achieved. When we consider that Graf is arguably the greatest player of all time, that fact certainly raises Seles' name in the all-time list, particularly in light of why that run was brought to a halt.

STEFFI GRAF

Much of my admiration for Steffi Graf lies in the above paragraphs. While she played I loathed her, yet with grudging admiration. There was an aura to Graf that was incomparable. It was one of efficiency, positivity, perfection, athleticism, power, grace, speed, dignity. She was almost God-like. If ever there was a Goddess of tennis, Steffi Graf possessed the striking countenance, physical shape and illustrious list of triumphs to be that very woman.

And as with Seles, Graf (for different reasons) suffered more injuries than any of today's players. She was fraught with a body that, at times, appeared to be falling apart. In light of the difficulties those types of injures cause today's players, and considering Graf never lost any of her speed, athletic prowess, not to mention formidability, that was an extraordinary achievement. The mark of the truly Great Champion, a term that's often bandied about.

ARANXTA SANCHEZ-VICARIO

Aranxta was the most tenacious player I've ever seen. When she ran hell for leather across the court for a lob or a passing shot, you'd commonly hear a husky noise that sounded like a roar ("Vamos", I think it was). Sanchez-Vicario had the heart of a lion on the court, a true warrior, and that was because unlike Graf or Seles, Aranxta's success owed nothing to pounding drives or deft natural touch, but to one simple philosophy: surrender never.

I'm not of the opinion that had Seles not been stabbed, Aranxta would never have blossomed. By 1993 she was becoming an increasing threat to Graf and Seles. In 1994 she inflicted some nasty stings on Graf, and claimed what was perhaps the jewel in her crown, the U.S Open (as well as the French Open). Toward the end of 1992 Seles had lost to Aranxta for the first time in Canada, and I see no reason why there wouldn't have been other occasions in major tournaments when Aranxta could have frustrated Seles as much as she did Graf in the mid-90s. If one thing is for sure, however many times she may have been beaten by Graf, Seles or anybody, Aranxta never gave up. Like a punch bag, she just kept coming.

Words can't convey the respect I have for Sanchez-Vicario. She helped define an era with her spirit, her charisma and her smile, and if Graf and Seles go down as all-time greats, then surely Aranxta will be remembered as one of their main obstacles in some truly epic matches. As Graf was quoted as saying in tribute to Aranxta on her retirement in 2002, "She helped make history".

A few more...

Mary Pierce

There's something about contrary Mary. Her game, when it's on, is like blitzkreig warfare. Surely some of the most destuctive, dominating performances of all time have come from her racket. But more than that, she's another one who carries a unique aura. The fiddling with the hair, the earnest pout before each serve, the statuesque walk, the stretching poses, the ghastly, inexplicable errors, the nervous smile, the cumbersome movement, the sheer unpredictability -- all these traits are the make up of Mary Pierce. Unforgettable.

Amanda Coetzer

Coetzer, much like Sanchez-Vicario, and possibly even to a greater extent when you consider she was just 5'2 with a very workmanlike array of shots, was a great over achiever, who could so easily have been a middle ranked player for most of her career. But Coetzer's hunger for success, to keep pushing herself, never ceased, and with wins over Graf, Seles, Sanchez-V, Novotna, Sabatini, Davenport, Venus Williams and Hingis, Amanda earned great admiration from fans as a tremendous fighter, and from opponents as a force to be reckoned with despite her limitations.

Jennifer Capriati

There couldn't be a greater role model for players whose careers are in the depths of despair. By 1998, it seemed that surely Jennifer's career was all but over. By 2000 she'd regained some respect as a player by reclaiming her place in the top 20, but few ever dreamed she'd then reach new levels. Capriati demonstrated to everybody that if you keep dreaming, and refuse to accept your lot in life, eventually things can come right for you. As a player, she's also one of the most exciting to watch, each shot hit crisply, with powerful, instinctive movement that keeps you on the edge of your seat. Her career seems to be gradually winding down, and she'll be a big loss for the tour.

Jana Novotna

She moved like a cat. Just glided around the court, hissing with every slice, leaping as she slammed away each volley. Had Jana Novotna won Wimbledon in 1993, her career may have never reached the late 90s. But her determination to live what seemed, with her immense talent, to be her destiny, kept her going. And as with Jennifer Capriati, it was inspirational to see somebody who didn't have success fall at her feet achieve what she undoubtedly deserved.

Martina Hingis

Hingis played probably the most beautiful tennis I've ever seen, and had she been born in an era with wooden rackets I've no doubt she would have been near invincible. The game still has a void without her, not only because she's still young enough to play, but when a player with her talent, beauty, intelligence and charisma graces the courts, they will be missed forever more. Her tussles with the Williams sisters and Davenport were definitive of an era, and she'll go down favourably in the history books for fighting such a brave and admirable, if ultimately forlorn, series of battles.

Lindsay Davenport

Lindsay Davenport is, to me, a perfect example of how positive thinking, even when it's not natural to you, can bring success. Lindsay is at heart a pessimist, always cautious of the future, and doubtful of her own potential. Yet something has kept Davenport at the top of the game longer than any of her earlier contemporaries, despite enduring as many career threatening injuries as anybody. She has the ability to take the rough with the smooth, and as long as she knows she's doing her best, she can put bad losses behind her and keep hoping that, despite herself, things will fall into place. And in 2004, things certainly have done when she could so easily have accepted, as I think many of us did, that her days were numbered.

She'll always be remembered for her intelligence, articulacy and honesty. Her haul of titles, including majors and prize money will make her sit nicely in the all-time list, too.

Gabriela Sabatini

Unfotunately, I only caught the last few years of Gabi's career. I must include her because it was her grace and beauty that drew my interest in women's tennis, and had she been less of a human being and more of a competitor, she may well have achieved even more than she did.

blue249
Nov 17th, 2004, 04:37 PM
Here's mine. There's a few rules:

-No more than 10 are allowed, otherwise we could all name a ridiculous amount.

- They must have played in YOUR lifetime, and more than that, you have to have a clear memory of them. e.g Chris Evert played in my lifetime, but I never saw her play at her peak - only in videos. I never felt the emotion of her 1985 RG win, or admired her career as a contemporary. So, I can't include her.

- They must be suitably famous. I'll leave individuals to decide what that means, but if people are putting in Tanasugarn, Frazier, Raymond, or even Majoli (useful players though they are), then really it makes a mockery of "Hall of Fame". They don't have to be slam winners, but prominent in respect of either their charisma, style or achievements, and of an era.

- Write just a little about what they mean/meant to you.

Mine...

MONICA SELES

One thing's for certain, there'll never be another Monica Seles. Since 1990, there have been many reminiscent in hitting style, grunting decibels, ferocity, intensity, etc. They continue to roll off the conveyor belt, and from around the world: Europe and America. But watch the Monica of the early 90s and you'll see that there emerged a truly unique phenomenon, a player who changed the style of women's tennis. Seles' nerves were like steel, her timing and accuracy pin-point, her spirit indomitable. Her fearless resolve to "hit-out" under the most enormous of pressue has become legendary.

When we see so many players victims of their own success through injuries, never quite recapturing the form of old, it reminds us just how strong Seles has been. Had she not returned, perhaps her record of near invincibility would have secured her a higher place in the history books. But to come back to top-level tennis, to even show glimpses of her old self, and leave us with yet more poignant moments, shows her strength. Not many could have achieved such feats having missed almost 3 years from the mental and physical effects of a stab wound. Six months out with athletic injuries is enough to interrupt most careers these days.

And lastly, Seles was the only player to ever consistently hold the edge over Steffi Graf. The eminent German dominated Evert, Navratilova and Sabatini in the late 80s, and Sanchez-Vicario in the mid-90s before injuries set in. She then returned in the late 90s with wins over the Williams', Hingis, Davenport - most of the next generation.

Seles was the only player Graf ever feared, and that was because Seles had the mental edge over her in major tournaments - something nobody else ever really achieved. When we consider that Graf is arguably the greatest player of all time, that fact certainly raises Seles' name in the all-time list, particularly in light of why that run was brought to a halt.

STEFFI GRAF

Much of my admiration for Steffi Graf lies in the above paragraphs. While she played I loathed her, yet with grudging admiration. There was an aura to Graf that was incomparable. It was one of efficiency, positivity, perfection, athleticism, power, grace, speed, dignity. She was almost God-like. If ever there was a Goddess of tennis, Steffi Graf possessed the striking countenance, physical shape and illustrious list of triumphs to be that very woman.

And as with Seles, Graf (for different reasons) suffered more injuries than any of today's players. She was fraught with a body that, at times, appeared to be falling apart. In light of the difficulties those types of injures cause today's players, and considering Graf never lost any of her speed, athletic prowess, not to mention formidability, that was an extraordinary achievement. The mark of the truly Great Champion, a term that's often bandied about.

ARANXTA SANCHEZ-VICARIO

Aranxta was the most tenacious player I've ever seen. When she ran hell for leather across the court for a lob or a passing shot, you'd commonly hear a husky noise that sounded like roar ("Vamos", I think it was). Sanchez-Vicario had the heart of a lion on the court, a true warrior, and that was because unlike Graf or Seles, Aranxta's success owed nothing to pounding drives or deft natural touch, but to one simple philosophy: surrender never.

I'm not of the opinion that had Seles not been stabbed, Aranxta would never have blossomed. By 1993 she was becoming an increasing threat to Graf and Seles. In 1994 she inflicted some nasty stings on Graf, and claimed what was perhaps the jewel in her crown, the U.S Open (as well as the French Open). Toward the end of 1992 Seles had lost to Aranxta for the first time in Canada, and I see no reason why there wouldn't have been other occasions in major tournaments when Aranxta could have frustrated Seles as much as she did Graf in the mid-90s. If one thing is for sure, however many times she may have been beaten by Graf, Seles or anybody, Aranxta never gave up. Like a punch bag, she just kept coming.

Words can't convey the respect I have for Sanchez-Vicario. She helped define an era with her spirit, her charisma and her smile, and if Graf and Seles go down as all-time greats, then surely Aranxta will be remembered as one of their main obstacles in some truly epic matches. As Graf was quoted as saying in tribute to Aranxta on her retirement in 2002, "She helped make history".

A few more...

Mary Pierce

There's something about contrary Mary. Her game, when it's on, is like blitzkreig warfare. Surely some of the most destuctive, dominating performances of all time have come from her racket. But more than that, she's another one who carries a unique aura. The fiddling with the hair, the earnest pout before each serve, the statuesque walk, the stretching poses, the ghastly, inexplicable errors, the nervous smile, the cumbersome movement, the sheer unpredictability -- all these traits are the make up of Mary Pierce. Unforgettable.

Amanda Coetzer

Coetzer, much like Sanchez-Vicario, and possibly even to a greater extent when you consider she was just 5'2 with a very workmanlike array of shots, was a great over achiever, who could so easily have been a middle ranked player for most of her career. But Coetzer's hunger for success, to keep pushing herself, never ceased, and with wins over Graf, Seles, Sanchez-V, Novotna, Sabatini, Davenport, Venus Williams and Hingis, Amanda earned great admiration from fans as a tremendous fighter, and from opponents as a force to be reckoned with despite her limitations.

Jennifer Capriati

There couldn't be a greater role model for players whose careers are in the depths of despair. By 1998, it seemed that surely Jennifer's career was all but over. By 2000 she'd regained some respect as a player by reclaiming her place in the top 20, but few ever dreamed she'd then reach new levels. Capriati demonstrated to everybody that if you keep dreaming, and refuse to accept your lot in life, eventually things can come right for you. As a player, she's also one of the most exciting to watch, each shot hit crisply, with powerful, instinctive movement that keeps you on the edge of your seat. Her career seems to be gradually winding down, and she'll be a big loss for the tour.

Jana Novotna

She moved like a cat. Just glided around the court, hissing with every slice, leaping as she slammed away each volley. Had Jana Novotna won Wimbledon in 1993, her career may have never reached the late 90s. But her determination to live what seemed, with her immense talent, to be her destiny, kept her going. And as with Jennifer Capriati, it was inspirational to see somebody who didn't have success fall at her feet achieve what she undoubtedly deserved.

Martina Hingis

Hingis played probably the most beautiful tennis I've ever seen, and had she been born in an era with wooden rackets I've no doubt she would have been near invincible. The game still has a void without her, not only because she's still young enough to play, but when a player with her talent, beauty, intelligence and charisma graces the courts, they will be missed forever more. Her tussles with the Williams sisters and Davenport were definitive of an era, and she'll go down favourably in the history books for fighting such a brave and admirable, if ultimately forlorn, series of battles.

Lindsay Davenport

Lindsay Davenport is, to me, a perfect example of how positive thinking, even when it's not natural to you, can bring success. Lindsay is at heart a pessimist, always cautious of the future, and doubtful of her own potential. Yet something has kept Davenport at the top of the game longer than any of her earlier contemporaries, despite enduring as many career threatening injuries as anybody. She has the ability to take the rough with the smooth, and as long as she knows she's doing her best, she can put bad losses behind her and keep hoping that, despite herself, things will fall into place. And in 2004, things certainly have done when she could so easily have accepted, as I think many of us did, that her days were numbered.

She'll always be remembered for her intelligence, articulacy and honesty. Her haul of titles, including majors and prize money will make her sit nicely in the all-time list, too.

Gabriela Sabatini

Unfotunately, I only caught the last few years of Gabi's career. I must include her because it was her grace and beauty that drew my interest in women's tennis, and had she been less of a human being and more of a competitor, she may well have achieved even more than she did.
excellent post!

Emptiness
Nov 17th, 2004, 04:41 PM
You write with a flair and have a way with words. Very enjoyable read especially in contrast with the majority of the posts here. I really like how you perceive certain players, Sanchez-Vicario in particular. However I'm far too lazy to slave over the keyboard for 40 minutes attempting to write as eloquently as you have in probably 5 minutes. http://xs.to/pics/04102/smilie-animesweat.gif

I uh, agree with most of your choices though. :)

Monica_Rules
Nov 17th, 2004, 04:47 PM
Ok i would pick

Monica Seles
Steffi Graf
Martina Hingis
Lindsay Davenport
Venus Williams
Serena Williams
Mary Peirce
Aranxta Sanchez-Vicario
Jenifer Capriarti
Justine Henin-Hardenne

selking
Nov 17th, 2004, 05:12 PM
what about navratilova?

Brαm
Nov 17th, 2004, 05:18 PM
In alphabetical order:

Jennifer Capriati
Kim Clijsters
Lindsay Davenport
Steffi Graf
Justine Henin
Martina Hingis
Amélie Mauresmo
Monica Seles
Serena Williams
Venus Williams

selking
Nov 17th, 2004, 05:23 PM
seles
navratilova
BJK
Evert
Little Mo
Davenport
Capriati

Brαm
Nov 17th, 2004, 05:25 PM
seles
navratilova
BJK
Evert
Little Mo
Davenport
Capriati

You were born in 1988 and yet you saw BJK and Little Mo at their prime? :scratch:

MLF
Nov 17th, 2004, 05:28 PM
Martina Navratilova
Chris Evert
Hana Mandlikova
Steffi Graf
Monica Seles
Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
Martina Hingis
Serena Williams
Venus Williams
Lindsay Davenport


I basically went with the nine that I clearly remember playing who achieved most in terms winning slams. So Venus gets in with her 4 slam singles titles for me.

That left one place on my list and whilst I'd love to have put Sabatini in it was between the three former #1s with 3 slam titles and an Olympic gold medal i.e Lindsay, Jennifer & Justine. If Justine comes back and hangs around the top for a few years she could bump Lindsay out but for now Davenport stays!

Caz
Nov 17th, 2004, 05:51 PM
OK, I began watching tennis properly in the early 1980's, so here's my list:

Martina Navratilova
Steffi Graf
Monica Seles
Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
Serena Williams
Martina Hingis
Venus Williams
Conchita Martinez (her consistently good results and high ranking over such a long period of time is often forgotten)
Lindsay Davenport
Mary Pierce

Would like to add: Jennifer, Justine and Jana, but that would make 13! ;)

Andy T
Nov 17th, 2004, 06:13 PM
I started watching tennis in the mid 1970s, so my list begins at about then.

Billie Jean King
Chris Evert
Evonne Goolagong
Martina Navratilova
Hana Mandlikova
Steffi Graf
Monica Seles
Martina Hingis
Serena Williams
Justine Henin

Margaret Court was still playing about then but I have no memory of watching her so she is outside the list.

FrauleinSteffi
Nov 17th, 2004, 06:35 PM
1.Steffi Graf-loved to watch her play
2.Monica Seles-Also fun to watch
3.Jennifer Capriati-awesome player in 90 & now
4. L Davenport-such power
5. Chris Evert-Graceful and smart & tough
6.Martina Hingis-very smart & graceful & fluid
7.Maria Sharapova-very exciting & enthusiastic player
8.Martina Navratilova-great volleys & serve
9.Gaby-Great player
10.Justine-great fighter & so tough & powerful for her size

Grohl
Nov 17th, 2004, 07:25 PM
kim clijsters (she's the best)
maria elena camerin ( got her towel)
karolina sprem (really nice and i got on the pic with her)
francesca schiavone (so powerfull tennis, sat right behind me)
marta marrero (funny to watch at doubles with llagostera)
elena dementieva (just is)
amelie mauresmo (inspiration)
jennifer capriati (inspiration)

CooCooCachoo
Nov 17th, 2004, 07:28 PM
- They must be suitably famous. I'll leave individuals to decide what that means, but if people are putting in Tanasugarn, Frazier, Raymond, or even Majoli (useful players though they are), then really it makes a mockery of "Hall of Fame". They don't have to be slam winners, but prominent in respect of either their charisma, style or achievements, and of an era.

Then it is not my personal Hall of Fame. This would include lower-ranked players too.

manu32
Nov 17th, 2004, 07:33 PM
steffi graf
chris evert
jennifer capriati
lindsay davenport
serena williams
venus williams
and i don't know.......

Jenny.C.Fan
Nov 17th, 2004, 08:05 PM
Jen-Cap
Arantxa
Lindsay
Martina h.
Monica
Steffi
Jana
Justine
umm think that'll do

Pengwin
Nov 17th, 2004, 08:08 PM
Navratilova
Seles
Graf
Sabatini
Novotna
ASV
Pierce
Hingis
Williams
Capriati or Davenport

mboyle
Nov 17th, 2004, 08:35 PM
I am going w/ the Open Era, not your rule, okay?

Margaret Court
Steffi Graf
Martina Navratilova
Chris Evert
Billie Jean King
Monica Seles
Evonne Goolagong
Serena Williams
Martina Hingis
Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario

DeDe4925
Nov 17th, 2004, 08:55 PM
1. Billie Jean King: She is the founder of the WTA and the player I most admired. She made me fall in love with the game and followed tennis up until her retirement. I felt about her like I feel about the Williams Sisters. I remember seeing her win two Wimbledons. She was a great player and role model for all the women players, back then and now.

2. Yvonne Goolagong: She had great court sense. I loved seeing her grace and style. I really liked her short curly hair.

3. Margaret Court: I loved her power. To me, she was the first real "big babe" power player.

4. Chris Evert: I loved her style on court (fashion wise and tennis wise). She always seemed so cool and collected. I loved watching her from the baseline with her two-handed backhands.

5. Martina Navratilova: The second woman to really use power tennis. She really had a great all-court game with power strokes, volleys and slices.

6. Steffi Graf: I really kind of stopped watching tennis during this time, so I never saw her play any matches. I only named her because of her reputation and in honor of the great champion she was.

7. Monica Seles: Another power player who had an amazing two-handed forehand. I had never seen that before. I remember seeing the semifinal match between her and Jen Cap. I think it was the US Open. I only watched it because there was nothing else on TV at the time. However, like I said, really didn't follow tennis back then.

8. Lindsay Davenport: A great ball-striker, friendly on and off court. A great champion. I just like Lindsay.

9. Serena Williams: The second black woman to ever win a major title. The first time I saw her play was at the 1999 US Open final against Hingis. I love her fighting spirit. She had it then and she still has it. During 2001-2003, she had one of the best all around court games. I know that with a lot of dedication and hard work, she'll win more majors and regain her No. 1 status in the tennis world.

10. Venus Williams: The third black woman to ever win a major title. Her wins at Wimbledon and the US Open made me sit up and start paying attention to tennis again. Great serve, great volleys, power hitter, great backhand. I love Venus and Serena and I know that Venus wants to be at the top again and I believe she will get there again. She just has to believe in herself.

hanafan
Nov 17th, 2004, 11:50 PM
I was catched by women's tenni in 1981, at the age of 10. So, here's my Halla of Fame!

1 : Hana Mandlikova : Thanks to her, I fell in love with the game, when I watched her on French TV , winning Rolland Garros. She stayed my fav since that! Another big, deep, emotional memory is her victory in 85'US Open... I miss her!

2 : Amelie Mauresmo
2 : Jana Novotna

4 : Mary Pierce
5 : Tracy Austin
6 : Monica Seles
7 : Maria Sharapova
8 : Jenn Cap
9 : Chris Evert
10 : Martina Navratilova / Martina Hingis

Chunchun
Nov 17th, 2004, 11:51 PM
Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva
Elena Dementieva

~Cherry*Blossom~
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:29 AM
I'm only gonna list players I have seen play:

(in no order)
Venus Williams
Serena Williams
Steffi Graf
Lindsay Davenport
Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario
Monica Seles
Martina Hingis
Justine Henin-Hardenne
Mary Pierce
Jennifer Capriati

Denise4925
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:32 AM
1. Billie Jean King: She is the founder of the WTA and the player I most admired. She made me fall in love with the game and followed tennis up until her retirement. I felt about her like I feel about the Williams Sisters. I remember seeing her win two Wimbledons. She was a great player and role model for all the women players, back then and now.

2. Yvonne Goolagong: She had great court sense. I loved seeing her grace and style. I really liked her short curly hair.

3. Margaret Court: I loved her power. To me, she was the first real "big babe" power player.

4. Chris Evert: I loved her style on court (fashion wise and tennis wise). She always seemed so cool and collected. I loved watching her from the baseline with her two-handed backhands.

5. Martina Navratilova: The second woman to really use power tennis. She really had a great all-court game with power strokes, volleys and slices.

6. Steffi Graf: I really kind of stopped watching tennis during this time, so I never saw her play any matches. I only named her because of her reputation and in honor of the great champion she was.

7. Monica Seles: Another power player who had an amazing two-handed forehand. I had never seen that before. I remember seeing the semifinal match between her and Jen Cap. I think it was the US Open. I only watched it because there was nothing else on TV at the time. However, like I said, really didn't follow tennis back then.

8. Lindsay Davenport: A great ball-striker, friendly on and off court. A great champion. I just like Lindsay.

9. Serena Williams: The second black woman to ever win a major title. The first time I saw her play was at the 1999 US Open final against Hingis. I love her fighting spirit. She had it then and she still has it. During 2001-2003, she had one of the best all around court games. I know that with a lot of dedication and hard work, she'll win more majors and regain her No. 1 status in the tennis world.

10. Venus Williams: The third black woman to ever win a major title. Her wins at Wimbledon and the US Open made me sit up and start paying attention to tennis again. Great serve, great volleys, power hitter, great backhand. I love Venus and Serena and I know that Venus wants to be at the top again and I believe she will get there again. She just has to believe in herself.
ditto ;)

rue
Nov 18th, 2004, 02:34 AM
Mine are
Serena Williams
Lindsay Davenport
Monica Seles
Justine Henin-Hardenne
Steffi Graf
Martina Navratilova
Jennifer Capriati
Venus Williams
Anastasia Myskina
Elena Dementieva

bello
Nov 18th, 2004, 05:03 AM
The 10 women who were the best performed during the time i have followed tennis

- Steffi Graf
- Monica Seles
- Serena Williams
- Martina Hingis
- Lindsay Davenport
- Venus Williams
- Jennifer Capriati
- Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
- Justine Henin Hardenne
- Gabriela Sabatini

Almost:

-Kim Clijsters/Jana Novotna/ Conchita Martinez/Mary Pierce/Martina Navratilova/Anastasia Myskina

*Yes i know i put Gaby instead of the other women listed under 'almost', that was decided via TALENT, and having done things all by age 26...
*Only didnt put Martina N cos she did all her success pre-me following tennis.....

WTAaddict
Nov 18th, 2004, 05:29 AM
1. Martina Navratilova
2. Steffi Graff
3. Monica Seles
4. Chris Evert
5. Martina Hingis
6. Lindsay Davenport
7. Serena Williams
8. Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
9. Billy Jean King
10. Margareth Court

Next in Line:
Justine Henin
Venus Williams
Jenifer Capriati

Volcana
Nov 18th, 2004, 06:04 AM
Here's mine. There's a few rules:

-No more than 10 are allowed, otherwise we could all name a ridiculous amount.

- They must have played in YOUR lifetime, and more than that, you have to have a clear memory of them. e.g Chris Evert played in my lifetime, but I never saw her play at her peak - only in videos. I never felt the emotion of her 1985 RG win, or admired her career as a contemporary. So, I can't include her.Interesting Rule. My normal list, in chronological order is ...
Suzanne Lenglen
Helen Wills Moody
Maureen Connolly
Althea Gibson
Margaret Smith Court
Billie Jean King
Evonne Goolagong
Chris Evert Lloyd
Martina Navratilova
Steffi Graf
Deleting those I only know by history and video leaves ...
Margaret Smith Court
Billie Jean King
Evonne Goolagong
Chris Evert Lloyd
Martina Navratilova
Steffi Graf





... four spots open.

Hmmm....

Just_lindsay
Nov 18th, 2004, 06:18 AM
Ok i would pick

Monica Seles
Steffi Graf
Martina Hingis
Lindsay Davenport
Venus Williams
Serena Williams
Mary Peirce
Aranxta Sanchez-Vicario
Jenifer Capriarti
Justine Henin-Hardenne

1. Lindsay Davenport
2. Justine Henin-Hardenne
3. Venus Williams
4. Serena Williams
5. Maria Sharapova
6. Martina Navratilova
7. Chanda Rubin
8. Elena Dementieva
9. Anna Kournikova
10. Mary Pierce

Volcana
Nov 18th, 2004, 06:49 AM
The Six Players from my All-Time Top Ten who I saw at their peaks while I was alive.

1) Margaret Smith Court - If you don't know Margaret Smith Court, you don't know tennis dominance. It really is that simple. 24 GS singles titles, 19 doubles and 19 mixed; and, of course, won the Grand Slam. She was bigger, stronger, faster, and in many ways a tennis playing machine. I wasn't a big fan of her's, being a fan of BJK and Evonne Goolagong. But after she won the Grand Slam, retired, had kids, came back and resumed dominance, you had to give the woman her props.
Comparing players across era is always dicey. But if the question, 'who was the most dominant player of all?' there's no question, and no comparison.

2) Martina Navratilova - 167 singles titles, 174 doubles titles. And counting. Not a large woman, by any means, but so fiercely athletic that people thought she was. The player who brought tennis, kicking and screaming, to modern standards of athleticism. Like her ultimate rival Evert, won every GS at least twice. My personal pick as 'greatest female tennis player of all time', but I concede the numbers favor Court Smith.

3) Steffi Graf - Steffi Graf stands out on this list because she's the only all-time top ten player (IMHO) who has only one (or fewer) GS doubles title. Her all surface record in singles is so staggering, however, she simply can't be overlooked. A combination of Court Smith power and Navratilova athletism, she fought off a failing body for basically the last seven years of her career. Subjectively, the best singles player of all time. (Court played against some real 'hit and giggle' tennis in the early rounds of tournaments.)

4) Billie Jean King - Loud, brash, oft-injured, but she attack the net on anybody, and for years was the only force that was more than a speedbump to Margaret Court. I modeled a lot of my game in her initially. GOt a lot done with guts and savvy that she really wasn't athlete enough for. Including beating Bobby Riggs. One of the best at going to net on the first short ball, really good half-volley.

5) Chris Evert Lloyd - The mentally toughest player ever. Period. Either sex. Could relentlessly hit balls corner to corner til hell froze over. THE single force that destroyed serve-and-volley tennis. What changed women's tennis from a net-attacking game to a baseline game? Two words. Chris Evert. It's a toss-up whether she or Suzanne Lengeln had the most effect on the tactical history of tennis. Won every GS at least twice. Didn't play double much, but won 3 GS single titles doing it.

6) Evonne Goolagong - In motion, possibly the beautiful player ever. Moved like a dream. Think Younes El Aynaoui without the obviousness of the effort. An impossible player not to root for. And famous for completely losing her mind during matches. As she once put it "everything is going fine, and suddenly I start wondering what flavor ice cream the man in the fourth row is eating." Highly proficient in singles and doubles, and won her GS titles competing against Murderer's Row. Court, King, Evert, and Navratilova.

The other four ....

7) Serena Williams - I can't believe I wrote that. Still ....

The Serena Slam - a feat only duplicated by Graf, Navratilova and Court Smith. She's won every GS in singles and doubles. And very much an unfinished book. I once wrote that in motion, she looked like the Goddess Diana made flesh. If Pygmaelion was a tennis coach ...

8) Monica Seles - Our Lady of 'Ifs'. If she hadn't been stabbed ....; If she'd come back as son as she healed, instead of staying out another tow years ....; If she played doubles ....

Well, the career is what it is. At one point the best singles player on the planet without question. Trademark two-hands off both side a la Frew McMillan. Power, power, power. A one dimensional player, but what a dimension!

9) Martina Hingis - The last obviously athletically gifted player on this list. And maybe the best hand-eye coordination. At almost was like she was walking and her opposition was running. And she STILL got to where their shots were going before the ball.

10) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario - 4 GS singles, 6 doubles, 3 mixed, 5 Fed Cup titles. Always overshadowed by Graf, but an inspriarion to retrievers everywhere. If you always get the ball back, you CAN'T lose.

Great Seles
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:55 AM
For CONSISTENCY ... I go with Evert's 13 consecutive years with a Grand Slam singles title.

For BRILLIANCE….I go with Seles who already had 8 majors at age 19-winning 55 of her last 56 Grand Slam tournaments prior to the 1993 tragedy. No one had ever broken in like this, on either side of the sport. Not Bjorn Borg or Chris Evert or John McEnroe or anybody.

For LONGEVITY ...I go with Navratilova's 19 consecutive years in the top 5 in singles and her almost 30 years between her first and last final in a Grand Slam event.

For DOMINANCE ...I go with Navratilova being the only woman player to hold the record for most singles titles at 2 of the 5 biggest events in women's tennis (Wimbledon and WTA Tour Championships) ALTERNATE: Helen Wills Moody with her 15 singles titles from Wimbledon and the U.S. Championships.

For OVERALL WINNING RECORDS ...I go with Navratilova for her 160+ singles titles and her 160+ doubles titles. ALTERNATE: Margaret Court with her record for most singles titles -- and most overall titles -- at the Grand Slam events.

Top 5 Greatest Ever

Maureen Connolly, Helen Wills, Suzanne Lenglen, Margaret Court and Martina Navratilova ( not in chronological order) are my top five picks for Greatest Female Tennis Players in the 120 year history of the sport.


Top 5 Open Era Greats

Martina Navratilova, Chris Evert, Monica Seles, Steffi Graf, Margaret Court ( not in chronological order) But again, Martina Navratilova reigns supreme in terms of historical stats and accomplishments.

Great Seles
Nov 18th, 2004, 08:08 AM
Here's mine. There's a few rules:

-No more than 10 are allowed, otherwise we could all name a ridiculous amount.

- They must have played in YOUR lifetime, and more than that, you have to have a clear memory of them. e.g Chris Evert played in my lifetime, but I never saw her play at her peak - only in videos. I never felt the emotion of her 1985 RG win, or admired her career as a contemporary. So, I can't include her.

- They must be suitably famous. I'll leave individuals to decide what that means, but if people are putting in Tanasugarn, Frazier, Raymond, or even Majoli (useful players though they are), then really it makes a mockery of "Hall of Fame". They don't have to be slam winners, but prominent in respect of either their charisma, style or achievements, and of an era.

- Write just a little about what they mean/meant to you.

Mine...

MONICA SELES

One thing's for certain, there'll never be another Monica Seles. Since 1990, there have been many reminiscent in hitting style, grunting decibels, ferocity, intensity, etc. They continue to roll off the conveyor belt, and from around the world: Europe and America. But watch the Monica of the early 90s and you'll see that there emerged a truly unique phenomenon, a player who changed the style of women's tennis. Seles' nerves were like steel, her timing and accuracy pin-point, her spirit indomitable. Her fearless resolve to "hit-out" under the most enormous of pressue has become legendary.

When we see so many players victims of their own success through injuries, never quite recapturing the form of old, it reminds us just how strong Seles has been. Had she not returned, perhaps her record of near invincibility would have secured her a higher place in the history books. But to come back to top-level tennis, to even show glimpses of her old self, and leave us with yet more poignant moments, shows her strength. Not many could have achieved such feats having missed almost 3 years from the mental and physical effects of a stab wound. Six months out with athletic injuries is enough to interrupt most careers these days.

And lastly, Seles was the only player to ever consistently hold the edge over Steffi Graf. The eminent German dominated Evert, Navratilova and Sabatini in the late 80s, and Sanchez-Vicario in the mid-90s before injuries set in. She then returned in the late 90s with wins over the Williams', Hingis, Davenport - most of the next generation.

Seles was the only player Graf ever feared, and that was because Seles had the mental edge over her in major tournaments - something nobody else ever really achieved. When we consider that Graf is arguably the greatest player of all time, that fact certainly raises Seles' name in the all-time list, particularly in light of why that run was brought to a halt.

STEFFI GRAF

Much of my admiration for Steffi Graf lies in the above paragraphs. While she played I loathed her, yet with grudging admiration. There was an aura to Graf that was incomparable. It was one of efficiency, positivity, perfection, athleticism, power, grace, speed, dignity. She was almost God-like. If ever there was a Goddess of tennis, Steffi Graf possessed the striking countenance, physical shape and illustrious list of triumphs to be that very woman.

And as with Seles, Graf (for different reasons) suffered more injuries than any of today's players. She was fraught with a body that, at times, appeared to be falling apart. In light of the difficulties those types of injures cause today's players, and considering Graf never lost any of her speed, athletic prowess, not to mention formidability, that was an extraordinary achievement. The mark of the truly Great Champion, a term that's often bandied about.

ARANXTA SANCHEZ-VICARIO

Aranxta was the most tenacious player I've ever seen. When she ran hell for leather across the court for a lob or a passing shot, you'd commonly hear a husky noise that sounded like a roar ("Vamos", I think it was). Sanchez-Vicario had the heart of a lion on the court, a true warrior, and that was because unlike Graf or Seles, Aranxta's success owed nothing to pounding drives or deft natural touch, but to one simple philosophy: surrender never.

I'm not of the opinion that had Seles not been stabbed, Aranxta would never have blossomed. By 1993 she was becoming an increasing threat to Graf and Seles. In 1994 she inflicted some nasty stings on Graf, and claimed what was perhaps the jewel in her crown, the U.S Open (as well as the French Open). Toward the end of 1992 Seles had lost to Aranxta for the first time in Canada, and I see no reason why there wouldn't have been other occasions in major tournaments when Aranxta could have frustrated Seles as much as she did Graf in the mid-90s. If one thing is for sure, however many times she may have been beaten by Graf, Seles or anybody, Aranxta never gave up. Like a punch bag, she just kept coming.

Words can't convey the respect I have for Sanchez-Vicario. She helped define an era with her spirit, her charisma and her smile, and if Graf and Seles go down as all-time greats, then surely Aranxta will be remembered as one of their main obstacles in some truly epic matches. As Graf was quoted as saying in tribute to Aranxta on her retirement in 2002, "She helped make history".

A few more...

Mary Pierce

There's something about contrary Mary. Her game, when it's on, is like blitzkreig warfare. Surely some of the most destuctive, dominating performances of all time have come from her racket. But more than that, she's another one who carries a unique aura. The fiddling with the hair, the earnest pout before each serve, the statuesque walk, the stretching poses, the ghastly, inexplicable errors, the nervous smile, the cumbersome movement, the sheer unpredictability -- all these traits are the make up of Mary Pierce. Unforgettable.

Amanda Coetzer

Coetzer, much like Sanchez-Vicario, and possibly even to a greater extent when you consider she was just 5'2 with a very workmanlike array of shots, was a great over achiever, who could so easily have been a middle ranked player for most of her career. But Coetzer's hunger for success, to keep pushing herself, never ceased, and with wins over Graf, Seles, Sanchez-V, Novotna, Sabatini, Davenport, Venus Williams and Hingis, Amanda earned great admiration from fans as a tremendous fighter, and from opponents as a force to be reckoned with despite her limitations.

Jennifer Capriati

There couldn't be a greater role model for players whose careers are in the depths of despair. By 1998, it seemed that surely Jennifer's career was all but over. By 2000 she'd regained some respect as a player by reclaiming her place in the top 20, but few ever dreamed she'd then reach new levels. Capriati demonstrated to everybody that if you keep dreaming, and refuse to accept your lot in life, eventually things can come right for you. As a player, she's also one of the most exciting to watch, each shot hit crisply, with powerful, instinctive movement that keeps you on the edge of your seat. Her career seems to be gradually winding down, and she'll be a big loss for the tour.

Jana Novotna

She moved like a cat. Just glided around the court, hissing with every slice, leaping as she slammed away each volley. Had Jana Novotna won Wimbledon in 1993, her career may have never reached the late 90s. But her determination to live what seemed, with her immense talent, to be her destiny, kept her going. And as with Jennifer Capriati, it was inspirational to see somebody who didn't have success fall at her feet achieve what she undoubtedly deserved.

Martina Hingis

Hingis played probably the most beautiful tennis I've ever seen, and had she been born in an era with wooden rackets I've no doubt she would have been near invincible. The game still has a void without her, not only because she's still young enough to play, but when a player with her talent, beauty, intelligence and charisma graces the courts, they will be missed forever more. Her tussles with the Williams sisters and Davenport were definitive of an era, and she'll go down favourably in the history books for fighting such a brave and admirable, if ultimately forlorn, series of battles.

Lindsay Davenport

Lindsay Davenport is, to me, a perfect example of how positive thinking, even when it's not natural to you, can bring success. Lindsay is at heart a pessimist, always cautious of the future, and doubtful of her own potential. Yet something has kept Davenport at the top of the game longer than any of her earlier contemporaries, despite enduring as many career threatening injuries as anybody. She has the ability to take the rough with the smooth, and as long as she knows she's doing her best, she can put bad losses behind her and keep hoping that, despite herself, things will fall into place. And in 2004, things certainly have done when she could so easily have accepted, as I think many of us did, that her days were numbered.

She'll always be remembered for her intelligence, articulacy and honesty. Her haul of titles, including majors and prize money will make her sit nicely in the all-time list, too.

Gabriela Sabatini

Unfotunately, I only caught the last few years of Gabi's career. I must include her because it was her grace and beauty that drew my interest in women's tennis, and had she been less of a human being and more of a competitor, she may well have achieved even more than she did.


You are Brilliant Steffica Greles! Definitely, the best post I've seen here in years..

Pamela Shriver
Nov 18th, 2004, 08:18 AM
Um.....so er no one can remember me play......

PS. Great post Steffica

Steffica Greles
Nov 18th, 2004, 10:59 AM
There really are some wally brains in here! Why did I choose that rule? Because I didn't want the thread to turn into ANOTHER one of those arguments between fans over who most deserved their positions blah blah blah. We're all partial, so I think it's best to just let everybody say who meant most to them personally. This is not about ranking players in order of their achievements. But because we're all partial, and because I want to avoid statistical wranglings, I think it's best that we stick to people we remember vividly. After all, those who meant most to us, who really engaged our interest in tennis, are those who we witnessed, surely?

But yes, I still can't believe people put Camerin or God knows who else in their lists. Maybe we should do a "friendly players" thread? ;)

Truthwillout
Nov 18th, 2004, 01:27 PM
OK, I'll just name those I've seen play (I agree with the initial poster's request: no point in naming people like H. Moody or Susane Lenglen we've only heard about though there's no doubt they were fabulous champions)

Alphabetical order then (and let it be clear that to me this thread's supposed to mean being fair and not necessarily naming those we like best).

Jennifer Capriati
Christ Evert
Steffi Graf
Justine Henin-Hardenne
Martina Hingis
Martina Navratilova
Monica Seles
Gaby Sabatini
Serena Williams
Venus Williams

To me, there's no doubt the ladies above will always be remembered as great tennis legends

Poppy Corn
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:22 PM
Poppy's list is as follows:

1. Jennifer Capriati ( The reason Poppy watches tennis)
2. Gaby Sabatini
3. Monica Seles
4. Steffi Graf
5. Serena Williams
6. Martina Hingis
7. Venus Williams
8. Justine Henin-Hardenne
9. Lindsay Davenport
10.Poppy Corn

SJW
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:32 PM
1.Steffi Graf-need an explanation? methinks not.
2. Monica Seles-Venus and Serena's idol. was the blueprint for their games today
3. Gabriela Sabatini-what a beautiful game. i reckon she should have achieved so much more, but still...
4. Mary Pierce...another original power diva. still up there after all these years
5. Venus Williams...no explanation needed really. records left right and centre. tore up the rule books and made her own. positive young role model for black people in general, especially young African-American females.
6. Serena Williams...see above...but has achieved slightly more
7. Martina Hingis...so much so young. she probably was the most impressive from the youngest age out of all i picked.
8. Lindsay Davenport...effortless hitter. if she had movement, she would be unstoppable
9. Jennifer Capriati...damn. talk about prodigy. and then she came back and achieved what she should have all those years ago. great story.
10. i'll go with Henin on this one.

alfajeffster
Nov 18th, 2004, 03:41 PM
I started watching tennis in the mid 1970s, so my list begins at about then.

Billie Jean King
Chris Evert
Evonne Goolagong
Martina Navratilova
Hana Mandlikova
Steffi Graf
Monica Seles
Martina Hingis
Serena Williams
Justine Henin

Margaret Court was still playing about then but I have no memory of watching her so she is outside the list.
I cannot improve, change, or otherwise alter this post to make it my own, so I will simply say that everything it says mirrors how I would have replied to this thread- to the T! Thanks Andy!

MistyGrey
Nov 18th, 2004, 05:13 PM
Its more like a fav list from the last 15 years
1.Steffi
2.Mary
3.Justine
4.ASV
5.Jen
6.Lindsay
7.Kim
8.Gaby
9.Venus
10.Monica

Andy T
Nov 18th, 2004, 05:29 PM
Christ Evert


More like Maria Magdalena if you ask me!

ps - Don't let Pam see this post or she'll go apoplectic - you're not a member of the Church of Pam, I see, and never will be now! :lol:

selking
Nov 18th, 2004, 05:30 PM
You were born in 1988 and yet you saw BJK and Little Mo at their prime? :scratch:

is there a rule that you have to see someone live for you to think that they are one of the best :scratch:

alfajeffster
Nov 18th, 2004, 06:25 PM
There really are some wally brains in here! Why did I choose that rule? Because I didn't want the thread to turn into ANOTHER one of those arguments between fans over who most deserved their positions blah blah blah. We're all partial, so I think it's best to just let everybody say who meant most to them personally. This is not about ranking players in order of their achievements. But because we're all partial, and because I want to avoid statistical wranglings, I think it's best that we stick to people we remember vividly. After all, those who meant most to us, who really engaged our interest in tennis, are those who we witnessed, surely?

But yes, I still can't believe people put Camerin or God knows who else in their lists. Maybe we should do a "friendly players" thread? ;)
I picked up a tennis racquet for the first time in 1974, and I am not ashamed to say that it was all because of Billie Jean King. In fact, I am very thankful that she was who she was back then.

kabuki
Nov 18th, 2004, 06:40 PM
1. (Tie) Steffi Graf and Martina Navratilova
3. Chris Evert
4. Monica Seles :sad:
5. Serena Williams
6. Martina Hingis
7. Venus Williams
8. Hana Mandlikova
9. Aranxta Sanchez Vicario
10. (Tie) Jennifer Capriati, Lindsay Davenport, and Justine Henin-Hardenne

I'll say a couple of words about Hana Mandlikova, an underdiscussed and underappreciated player from the eighties. She was a truly gifted player with the complete package- a truly all-court, all surface player with every shot in the book, and athletic ability to boot. She could hit a winner from anywhere with power or placement, or both. Her weakness was always the mental game and consistency. When she was on, she was almost impossible to beat, but when she was off, it was ugly. She also had the bad luck to be sandwiched between the Evert/Navratilova and the Graf/Seles eras.

bandabou
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:37 PM
The Six Players from my All-Time Top Ten who I saw at their peaks while I was alive.

1) Margaret Smith Court - If you don't know Margaret Smith Court, you don't know tennis dominance. It really is that simple. 24 GS singles titles, 19 doubles and 19 mixed; and, of course, won the Grand Slam. She was bigger, stronger, faster, and in many ways a tennis playing machine. I wasn't a big fan of her's, being a fan of BJK and Evonne Goolagong. But after she won the Grand Slam, retired, had kids, came back and resumed dominance, you had to give the woman her props.
Comparing players across era is always dicey. But if the question, 'who was the most dominant player of all?' there's no question, and no comparison.

2) Martina Navratilova - 167 singles titles, 174 doubles titles. And counting. Not a large woman, by any means, but so fiercely athletic that people thought she was. The player who brought tennis, kicking and screaming, to modern standards of athleticism. Like her ultimate rival Evert, won every GS at least twice. My personal pick as 'greatest female tennis player of all time', but I concede the numbers favor Court Smith.

3) Steffi Graf - Steffi Graf stands out on this list because she's the only all-time top ten player (IMHO) who has only one (or fewer) GS doubles title. Her all surface record in singles is so staggering, however, she simply can't be overlooked. A combination of Court Smith power and Navratilova athletism, she fought off a failing body for basically the last seven years of her career. Subjectively, the best singles player of all time. (Court played against some real 'hit and giggle' tennis in the early rounds of tournaments.)

4) Billie Jean King - Loud, brash, oft-injured, but she attack the net on anybody, and for years was the only force that was more than a speedbump to Margaret Court. I modeled a lot of my game in her initially. GOt a lot done with guts and savvy that she really wasn't athlete enough for. Including beating Bobby Riggs. One of the best at going to net on the first short ball, really good half-volley.

5) Chris Evert Lloyd - The mentally toughest player ever. Period. Either sex. Could relentlessly hit balls corner to corner til hell froze over. THE single force that destroyed serve-and-volley tennis. What changed women's tennis from a net-attacking game to a baseline game? Two words. Chris Evert. It's a toss-up whether she or Suzanne Lengeln had the most effect on the tactical history of tennis. Won every GS at least twice. Didn't play double much, but won 3 GS single titles doing it.

6) Evonne Goolagong - In motion, possibly the beautiful player ever. Moved like a dream. Think Younes El Aynaoui without the obviousness of the effort. An impossible player not to root for. And famous for completely losing her mind during matches. As she once put it "everything is going fine, and suddenly I start wondering what flavor ice cream the man in the fourth row is eating." Highly proficient in singles and doubles, and won her GS titles competing against Murderer's Row. Court, King, Evert, and Navratilova.

The other four ....

7) Serena Williams - I can't believe I wrote that. Still ....

The Serena Slam - a feat only duplicated by Graf, Navratilova and Court Smith. She's won every GS in singles and doubles. And very much an unfinished book. I once wrote that in motion, she looked like the Goddess Diana made flesh. If Pygmaelion was a tennis coach ...

8) Monica Seles - Our Lady of 'Ifs'. If she hadn't been stabbed ....; If she'd come back as son as she healed, instead of staying out another tow years ....; If she played doubles ....

Well, the career is what it is. At one point the best singles player on the planet without question. Trademark two-hands off both side a la Frew McMillan. Power, power, power. A one dimensional player, but what a dimension!

9) Martina Hingis - The last obviously athletically gifted player on this list. And maybe the best hand-eye coordination. At almost was like she was walking and her opposition was running. And she STILL got to where their shots were going before the ball.

10) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario - 4 GS singles, 6 doubles, 3 mixed, 5 Fed Cup titles. Always overshadowed by Graf, but an inspriarion to retrievers everywhere. If you always get the ball back, you CAN'T lose.


Pretty good list..

cmon
Nov 18th, 2004, 07:51 PM
In no particular order -
1. Lindsay Davenport
2. Steffi Graf
3. Monica Seles
4. Jennifer Capriati
5. Amelie Mauresmo
6. A.S. –VICARIO
7. Mary Pierce
8. Conchita Martinez
9. Sabitini
10. Corina Morariu

Come-on-kim
Nov 18th, 2004, 08:04 PM
1) Kim : my all time favourite, she brang me happiness, tears, fears,...

2) Martina Hingis : great girl
3) Lindsay Davenport : faboulous game, great achievements
4) Monica Seles
5) Anastasia Myskina : she is a real fighter
6) Jennifer Capriati
7) Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario
8) Serena Williams
9) Venus Williams
10) Justine Henin-Hardenne

Becool
Nov 18th, 2004, 08:14 PM
1 - Billie Jean King
2 - Martina Navratilova
3 - Steffi Graf
4 - Serena Williams
5 - Martina Hingis
6 - Monica Seles
7 - Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
8 - Lindsay Davenport
9 - Justine Henin Hardenne
10 - Venus Williams

deep bass
Nov 18th, 2004, 09:10 PM
Martina Navratilova
Steffi Graf
Monica Seles
Jana Novotna
Lindsay Davenport
Martina Hingis
Venus Williams
Serena Williams
Justine Henin-Hardenne
Amélie Mauresmo

And an honourable mention to J Cap. Jana gets in instead because of my sheer relief at her Wimby win.

LDVTennis
Nov 18th, 2004, 09:42 PM
My List:

1) Steffi Graf - Will be remembered for her speed, grace under pressure, ability to play through injury and win, the slice backhand, and the most dominating shot the woman's game has ever seen, the forehand. Her career began gloriously and it ended gloriously.

2) Hana - a special favorite of mine. Will be remembered for her fluid movement, her apparent ability to hit almost any shot in the book with an élan that I don't think any other player has ever displayed, for her mental fragility, and for sparking my first true interest in the sport. I thought she was going to be the greatest ever, but I would have to wait for another lady with long legs to come along.

3) Chris - Will be remembered for that two handed backhand, her court sense, her grace under pressure, her style on the court, and her rivalry with Martina.

4) Martina - Will be remembered for her agility and tactical awareness at the net, her overall athleticism, her vulnerability under pressure, her rivalry with Chris, and her longevity.

5) Billy Jean King - Will be remembered for her volleying technique, that deep knee bend, her courage both on and off the court, for being the driving force behind the early WTA.

6) Gabriella Sabatini - Will be remembered for her sensual style of play, the way she brushed up on her backhand, caressed her slice backhand, her beautiful dark face, the first and perhaps only true beauty of tennis.

7) Lori McNeil - Will be remembered in my mind not only because she beat Graf in the first round of Wimbledon, but because she moved as if she was floating on a cloud of air. She may have lacked the mental fortitude to realize her full potential, but she nevertheless managed a few brilliant moments.

8) Jennifer Capriati - Will be remembered for her apparently perfect technique on the forehand and two-handed backhand. I didn't think anyone could perfect upon Chris' two-handed backhand technique. Capriati did.

9) Anna Kournikova - In an age when women's tennis has less to do with the shotmaking ability of the players and everything to do with the player's persona, she was and still is the only real spectacle in the game. I remember being quite skeptical of her. Then I actually stayed for one of her matches at La Costa. I became a believer that day. Anna wasn't so much a tennis player; she was the goddess of some cult of beauty and the court was her temple.

Tie for
10a) Justine Henin-Hardenne - Will be remembered for that one-handed backhand and for reminding us that hardwork and great shot-making ability can do more to improve the game than any amount of hype, marketing or merchandizing.

10b) Venus and Serena Williams - Will be remembered for shaking the country club girls out of their athletic complacency with their speed, power, and unconventional sense of style. And once they were done doing that, who will be able to forget how they treated the game with the same "noblesse oblige" that these country club types treat the rest of the world. Game, Set, Match, Life, Venus and Serena.

deep bass
Nov 18th, 2004, 09:47 PM
Venus and Serena Williams - Will be remembered for shaking the country club girls out of their athletic complacency with their speed, power, and unconventional sense of style. And once they were done doing that, who will be able to forget how they treated the game with the same "noblesse oblige" that these country club types treat the rest of the world. Game, Set, Match, Life, Venus and Serena.

I bow down to you. :worship: Wonderfully put. Yet another in a series of great posts by you.

Greatest
Nov 19th, 2004, 07:01 AM
Here's mine. There's a few rules:

-No more than 10 are allowed, otherwise we could all name a ridiculous amount.

- They must have played in YOUR lifetime, and more than that, you have to have a clear memory of them. e.g Chris Evert played in my lifetime, but I never saw her play at her peak - only in videos. I never felt the emotion of her 1985 RG win, or admired her career as a contemporary. So, I can't include her.

- They must be suitably famous. I'll leave individuals to decide what that means, but if people are putting in Tanasugarn, Frazier, Raymond, or even Majoli (useful players though they are), then really it makes a mockery of "Hall of Fame". They don't have to be slam winners, but prominent in respect of either their charisma, style or achievements, and of an era.

- Write just a little about what they mean/meant to you.

Mine...

MONICA SELES

One thing's for certain, there'll never be another Monica Seles. Since 1990, there have been many reminiscent in hitting style, grunting decibels, ferocity, intensity, etc. They continue to roll off the conveyor belt, and from around the world: Europe and America. But watch the Monica of the early 90s and you'll see that there emerged a truly unique phenomenon, a player who changed the style of women's tennis. Seles' nerves were like steel, her timing and accuracy pin-point, her spirit indomitable. Her fearless resolve to "hit-out" under the most enormous of pressue has become legendary.

When we see so many players victims of their own success through injuries, never quite recapturing the form of old, it reminds us just how strong Seles has been. Had she not returned, perhaps her record of near invincibility would have secured her a higher place in the history books. But to come back to top-level tennis, to even show glimpses of her old self, and leave us with yet more poignant moments, shows her strength. Not many could have achieved such feats having missed almost 3 years from the mental and physical effects of a stab wound. Six months out with athletic injuries is enough to interrupt most careers these days.

And lastly, Seles was the only player to ever consistently hold the edge over Steffi Graf. The eminent German dominated Evert, Navratilova and Sabatini in the late 80s, and Sanchez-Vicario in the mid-90s before injuries set in. She then returned in the late 90s with wins over the Williams', Hingis, Davenport - most of the next generation.

Seles was the only player Graf ever feared, and that was because Seles had the mental edge over her in major tournaments - something nobody else ever really achieved. When we consider that Graf is arguably the greatest player of all time, that fact certainly raises Seles' name in the all-time list, particularly in light of why that run was brought to a halt.

STEFFI GRAF

Much of my admiration for Steffi Graf lies in the above paragraphs. While she played I loathed her, yet with grudging admiration. There was an aura to Graf that was incomparable. It was one of efficiency, positivity, perfection, athleticism, power, grace, speed, dignity. She was almost God-like. If ever there was a Goddess of tennis, Steffi Graf possessed the striking countenance, physical shape and illustrious list of triumphs to be that very woman.

And as with Seles, Graf (for different reasons) suffered more injuries than any of today's players. She was fraught with a body that, at times, appeared to be falling apart. In light of the difficulties those types of injures cause today's players, and considering Graf never lost any of her speed, athletic prowess, not to mention formidability, that was an extraordinary achievement. The mark of the truly Great Champion, a term that's often bandied about.

ARANXTA SANCHEZ-VICARIO

Aranxta was the most tenacious player I've ever seen. When she ran hell for leather across the court for a lob or a passing shot, you'd commonly hear a husky noise that sounded like a roar ("Vamos", I think it was). Sanchez-Vicario had the heart of a lion on the court, a true warrior, and that was because unlike Graf or Seles, Aranxta's success owed nothing to pounding drives or deft natural touch, but to one simple philosophy: surrender never.

I'm not of the opinion that had Seles not been stabbed, Aranxta would never have blossomed. By 1993 she was becoming an increasing threat to Graf and Seles. In 1994 she inflicted some nasty stings on Graf, and claimed what was perhaps the jewel in her crown, the U.S Open (as well as the French Open). Toward the end of 1992 Seles had lost to Aranxta for the first time in Canada, and I see no reason why there wouldn't have been other occasions in major tournaments when Aranxta could have frustrated Seles as much as she did Graf in the mid-90s. If one thing is for sure, however many times she may have been beaten by Graf, Seles or anybody, Aranxta never gave up. Like a punch bag, she just kept coming.

Words can't convey the respect I have for Sanchez-Vicario. She helped define an era with her spirit, her charisma and her smile, and if Graf and Seles go down as all-time greats, then surely Aranxta will be remembered as one of their main obstacles in some truly epic matches. As Graf was quoted as saying in tribute to Aranxta on her retirement in 2002, "She helped make history".

A few more...

Mary Pierce

There's something about contrary Mary. Her game, when it's on, is like blitzkreig warfare. Surely some of the most destuctive, dominating performances of all time have come from her racket. But more than that, she's another one who carries a unique aura. The fiddling with the hair, the earnest pout before each serve, the statuesque walk, the stretching poses, the ghastly, inexplicable errors, the nervous smile, the cumbersome movement, the sheer unpredictability -- all these traits are the make up of Mary Pierce. Unforgettable.

Amanda Coetzer

Coetzer, much like Sanchez-Vicario, and possibly even to a greater extent when you consider she was just 5'2 with a very workmanlike array of shots, was a great over achiever, who could so easily have been a middle ranked player for most of her career. But Coetzer's hunger for success, to keep pushing herself, never ceased, and with wins over Graf, Seles, Sanchez-V, Novotna, Sabatini, Davenport, Venus Williams and Hingis, Amanda earned great admiration from fans as a tremendous fighter, and from opponents as a force to be reckoned with despite her limitations.

Jennifer Capriati

There couldn't be a greater role model for players whose careers are in the depths of despair. By 1998, it seemed that surely Jennifer's career was all but over. By 2000 she'd regained some respect as a player by reclaiming her place in the top 20, but few ever dreamed she'd then reach new levels. Capriati demonstrated to everybody that if you keep dreaming, and refuse to accept your lot in life, eventually things can come right for you. As a player, she's also one of the most exciting to watch, each shot hit crisply, with powerful, instinctive movement that keeps you on the edge of your seat. Her career seems to be gradually winding down, and she'll be a big loss for the tour.

Jana Novotna

She moved like a cat. Just glided around the court, hissing with every slice, leaping as she slammed away each volley. Had Jana Novotna won Wimbledon in 1993, her career may have never reached the late 90s. But her determination to live what seemed, with her immense talent, to be her destiny, kept her going. And as with Jennifer Capriati, it was inspirational to see somebody who didn't have success fall at her feet achieve what she undoubtedly deserved.

Martina Hingis

Hingis played probably the most beautiful tennis I've ever seen, and had she been born in an era with wooden rackets I've no doubt she would have been near invincible. The game still has a void without her, not only because she's still young enough to play, but when a player with her talent, beauty, intelligence and charisma graces the courts, they will be missed forever more. Her tussles with the Williams sisters and Davenport were definitive of an era, and she'll go down favourably in the history books for fighting such a brave and admirable, if ultimately forlorn, series of battles.

Lindsay Davenport

Lindsay Davenport is, to me, a perfect example of how positive thinking, even when it's not natural to you, can bring success. Lindsay is at heart a pessimist, always cautious of the future, and doubtful of her own potential. Yet something has kept Davenport at the top of the game longer than any of her earlier contemporaries, despite enduring as many career threatening injuries as anybody. She has the ability to take the rough with the smooth, and as long as she knows she's doing her best, she can put bad losses behind her and keep hoping that, despite herself, things will fall into place. And in 2004, things certainly have done when she could so easily have accepted, as I think many of us did, that her days were numbered.

She'll always be remembered for her intelligence, articulacy and honesty. Her haul of titles, including majors and prize money will make her sit nicely in the all-time list, too.

Gabriela Sabatini

Unfotunately, I only caught the last few years of Gabi's career. I must include her because it was her grace and beauty that drew my interest in women's tennis, and had she been less of a human being and more of a competitor, she may well have achieved even more than she did.


Most respectable objective list ever. :worship: Thanks Steffica :worship:

Greatest
Nov 19th, 2004, 07:05 AM
Open Era Lists

Navratilova
Court
Seles
Evert
Hingis
Austin
Sanchez Vicario
Williams Sisters
Sharapova
Graf

Truthwillout
Nov 19th, 2004, 09:28 AM
More like Maria Magdalena if you ask me!

ps - Don't let Pam see this post or she'll go apoplectic - you're not a member of the Church of Pam, I see, and never will be now! :lol:

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Yep, quite a typo, I could have made it worse, mind you, something like Christ Ever. :eek:
About Pam and her Church oh well, I won't be the first glorious opportunity I've fouled up...

Brαm
Nov 19th, 2004, 01:42 PM
is there a rule that you have to see someone live for you to think that they are one of the best :scratch:
From 1st post:

There's a few rules:

-No more than 10 are allowed, otherwise we could all name a ridiculous amount.

- They must have played in YOUR lifetime, and more than that, you have to have a clear memory of them. e.g Chris Evert played in my lifetime, but I never saw her play at her peak - only in videos. I never felt the emotion of her 1985 RG win, or admired her career as a contemporary. So, I can't include her.

:wavey:

Greatest
Nov 20th, 2004, 02:04 AM
There really are some wally brains in here! Why did I choose that rule? Because I didn't want the thread to turn into ANOTHER one of those arguments between fans over who most deserved their positions blah blah blah. We're all partial, so I think it's best to just let everybody say who meant most to them personally. This is not about ranking players in order of their achievements. But because we're all partial, and because I want to avoid statistical wranglings, I think it's best that we stick to people we remember vividly. After all, those who meant most to us, who really engaged our interest in tennis, are those who we witnessed, surely?

But yes, I still can't believe people put Camerin or God knows who else in their lists. Maybe we should do a "friendly players" thread? ;)

Wonderful point Steffica...

MisterQ
Nov 20th, 2004, 02:15 AM
This won't be a very controversial list... ;) The best players I have seen since I first actively watched a match in 1990.

Martina Navratilova
Monica Seles
Martina Hingis
Lindsay Davenport
Serena Williams
Venus Williams
Jennifer Capriati
Justine Henin-Hardenne
Steffi Graf
Arantxa Sanchez Vicario

cartmancop
Nov 20th, 2004, 02:36 AM
Based on who I've seen in my 16 yrs.
Steffi Graf -I just saw the very last years of her career.
Monica Seles
Serena Williams
Venus Williams
Martina Hingis
Lindsay Davenport
Justine H-H
Jennifer Capriati
Arantxa S-V
Amelie Mauresmo

Jakeev
Nov 20th, 2004, 09:17 AM
Martina Navratilova.........she was my first great fave.

Monica Seles.................damn what could have been

Lindsay Davenport...........loved her ever since 96 Olympics

Serena Williams...............Brilliant when she is at her best.......she has many years to go.

Jennifer Capriati...............even though I'm still a little bothered by that call at the US Open I know she saw.

Steffi Graf.......................Was not my fave but I rooted for her on many occasions.

Chris Evert......................Found her game boring but damn she was often brilliant against Martina at her best.

Venus Williams..................I like Serena better, but like younger sis, has so many years to go if she still wants it.

Aranxta Sanchez-Vicario.....Her epics against Graf I think will go down as legendary.

Tie: Tracy Austin and Andrea Jaeger.......Two of the greatest junior to adult players to have played the game but found their careers cut short by injuries.

Pamela Shriver
Nov 20th, 2004, 10:28 AM
More like Maria Magdalena if you ask me!

ps - Don't let Pam see this post or she'll go apoplectic - you're not a member of the Church of Pam, I see, and never will be now! :lol:
I am all seeing and knowing (Pamnipotent??)


But I am also forgiving ;) Otherwise I'd never speak to Martina again after all those defeats achem

vertigo
Nov 20th, 2004, 10:37 AM
Here goes...in no particular order.

Steffi graf- her legendary status was set well before my time however i had the opportunity of watching her play at her last wimbledon, and kick venus' ass.

Venus Williams- talk about destroying sterotypes. She never fails to make me smile in interviews.

Martina Hingis- I so miss Hingis!

Amelie Mauresmo- I don't think i've ever wanted someone to win a GS as much.

The Jennifer Capriati- Again, just something about her- winning some of the best and hardest fought GS finals I've ever seen.

Justine H-H. A beautiful game.

Ai Sugiyama. Not a ball she won't run for, she brings fun to tennis both in singles and on the doubles court.

Lindsay Dav. Top notch player and all round charmer.

Serena W; fabulous athlete and tennis superstar.

Sue Barker; never saw her play but i just can't resist that tan.

BeautifulGirl
Nov 21st, 2004, 10:05 AM
Here's mine. There's a few rules:

-No more than 10 are allowed, otherwise we could all name a ridiculous amount.

- They must have played in YOUR lifetime, and more than that, you have to have a clear memory of them. e.g Chris Evert played in my lifetime, but I never saw her play at her peak - only in videos. I never felt the emotion of her 1985 RG win, or admired her career as a contemporary. So, I can't include her.

- They must be suitably famous. I'll leave individuals to decide what that means, but if people are putting in Tanasugarn, Frazier, Raymond, or even Majoli (useful players though they are), then really it makes a mockery of "Hall of Fame". They don't have to be slam winners, but prominent in respect of either their charisma, style or achievements, and of an era.

- Write just a little about what they mean/meant to you.

Mine...

MONICA SELES

One thing's for certain, there'll never be another Monica Seles. Since 1990, there have been many reminiscent in hitting style, grunting decibels, ferocity, intensity, etc. They continue to roll off the conveyor belt, and from around the world: Europe and America. But watch the Monica of the early 90s and you'll see that there emerged a truly unique phenomenon, a player who changed the style of women's tennis. Seles' nerves were like steel, her timing and accuracy pin-point, her spirit indomitable. Her fearless resolve to "hit-out" under the most enormous of pressue has become legendary.

When we see so many players victims of their own success through injuries, never quite recapturing the form of old, it reminds us just how strong Seles has been. Had she not returned, perhaps her record of near invincibility would have secured her a higher place in the history books. But to come back to top-level tennis, to even show glimpses of her old self, and leave us with yet more poignant moments, shows her strength. Not many could have achieved such feats having missed almost 3 years from the mental and physical effects of a stab wound. Six months out with athletic injuries is enough to interrupt most careers these days.

And lastly, Seles was the only player to ever consistently hold the edge over Steffi Graf. The eminent German dominated Evert, Navratilova and Sabatini in the late 80s, and Sanchez-Vicario in the mid-90s before injuries set in. She then returned in the late 90s with wins over the Williams', Hingis, Davenport - most of the next generation.

Seles was the only player Graf ever feared, and that was because Seles had the mental edge over her in major tournaments - something nobody else ever really achieved. When we consider that Graf is arguably the greatest player of all time, that fact certainly raises Seles' name in the all-time list, particularly in light of why that run was brought to a halt.

STEFFI GRAF

Much of my admiration for Steffi Graf lies in the above paragraphs. While she played I loathed her, yet with grudging admiration. There was an aura to Graf that was incomparable. It was one of efficiency, positivity, perfection, athleticism, power, grace, speed, dignity. She was almost God-like. If ever there was a Goddess of tennis, Steffi Graf possessed the striking countenance, physical shape and illustrious list of triumphs to be that very woman.

And as with Seles, Graf (for different reasons) suffered more injuries than any of today's players. She was fraught with a body that, at times, appeared to be falling apart. In light of the difficulties those types of injures cause today's players, and considering Graf never lost any of her speed, athletic prowess, not to mention formidability, that was an extraordinary achievement. The mark of the truly Great Champion, a term that's often bandied about.

ARANXTA SANCHEZ-VICARIO

Aranxta was the most tenacious player I've ever seen. When she ran hell for leather across the court for a lob or a passing shot, you'd commonly hear a husky noise that sounded like a roar ("Vamos", I think it was). Sanchez-Vicario had the heart of a lion on the court, a true warrior, and that was because unlike Graf or Seles, Aranxta's success owed nothing to pounding drives or deft natural touch, but to one simple philosophy: surrender never.

I'm not of the opinion that had Seles not been stabbed, Aranxta would never have blossomed. By 1993 she was becoming an increasing threat to Graf and Seles. In 1994 she inflicted some nasty stings on Graf, and claimed what was perhaps the jewel in her crown, the U.S Open (as well as the French Open). Toward the end of 1992 Seles had lost to Aranxta for the first time in Canada, and I see no reason why there wouldn't have been other occasions in major tournaments when Aranxta could have frustrated Seles as much as she did Graf in the mid-90s. If one thing is for sure, however many times she may have been beaten by Graf, Seles or anybody, Aranxta never gave up. Like a punch bag, she just kept coming.

Words can't convey the respect I have for Sanchez-Vicario. She helped define an era with her spirit, her charisma and her smile, and if Graf and Seles go down as all-time greats, then surely Aranxta will be remembered as one of their main obstacles in some truly epic matches. As Graf was quoted as saying in tribute to Aranxta on her retirement in 2002, "She helped make history".

A few more...

Mary Pierce

There's something about contrary Mary. Her game, when it's on, is like blitzkreig warfare. Surely some of the most destuctive, dominating performances of all time have come from her racket. But more than that, she's another one who carries a unique aura. The fiddling with the hair, the earnest pout before each serve, the statuesque walk, the stretching poses, the ghastly, inexplicable errors, the nervous smile, the cumbersome movement, the sheer unpredictability -- all these traits are the make up of Mary Pierce. Unforgettable.

Amanda Coetzer

Coetzer, much like Sanchez-Vicario, and possibly even to a greater extent when you consider she was just 5'2 with a very workmanlike array of shots, was a great over achiever, who could so easily have been a middle ranked player for most of her career. But Coetzer's hunger for success, to keep pushing herself, never ceased, and with wins over Graf, Seles, Sanchez-V, Novotna, Sabatini, Davenport, Venus Williams and Hingis, Amanda earned great admiration from fans as a tremendous fighter, and from opponents as a force to be reckoned with despite her limitations.

Jennifer Capriati

There couldn't be a greater role model for players whose careers are in the depths of despair. By 1998, it seemed that surely Jennifer's career was all but over. By 2000 she'd regained some respect as a player by reclaiming her place in the top 20, but few ever dreamed she'd then reach new levels. Capriati demonstrated to everybody that if you keep dreaming, and refuse to accept your lot in life, eventually things can come right for you. As a player, she's also one of the most exciting to watch, each shot hit crisply, with powerful, instinctive movement that keeps you on the edge of your seat. Her career seems to be gradually winding down, and she'll be a big loss for the tour.

Jana Novotna

She moved like a cat. Just glided around the court, hissing with every slice, leaping as she slammed away each volley. Had Jana Novotna won Wimbledon in 1993, her career may have never reached the late 90s. But her determination to live what seemed, with her immense talent, to be her destiny, kept her going. And as with Jennifer Capriati, it was inspirational to see somebody who didn't have success fall at her feet achieve what she undoubtedly deserved.

Martina Hingis

Hingis played probably the most beautiful tennis I've ever seen, and had she been born in an era with wooden rackets I've no doubt she would have been near invincible. The game still has a void without her, not only because she's still young enough to play, but when a player with her talent, beauty, intelligence and charisma graces the courts, they will be missed forever more. Her tussles with the Williams sisters and Davenport were definitive of an era, and she'll go down favourably in the history books for fighting such a brave and admirable, if ultimately forlorn, series of battles.

Lindsay Davenport

Lindsay Davenport is, to me, a perfect example of how positive thinking, even when it's not natural to you, can bring success. Lindsay is at heart a pessimist, always cautious of the future, and doubtful of her own potential. Yet something has kept Davenport at the top of the game longer than any of her earlier contemporaries, despite enduring as many career threatening injuries as anybody. She has the ability to take the rough with the smooth, and as long as she knows she's doing her best, she can put bad losses behind her and keep hoping that, despite herself, things will fall into place. And in 2004, things certainly have done when she could so easily have accepted, as I think many of us did, that her days were numbered.

She'll always be remembered for her intelligence, articulacy and honesty. Her haul of titles, including majors and prize money will make her sit nicely in the all-time list, too.

Gabriela Sabatini

Unfotunately, I only caught the last few years of Gabi's career. I must include her because it was her grace and beauty that drew my interest in women's tennis, and had she been less of a human being and more of a competitor, she may well have achieved even more than she did.

Chris Evert...the classiest i've seen
Martina Navratilova...she is tennis
Monica Seles...the best i've seen
Martina Hingis..,,the most entertaining
Mary Pierce.....looks like my sister
Jennifer Capriati...a rebel like me
Justine Henin....excellence
Maria Sharapova...the most beautiful and talented
Gabriela Sabatini.....the most beautiful before
Kim Clijsters....the current classiest

tennislover
Nov 21st, 2004, 11:39 PM
1) Navratilova
2) Navratilova
3) Navratilova
4) Navratilova
5) Navratilova
6) Navratilova
7) Navratilova
8) Navratilova
9) Navratilova
10) Navratilova

It's incredible how some people don't realize that there is a ocean-wide gap beetween Navratilova's supreme class, talent, tecnique and all the others'.....

Greatest
Nov 23rd, 2004, 09:52 AM
1) Navratilova
2) Navratilova
3) Navratilova
4) Navratilova
5) Navratilova
6) Navratilova
7) Navratilova
8) Navratilova
9) Navratilova
10) Navratilova

It's incredible how some people don't realize that there is a ocean-wide gap beetween Navratilova's supreme class, talent, tecnique and all the others'.....

"Frankly, Martina Navratilova is the greatest singles, doubles and mixed doubles player that has ever lived."

- Billie Jean King-

Greenout
Nov 23rd, 2004, 10:30 AM
1) Gaby Sabatini- The uber classy 1-handed backhand was what actually
drew me into tennis in the 1990's. She was so unlike her rivals
Monica, Steffi, ASV, and was rather cool and charming minus
any sounds or sweat. There really was nothing to dislike about
her personality too. Wonderful player- grace and class all the way
despite tanking those last years away.

2) Kimiko Date- She's the all court chessboard player before
Myskina or even Hingis. Talent and really gritty. Amazing steel nerves
and when you were about to count her out in set #2, she came roaring
ahead. What amazes me is how underated Kimiko is in the tennis.
She's a born leftie that learned to play right; but when stretched out
wide she used her left hand. Steffi could hardly get a ball past her-
really. Nobody seems to mention how fit she was- really fit- as Steffi.
I think she even ran faster than Steffi or Monica. OH, a very classy
gracious player too. Charm and grace, words we hardly ever use
nowadays.

3) Natasha Zvereva- The most talented tennis player ever, and I do
mean ever to be in the top 10. She could do it all. I've even seen her
play one-handed backhands with really whomp in those shots; but the
commentators hated it when she did it because it was pure show off
things. Where the wacky entertainers nowadays?

4) Jana Novotna- A real artist with a capital "A". Thank God that
chicken bone got released at WIMBLEDON 1998! :eek: Not particulary
loved in the USA; but many of us loved to watch her play. I wouldn't
exactly call her (cough, cough) classy; but hey her hissy/pissy fits
were entertaining!

5) Justine Henin-Hardenne- Talent, style, artist type player that
wins? Dream come true or what? Sublime. Steel nerves. I can't
believe my luck! Someone comes along and combines all the stuff
I love about tennis into this single entity. Help! Swoon!

6) Patty Schnyder- We are back in that weird category where it's
talent matched with a self determination to go against all the
things you are told when your young. "Go ahead, be successful,
take ahold of everything on offer!". It's heartbreaking; but I'm an
absolute sucker for that incredible talent. Artist type without
the mind of a champion, sad to say.

7) Jennifer Capriati- The Capster doesn't even play the type of tennis
I really enjoy; but damn it she fantastic. The best matches were so
exciting. The personal triumph over ...well herself is amazing. She's not
perfect, and we like it that way.

8) Lindsay Davenport- I use to be an avid hardcore LD supporter, and
I recall those brilliant days well. Call her boring, a klutz if
you like; but when she is really on it's so flawless looking. There's clean
hitting, like butter or a perfect dive. Really refreshing tennis- it felt
like a nice cold shower. The bad days were...like a bad case of sun burn!
:lol:

9) Amelie Mauresmo- On a perfect day; she reminds me of Gaby Sabatini
and on a bad day she reminds me of Jana Novotna choking!!! :p

10) Martina Hingis- I use always cheer for her losses. She really
pissed me off in my LD days. Damn that cheeky grin! On an average
day for her, the UE's were about 3! A brilliant player- and a thorn
of every tennis fan from 1997-2001

jun_maria
Nov 23rd, 2004, 10:34 AM
1) maria
2) maria
\
\
10) maria sharapova

well .. tennis newbie here :).... :dog:
:cat: