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CooCooCachoo
Nov 13th, 2004, 06:32 PM
I noticed there wasn't such a thread around yet :o

OK Maybe 90% of the posters here don't even know what a book is (:lol: Just kidding, but you get what I mean ;)), but for the others.. This is the thread in which you can discuss certain books! Share which books the others should definitely read, or should avoid :)

:bigwave:

__________
Martijn

SilK
Nov 13th, 2004, 06:33 PM
Anybody Read 'Girl With A Pearl Earring' by Tracy Chevalier?

BTW, :worship: CooCoo for starting this thread!

CooCooCachoo
Nov 13th, 2004, 06:34 PM
My Tips:

- Finding Myself - Toby Litt
- Life of Pi - Yann Martel (I am still reading this one, but it is really good :yeah: )
- Villa des Roses - Willem Elsschot (Only read this if you are Dutch ;))
- La cantatrice chauve - Eugène Ionesco
- Les justes - Albert Camus
- Animal Farm - George Orwell
- MacBeth - William Shakespeare (Nice play ;))

Don't Read:

- Bint - F. Bordewijk
- My maths book :lol:

CooCooCachoo
Nov 13th, 2004, 06:36 PM
Anybody Read 'Girl With A Pearl Earring' by Tracy Chevalier?

BTW, :worship: CooCoo for starting this thread!

Nope.. It doesn't appeal to me :) Tell me what you like about it :)

And thanks Silas.. It's weird that there wasn't such a thread yet, and I remember discussing books in a different thread and everyone enjoyed reading ;) So I thought it'd be a good thread!

Maajken
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:13 PM
well i'm reading jonathan lethem's "motherless brooklyn" at the moment and according to my english professor it's supposed to be good. but then again, he might be a bit biased ;)

SilK
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:37 PM
Nope.. It doesn't appeal to me :) Tell me what you like about it :)

And thanks Silas.. It's weird that there wasn't such a thread yet, and I remember discussing books in a different thread and everyone enjoyed reading ;) So I thought it'd be a good thread!

I know what you mean... I don't know too many people that enjoy reading as much as I do. I hope we can get this thread going! :wavey:

http://www.nl.bol.com/intershoproot/BOOKCOVER/FC/0/4/5/2/2/0452282152.gif

Anyway, 'GWAPE', everybody was talking about the movie. I saw it as well. The movie was really good visually, but there wasn't too much text. So this is the first and only time I tell people to see the movie first, and to read the book after it. It's a simple book. With a huge eye for detail. Nothing really happens, but it's written great. Plus, good to see a foreigns perspective on differnent times in the Neds ;)

CooCooCachoo
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:41 PM
From now on.. This thread is proudly brought to you by:

CooCooCachoo
&
:hug: Silas :hug:

TatiAnnahølic
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:44 PM
I'm reading the Da Vinci code (started it 2 months ago) and I'm still in the 4th page :tape: :lol: hopefully by this time next year I will finish the book... :angel:

kikker
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:45 PM
well i just read vals licht from joost zwagerman and i'm reading
kaas from willem elschot, i know it's all dutch :o

shap_half
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:46 PM
Girl with the Pearl Earring was a great read.

I am actually in between books right now. The problem with me is that I'll read a book and then stop in the middle and start another. I have a dozen books that are half read.

SilK
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:46 PM
I'm reading the Da Vinci code (started it 2 months ago) and I'm still in the 4th page :tape: :lol: hopefully by this time next year I will finish the book... :angel:

Again... good book. I read it, even though it is really hyped. Like, people that never read, read this book. Normally that bugs me out, but I had to know what the hype was all about. Didn't like the character that carried my name too much. Dan Brown really put in some effort. Good facts, he did his research. That's for sure!

grmbl
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:50 PM
wat is dit nu voor'n combi? :tape:

kikker
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:50 PM
hey silas i saw ''girl with the pearl earring'' too but i didn't read the book
but the film was very good tough

~{X}~
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:52 PM
The Vampire Armand by Anne Rice
A Seperate Peace by John Knowles
Pompeii by Robert Harris

Loved them all :)

SilK
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:52 PM
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0399152571.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Now I know a lot of people do not call this a book or literature. BUT, since I concider myself a poet, I am interested in (contemporary) poetry/songwriting. I like Alicia, and I am really curious about her upcoming book of poetry etc. I've read what Ashanti brought to the table and that truly SUCKED so hard. Alicia should be able to give us something good. I'll let y'all know when I finished it!

:wavey:

SilK
Nov 13th, 2004, 07:53 PM
hey silas i saw ''girl with the pearl earring'' too but i didn't read the book
but the film was very good tough

I saw the movie as well, before I read the book. And the movie was GREAT, but it made me curious about the book. You MUST go read the book, really! It's a great read, esspecially if you enjoyed the movie!

Rocketta
Nov 13th, 2004, 08:21 PM
There were a bunch of book threads....

not reading anything right now....but hopefully a textbook...:unsure:

Lemonskin.
Nov 13th, 2004, 08:24 PM
I've read The Power of One and it's sequel Tandia by Bryce Courtney.

They were bloody good, but beware: They're bloody long.

Lemonskin.
Nov 13th, 2004, 08:25 PM
One of my favourtie books is Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park

The movie was good, but the book is so much better.

SilK
Nov 13th, 2004, 08:46 PM
I've read The Power of One and it's sequel Tandia by Bryce Courtney.

They were bloody good, but beware: They're bloody long.

I will try to go and bloody read them. What are they about?

Joana
Nov 13th, 2004, 08:51 PM
"Death and other surprises" by Mario Benedetti. Loved it.
Last week I read "A long day's journey into the night" by Eugene O'Neill. Excellent.

propi
Nov 13th, 2004, 09:41 PM
The Vampire Armand by Anne Rice
A Seperate Peace by John Knowles
Pompeii by Robert Harris

Loved them all :)
If you like Anne Rice's new colection about "New vampires" be sure you read Pandora :bounce: the best of all I've read from her :D
One of my favourite books ever is House of spirits by Isabel Allende :bounce:

MisterQ
Nov 13th, 2004, 10:05 PM
Some good books:

Don't Let's Go To The Dogs Tonight by Alexandra Fuller. autobiographical memoirs about a fascinating African childhood. both amusing and tragic.

A Separate Peace by John Knowles -- a beautiful book. a classic, but I just read it recently for the first time.

Me Talk Pretty One Day by Dave Sedaris --- this one got me laughing so hard on the subway that I was drawing stares! :lol:

Dahveed
Nov 13th, 2004, 10:29 PM
Girl with the Pearl Earring was a great read.

I am actually in between books right now. The problem with me is that I'll read a book and then stop in the middle and start another. I have a dozen books that are half read.
Same here. I used to read a lot and now i don't find the time and when i do i can't seem to focus enough to finish a book!! I'm currently reading hmm 3 books? Animal Farm (even though i read it already twice before), Bram Stocker's Dracula (love that book but bleh it's long!) and another one i forgot lol!

My fave book i think is Perfume by Patrick Suskind!

Carolina Girl
Nov 13th, 2004, 10:35 PM
A Separate Peace by John Knowles -- a beautiful book. a classic, but I just read it recently for the first time.I read this last year, very good book..

Another really good book is Tuesdays With Morrie -- this book had me crying, but don't let that deter you it is very very good!

raquel
Nov 13th, 2004, 10:44 PM
My fave book i think is Perfume by Patrick Suskind!
:worship:
Great choice Dahveed :) I really loved that book!

I have just finished reading The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough which is a pretty old book now but it was a really bigseller back in the day and I really loved it. It's about an Australian family over the course of about 40 years and it's just a big saga that I couldn't put down and would definitely recommend it if you like that kind of thing.

Catcher In The Rye by J.D Salinger - There is a lot of hype about this book being a classic so I thought I might have been disappointed by it, but I actually did enjoy it. I thought it was very poignant at the end.

Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier - I think this is a brilliant book and I thought that even though the film missed out a lot of the smaller details it was a pretty loyal to the book overall. Everything in the book is really detailed and I think you should read it before seeing the film because the 'shock' ending is more of a shock in the book, if that makes sense! It has more emotional impact in the book as well I thought.

I am reading John McEnroe's autobiography right now. Who knew old Johnny Mac was so emotional and sensitive? :)

Avid Merrion
Nov 13th, 2004, 10:58 PM
hmmm, i used to always have my nose in a book. don't seem to have the time these days :(

i tend to only read autobiographies these days, i'm reading one my mum passed on to me atm. Get Happy - The Life Of Judy Garland. pretty interesting so far... :)

SilK
Nov 13th, 2004, 11:16 PM
Yay... this thread is becoming a minor succes! I'm like making a huge still-to-read list right now! :lol:

shap_half
Nov 14th, 2004, 01:29 AM
I think my favorite book is Ayn Rand's We the Living and Arthur Golden's Memoirs of a Geisha . Both books really kept me glued. Most of the time I'll lose focus midway through books and forget about 'em and will want to read something else, but those two almost made me miss class becuase I wanted to have time to finish 'em as soon as possible. I LOVE BOTH OF 'EM!!!! :hearts:

Other notables (G denotes homosexual theme)

Michael Cunninham's A Home at the End of the World G
much better than movie. the storyline is very interesting and language is subtle and delicate but very powerful. it's the story of two childhood friends (they dabbled in some sexual exploration in their early years, but one ended up gay and the other bisexual) and their progression through life.

John Rechy's City of Night G
This book is really, really well written and the storyline is very, very interesting. it's about the male hustling underworld through the eyes of one hustler. very interesting and great read.

E.M. Forester's Maurice G
this might be my favorite book that has a gay theme to it. It is viewed as a social commentary to the traditional perspective of homsexuality. there's actually a movie made based on the book by Ivory Merchant starring Hugh Grant. The movie is very closely modelled after the book, so the movie is also worth watching (there's full frontal so...)

Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale
I really enjoyed reading this -- even if it was for class. It's about a future world where women are basically enslaved to become birthing species for the world.

more to come...

~{X}~
Nov 14th, 2004, 03:30 AM
Thanks Propi, I will be sure to check out Pandora :)

CC
Nov 14th, 2004, 03:36 AM
Currently reading The Secret Life of Salvador Dali by Salvador Dali.

MisterQ
Nov 14th, 2004, 07:37 AM
Another all-time favorite of mine is Trout Fishing In America by Richard Brautigan. :worship: :cool:

It's not about trout fishing... ;)

Zamboni
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:27 AM
lol Silas I didn't know Szilas was your real name so after I read the Da Vinci Code I thought you named yourself after the character :lol:

Martijn, I did like Bint, why don't you like it?

Best book ever: Fall down on your knees by Ann Marie McDonald :bounce:
I love most books by Isabel Allende, Marianne Frederiksson and Nicci French too :)

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:29 AM
Again... good book. I read it, even though it is really hyped. Like, people that never read, read this book. Normally that bugs me out, but I had to know what the hype was all about. Didn't like the character that carried my name too much. Dan Brown really put in some effort. Good facts, he did his research. That's for sure!

I have it at home actually.. Like I have loads of other books :rolleyes: Still have to read it someday, I guess.. But it's not really the kind of book I think I'd like.

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:30 AM
wat is dit nu voor'n combi? :tape:

Choo William..

This is a books & literature thread. You don't belong here.


:devil:

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:31 AM
The Vampire Armand by Anne Rice
A Seperate Peace by John Knowles
Pompeii by Robert Harris

Loved them all :)

You like tension ;) My favourite style is more humourous and critical in the same time. I really suggest everyone reads Finding Myself by Toby Litt. It's a fantastic book, with a good plot and a lot of humour. It's kind of a parody on the Big Brother era.

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:32 AM
One of my favourtie books is Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park

The movie was good, but the book is so much better.

I have the same thing with Thomas Harris' Hannibal. I must admit that it is the only book I have read of him, but this one was so much better than the movie was ;)

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:33 AM
Some good books:

Don't Let's Go To The Dogs Tonight by Alexandra Fuller. autobiographical memoirs about a fascinating African childhood. both amusing and tragic.

A Separate Peace by John Knowles -- a beautiful book. a classic, but I just read it recently for the first time.

Me Talk Pretty One Day by Dave Sedaris --- this one got me laughing so hard on the subway that I was drawing stares! :lol:

:lol: That last one sounds like a book I'd like ;) What is it about Mister Q ? :p

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:38 AM
lol Silas I didn't know Szilas was your real name so after I read the Da Vinci Code I thought you named yourself after the character :lol:

Martijn, I did like Bint, why don't you like it?

Best book ever: Fall down on your knees by Ann Marie McDonald :bounce:
I love most books by Isabel Allende, Marianne Frederiksson and Nicci French too :)

The style. De Nieuwe Zakelijkheid / Die neue Sachlichkeit is really not my thing, though I did love Elsschot's Villa des Roses, but that had more aspects of realism in it too. I also didn't like the storyline at all.

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:41 AM
Other tips:

- All of the Harry Potter books - J.K. Rowling (Yes, I really like them :p)
- Hannibal - Thomas Harris
- The Rider - Tim Krabbé (A Dutch book, but it has been translated and The New York Times was really positive about it. It's a short book that you will finish in one or two days, but if you only slightly like cycling, then you will love this book)
- Karel ende Elegast
- Warenar - P.C. Hooft (Both this one and Karel ende Elegast are very old works in Dutch literature that I had to read for school. But I actually liked them ;) I only recommend reading these for the Dutch-speaking people, cause I don't think there is a translation available somewhere and if there is, these translations would take away the beauty of the works.

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:43 AM
Kikker.. If you like Vals Licht by Joost Zwagerman, you should try Tomaatsj. It's one of his lesser-known works. I can't say I really liked it, but it is such a weird and unique subject. It is about a guy whose girlfriend becomes pregnant, but he gets contractions too ;)

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 09:46 AM
http://www.tobylitt.com/findingmyselfnewsmall.jpg

Buy it.
Read it.
Love it.

James
Nov 14th, 2004, 10:01 AM
Yay... this thread is becoming a minor succes! I'm like making a huge still-to-read list right now! :lol:
I was thinking the same thing. Hope my library has all these titles. I started with a book by Anna Enquist. I enjoy her writing a lot.

I had not so good an experience with Der Blechtrommel from Gunter Grass. After it took me almost an hour to read and understand the first two pages I gave up and started on John Grisham instead.

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 10:28 AM
I was thinking the same thing. Hope my library has all these titles. I started with a book by Anna Enquist. I enjoy her writing a lot.

I had not so good an experience with Der Blechtrommel from Gunter Grass. After it took me almost an hour to read and understand the first two pages I gave up and started on John Grisham instead.

:lol:

Then don't try to start in 'The Dante Club' by Matthew Pearl. It's supposed to be really good, but I couldn't get past the first ten pages :eek:

Zamboni
Nov 14th, 2004, 10:41 AM
Martijn, Karel ende Elegast :lol:

I think I was the only student in my yeah who LOVED Max Havelaar, I think it's a great book!

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 11:14 AM
Martijn, Karel ende Elegast :lol:

I think I was the only student in my yeah who LOVED Max Havelaar, I think it's a great book!

Argh we read some excerpts of it and I didn't like it one bit :p

And Karel ende Elegast is :cool: ;)

SilK
Nov 14th, 2004, 11:22 AM
that are a lot of CooCooCachoo replies :eek:

Zamboni
Nov 14th, 2004, 11:39 AM
Argh we read some excerpts of it and I didn't like it one bit :p

And Karel ende Elegast is :cool: ;)
My teacher read Karel ende Elegast aloud for us and that was so boring I hated it, even tho I think I would have liked it otherwise:p

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 11:51 AM
My teacher read Karel ende Elegast aloud for us and that was so boring I hated it, even tho I think I would have liked it otherwise:p

:lol:

That reminds me of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion". We listened to that on tape for English last year :cuckoo: Trust me, hearing Eliza cry out "I'm a good girl, I am!" loads of times is not good for your ears :p

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 11:52 AM
that are a lot of CooCooCachoo replies :eek:

:angel:

rightous
Nov 14th, 2004, 11:59 AM
Hey someone was talking about the Da Vinci Code, has someone else read it. The most amazing book, Dan Brown really makes you challenge your understanding of what you think you know.

Hey if you want to read a brilliant book about deciet, love, jealousy, gendery etc in the back drop of Ireland, 'The Real Charlotte' is a brilliant book.

Joana
Nov 14th, 2004, 12:03 PM
That reminds me of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion". We listened to that on tape for English last year :cuckoo: Trust me, hearing Eliza cry out "I'm a good girl, I am!" loads of times is not good for your ears :p
Oh yes, I still have traumas because of that. Could that voice have been any more annoying? :eek:
The play itself is fantastic, though.

CooCooCachoo
Nov 14th, 2004, 03:00 PM
Oh yes, I still have traumas because of that. Could that voice have been any more annoying? :eek:
The play itself is fantastic, though.

:haha: Yeah that is true ;)

MisterQ
Nov 14th, 2004, 03:52 PM
:lol: That last one sounds like a book I'd like ;) What is it about Mister Q ? :p

:wavey: CooCoo,
It's a collection of essays by Dave Sedaris, most of which either relate to A) growing up in North Carolina, or B) his life as an adult in New York City, or C) moving to France with his boyfriend, and the hysterical culture clashes that ensue.

here are some reviews:

http://www.bookbrowse.com/index.cfm?page=title&titleID=556

http://flakmag.com/books/pretty.html

http://thebookhaven.homestead.com/Z_Me_Talk_Pretty.html

CooCooCachoo
Nov 15th, 2004, 08:49 PM
Thanks MisterQ :hug:

Right now I am noticing how boring mathematics and business can be ;)

"The job-creating power of entrepreneurs in the United States". Yippee.

SilK
Nov 15th, 2004, 09:20 PM
I will be here with new books very soon... I promise :wavey:

grmbl
Nov 15th, 2004, 10:14 PM
I love Kuifje! :bounce:

Svennovitch
Nov 15th, 2004, 10:26 PM
I love Kuifje! :bounce:
Dat is dan ook Belgisch.

Svennovitch
Nov 15th, 2004, 10:28 PM
I am reading the fifth Harry Potter ATM.

I still have 'De ontdekking van de hemel' from Harry Mulisch laying around. Anyone read it yet? Is it good? I haven't had the courage yet to start it.

SilK
Nov 15th, 2004, 10:33 PM
I am reading the fifth Harry Potter ATM.

I still have 'De ontdekking van de hemel' from Harry Mulisch laying around. Anyone read it yet? Is it good? I haven't had the courage yet to start it.

OOOOH MY GOD... 'The Discovery Of Heaven' is like THE book in on my shelf that I love THE most. I can't help it. I know it's a big read, but I really liked it and enjoyed it... All THREE times I've read it so far :eek:
You should really get to read it. It's worth your time.. Beautiful book!

SilK
Nov 15th, 2004, 10:36 PM
I've had a conversation today with one my mates. And we came to the point where we talked about the 'Lord Of The Rings' books. I have to be honest I did not read them... I do know they were there LONG before the movies. I just did not know them. Than the movies became such a hype, that I told myself not to read the books, or see the movies. So I did. But know he told me to really try and go read those books, that it would be worth the read. Now I am curious, anybody else read them, and what is your advise? I believe my mate on his word. But I am curious about other opinions. Are they really that great?

Svennovitch
Nov 15th, 2004, 10:49 PM
I've had a conversation today with one my mates. And we came to the point where we talked about the 'Lord Of The Rings' books. I have to be honest I did not read them... I do know they were there LONG before the movies. I just did not know them. Than the movies became such a hype, that I told myself not to read the books, or see the movies. So I did. But know he told me to really try and go read those books, that it would be worth the read. Now I am curious, anybody else read them, and what is your advise? I believe my mate on his word. But I am curious about other opinions. Are they really that great?I've seen the movies. So, now I have an idea about the story. But I am afraid the books will give me a totally other interpretation of the story. You know: everybody reads and feels a story differently. I liked the interpretation from the director, Peter Jackson, so I think I am gonna leave it with that.

I am actually reading another fantasy series: The Wheel of Time form Robert Jordan. There are already 10 books of that. I have 9 at home, and read already 2. The others are waiting. I still have so much books waiting to be read... :rolleyes:

CooCooCachoo
Nov 16th, 2004, 06:03 AM
Svennovitch.. I have The Discovery of Heaven as well, but like you, I am afraid to start in it ;)

CooCooCachoo
Nov 16th, 2004, 06:03 AM
I love Kuifje! :bounce:

:haha: :tape: How appropriate ;)

:hug:

Allez-H
Nov 16th, 2004, 08:19 AM
We're doing this project at school around one particular author and I picked Marion Bloem.I just finsihed reading 'Ver van familie','Geen gewoon Indisch meisje' and 'De honden van Slipi'..I must say that I quite enjoyed the books,she has a difficlut style of writing which makes it difficult to follow the story in the beginning (especially in the first two books) but the more you read,the more you understand and the end pretty much makes up for the chaotic beginning.I must say that the theme's are intresting;if you're bound to learn about Indonesia,Indonisians living and the Netherlands, re-discovering you're familiy and roots,her books are really a must-read :yeah:

Central
Nov 17th, 2004, 11:44 AM
I'm reading Fever Pitch, by Nick hornby, at the moment, and I'm really loving it... I just love books talking about football and experiences related to it... it's just hilarious and pretty understandable for me the way he's been living mostly through his team's results, and how it's been determing his mood.

I also bought a couple of weeks ago Bill Bryson's A short story of nearly everything, and although I stopped reading it to start Hornby's, it seems to be quite interesting and simple for my tiny understanding capability :o

Sabazius
Nov 17th, 2004, 11:59 AM
hello! :wavey:
Does anyone like Patricia Cornwell's books? How about autobiographical works. Be looking forward to hearing from everyone :D

deep bass
Nov 17th, 2004, 12:26 PM
The Da Vinci Code. I was thinking about buying this book this morning and passed. I shall have to go back down the street and buy it now, the comments have me intrigued! I love Patricia Cornwell. You should also try Kathy Reichs, she writes in a similar vein.

SilK
Nov 18th, 2004, 01:03 PM
Svennovitch.. I have The Discovery of Heaven as well, but like you, I am afraid to start in it ;)

:eek:

CooCooCaWHAT? :eek:

You haven't read it yet? :o

mandy7
Nov 19th, 2004, 08:09 AM
i was forced to post here...
but i can't read :bigcry:

SilK
Nov 19th, 2004, 09:37 AM
:bumperitos:

Ekkekko
Nov 21st, 2004, 01:31 PM
nobody reads anything here besides those who've posted?

SilK
Nov 21st, 2004, 01:32 PM
it seems to appear that way :(

very depressing... book of poetry: Tears For Water! :)

Ekkekko
Nov 21st, 2004, 01:35 PM
I know :o how disturbing can that be :D

SilK
Nov 21st, 2004, 02:36 PM
we need some Oprah to get people reading! : oprah : :lol:

Ekkekko
Nov 21st, 2004, 02:38 PM
Would you want me to be Oprah? :angel:

SilK
Nov 21st, 2004, 02:40 PM
Would you want me to be Oprah? :angel:

nooo... but I got a genious idea...
we're gonna write a book!

READING FOR DUMMIES... by Esther & Silas

:lol:

Ekkekko
Nov 21st, 2004, 02:44 PM
awesome...you start the first line :D and i'd continue ;)

SilK
Nov 21st, 2004, 02:45 PM
awesome...you start the first line :D and i'd continue ;)

BTW, I think it's a nice way for us to introduce outselves to the world. You know, preparing them for out World Travel Series...
We're up for World Domination! :cool:

Joana
Nov 21st, 2004, 02:48 PM
I think many people are simply put off reading because of the school system. I mean, at least here in Serbia students in high school have to read books like Bible, Don Quijote, Anna Karenina and War and Peace, all of which are classics of literature but are not suitable for teenagers. That way people develope some kind of anymosity towards reading which is not easy to change.

SilK
Nov 21st, 2004, 02:51 PM
Anna Karenina :worship:

I love that book! Oh my goodness...

Hulet
Nov 21st, 2004, 04:06 PM
Oh, how did I miss this thread. :eek:

Just finished reading Kafka's "The Trial" yesterday. I have only been able to read this book on the way from and to work, on the streetcar. Still, I don't know why I put off reading it for so long. It's a wonderful book - especially suited to this particular time.

At home, I am reading Heidegger's "Introduction to Metaphysics". Really hard book to understand. Atleast 50% of what I read of this book, I couldn't comprehend at all.

Btw, I agree about Anna Karenina with Silas.

Joana
Nov 21st, 2004, 04:39 PM
Oh, how did I miss this thread. :eek:

Just finished reading Kafka's "The Trial" yesterday. I have only been able to read this book on the way from and to work, on the streetcar. Still, I don't know why I put off reading it for so long. It's a wonderful book - especially suited to this particular time.

At home, I am reading Heidegger's "Introduction to Metaphysics". Really hard book to understand. Atleast 50% of what I read of this book, I couldn't comprehend at all.

Btw, I agree about Anna Karenina with Silas.
I read "The Trial" in the 4th grade of high school and I found it extremely depressing and not an easy read. I don't know what would my impressions be if I read it now, but I read "The Castle" recently and Kafka just isn't my cup of tea.
About Anna Karenina, I quite liked it and it was fairly easy to read and thought it was much better than War and Peace, which is, IMHO, one of the most overhyped books ever.

Have any of you read Kundera? I really enjoyed most of his books.

Hulet
Nov 21st, 2004, 05:05 PM
I read "The Trial" in the 4th grade of high school and I found it extremely depressing and not an easy read. I don't know what would my impressions be if I read it now, but I read "The Castle" recently and Kafka just isn't my cup of tea.
About Anna Karenina, I quite liked it and it was fairly easy to read and thought it was much better than War and Peace, which is, IMHO, one of the most overhyped books ever.

Have any of you read Kundera? I really enjoyed most of his books.
I never read Kundera's books although I would like too. Which book do you recommend for a beginner? One of my friends recommended "The unbearable lightness" to me, but I never got around to reading it.

I found "The Trial" much more easier to read than "The Castle". That's probably because "The Castle" was the first book/story that I have read by Kafka so didn't know what to expect. Since then though, I have read so many stories by him and also other books about him and his work that I almost knew the story of "The trial" before I read the book. I didn't think it that depressing 'till I read the final chapter. Actually often, I chuckled at all the high expectation and confidence of the main character clashing with the absurdity and incomprehensiblity of the court system he is faced with. Even Kafka was said to have laughed uncontrollably when he read it for his friends. I don't know - I think it's a perfect book for this uncontrollabily incomprehensible and inhuman world of today.

W&P - I strongly disagree but, since I have read it long ago and almost totally forgot the plot, I can't argue about it with you. :)

Central
Nov 21st, 2004, 05:33 PM
Have any of you read Kundera? I really enjoyed most of his books.
I have read Ignorance, which I find it quite interesting, and The Joke, which I really really really loved. It was great, and I would not mind (at all) reading it again. Highly recommended IMHO :yeah:

Joana
Nov 21st, 2004, 05:54 PM
I also enjoyed The Joke, and I absolutely adored Laughable Loves (I think it's translated like that). That's my favourite Kundera's book.

Psychon, have you read Camu's "Stranger"? It's a bit like "The Trial", yet totally different. I loved it.

Hulet
Nov 21st, 2004, 06:51 PM
"The Stranger" - I have only read it once, but didn't like it at all because I couldn't identify, nor sympathise, with the aloofness of the the protagonist. I liked his other book "The myth of Sisyphus" which I read at a really difficult time in my life and, although I didn't agree with most of his conclusions, it was a big help.

sarza
Nov 21st, 2004, 06:59 PM
Strange fits of passion-Anita Shreeve

i havent read it all yet im midway through it and i only started reading it today. Its great!!!! Its about a woman who runs from her husband after suffering domestic abuse but like i say i am only halfway through but when ive read it i will let you know more, but already i must recommend it!!!!!!

Joana
Nov 21st, 2004, 08:07 PM
"The Stranger" - I have only read it once, but didn't like it at all because I couldn't identify, nor sympathise, with the aloofness of the the protagonist. I liked his other book "The myth of Sisyphus" which I read at a really difficult time in my life and, although I didn't agree with most of his conclusions, it was a big help.
Those two are very closely related. I'd even say The Stranger is sort of a sequel to The Myth of Sisyphus, and it's impossible to understand without having read The Myth... before.
I think it's not possible for anyone to identify with the protagonist of The Stranger. Because he is the stranger to us - his whole concept of being, living in the now and the world without tomorrow are totally different to everything we know. And that's exactly why he's so fascinating.

Hulet
Nov 22nd, 2004, 04:24 PM
I read those books in reverse so you might be right, Joana, on why I didn't like The Stranger but enjoyed the other book.

I have requested from the library all the Kundera books you and Central recommended here. I need a new book for my streetcar ride. :)

chapel
Nov 23rd, 2004, 08:44 AM
- sophie’s world
- tuesday’s with morie
- the little prince (my fave book for some reason)
- the client, the firm, the runaway jury, the last juror, the bleachers (john grisham’s probably my fave author)
- the art of war
- we were soldiers once and young
- harry potter 1-4 (currently reading the 5th book)
- the da vinci code (probably the best book ive read)
- a walk to remember (read the book but didn’t see the movie)
- hannibal (read the book but didn’t see the movie)
- me talk pretty one day (really really funny)
- chicken soup series


........these ones i had to read for school
- animal farm
- moby dick
- a christmas carol
- les miserables
- chronicle of a death foretold


…….and my girlfriend made me read a couple of chick lit books
- can you keep a secret
- ex (or x) files (not too sure about the title)
…….and she also wants me to read the shopaholic series :o

SilK
Nov 24th, 2004, 01:51 PM
:bump:

lilly
Nov 24th, 2004, 03:06 PM
Cool thread! :yeah:

For the peeps afraid to start in 'The Discovery Of Heaven', DO IT NOW! It's a fascinating story, which can be read on many levels. Granted, Mulisch does have a tendency to show off his socalled knowledge, but it only adds to the enjoyment. Of course, I'm into the Jewish and Christian symbolics... but it also has the tale of three people connected in a deep way.

Now I'm reading 'Foucault's Pendulum' by Umberto Eco. Pretty good, again mixing history (eveything this time) with boyish adventure!

Any fellow admirers of Charlotte Brontë's witty, insightful and compelling books? 'Jane Eyre' and 'Shirley' are musts imo if you like the better 19th century literature!

lilly
Nov 24th, 2004, 03:12 PM
btw The Discovery of Heaven reminds me of Stephen Fry's writings. Ok, I'm a fan of everything he does (major tip for the Europeans: Q.I. BBC2 fri 23u00, hilarious!) and he writes exactly the way he talks: erudite, English posh and funny as hell!!
ch-ch-check it out!

Central
Nov 24th, 2004, 03:42 PM
Not long ago I started reading Catch-22, by Joseph Heller... They say it's pretty good, and very entertaining, and it certainly seems to be so, but I had to quit reading it (in English, of corse ;)) because it was way too difficult to read for me :o

Hulet
Dec 3rd, 2004, 10:32 AM
A small bump :) just to let you guys know that I have finished reading Kundera's "Ignorance". I am glad you guys recommended this book b/c it was full of great insights about the psyche of immigrants. Sometimes I even forgot I was reading about the thinking process of a fictional emigre b/c it was so similar to how I really think: the similarity of dreams/nightmares emigre's experience, the loss of memory of the place you grew upon, being stuck in the past one moment in time - all very, very true of most of the immigrants I know.
Unfotunately, those insights scattered through the book is all I liked about this book. I couldn't get interested in the story of the two main characters. For this I blame the many distraction in this book: the often shifting narrative views(sometimes even within the same paragraph), the many digressive story lines which contribute little to the main the story line, ...

Overall though a really good book. I have to re-read it again.

Next I was going to read his other book "The joke" but my roommate couldn't shut up about a book called "Natasha and other stories" by David Bezmozgis, so I will read that instead to see what's so great about it. Has anyone read this book btw?

moby
Dec 3rd, 2004, 01:57 PM
i intend to read some of kundera's stuff some day

one of my favourite books is Gerald Durrell's My Family and Other Animals
it's about the author's boyhood in Greece (having had to move from England at age 11) and it's a hilarious account on the eccentricities of his family

SilK
Dec 9th, 2004, 10:47 AM
I'm reading Shakey's Orthello *again*

Harju.
Dec 9th, 2004, 11:06 AM
I've just finished reading The Time Traveler's Wife by Audry Niffengger. Great book. :yeah:

Central
Dec 9th, 2004, 11:24 AM
I just started Philip Roth's I married a communist :o
Looks interesting so far, although some people haven't exactly told me wonders about it :o

Joana
Dec 9th, 2004, 02:31 PM
Just to promote Serbian literature a bit - if you ever come across The Bridge on the Drina by Ivo Andric, read it. It was awarded with the Nobel Prize in 1961, and it is a really great book.

Hulet
Dec 13th, 2004, 02:12 AM
"Natasha & other stories" -finished reading this yesterday. All the stories are about the struggle of an immigrant Jewish/Russian family in Toronto, told from the perspective of their son. The stories weren't as great as I was led to believe from my roommate's enthusiasm about this book, but some of them are very well done, especially the last one, called "Minyan", and my favourite one, titled "The second strongest man on Earth".

At home, I am freaking stuck reading Heidegger's book. I can't wait until I finish this book and start some other book.

Harju.
Dec 13th, 2004, 02:23 AM
I'm reading this book called "Company" by Robert Litell.

Well it's going to take at least few months. :haha: It's like super thick.

silverwhite
Dec 13th, 2004, 03:23 AM
I've just finished The Da Vinci Code. Found it very interesting and informative. The storyline itself was exciting for the first half of the book, but it was a letdown in the second half.

moby
Dec 13th, 2004, 04:00 AM
I've just finished The Da Vinci Code. Found it very interesting and informative. The storyline itself was exciting for the first half of the book, but it was a letdown in the second half.
it isn't really informative
a lot of it is fiction
it is better not to assume anything is true

So Disrespectful
Dec 13th, 2004, 06:18 AM
I have been reading my Aus Open 2004 guide since January :(
2005 is coming soon!!! I love those guides, they have really cool player profiles and stuff like that. 0_o this thread is non-tennis, but oh well...

silverwhite
Dec 13th, 2004, 02:11 PM
it isn't really informative
a lot of it is fiction
it is better not to assume anything is true

I know that some of it is fiction. It's informative in the sense that it exposes the existence of a theory that some people hold true.

SilK
Dec 18th, 2004, 08:10 AM
"How To Bring A Thread Back To Life For DUMMIES" :worship:

Yonge
Dec 19th, 2004, 03:51 AM
CooCoo, I also loved Hannibal (Thomas Harris) and I thought the movie was CRAP!

Life of Pi - Now I'm very proud of this book because it's Canadian and part of it happens in my hometown of Toronto. Also a terrific story - the ending floored me completely.

The Da Vinci Code - I waited 8 months(!) for this book (I borrowed from the public library and there was a waiting list despite them having 450 copies in circulation). This is my favourite book and I'm afraid the movie version will ruin my love for it (movie will star Tom Hanks as Robert Langdon, will be directed by Ron Howard).

Some suggestions:

Oryx and Crake - This one's by Margaret Atwood and it's also awesome. If you like tragic, futuristic stories, this one's for you.

My Year of Meats - By Ruth Ozeki. This one has something for everybody. It has drama, comedy, politics, romance, disgusting things, sex, cultural issues, etc. A page-turner.

Right now I'm reading Human Biology because I have an exam coming up, but this book I already have on target just because MisterQ recommends it:

Me Talk Pretty One Day by Dave Sedaris

I can't wait!

Yonge
Dec 19th, 2004, 03:53 AM
By the way, great thread CooCoo and Silas :yeah:

CooCooCachoo
Dec 19th, 2004, 10:10 AM
CooCoo, I also loved Hannibal (Thomas Harris) and I thought the movie was CRAP!

Life of Pi - Now I'm very proud of this book because it's Canadian and part of it happens in my hometown of Toronto. Also a terrific story - the ending floored me completely.



Hey Yonge :wavey:

I didn't think the movie was absolute crap, but it was not nearly as good as the book.

Life of Pi is a great book indeed. I finished it, and the ending is soooooo shocking (considering the story). I was so surprised :eek: :)

I am now reading 'Van den vos Reynaerde', which is a very old Dutch classic. Sort of a fable, based on the French Le Renard. The author is unknown, but it's probably some 'Willem'. It's quite interesting, cause the version I am reading also contains information on the background of certain aspects of the book (written around the year 1200).

Yonge
Dec 20th, 2004, 06:50 PM
I tried to borrow "Me Talk Pretty One Day" in 3 different libraries today and no copies are currently available because of - again- the waiting list. I got 100 Years of Solitude instead (I'm reading it for the first time).

SilK
Dec 25th, 2004, 12:42 PM
I just love bumping this thread! Merry Xmas to all the readers on this board! :hug:

~ The Leopard ~
Dec 25th, 2004, 02:16 PM
Just a few favourites :angel: .....

Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov
W.B. Yeats, Collected Poems
John Barth, Giles Goat-Boy
Robert A. Heinlein, Stranger in a Strange Land
Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy
Ursula Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness
Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings
Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra
Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams
Martha Nussbaum, The Fragility of Goodness
Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow
Iris Murdoch, Under the Net
J.S. Mill, On Liberty
William Gibson, Neuromancer
E.M. Forster, A Passage to India
Herman Hesse, The Glass Bead Game
Homer, The Iliad .... hey, and The Odyssey
Robert Graves, The Greek Myths
Byron, Don Juan
H.G. Wells, The Time Machine
Kurt Vonnegut, weeeeeelll anything by good ol' KV
Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Shakespeare, Othello .... King Lear ... Macbeth ... Twelfth Night ..... The Tempest

CC
Dec 25th, 2004, 03:57 PM
This may seem completely obssessive and/or weird, but sometime ago I started reading this book called, "The Girl Who Played Go" by Shan Sa, and I found the first chapter to be the most beautiful writing I had ever read. And no matter how much I tried to move on and read the rest of the book I kept going back to the first chapter to re-read it. I lost interest in the rest of the book and never finished it, so I just returned it to the library when it expired. I wonder if I would still think so much of it if I read again now.

Yonge
Dec 25th, 2004, 06:00 PM
Keep posting your lists everyone. I really don't know which books to read next and I like the suggestions here so far. Say, maybe we can have a WTA Book Club next year? We can read the same books then we can talk about it here, just like what we do in classrooms.

SilK
Dec 25th, 2004, 06:07 PM
Keep posting your lists everyone. I really don't know which books to read next and I like the suggestions here so far. Say, maybe we can have a WTA Book Club next year? We can read the same books then we can talk about it here, just like what we do in classrooms.

That is a really nice idea... I don't know if CooCoo is up for it. But I am... if we can get a little club of people who are commited to something like that, it could be fun! :hug:

silverwhite
Dec 25th, 2004, 06:32 PM
Keep posting your lists everyone. I really don't know which books to read next and I like the suggestions here so far. Say, maybe we can have a WTA Book Club next year? We can read the same books then we can talk about it here, just like what we do in classrooms.

Super idea! :)

SilK
Dec 25th, 2004, 06:34 PM
People Who Are Interesting In A WTAWORLD Book Club:

- Yonge
- silverwhite
- Silas

Hulet
Dec 26th, 2004, 07:50 PM
CooCoo, I also loved Hannibal (Thomas Harris) and I thought the movie was CRAP!

Life of Pi - Now I'm very proud of this book because it's Canadian and part of it happens in my hometown of Toronto. Also a terrific story - the ending floored me completely.


I enjoyed the "Life of Pi" too, especially the two alternate endings. It made me go "hmmm" for a while after I finished it.

Hulet
Dec 26th, 2004, 07:51 PM
People Who Are Interesting In A WTAWORLD Book Club:

- Yonge
- silverwhite
- Silas
I am interested in the book club too although not as a participant, but I will religiously read what you guys have to say about the books and may be even read them afterwards. ;)

Hulet
Dec 26th, 2004, 08:08 PM
Just a few favourites :angel: .....

Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov
W.B. Yeats, Collected Poems
John Barth, Giles Goat-Boy
Robert A. Heinlein, Stranger in a Strange Land
Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy
Ursula Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness
Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings
Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra
Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams
Martha Nussbaum, The Fragility of Goodness
Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow
Iris Murdoch, Under the Net
J.S. Mill, On Liberty
William Gibson, Neuromancer
E.M. Forster, A Passage to India
Herman Hesse, The Glass Bead Game
Homer, The Iliad .... hey, and The Odyssey
Robert Graves, The Greek Myths
Byron, Don Juan
H.G. Wells, The Time Machine
Kurt Vonnegut, weeeeeelll anything by good ol' KV
Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure
James Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Shakespeare, Othello .... King Lear ... Macbeth ... Twelfth Night ..... The Tempest
So many good sci-fi books there. I love Kurt Vonnegut's book too - my favourites are Mother Night, Slaughterhouse 5 and Cat Cradle.

Okay, my own favourite sci-fi books (apart to some mentioned by the Leopard):

- Anything by Strugatsky brothers. Those guys are amazing but I especially love the "Roadside picnic", "Beetle in antHill", "Definately maybe", "Hard to be a God"
-"The dispossesed" by Ursula Le Guin
-"Dune" by Frank Herbert
-"A fire upon the deep" and "A deepness in the sky" by Vernor Vinge
-"Rendezvous with rama" by Arthur C Clarke

Boy, I used to only read sci-fi books three or four years ago, and was insanely obsessed by it, but the huge number of crappy books in this genre pretty much turned off my enthusiasm to it.

SilK
Dec 27th, 2004, 01:26 AM
Imma talk to CooCoo about the book club thingy when I get to talk to him! :lol:

SilK
Jan 7th, 2005, 03:23 PM
:bumperitos: :p

chapel
Jan 26th, 2005, 11:18 AM
any good suggestions on what i can read next? someone told me to read the diary of anne frank but i sense that i'll end up depressed after reading it. so maybe i'll do that some other time. so.........suggestions?

mandy7
Jan 26th, 2005, 11:20 AM
any good suggestions on what i can read next? someone told me to read the diary of anne frank but i sense that i'll end up depressed after reading it. so maybe i'll do that some other time. so.........suggestions?
martijn, silas, wat ie ook zegt, niet geloven hoor
hij kan amper lezen
bert en ernie in de sneeuw is zijn favoriete boek

chapel
Jan 26th, 2005, 11:25 AM
martijn, silas, wat ie ook zegt, niet geloven hoor
hij kan amper lezen
bert en ernie in de sneeuw is zijn favoriete boekhey! you may be typing in dutch but bert and ernie is still bert and ernie in english and i remember telling you something about them so shush!

mandy7
Jan 26th, 2005, 11:26 AM
haha, :devil:

chapel
Jan 26th, 2005, 11:28 AM
haha, :devil:
whatever this girl said, she's lying!

mandy7
Jan 26th, 2005, 11:30 AM
:lol: are you sure mike? :angel:

chapel
Jan 26th, 2005, 11:32 AM
well, except if you said something nice about me but other than that, they're all lies.

Hulet
Feb 27th, 2005, 06:24 PM
:bump: :)

Why is this thread abandoned? :confused:

Anyways, finished Yaroslav Hasek's "The good soldier svejk and his adventures in the world war" this friday, but I am :sad: now because I already miss the main character (Svejk) and his several ridiculous & sarcastic anecdotes. A great book. :)