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Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 04:40 AM
Most of you won't remember, but this is, in many ways, like the passing of Dr. King. He was vilified by much of the white media at the time of his death. Arafat's death will be similarly covered. How Arafat will be remembered half a century from now .... Who knows? But we know Dr. King isn't vilified by any except the true White Supremacist Right now.

For those of you who recoil at comparing Arafat to Dr. King, recall that many of us, me included, hold Malcom X in every bit as high esteem as Dr. King. And I think you'd agree THAT comparison is apt.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6402008/

Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat dead
Controversial leader, 75, succumbs to unknown disease
http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/j/msnbc/Components/Photos/041110/041110_arafat_main_hmed817p.h2.jpg
Palestinians rally in support of Yasser Arafat in the West Bank town of Ramallah, late Wednesday, hours before he died.
The Associated PressUpdated: 12:23 a.m. ET Nov. 11, 2004


Yasser Arafat, who triumphantly forced his people’s plight into the world spotlight but failed to achieve his lifelong quest for Palestinian statehood, died Thursday at age 75.

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The French military hospital where he had been treated for nearly a month said he died at 3:30 a.m. The Palestinian leader spent his final days there in a coma.

Palestinian Cabinet Minister Saeb Erekat and Tayeb Abdel Rahim, a top Arafat aide, confirmed that Arafat died in a conversation with reporters at Arafat’s headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah.

White House spokesman Trent Duffy said the administration was waiting to comment until it confirmed Arafat had died. The State Department had no immediate comment.

The Palestinian parliament speaker will be sworn in as Palestinian Authority president in the coming hours.
Palestinian officials have said they want to ensure a smooth transition. Under Palestinian law, Parliament Speaker Rauhi Fattouh, a virtual unknown, is to become caretaker president until elections are held in 60 days.

Arafat’s last days were as murky and dramatic as his life. Flown to France on Oct. 29 after nearly three years of being penned in his West Bank headquarters by Israeli tanks, he initially improved but then sharply deteriorated as rumors swirled about his illness.

Top Palestinian officials flew in to check on their leader while Arafat’s 41-year-old wife, Suha, publicly accused them of trying to usurp his powers. Ordinary Palestinians prayed for his well being, but expressed deep frustration over his failure to improve their lives.

Arafat’s failure to groom a successor complicated his passing, raising the danger of factional conflict among Palestinians.

A visual constant in his checkered keffiyeh headdress, Arafat kept the Palestinians’ cause at the center of the Arab-Israeli conflict. But he fell short of creating a Palestinian state, and, along with other secular Arab leaders of his generation, he saw his influence weakened by the rise of radical Islam in recent years.

Revered by his own people, Arafat was reviled by others. He was accused of secretly fomenting attacks on Israelis while proclaiming brotherhood and claiming to have put terrorism aside. Many Israelis felt the paunchy 5-foot, 2-inch Palestinian’s real goal remained the destruction of the Jewish state.

Arafat became one of the world’s most familiar faces after addressing the U.N. General Assembly in New York in 1974, when he entered the chamber wearing a holster and carrying a sprig. “Today I have come bearing an olive branch and a freedom fighter’s gun,” he said. “Do not let the olive branch fall from my hand.”

Two decades later, he shook hand at the White House with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin on a peace deal that formally recognized Israel’s right to exist while granting the Palestinians limited self-rule in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The pact led to the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize for Arafat, Rabin and Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres.

But the accord quickly unraveled amid mutual suspicions and accusations of treaty violations, and a new round of violence that erupted in the fall of 2000 has killed some 4,000 people, three-quarters of them Palestinian.

The Israeli and U.S. governments said Arafat deserved much of the blame for the derailing of the peace process. Even many of his own people began whispering against Arafat, expressing disgruntlement over corruption, lawlessness and a bad economy in the Palestinian areas.

A resilient survivor of war with Israel, assassination attempts and even a plane crash, Arafat was born Rahman Abdel-Raouf Arafat Al-Qudwa on Aug. 4, 1929, the fifth of seven children of a Palestinian merchant killed in the 1948 war over Israel’s creation. There is disagreement whether he was born in Gaza or in Cairo, Egypt.

Educated as an engineer in Egypt, Arafat served in the Egyptian army and then started a contracting firm in Kuwait. It was there that he founded the Fatah movement, which became the core of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
After the Arabs’ humbling defeat by Israel in the six-day war of 1967, the PLO thrust itself on the world’s front pages by sending its gunmen out to hijack airplanes, machine gun airports and seize Israeli athletes at the 1972 Summer Olympics.

“As long as the world saw Palestinians as no more than refugees standing in line for U.N. rations, it was not likely to respect them. Now that the Palestinians carry rifles the situation has changed,” Arafat explained.
Arafat’s failure to groom a successor complicated his passing, raising the danger of factional conflict among Palestinians.
A visual constant in his checkered keffiyeh headdress, Arafat kept the Palestinians’ cause at the center of the Arab-Israeli conflict. But he fell short of creating a Palestinian state, and, along with other secular Arab leaders of his generation, he saw his influence weakened by the rise of radical Islam in recent years.

Arafat became one of the world’s most familiar faces after addressing the U.N. General Assembly in New York in 1974, when he entered the chamber wearing a holster and carrying a sprig. “Today I have come bearing an olive branch and a freedom fighter’s gun,” he said. “Do not let the olive branch fall from my hand.”
Two decades later, he shook hand at the White House with Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin on a peace deal that formally recognized Israel’s right to exist while granting the Palestinians limited self-rule in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The pact led to the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize for Arafat, Rabin and Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres.

© 2004 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Fingon
Nov 11th, 2004, 04:58 AM
There are already 2 threads about it, are you blind?
no, but how would he miss an opportunity to mention the "white supremacists", even if the palestinians wouldn't have a clue what he is talking about.

And how would he otherwise fail to make an stupid comparisson like with Martin Luther King, that had nothing in common with Arafat whatsoever.

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:00 AM
no, but how would he miss an opportunity to mention the "white supremacists", even if the palestinians wouldn't have a clue what he is talking about.

And how would he otherwise fail to make an stupid comparisson like with Martin Luther King, that had nothing in common with Arafat whatsoever.Ah such a pity you haven't a monoploy on starting threads. I weep for you.

To the Palestinian people, may your next leader be as committed to you as your last.

Fingon
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:03 AM
Ah such a pity you haven't a monoploy on starting threads. I weep for you.

To the Palestinian people, may you next leader be as committed to you as your last.
another stupid comment and counting, how many thread have I started, and how many thread have you started?

talking about making comments unrelated to the issue, but you are an expert on that volcana.

good luck recruiting.

Justeenium
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:18 AM
Ah such a pity you haven't a monoploy on starting threads. I weep for you.

To the Palestinian people, may your next leader be as committed to you as your last.you mean as committed to not accept peace of arafat.

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:19 AM
another stupid comment and counting, how many thread have I started, and how many thread have you started?

talking about making comments unrelated to the issue, but you are an expert on that volcana.

good luck recruiting.Don't need luck. Ain't recruitin'. But I'd appreciate it if you'd say something stupid enough for me to put in my sig again. You've already done it twice.

I'm sorry to see Chairman Arafat die. His commitment to the welfare of his people is unquestioned, in my book.

Justeenium
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:21 AM
I'm sorry to see Chairman Arafat die. His commitment to the welfare of his people is unquestioned, in my book.:retard: Clinton and Barak offered him 97% and the bastard turned it down and the violence continued

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:21 AM
President Arafat has died



Thursday 11 November 2004, 7:15 Makka Time, 4:15 GMT " target="_blank">http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/rdonlyres/F31DEC3E-A2C0-447C-B501-B902444D8019/54187/943E6BF08E4D4E4193A1C85B1D5C86C9.jpg (http://<img%20src=/)Israel has refused permission for a burial in occupied Jerusalem





http://english.aljazeera.net/english/Images/0000.gif
Palestinian leader Yasir Arafat has been officially announced dead at the Paris military hospital where he was being treated, Aljazeera reports. He was 75.

Secretary-general of the Palestinian presidency, Tayib Abd al-Rahim, confirmed the death.

A spokesman for Percy military hospital had earlier said no decision had been taken to disconnect Arafat from artificial respirators.

A senior Muslim cleric who visited Arafat on Wednesday had ruled out disconnecting him from life-support machines.

Statements by Palestinian officials and medics have not mentioned the cause of the illness.

Aljazeera's correspondent in Paris said it seemed no one was permitted to give details on the cause or exact diagnosis of the illness.



Burial dispute

Media reports and speculation regarding the circumstances surrounding his funeral have increased.

Israel says that it will not allow Arafat to be buried in Jerusalem, his preferred resting place and a holy site for all Muslims.



http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/rdonlyres/F31DEC3E-A2C0-447C-B501-B902444D8019/54096/64BD704B0CA04F299C6410780DAF90DD.jpgTayib Abd al-Rahim says the best

place for burial is in Ram Allah






Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and top Israeli cabinet members agreed on Wednesday to allow Arafat to be buried in the West Bank city of Ram Allah, Israel Radio said.

Palestinian authorities had previously suggested that the Ram Allah headquarters of Arafat might be the best place, according to Tayib Abd al-Rahim, secretary-general of the Palestinian presidency.

Freedom of movement


Discussions with Israel regarding funeral arrangements is a necessity since freedom of movement for all Palestinians including Arafat is restricted by Israel.


A Palestinian official said: "Arafat's life-long ambition was to make Jerusalem the capital of a Palestinian state, and his will was to be buried there."

Minister of Negotiation Affairs Saib Uraiqat pledged that Arafat's body would eventually be moved and reburied in east Jerusalem in the future.


"I think it [a burial in Ram Allah] will be temporary and one day, when we have peace and we are all right as neighbours, President Arafat's body will be moved to east Jerusalem, to al-Aqsa mosque," he told Israeli Radio.

Egyptian announcement

Neighbouring Egypt has also been drawn into the controversy.


The country has welcomed the idea of holding a real or symbolic funeral for Palestinian President Yasir Arafat in Cairo, according to an announcement.


Egypt prefers Arafat to be buried in Jerusalem, to indicate that this city will remain the headquarters of the Palestinian State.


Egyptian Foreign Minister Ahmad Abu al-Ghait and intelligence chief Umar Sulayman will visit Israel and the Palestinian Authority on Friday to discuss the procedures of the burial and the future of the Palestinian Authority after the demise of Arafat.


Arab League assistance



http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/rdonlyres/F31DEC3E-A2C0-447C-B501-B902444D8019/54098/A9CE201FE1224935946C2EFB971EDB4F.jpgEgypt's Abu al-Ghait (L) will meet

Palestinian and Israeli officials




Aljazeera's correspondent in Cairo reported that the Egyptians have said they will also try to prevent Israel from causing internal conflicts and from creating confusion among Palestinians.

Palestinian officials have said it is highly likely a funeral ceremony presided by the Arab League will be held in Cairo followed by a burial in Ram Allah in the West Bank.

"Egypt has offered for Arafat to lie in state in Cairo, but the Palestinian leadership will give the final decision today," Uraiqat said.

Hopeful Bush
US President George Bush meanwhile has said that a new Palestinian leadership after the death of Arafat would improve chances for peace in the Middle East.

"There will be an opening for peace with new leaders in place," he said.

"When that happens, and I believe that it's going to happen ... the United States of America will be more than willing to help build the institutions for a free society to emerge so that the Palestinians can have their own state," he said.

"The vision is two states, a Palestinian state and Israel living side by side in peace. I think we have got a chance to do that. I look forward to being involved in the process".

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:25 AM
I do find the decision to refuse him burial in Jerusalem .... an interesting decision. It will make it difficult for the next leader to comporomise, but inthe long term, his burial there would have made it more difficult for the Israelis to claim exclusive soveignity over the city.

Oh to be a fly on the wall ....

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:28 AM
:retard: Clinton and Barak offered him 97% and the bastard turned it down and the violence continuedThat offer, bluntly, was horseshit. Israel retained virtually all the water rights, as well as the right to send the Israeli military into Palestinian land on ANY pretext.

That wasn't an offer of 97% of the land. That was an offer of the right to RENT 90% of the land, with Israel as a lanlord with the right to enter and destroy anything they chose. Read the fucking proposal.

Justeenium
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:30 AM
That offer, bluntly, was horseshit. Israel retained virtually all the water rights, as well as the right to send the Israeli military into Palestinian land on ANY pretext.

That wasn't an offer of 97% of the land. That was an offer of the right to RENT 90% of the land, with Israel as a lanlord with the right to enter and destroy anything they chose. Read the fucking proposal.after Israel put him in house arrest in 02 then he claimed he was ready to accept Clinton's plan.

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:32 AM
you mean as committed to not accept peace of arafat.Well, in that context, as I meant not as committed to peace as Sharon.

Andrew.
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:32 AM
after Israel put him in house arrest in 02 then he claimed he was ready to accept Clinton's plan. Well, he was held prisioner in a room for two years. I'm not sure what you would have done either.

Fingon
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:00 AM
Don't need luck. Ain't recruitin'. But I'd appreciate it if you'd say something stupid enough for me to put in my sig again. You've already done it twice.

I'm sorry to see Chairman Arafat die. His commitment to the welfare of his people is unquestioned, in my book.
without a doubt he was committed to the welfare of his people, his wife was receiving 100,000 dollars a month from the empoverished Palestinian Authority, to live in Paris while million of Palestinians starve.

What's your book? Mein Kampft?

Justeenium
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:03 AM
That offer, bluntly, was horseshit. Israel retained virtually all the water rights, as well as the right to send the Israeli military into Palestinian land on ANY pretext.

That wasn't an offer of 97% of the land. That was an offer of the right to RENT 90% of the land, with Israel as a lanlord with the right to enter and destroy anything they chose. Read the fucking proposal.


MYTH “Yasser Arafat rejected Ehud Barak's sproposals at Camp David and the White House in 2000 because they did not offer the Palestinians a viable state. Palestine would have been denied water, control of its holy places, and would have been divided into cantons surrounded by Israelis. Israel would have also retained control of Jerusalem and denied refugees the right to return.”

FACT



Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/barak.html) offered (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Peace/cd2000toc.html) to withdraw from 97 percent of the West Bank (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Peace/wbtoc.html) and 100 percent of the Gaza Strip (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Peace/gazatoc.html). In addition, he agreed to dismantle 63 isolated settlements (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Peace/settletoc.html). In exchange for the 5 percent annexation of the West Bank, Israel would increase the size of the Gaza territory by roughly a third.

Barak also made previously unthinkable concessions on Jerusalem (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Peace/jerutoc.html), agreeing that Arab neighborhoods of East Jerusalem would become the capital of the new state. The Palestinians would maintain control over their holy places and have "religious sovereignty" over the Temple Mount (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Society_&_Culture/geo/Mount.html).

According to U.S. peace negotiator Dennis Ross, Israel offered to create a Palestinian state that was contiguous, and not a series of cantons. Even in the case of the Gaza Strip, which must be physically separate from the West Bank unless Israel were to be cut into non-contiguous pieces, a solution was devised whereby an overland highway would connect the two parts of the Palestinian state without any Israeli checkpoints or interference.



“[Prime Minister Barak] was prepared to make decisions; Arafat was not. I believe he is capable of launching the process, but he is not capable of concluding it.” — U.S. mediator Dennis Ross on the failure of the Camp David Summit31 (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/myths/mf22.html#31)





The proposal also addressed the refugee (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/palreftoc.html) issue, guaranteeing them the right of return to the Palestinian state and reparations from a $30 billion international fund that would be collected to compensate them.

Israel also agreed to give the Palestinians access to water (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/watertoc.html) desalinated in its territory.

Arafat (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/arafat.html) was asked to agree to Israeli sovereignty over the parts of the Western Wall (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/walltoc.html) religiously significant to Jews (i.e., not the entire Temple Mount), and three early warning stations in the Jordan valley, which Israel would withdraw from after six years. Most important, however, Arafat (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/arafat.html) was expected to agree that the conflict was over at the end of the negotiations. This was the true deal breaker. Arafat was not willing to end the conflict. "For him to end the conflict is to end himself," said Ross.30c (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/myths/mf22.html#30c)

The prevailing view of the Camp David/White House negotiations (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Peace/cd2000toc.html) – that Israel offered generous concessions, and that Yasser Arafat (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/arafat.html) rejected them to pursue the intifada (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Peace/intifada2.html) that began in September 2000 – prevailed for more than a year. To counter the perception that Arafat (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/arafat.html) was the obstacle to peace, the Palestinians and their supporters then began to suggest a variety of excuses for why Arafat (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/arafat.html) failed to say "yes" to a proposal that would have established a Palestinian state. The truth is that if the Palestinians were dissatisfied with any part of the Israeli proposal, all they had to do was offer a counterproposal. They never did.

“In his last conversation with President Clinton, Arafat told the President that he was "a great man." Clinton responded, "The hell I am. I'm a colossal failure, and you made me one.”31a (http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/myths/mf22.html#31a)

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:03 AM
What's your book? Mein Kampft?If that's your best shot, you've ceased to be a worthy adversary. What's YOUR book? 'See Spot Run'?

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:06 AM
FACTSOURCE? (a link would be best)

Freewoman33
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:07 AM
Very very sad. My deepest sympathy to the people of Palestine.

Fingon
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:09 AM
If that's your best shot, you've ceased to be a worthy adversary. What's YOUR book? 'See Spot Run'?
I don't even know that book,

Mein Kampt has ideas very similar to yours, you are promoting unrest, you are attributing the problems to race wars, you hate the jews, you try to convince people by spamming them with never-ending posts about the same thing (with a careful selection, so they see what you want them to see).

Not as good as Goebels, but you are getting better.

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:18 AM
I don't even know that book,

Mein Kampt has ideas very similar to yours, you are promoting unrest, you are attributing the problems to race wars, you hate the jews, you try to convince people by spamming them with never-ending posts about the same thing (with a careful selection, so they see what you want them to see).

Not as good as Goebels, but you are getting better.Thank you.

To anyone else who feels my ideas reflect the same ethos as 'Mein Kampft' I certainly relaize I have no hope of reaching you. It's unfortunate that you reach that conclusion, but I know my limitations, and I realize I have no hope of reaching you.

To anyone else who realizes that ideas do NOT reflect those in 'Mein Kampft', but, like Fingon, feels it makes a useful political accusation, I know my limitations, and I realize I have no hope of reaching you.

I have enough faith in my ideals, and my abilitry to express them, that I simply don't believe that 99% of the people who read what I right will draw the same conclusions as Fingon.

I make no apologies.

Fingon - Check out the sig. Your assessment of my ideals will live on.

Fingon
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:24 AM
Thank you.

To anyone else who feels my ideas reflect the same ethos as 'Mein Kampft' I certainly relaize I have no hope of reaching you. It's unfortunate that you reach that conclusion, but I know my limitations, and I realize I have no hope of reaching you.

To anyone else who realizes that ideas do NOT reflect those in 'Mein Kampft', but, like Fingon, feels it makes a useful political accusation, I know my limitations, and I realize I have no hope of reaching you.

I have enough faith in my ideals, and my abilitry to express them, that I simply don't believe that 99% of the people who read what I right will draw the same conclusions as Fingon.

I make no apologies.

Fingon - Check out the sig. Your assessment of my ideals will live on.
unlike you I don't behave like a child, I can't even see the signatures because they are off and they will remain off, I prefer to use ideas than slogans.

you are right on something, you have no hope of reaching me, your last hope died when you promoted suicide murdering as a way to solve problems, sounds awfully like to Bin Laden. It's then when you showed your true face and when I decided there was no point in trying to discuss reasonably with someone that promotes murder as a way of action.

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:32 AM
unlike you I don't behave like a child, I can't even see the signatures because they are off and they will remain off, I prefer to use ideas than slogans.The beauty of a sig is that it's an idea in an echo chamber.you are right on something, you have no hope of reaching me, your last hope died when you promoted suicide murdering as a way to solve problems, sounds awfully like to Bin Laden. It's then when you showed your true face and when I decided there was no point in trying to discuss reasonably with someone that promotes murder as a way of action.When you've posted as much as I have, you kinda figure your body work is the evidence of your position.

If people agree with your assessment of my position, fine.
If people agree with my assessment of my position, fine.

I'm proud to the be the person who's written what I have. I'm quite content to be judged by my words.

So far, YOUR assessment of my words hasn't damaged my ability to communicate. Sing on.

Sally Struthers
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:38 AM
I'm proud to the be the person who's written what I have. I'm quite content to be judged by my words.

So far, YOUR assessment of my words hasn't damaged my ability to communicate. Sing on.

Give me a fucking break. 3/4 of your words are copied and pasted from something you found on another webpage.

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:42 AM
Give me a fucking break. 3/4 of your words are copied and pasted from something you found on another webpage.And I credit those people every time. I certainly don't prestn their words as mine. As to whether it's 33%, 50% 75% or 99%, I don't care. I happy with what I write, and I happy with how I present it. Even the responses of those who disagree with me make it clear I get my points across. And THAT is my goal.

Happy Camper Eye.

Brαm
Nov 11th, 2004, 07:37 AM
Most of you won't remember, but this is, in many ways, like the passing of Dr. King. He was vilified by much of the white media at the time of his death.

King was black, Arafat was not :tape:

Andy T
Nov 11th, 2004, 09:03 AM
King also preached and practised non-violence, so the comparison is false.

With all due respect to the man who undoubtedly did more than anyone else to promote and defend the just Palestinian cause for full independence and a viable state, I think that it is time that the generation of warrior-politicians (on both sides) is slowly making way for a younger generation which will be able to move the peace process forward. I just hope that the new leader will have enough support from the people to have a mandate to negotiate a peace settlement.

A modified Clinton plan could still form the basis of a settlement (Clinton should get back in this process as Bush is going to be a dead loss). Making central Jerusalem an independent demilitarised city state à la Vatican administered by Israel and Palestine seems to me the way forward.

Halardfan
Nov 11th, 2004, 09:49 AM
I think Tony Blair's reaction is interesting to Arafat's death is interesting, highlighting a difference of perception between the US and British govnerments...

LONDON (Reuters) - Prime Minister Tony Blair has said Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat, who died early on Thursday aged 75, had been a symbol of the Palestinian movement who worked towards peace in the Middle East.
Blair said Arafat's award of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1994 with Israel's Yitzhak Rabin had been in "recognition of their efforts to achieve peace."

"He (Arafat) led his people to an historic acceptance and the need for a two state solution," the prime minister said in a statement on Thursday.

"President Arafat came to symbolise the Palestinian national movement."

Blair, who expressed condolences to Arafat's family and to the Palestinian people, also said work must continue towards creating a "viable Palestinian state alongside a secure Israel."

"Peace in the Middle East must be the international community's highest priority. We will do whatever we can, working with the U.S. and the EU to help the parties reach a fair and durable settlement."

Blair, who this week will become the first world leader to visit Bush since the U.S. election, is expected to use the opportunity to push the president on Middle East peace issues.

In the last two months the prime minister has emphasised the need for peace between Israel and the Palestinians, arguing it is crucial to tackling global terrorism.

Blair, often depicted in British newspapers as Bush's poodle, will also be keen to show critics in Europe and his own Labour party that he can reap rewards for his unflinching support for Bush over Iraq.

British officials said a member of the government will attend Arafat's funeral.

Sam L
Nov 11th, 2004, 10:20 AM
Give me a fucking break. 3/4 of your words are copied and pasted from something you found on another webpage.
What do you expect him to do, write his own articles? Then you'll say he's a wannabe. Good on him for finding articles that support his opinions and disseminating that information. I'm sure the writers would be thankful. As a reader, I'm thankful because I might not have seen it if it weren't for him.

Oh and commiserations to the Palestinian people for losing their leader, and may he rest in peace.

Steff_forever
Nov 11th, 2004, 10:34 AM
I don't even know that book,

Mein Kampt has ideas very similar to yours, you are promoting unrest, you are attributing the problems to race wars, you hate the jews, you try to convince people by spamming them with never-ending posts about the same thing (with a careful selection, so they see what you want them to see).

Not as good as Goebels, but you are getting better.
Not as good as Goebels, but you are getting better. Why all of those comparisons ??? :mad:

That's like comparing Bush to Hitler (what you always critize right). Sorry, you're losing your credibility here, too.

flyingmachine
Nov 11th, 2004, 10:57 AM
King also preached and practised non-violence, so the comparison is false.

With all due respect to the man who undoubtedly did more than anyone else to promote and defend the just Palestinian cause for full independence and a viable state, I think that it is time that the generation of warrior-politicians (on both sides) is slowly making way for a younger generation which will be able to move the peace process forward. I just hope that the new leader will have enough support from the people to have a mandate to negotiate a peace settlement.

A modified Clinton plan could still form the basis of a settlement (Clinton should get back in this process as Bush is going to be a dead loss). Making central Jerusalem an independent demilitarised city state à la Vatican administered by Israel and Palestine seems to me the way forward.

:worship: :worship: :worship:
I agree on what Andy T is saying Arafat did more them anyone else to defend the Palestinian cause and give many Palestinians hope and pride otherwise non-existed. However I'm have to disagree on Volcana on the comparisons between King and Arafat. I could understand why are saying because both men are figthing for a cause and justices for their people but that's about it on the comparisons level because the rest is basicly too far a part to be comparisons so overall I don't think King is like Arafat.

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 12:54 PM
However I'm have to disagree on Volcana on the comparisons between King and Arafat.The point isn't whether or not they're similar. The point is that assessments of Dr. King by many, at the time of his death, were very different than assessment of him now. This will be true of President Arafat as well.

I believe I also noted Malcolm X when making the comparison, precisely because the point was the nature of historical assessment, not the actions of the persons involved.

Volcana
Nov 11th, 2004, 12:55 PM
French President Jacques Chirac: “man of courage and conviction who, for 40 years, has incarnated the Palestinians’ combat for recognition of their national rights.”

Chinese President Hu Jintao: “an outstanding leader of the Palestinian cause and he was an outstanding politician.”

Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi: “He was indeed a pioneer who had laid out the foundation for the establishment of a Palestinian state”

THe Vatican: “The Holy See joins the pain of the Palestinian people for the passing of President Yasser Arafat. He was a leader of great charisma who loved his people and tried to guide them towards national independence.”

U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan (thru spokesman): “President Arafat was one of those few leaders who could be instantly recognized by people in any walk of life all around the world. For nearly four decades, he expressed and symbolized in his person the national aspirations of the Palestinian people."

alfajeffster
Nov 11th, 2004, 01:21 PM
And still, plans to tear down the mosque and resurrect a Hebrew temple on the rock live on...

nash
Nov 11th, 2004, 01:42 PM
Is the adoption agency you're working with aware that you read Al Jazeera news, openly advocate the assasination of the president, and voice support for terrorist organizations?

PointBlank
Nov 11th, 2004, 01:49 PM
....:sad:....

Israel wont let him be buried in their capital..only in West Bank or Gaza

Cassius
Nov 11th, 2004, 01:56 PM
Did anyone in Britain see Dead Ringers on Monday, and the skit of Ariel Sharon thinking Arafat had died?:haha:

But seriously, it's a shame for the Palestinian people that their only world recognised leader is dead.

alfajeffster
Nov 11th, 2004, 02:10 PM
Is the adoption agency you're working with aware that you read Al Jazeera news, openly advocate the assasination of the president, and voice support for terrorist organizations?
I wonder if Alan Greenspan reads Al Jazeera news?

daniela86
Nov 11th, 2004, 02:29 PM
....:sad:....

Israel wont let him be buried in their capital..only in West Bank or Gaza
indeed, it's sad.The causes of his dead are still a mystery

Justeenium
Nov 11th, 2004, 04:31 PM
The point isn't whether or not they're similar. The point is that assessments of Dr. King by many, at the time of his death, were very different than assessment of him now. This will be true of President Arafat as well.
.
I agree, hopefully the world outside of Australia, US, Israel will pull their head out of their ass and say good riddance to this terrorist.

Seles_Beckham
Nov 11th, 2004, 04:54 PM
Allah mu rahmetile :sad: :sad:

Fingon
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:28 PM
Why all of those comparisons ???

That's like comparing Bush to Hitler (what you always critize right). Sorry, you're losing your credibility here, too.of course Volcana is not Goebbels, But Volcana is trying to do exactly what Goebbels did, if you want it, take a page from Goebbels book.
He is been trying to indoctrinate people in this board since way before the election. He's been using this board as cheap propaganda forum, basically through spamming with hundreds of threads posting hundreds of articles to make his point, and insulting those who disagree with him in the first place.
Because he is an educated person, and English is his first language and obviously manages it better than me and most people here, his post "look" reasonable, and to be honest, I never agreed with him, and I was a little tired of his continous rants, but I used to consider him harmless.
I started to change my mind when I read several posts from him that suggested he considered terrorists to be freedom fighters.
But this reached its limit when Volcana lost it over the election result, he was obviously so angry and frustrated that probably said more than he would normally do.
He openly called for the assassination of Bush, saying the man who killed himself could have make it worth by eliminating the problem. Call it as you like, but you can't possibly joke about that or take it lightly, at that point I really reasessed what I thought of volcana he wasn't longer harmless, for me somebody inciting murder is a murderer himself. He is asking for someone who committed suicide to take someone's live in the process, isn't that what Al Queda does?
As you can see, he is smart, he carefully avoids to respond all his misteps, he couldn't ignore this one because I brought it back, but he did at first. When he made a really stupid comment that if I was a programmer I would understand (and I am indeed a programmer), he just ignored it. That's the propagandistic techniques used by Goebbels, show part of the true, only the part you like, and turn it into something else, the same way he has turned the death of Arafat and the US election into a racial issue.
Honesly, it's not that I don't like Volcana, it's not that I disagree with him, it's that at this point I consider him a perturbed and dangerous individual, and I don't know what he is capable of doing, and certainly don't rule anything out.

Martian Willow
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:41 PM
They buried him in a Newcastle shirt, Lazio shorts and Spurs socks.

He said he wanted to be buried in the Gazza strip.

Justeenium
Nov 11th, 2004, 05:53 PM
SOURCE? (a link would be best)it's from the jewishvirtuallibrary

(<---waits for Volcana to just claim the source is biased and not even debate the material)

Tylane
Nov 11th, 2004, 06:04 PM
I won't miss him !!! Bye bye !!!

Jeleno Benesovo
Nov 12th, 2004, 12:10 AM
RIP Yasser :sad:

my condolences to the palestinian people.

Volcana
Nov 12th, 2004, 12:15 AM
it's from the jewishvirtuallibrary

(<---waits for Volcana to just claim the source is biased and not even debate the material)jewishvirtuallibrary.com does not come up on my browser. Any chance of a link? And, since you've had a chance to read other things fromthe source, does that source consider itself neutral when it comes to Arafat and his opponent? Since I can't get to that source, it would be hard for me to say.

Bacardi
Nov 12th, 2004, 12:17 AM
:sad: For his people, I think they loved the man, and will view his passing with a great sadness.

However, for those of us of age. I wouldn't doubt that the fact he passed away means those of us that are American could be drafted and sent to either one of 3 places in the middle east now: Palastine, Iraq, or Afganistan. :scared: