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geegables
Nov 6th, 2004, 05:16 AM
http://www.homle.com/aer/2004election_by_iq.png

im unsure if this has been posted before. im sure it speaks for itself :lol: :lol:

I Love Sharapova
Nov 6th, 2004, 06:15 PM
http://www.homle.com/aer/2004election_by_iq.png

im unsure if this has been posted before. im sure it speaks for itself :lol: :lol:
You know what? All of those IQs falll within about the average range. Actually an average IQ ranges between 70-100. :rolleyes: So whatever you're laughing about is rather irrelevant. Thank you. :wavey: :rolleyes:

Bacardi
Nov 6th, 2004, 06:58 PM
I'm shocked to see my state of Virginia at #17, with an average IQ of 100. What I'm not shocked to see is Texas at #40 with an average IQ of 92. After all, what must one expect from a state that produced W. :haha:

It's humoring to show the lower IQ states on this voted for W, but I guess stupid people identify with stupid people better. :lol:

Gallofa
Nov 6th, 2004, 07:22 PM
Strange that suddently those IQ tests are valid. :rolleyes: I remember everyone saying how innacurate and meaningless those IQ tests are.
Agreed. But do you think the correlation is completely spurious?

Crazy Canuck
Nov 6th, 2004, 09:18 PM
Actually an average IQ ranges between 70-100. :rolleyes:

Unless "average" in the USA is considerably lower than it is in Canada, then no, "average" does not range from 70-100. This would be news to all the working professionals that I've ever encountered who deal with this shit on a daily basis.

!<blocparty>!
Nov 6th, 2004, 09:30 PM
:lol: not really surprising. There has to be some correlation as CC said :) :yeah:

Martian Willow
Nov 6th, 2004, 09:38 PM
http://www.sq.4mg.com/stateIQ-income.htm

http://americanassembler.com/features/iq_state_averages.htm

:scratch:

Paldias
Nov 6th, 2004, 09:45 PM
You know what? All of those IQs falll within about the average range. Actually an average IQ ranges between 70-100. :rolleyes: So whatever you're laughing about is rather irrelevant. Thank you. :wavey: :rolleyes:

But as you can clearly see more than 50% of states that have and IQ of 100+ elected John Kerry.

On another note...:haha: that's hilarious. Thanks geegables! :)

Fingon
Nov 6th, 2004, 11:18 PM
and how do they know the average IQ of each state? do they test people in an ongoing basis?

veryborednow
Nov 7th, 2004, 10:59 AM
There has to be some correlation
But correlation doesn't infer causation....

gentenaire
Nov 7th, 2004, 11:48 AM
and how do they know the average IQ of each state? do they test people in an ongoing basis?

That was the first thing I was wondering as well but according to the sites Willow posted (and which show different stats, BTW) they base it on the SAT results.

Anyway, the largest Bush supporter amongs my American internet friends is actually one of the most intelligent of my internet friends. I've often felt she was biased on many subjects, have called her on it, but she's not stupid!

Bezz
Nov 7th, 2004, 03:07 PM
But correlation doesn't infer causation....
no but the pattern is undeniable, and i dont think anyone said having a higher IQ makes yu vote for democrats, they are probably just more informed on certain issues and know there are places outside of thier little state.

The average IQ is 100, having one at 70 is basically at retardation level.

matthias
Nov 7th, 2004, 04:24 PM
why is such a big difference with the IQ in America?

SJW
Nov 7th, 2004, 04:48 PM
you could tell that by the red/blue map. those states that were red tended to be the backward bumfucks. the blue ones tended to be the more affluent

Steff_forever
Nov 7th, 2004, 04:56 PM
why is such a big difference with the IQ in America?
maybe they've asked the cattle in the corn belt ...

UDiTY
Nov 7th, 2004, 05:16 PM
And how did the people who put this together spell Missouri...they must be from Mississippi.

I have seen this a few times since the election, it's kinda BS...but I do believe that smart people voted for Kerry and dumb gullible assholes voted for Kerry:devil:

Steff_forever
Nov 7th, 2004, 05:19 PM
And how did the people who put this together spell Missouri...they must be from Mississippi.

I have seen this a few times since the election, it's kinda BS...but I do believe that smart people voted for Kerry and dumb gullible assholes voted for Kerry:devil:
same for the BIG W

Monica_Rules
Nov 7th, 2004, 07:26 PM
Not too suprised.

The average IQ is actually 90-110. Below 80 is forest gump teritory.

I Love Sharapova
Nov 7th, 2004, 08:10 PM
why is such a big difference with the IQ in America?
Matthias, the sad fact of the matter is that many of my fellow countrymen are very self involved. Most people find little or no time to actually pick up a book and read anymore. :mad: People would rather sit their fat asses on the couch and watch Survivor or some garbage like that on T.V.
A large percentage of the population cannot even tell you who Dick Cheney is. Something like 29% of the population thinks that Al Gore is a movie actor. :rolleyes:
Being from Texas, I can say without a doubt that there are certainly some ignorant people,not necessarily "dumb" but ignorant. A vast majority of the world's population has no desire to know what is really going on. They would rather be spoon fed bullshit through the mass media. :fiery: :rolleyes:

Bacardi
Nov 7th, 2004, 08:11 PM
No shit Sharapova, I think I got bitch slapped in another thread for actually reading a few religion books and calling Bush out on his "faith". If you read, or actually have knowledge you are the odd ball out in the USA today.

Did you happen to vote for Nader this time by chance? He wasn't even on the ticket in VA.

I Love Sharapova
Nov 7th, 2004, 08:20 PM
No shit Sharapova, I think I got bitch slapped in another thread for actually reading a few religion books and calling Bush out on his "faith". If you read, or actually have knowledge you are the odd ball out in the USA today.

Did you happen to vote for Nader this time by chance? He wasn't even on the ticket in VA.
Bacardi,I voted for nader in 2000,not this year though. He wasn't on the ballot here. However,Bacardi,your anti-southern rants are rather disturbing to me. Have you even ever been down here. Oh,and by the way, Virginia is a Southern state. :rolleyes:

Bacardi
Nov 7th, 2004, 08:23 PM
I live in VA, and I can tell you for a fact.... Nobody around here, no matter how die hard republican they are would vote for a black man or a woman.

You must have lived in a larger southern town than I did. My town has a population of just about 600.

Oizo
Nov 8th, 2004, 12:17 AM
Knowledge Gap

http://www.utwente.nl/repository/atcampus/images/spacer.gifincreasing gap between higher and lower educated people


History and Orientation

The knowledge gap theory was first proposed by Tichenor, Donohue and Olien at the University of Minnesota in the 70s. They believe that the increase of information in society is not evenly acquired by every member of society: people with higher socioeconomic status tend to have better ability to acquire information (Weng, S.C. 2000 (http://www.sit.wisc.edu/~ichuncheng/reference.htm#Weng)). This leads to a division of two groups: a group of better-educated people who know more about most things, and those with low education who know less. Lower socio-economic status (SES) people, defined partly by educational level, have little or no knowledge about public affairs issues, are disconnected from news events and important new discoveries, and usually arenít concerned about their lack of knowledge.

Core Assumptions and Statements

The knowledge gap can result in an increased gap between people of lower and higher socioeconomic status. The attempt to improve peopleís life with information via the mass media might not always work the way this is planned. Mass media might have the effect of increasing the difference gap between members of social classes.

Tichenor, Donohue and Olien (1970) present five reasons for justifying the knowledge gap. 1) People of higher socioeconomic status have better communication skills, education, reading, comprehending and remembering information. 2) People of higher socioeconomic status can store information more easily or remember the topic form background knowledge 3) People of higher socioeconomic status might have a more relevant social context. 4) People of higher socioeconomic status are better in selective exposure, acceptance and retention. 5) The nature of the mass media itself is that it is geared toward persons of higher socioeconomic status.

Conceptual Model

http://www.tcw.utwente.nl/theorieenoverzicht/Theory%20Clusters/Mass%20Media/knowledge_gap.doc/knowledge_gap-1.png

Source: Tichenor, Donohue and Olien, 1970.

This example shows that education level or socioeconomic status made a difference in knowledge. The question was whether or not respondents felt astronauts would ever reach the moon. Those with high levels of education (based on three levels: grade school, high school and college) were more likely to agree that man would reach the moon than those with lower levels of education both at a certain point in time and over all four intervals. Most important was that the gap between levels widened over time in that the percentage of respondents in the high education level who agreed rose more than 60 percentage points over 16 years while those in the low level of education category rose less than 25 percentage points.

Favorite Methods

Surveys of mass media and tests of knowledge.

Scope and Application

Media presenting information should realize that people of higher socioeconomic status get their information in a different way than lower educated people. Furthermore, this hypothesis of the knowledge gap might help in understanding the increased gap between people of higher socioeconomic status and people of lower socioeconomic status. It can be used in various circumstances.

Example

The knowledge gap was used in a research for presidential campaigns. The knowledge gap hypothesis holds that when new information enters a social system via a mass media campaign, it is likely to exacerbate underlying inequalities in previously held information. Specifically, while people from all strata may learn new information as a result of a mass media campaign, those with higher levels of education are likely to learn more than those with low levels of education, and the informational gap between the two groups will expand. The results of the analysis show that knowledge gaps do not always grow over the course of presidential campaigns and that some events, such as debates, may actually reduce the level of information inequality in the electorate.

Source: Holbrook (2002)