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~SunFlower~
Aug 31st, 2004, 04:52 AM
I want to learn a bit of Russian language in case I want to go and visit Russia one day. The link is here... (don't know if it's good)

http://www.waytorussia.net/WhatIsRussia/Russian.html

deckham
Aug 31st, 2004, 04:55 AM
hey sharky... i want to learn russian as well, but i don't know if i have the discipline for it... i'm pretty bad with languages i think... i'll check out that site you are talking about too...

i think it would be quite cool to go to russia... maybe we can get some info from the russians in this forum, or maybe other tourists that have been there.... :yeah:

good thread.... :drink: (that's vodka i'm drinking ofcourse... ;) )

Julia_08
Aug 31st, 2004, 05:05 AM
Russian was pretty easy for me to learn, not that im 100% fluent and bla bla bla.. but like im french and i still do some french mistakes... oh well what i could tell ya is to listen to a lotta of russian music or tv.... and read the lyrics in english and russian at the same time.

Use the website that you posted, i did not really look but i think it'S a great start!

deckham
Aug 31st, 2004, 05:07 AM
i notice all of us are canadian???? lol.. that's a bit funny... :lol:

we canadians are fixated with russia.... :confused: :lol: :drink:

!!!--Duiz™--!!!
Aug 31st, 2004, 05:18 AM
:rolleyes:

~SunFlower~
Aug 31st, 2004, 05:23 AM
I wonder if I as Canadian enter into a pub in Russia wearing "Canada" on the top, would people treat me normally as they would to Russians people? Or Would I be a huge threat? :confused:

~SunFlower~
Aug 31st, 2004, 05:28 AM
People from Russia answers to question about life in Russia in general... some are interesting to learn what they have to say...

http://www.waytorussia.net/Features/RussianPeople.html

Boy, they hardly make money from work. No pension plans... :eek: And how can they afford to subscribe to have access internet in Russia... I am sure some of posters from Russia can answer to this.

I want to learn more and more about life in Russia.

deckham
Aug 31st, 2004, 05:41 AM
ah yes... i remember this site now... i read that part about the way of life interviews with the people... seems very depressing.

but they also seem very loyal...

deckham
Aug 31st, 2004, 05:42 AM
I wonder if I as Canadian enter into a pub in Russia wearing "Canada" on the top, would people treat me normally as they would to Russians people? Or Would I be a huge threat? :confused:
i don't think they'd view canadians as a threat.... (except for the fact that we get more marijuana up in canada... heheheh... :lol: )

CJ07
Aug 31st, 2004, 09:56 PM
I'm actually planning to major in Russian in college...really looking forward to it

no1mariafan
Aug 31st, 2004, 10:01 PM
I want to learn Russian also. Would you have to go to college or something? or can you learn at home? I hope so. I want to give it a go. Any tips on how to start?

the cat
Aug 31st, 2004, 10:06 PM
Remember Sharky, we're going to travel together to Russia someday. :D ;)

I'm planning to learn Russian too. I just got the july 2004 issue of Tennis + and I can't read it. :( The issue has Wimbledon champion Maria Sharapova on the cover and it has a feature on Elena Dementieva and Anastasia Myskina being friends. And the magazine has photos of Elena and Anastasia together through the years. The photos of Elena and Ana are absolutely wonderful! :D

Fearful Jesuit
Aug 31st, 2004, 10:17 PM
it seems to be difficult to learn russian...I can barely speak spanish

no1mariafan
Aug 31st, 2004, 10:24 PM
I've learnt there are 33 letters in the russian alphabet so far.

Epigone
Aug 31st, 2004, 10:42 PM
I'll post some of my pics from Russia when I get back to Australia next week.

I'm going to do a lot of research about Russia in the coming weeks/months because I'm trying to find out how realistic it would be to do my PhD in Moscow next year.

the cat
Aug 31st, 2004, 11:34 PM
Thanks for your Russian photos Epi. I look forward to seeing them.

Julia_08
Sep 1st, 2004, 05:02 AM
I wonder if I as Canadian enter into a pub in Russia wearing "Canada" on the top, would people treat me normally as they would to Russians people? Or Would I be a huge threat? :confused:
hahah!!!! Well the first time that i went to Russia and went out with a russian friend that live there, i was wearing a shirt and on the front of the shirt it was : ''Russian girl wanted'' and on the back : Russian girls loves Canadian girls (personal shirt that i asked to have and i bought it ... i also have some for other countries but not for USA :rolleyes: ) oh well so everybody knew or saw when they saw me that i was Canadian and the peeps was acting normaly with me...like i was not a threat or whatever, the peeps was cool and well they kinda show me how Russian drink vodka... :o

it's not like if you go to Cuba with a ''IM PRO AMERICANS'' shirt hahahahahahahahahaahahahahaha

Andy.
Sep 1st, 2004, 05:25 AM
One of my best friends is russian its such a pretty language i would like learn it one day maybe.

~SunFlower~
Sep 1st, 2004, 07:34 AM
Anastasia
Анастасия, Настя, Настенька, Настюша, Настёна, Настасья
AnastasIa, NAstya, NAsten'ka, NastyUsha, NastyOna, NastAsya

Alexandra
Александра, Саша, Сашенька, Сашка, Шура, Шурочка
Alexandra, Sasha, Sashen'ka, Sashka, ShUra, ShUrochka

Alla
Алла, Аля, Аллочка, Аллушка
Alla, Alya, Allochka, Allushka

Alyona
Алёна, Алёнушка, Алёнка, Аля
AlyOna, AlyOnushka, AlyOnka, Alya

Anna
Анна, Аня, Анюта, Анечка, Аннушка
Anna, Anya, AnyUta, Anechka, Annushka

Daria
Дарья, Даша, Дашенька,Дашечка, Дашуня
DAria, DAsha, DAshen'ka, DAshechka, DashUnya

Diana
Диана, Дианушка, Дианочка, Дина
DiAna, DiAnochka, DiAnushka, DIna

Ekaterina
Екатерина, Катя, Катюша, Катенька, Катерина, Катюшка
EkaterIna, KAtya, KatyUsha, KAten'ka, KaterIna, KatyUshka

Elena
Елена, Лена, Леночка, Ленок, Еленушка
YelEna, LEna, LEnochka, LenOk, LEnchik, YelEnushka

Eleonora
Элеонора, Эля
EleonOra, Elya

Elizaveta Елизавета, Лиза, Лизонька, Лизок, Лизочка ElizavEta, LIza, LIzon'ka, LizOk, LIzochka
Elvira
Эльвира, Эля
ElvIra, Elya

Eugenia
Евгения, Женя, Женька, Женечка
EvgEnia, ZhEnya, ZhEn'ka, ZhEnechka

Galina
Галина, Галочка, Галчонок, Галенька, Галюшка
GalIna, GAlochka, GalchOnok, GAlen'ka, GalyUshka

Inna
Инна, Инночка, Иннуля, Иннуленька, Инуся, Инок, Инесса
Inna, Innochka, InnoUl'ya, InnoUlen'ka, InUsya, InOk, InnEssa

Irina
Ирина, Ира, Иринка, Ириночка, Иришка, Иринчик, Ирунчик
IrIna, Ira, IrInka, IrInochka, IrIsha, Irishka, IrInchik, IrUnchik

Julia
Юлия, Юля, Юленька, Юлька, Юльчик
YUlia, YUlya, YUlen'ka, YUl'ka, YUl'chik

Ksenia Ксения, Ксюша, Ксюшка, Ксюшенька KsEnia, KsyUsha, KsyUshka, KsyUshen'ka
Larisa
Лариса, Лара, Ларочка
Larisa, LAra, LArochka

Lilia
Лилия, Лилечка, Лиля
Lilia, LIlechka, LIlya

Ludmila
Людмила, Люда, Люся, Людочка, Мила, Милочка
LyudmIla, LyUda, LyUsya, LyUdochka, MIla, MIlochka

Lyubov
Любовь, Люба, Любонька, Любаша, Любочка
Lyubov, LyUba, LyUbon'ka, LyubAsha, LyUbochka

Margarita
Маргарита, Рита, Маргаритка, Риточка, Ритуля, Марго
MargarIta, RIta, MargarItka, RItochka, RitUlya, MargO

Maria
Мария, Маша, Машенька, Машуша, Машуня
MarIa, MAsha, MAshen'ka, MashUsha, MashUnya

Marina
Марина, Мариша, Мариночка, Маришка
Marina, Marisha, Marinochka, Marishka

Nadezhda
Надежда, Надя, Наденька, Надюша, Надюшка
Nadezhda, Nadia, NAden'ka, NadyUsha, NadyUshka

Natalia
Наташа, Наташенька, Наташечка, Ната, Натусенька, Натусик, Натаха
NatAsha, NatAshen'ka, Natshechka, NAta, NatUsen'ka, NatUsik, NatAha

Nina Нина, Ниночка, Нинок, Нинуля, Нинушка NIna, NInochka, NinOk, NinUlya, NInushka
Oksana
Оксана, Оксаночка, Ксюша, Ксюшенька, Ксана
Oksana, OksAnochka, KsyUsha, KsyUshenka, KsAna

Olesya Олеся, Леся, Лесенька OlEsya, LEsya, LEsen'ka
Olga
Ольга, Оля, Оленька, Олюшка
Olga, Olya, Olen'ka, Olyushka

Polina
Полина, Поля, Полинка
PolIna, POlya, PolInka

Roza
Роза, Розочка, Розита, Рози
Roza, ROzochka, RozIta, RozI

Sophia
Софья, Соня, Сонечка, Софочка, Софи
SOphia, SOnya, SOnechka, SOphochka, SophIe

Svetlana
Светлана, Света, Светочка, Светланка, Светик
SvetlAna, SvEta, SvEtochka, SvetlAnka, SvEtik

Tamara
Тамара, Тома, Томочка, Тамарка
TamAra, TOma, TOmochka, TamArka

Tatyana
Татьяна, Таня, Танечка, Танюшенька, Танюшка, Танюська
TatyAna, TAnya, TAnechka, TanYUchen'ka, TanyUsha, TanyUshka, TanyUs'ka

Valentina
Валентина, Валя, Валюша, Валюшка, Валенька, Валечка
ValentIna, VAlya, ValyUsha, ValyUshka, VAlen'ka, VAlechka,

Valeria
Валерия, Лера, Лерчик, Лерунчик, Леруся, Лерок, Леруня
ValEria, LEra, lErchik, LerUnchik, LerUsia, LerOk, LerUnia

Vera
Вера, Верочка, Веруня,Верок
VEra, VErochka, VerOk

VeronIka
Вероника, Ника
VeronIka, NIka

Victoria
Виктория, Вика
ViktOria, Vika

~SunFlower~
Sep 1st, 2004, 07:37 AM
Another great site to learn Russian at
http://www.meighan.net/alexander/

Julia_08
Sep 1st, 2004, 06:24 PM
i know it's not the place to post somethng like this.. but since some of us have been to Russia, or live there or love Russia or just cheer for a russian player... i think it's kinda important to take some times and read this article..which break my heart.. i know there will always haves ome terrorism around the world, but what the terrorist do sometimes it's very terrible, for me, when somebody attack the president or some important things in a country dont really affect me ..it affect me.. i find it stupid but what make me sad, mad is when they attack children.. so please... iknow the article is long.. but just take 2 sec....just put u in the shoes of the kids that was at this school... just try to live what they felt....yeah the attack in USA was terrible yeah, but this time, it'S children..and i find it so damn sad that CNN or whatever in USA did not put some TIMES to make a damn breaking news and talk about it on tv..yeah they will received some help from USA and Canada and other place, but if it was USA that has been attacked and not Russia im sure every country would right now, send help and bla bla bla...What's the solution? Send a bomb to Chechnya and Iraqi and all of the other hum ''musulmans'' places?i know it's not a solution but why children?

oh well i know it's a long article.. but it wont kill you to read this...



More than a dozen attackers wearing suicide bomb belts seized a southern Russian school in a region bordering Chechnya on Wednesday, taking hostage about 400 people -- half of them children -- and threatening to blow up the building if police tried to rescue them.
As many as eight people were reported killed, one of them a parent.

Hours into the desperate standoff, security officials said they had made brief contact with the hostage-takers who stormed the school in Belsen, a town in North Ossetia about 15 kilometres north of the regional capital, Vladikavkaz.

Russian special forces wearing camouflage and carrying heavy-calibre machine-guns surrounded Middle School No. 1. About 1,000 people, mostly parents, were massed near the three-storey building demanding information and accusing the government of failing to protect their children.

Kazbek Dzantiyev, head of the North Ossetia region's Interior Ministry, said the hostage-takers have threatened "for every destroyed fighter, they will kill 50 children and for every injured fighter -- 20 (children),'' the ITAR-Tass news agency reported.

At one point, a girl wearing a floral print dress and a red bow in her hair fled the school, her hand held by a flak-jacketed soldier. An older woman followed them.

Ruslan Ayamov, spokesman for North Ossetia's Interior Ministry, told The Associated Press that 12 children and one adult managed to escape after hiding in the building's boiler room.

The attack was the latest blamed on secessionist Chechen rebels, coming a day after a suicide bomber killed nine people in Moscow and a week after near-simultaneous explosions blamed on terrorists caused two Russian planes to crash, killing all 90 people on board. The surge in violence was apparently timed around last Sunday's Chechen presidential election.

"In essence, war has been declared on us, where the enemy is unseen and there is no front,'' Russian Defence Minister Sergei Ivanov said.

The militants inside the school released one hostage with a list of their demands, including the release of fighters detained in a string of attacks on police facilities in neighbouring Ingushetia in June, ITAR-Tass reported.

They also seek talks with regional officials and a well-known pediatrician, Leonid Roshal, who aided hostages during the deadly seizure of a Moscow theatre in 2002, news reports said.

Parents of the seized children recorded a videocassette appeal to President Vladimir Putin to fulfil the hostage-takers' demands, officials said. The text of the appeal was not immediately available.

Putin interrupted his working holiday Wednesday in the Black Sea resort of Sochi for a second time and returned to the capital. On arrival at the airport, he held an immediate meeting with the heads of Russia's Interior Ministry and Federal Security Service, the Interfax news agency said.

The standoff began after a ceremony marking the first day of the Russian school year, when it was likely that many parents had accompanied their children.

About 17 attackers, men and women, stormed the building and herded captives into the gymnasium. They forced children to stand at the windows and warned they would blow up the school if police intervened, said Alexei Polyansky, a police spokesman for southern Russia.

A teenage witness, Zarubek Tsumartov, told Russian television he was standing near the school gate with some other people when "I saw three armed people running with guns.''

"At first I thought it was a joke,'' he said. "When they fired in the air and we fled.''

Hours after the seizure, Regional Federal Security Service chief Valery Andreyev said on NTV television that negotiations with the hostage-takers "are just, just beginning'' but that the brief contact had not allowed authorities to evaluate the situation.

ITAR-Tass, citing local hospitals, reported seven people died of their injuries in hospital and one died at the school.

But Regional Emergency Situations Minister Boris Dzgoyev told The Associated Press that two civilians were killed and nine hospitalized, and that two bodies were visible near the school.

Dzgoyev said a girl was also lying near the building, presumably wounded, but officials said the area could not be approached because it was coming under fire.

Fatima Khabalova, spokeswoman for the regional parliament, earlier said one of the dead was a father who brought his child to the school and was shot when he tried to resist the raiders.

The attacks came around Chechnya's presidential elections, a Kremlin-backed vote aimed at undermining support for the insurgents by establishing a modicum of civil order in the war-shattered republic. The previous president, Akhmad Kadyrov, was killed with more than 20 others in a bombing May 9.

The violence was the latest to plague the government of Putin, who came to power vowing to crush the Chechen rebellion. Terrorism fears in Russia have risen markedly following the plane crashes and the suicide bombing outside a Moscow subway station Tuesday night. The blast by a female attacker tore through a busy area between the station and a department store, killing nine people and wounded more than 50.

Authorities said Tuesday that 10 people were killed, but Interfax reported Wednesday that Moscow health officials revised that, saying one man who died in a hospital was not a victim of the blast.

An Islamic website published a statement claiming responsibility for the bombing on behalf of the ``Islambouli Brigades,'' a group that also claimed responsibility for the airliner crashes. The statements could not immediately be verified.

The statement said Tuesday's bombing was a blow against Putin, ``who slaughtered Muslims time and again.''

At a glance
Following, at a glance, are the hostage crises faced by Russian authorities over the last decade:

Sept. 1, 2004: Gunmen seized about 400 people in an elementary school in the southern Russian republic of North Ossetia, demanding the release of fighters detained in connection with June attacks on police facilities in neighbouring Ingushetia.
Oct. 25, 2002: Chechen rebels took about 800 people hostage in a Moscow theatre, demanding that Russian troops withdraw from Chechnya. All 41 attackers were shot and 129 hostages died, most of them succumbing to the gas Russian special forces used when they stormed the theatre.
Jan. 16, 1996: Six Turks and three Russians held 255 hostages on a ferry in the Black Sea, threatening to blow up the ship if Russia didn't halt a battle near Kizlyar, where rebels had taken hostages. The attackers surrendered after three days.
Jan. 9, 1996: Chechen militants seized 3,000 hostages at a hospital in the southern Russian town of Kizlyar. Rebels released most, then headed for Chechnya with about 100 hostages. Were stopped in village and attacked by Russian troops. At least 78 were killed in a weeklong fight.
June 14, 1995: Chechen gunmen took 2,000 hostages at a hospital in the southern Russian town of Budyonnovsk, near Chechnya. After failed attempts at force, Russia negotiated hostages' release after week in exchange for gunmen's escape. More than 100 were killed.

Wednesday's seizure came as terrorism fears in Russia rose markedly following a suicide bombing outside a Moscow subway station on Tuesday night that killed 10 people and injured more than 50, and last week's near-simultaneous crashes of two Russian airliners, killing a total of 90 people, that officials say were terrorist bombings.

The attacks bracketed Sunday's presidential elections in Chechnya, a Kremlin-baked move aimed at undermining support for the insurgents by establishing a modicum of civil order in the war-shattered republic.

Fears that the Chechen rebels aimed to export their fight outside the small republic's borders rose in June in connection with the raids in Ingushetia. In a videotape released several days after the attack, a man appearing to be Basayev claimed responsibility for the assaults and said his fighters had seized huge quantities of arms from police arsenals.

http://media.canada.com/cp/world/20040901/w090124A.jpg
*nothing to say about the pic.. just put u in her shoes*

no1mariafan
Sep 1st, 2004, 10:39 PM
It's very sad! My heart goes out to the innocent victims involved. Why is this happening?!? To release people, im not understanding.

My word for the day...До свидания. Do svidAnya. meaning good-bye.

deckham
Sep 2nd, 2004, 04:33 AM
you can't put feelings into words for this sort of thing..... it's just sick and disturbing and, well, they are terrorists....... meeting demands means nothing to them. they come with a purpose and death is usually one of them..... sick bastards..... i'd like to be put in a room with any terrorist in hand to hand combat, see who's so tough now.

no1mariafan
Sep 3rd, 2004, 01:36 PM
siege is coming to an end it looks like..

Can you write russian with an english keyboard? im guessing you can't.

Arhivarius
Sep 3rd, 2004, 03:04 PM
I wonder if I as Canadian enter into a pub in Russia wearing "Canada" on the top, would people treat me normally as they would to Russians people? Or Would I be a huge threat? :confused: Sharky,
As a matter of fact, you'll be treated better than normally, because you will be considered as a guest.

And these word about "threat" , no offence, but they sound very funny for Russian. :)
Would you consider Russians coming into Canada bar as a threat?
Why do you think, Russians are so much different?
They have enough of real threats in their life over there. No innscription on the shirts can be viewed as a threat and no foreign individual will be considered as a threat.
Actually, the most probably, nobody will notice at first that you are a foreigner. Before you start to talk, of course. Russians, especially young, like to wear shirts with some funny foreign inscriptions. It is sort of cool. :)
Also, Russians have no problems with Canada.
Except, last Winter Olimpic games, of course . :D . Just kidding. :)

Even if you was from ther country Russians have some problems with, there will be no problems for you. Russians never associated the policy of the country with certain individuals from those contries. Especially, when the person is a guest. :)

Arhivarius
Sep 3rd, 2004, 03:12 PM
siege is coming to an end it looks like..

Can you write russian with an english keyboard? im guessing you can't. Of course, we can. :)
It is a little bit awkward, but undestandable. There is not enough letters in English for sounds of Russian, but some can be substituted for combination of letters.
Example: Всё что угодно - vsyo chto ugodno - anything you want. :)

Fearful Jesuit
Sep 3rd, 2004, 03:49 PM
they're playing world music
in tiannamen square (or North Ossetia, o wherever, I add)
the whistle of bullets
in the air
Peter Hammill "Our Oyster"

~SunFlower~
Sep 7th, 2004, 04:52 AM
http://tx.mb21.co.uk/features/ostankino/index.asp
http://members.lycos.nl/rtvtower/ostankino/picture1a.html

I thought you might be interested..... it was scary :scared: it reminds me of World Trade Center terrorist attack

~SunFlower~
Sep 7th, 2004, 04:54 AM
Sharky,
As a matter of fact, you'll be treated better than normally, because you will be considered as a guest.

And these word about "threat" , no offence, but they sound very funny for Russian. :)
Would you consider Russians coming into Canada bar as a threat?
Why do you think, Russians are so much different?
They have enough of real threats in their life over there. No innscription on the shirts can be viewed as a threat and no foreign individual will be considered as a threat.
Actually, the most probably, nobody will notice at first that you are a foreigner. Before you start to talk, of course. Russians, especially young, like to wear shirts with some funny foreign inscriptions. It is sort of cool. :)
Also, Russians have no problems with Canada.
Except, last Winter Olimpic games, of course . :D . Just kidding. :)

Even if you was from ther country Russians have some problems with, there will be no problems for you. Russians never associated the policy of the country with certain individuals from those contries. Especially, when the person is a guest. :)

Many thanks. :)

~SunFlower~
Sep 7th, 2004, 04:56 AM
Belsan School.... it's a sad day in Russia.. :sad: :sad: I felt so sick in my stomach.

PointBlank
Sep 15th, 2004, 05:00 PM
Русский легок ;)