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View Full Version : Was there ever a good USSR player?


PointBlank
Feb 15th, 2004, 03:57 AM
I know it would be hard to play under USSR but was there ever any good pros that played under USSR flag? :confused: It was a big country someone good had to come out of it

fammmmedspin
Feb 15th, 2004, 04:09 AM
They called her Natasha and she got Graf in the end.

CinnamoninCinema
Feb 15th, 2004, 04:40 AM
They called her Natasha and she got Graf in the end.

LOL. Exactly.

Zummi
Feb 15th, 2004, 04:41 AM
Olga Morozova

Xian
Feb 15th, 2004, 06:56 AM
Leila Meshki

Andy T
Feb 15th, 2004, 07:43 AM
Anna Dimitrieva was the first USSR player to compete at Wimbledon in the 1950s. Her best showing there was thenlast 16 in 1960.
Olga Morozova was the best player of the Soviet era:she reached the finals at Wimbledon (bt King and Wade) and Roland Garros in 74. There was also Natalia Chmyreva, junior champ at Wimbledon in 75 and 76 at in the US in 75, who made it to the semis in Australia in 1975 and the qf in the US in 76.
In early 77, the Soviet authorities pulled the plug on their players competing on the pro tour and that was that for these two women. Chmyreva was only just beginning her career. I wonder what happened to her...

Then you have to jump to the Savchenko-Neiland - Zvereva - Meskhi generation mentioned above.

Dymension
Feb 15th, 2004, 08:40 AM
Yes, Morozova. :)

*JR*
Feb 15th, 2004, 11:40 AM
Once in a retrospective with blurbs about a bunch of stuff, www.******************** recounted the story of Natasha's showdown with the Soviet tax system. They gave it a headline adapted from an old Bob Dylan song:

Ain't Gonna Work on Gorby's Farm No More :lol:

propi
Feb 15th, 2004, 11:47 AM
what about Larissa Neiland???? :)

Jem
Feb 15th, 2004, 12:36 PM
On the men's side, there was Alex Metrevelli, who reached the Wimbledon final in 1973, the year most of the top men boycotted. Metrevelli was a top 10 player in his own right, however, and won several ATP tournaments.

The Soviet's decision to withdraw from international tennis was a real blow to Chymreva, who had the game to challenge for the top of women's tennis. In the mid 1970s, Chris Evert actually thought Chymreva would be her big rival for the top of women's tennis. She was big, strong, could serve and knew how to thump a forehand -- an early version of Steffi Graf with a two-handed backhand.

I saw Olga Morozova in Atlanta in the 1990s, and we spoke about Chymreva. At that time, she said Chymreva had been ill for some time.

MisterQ
Feb 16th, 2004, 07:42 PM
The Soviet's decision to withdraw from international tennis was a real blow to Chymreva, who had the game to challenge for the top of women's tennis. In the mid 1970s, Chris Evert actually thought Chymreva would be her big rival for the top of women's tennis. She was big, strong, could serve and knew how to thump a forehand -- an early version of Steffi Graf with a two-handed backhand.

I saw Olga Morozova in Atlanta in the 1990s, and we spoke about Chymreva. At that time, she said Chymreva had been ill for some time.

That's quite sad that Chymreva was denied a chance to compete with the greatest pros. :sad:

Jem
Feb 16th, 2004, 09:21 PM
It is sad. At the time, I was a huge Chris Evert fan and was fearful that Cymreva might one day get her number. In 1977, there was something called the Peanut Tennis Classic played in Plains, Georgia -- home of President Jimmy Carter. It was a World Team Tennis match and featured the Phoenix Suns (Evert's team) against the Soviet team. Chymreva played singles and beat Evert solidly. Her ground game was strong, and she was not afraid to come into the net to finish off points. I was dismayed (hey, I was 16!, today I'd hardly give it a passing thought)! Except for a few Fed Cup matches here and there, that summer was basically the Soviet's last hurrah. I would have to check the recordbooks, but I don't think the Soviets even played Wimbledon or the U.S. Open in 1976. It seems like they were recalled from the Slims tour in the winter of 77 and didn't play anymore tournaments after that. At the time, I thought, "Great, Chris won't have to worry about her!" But that was a dumb kid's perspective. It did not take me many years to realize what a great talent the game had been denied.

ys
Feb 16th, 2004, 09:32 PM
In early 77, the Soviet authorities pulled the plug on their players competing on the pro tour and that was that for these two women.
It was not related to Pro Tour. It was related to coming Moscow Olympics and South African situation.

Ballbuster
Feb 16th, 2004, 09:56 PM
Nope!

No one of "HALL OF FAME" significance.