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View Full Version : So is patty now the fastest female server?


bis2806
Jan 26th, 2004, 10:41 AM
since she clocked a 211 km/h, she has broken venus' world record of 205...

Rtael
Jan 26th, 2004, 10:50 AM
:rolleyes: Can I sell you some real-estate in Florida?

Jakeev
Jan 26th, 2004, 11:16 AM
since she clocked a 211 km/h, she has broken venus' world record of 205...
Honey bunch as much as I am not a big fan of the poster below you I am sorry she is so right.........:lol: :lol: :lol:

SpikeyAidanm
Jan 26th, 2004, 11:18 AM
Well we'll see if the record goes into the papers tomorrow or not...

calabar
Jan 26th, 2004, 12:34 PM
Well we'll see if the record goes into the papers tomorrow or not...
Why would the serve NOT be considered a world record?

Experimentee
Jan 26th, 2004, 12:58 PM
I doubt thats right :lol:
She got a 211 kph serve but only averaged 146 kph for her first serve! Something wrong with the speedo. They even clocked Amanda Coetzer at 191 kph!

Greenout
Jan 26th, 2004, 01:02 PM
You should've seen how fast my serve was clocked in? ;)

Greenout
Jan 26th, 2004, 01:03 PM
Broken radar gun? Nah. I doubt it. We've got the world's greatest
technology at this year's Australian Open. Why, look at how wonderful
the official web site is. ;)

7~LV3
Jan 26th, 2004, 01:22 PM
OMG...

whats up with this AO???

no wonder why she can challenge those men..

SerenaSlam
Jan 26th, 2004, 01:29 PM
Why would the serve NOT be considered a world record?
i think you are getting excited for no reason. and i guess u can say w/ reason. u may not be used to the AO jacked up numbers this year. this is their "lowest" year in terms of stats etc. the scoreboard was just pitiful. i remember watching the venus/doucheivna match with the scoreboard, and it flahsed that Vera clocked one at 197 km/h. now if that doesn't say ERROR if you have seen the girls serve, i don't know what is. and to hear Amanda Coetzer so high etc, you possibly cannot believe this.

And mention that also, when the serve speed is borken it becomes NEWS, its not just a thing, or just b/c its a williams sister. it would have been in Articles about pattys win had she hit one at 131 km/h.

tennisIlove09
Jan 26th, 2004, 07:14 PM
It's wrong.

*JR*
Jan 26th, 2004, 07:23 PM
This Thread points up something maddening about the IBM Live Scoreboard applet box you can open in the corner of your screen. It gives the (obviously Suspect) Speed of the last serve, but does NOT say If It went in. Only when UC a lower speed B4 the next score change Is It saying "Out" re. the first one (which of course doesn't count re. speed records, anyway). :rolleyes:

faboozadoo15
Jan 26th, 2004, 08:21 PM
but still i can't imagine patty bitting a serve that fact straight into the ground... :rolleyes:

i think amanda coetzer's may have been legit? no? she could how just powered one over...lol, i dunno. it's messed up this year.

Fyndh0rnElf
Jan 26th, 2004, 08:28 PM
It IS NOT POSSIBLE, Patty hitting a serve at 211Kmph. It's not the first time it happens, Patty clocking a serve at that speed, it happened at last year's USO I think or in 2002. But there's no way in hell that is right, it must have been an error because... :o Well, have you seen Patty serve?! She hits with so much spin, she has a good serve, but a slow one.

Hurley
Jan 26th, 2004, 08:30 PM
She didn't beat Schiavone's record of 151 MPH that the AO site told us about earlier in the week ;) :p

fammmmedspin
Jan 26th, 2004, 09:21 PM
If the radar gun said 211 why would it be any less true than some other radar gun saying someone else had the fastest serve? If it wasn't televised there is no way of checking. If you can't count fast serves in matches that can't be checked on TV replay the record is pretty useless anyway as lower ranked players who don't get on TV (or courts with radar guns) could break it all the time and not be counted.

Any physics students out there? Would a spin on the ball add to the speed recorded if the spinning was forward and the radar gun caught it at the right angle? If so, as any ball could spin by an unknown amount you could never work out what was forward motion only anyway? In which case Patty's 211kph would be as valid as anyone elses record even if it looked slower as it spun on its way?

SerenaSlam
Jan 26th, 2004, 09:37 PM
This Thread points up something maddening about the IBM Live Scoreboard applet box you can open in the corner of your screen. It gives the (obviously Suspect) Speed of the last serve, but does NOT say If It went in. Only when UC a lower speed B4 the next score change Is It saying "Out" re. the first one (which of course doesn't count re. speed records, anyway). :rolleyes:
also you can just watch "points" won on 1st serve, when it shows the MPH, and then watch whether the server gets a point on 1st or 2nd serve, and u will know even before they put up 15-0 15-15 who gets the point. helpful hint to be one step ahead instead of sitting there waiting for an actual score. they update the stats before they update the actual points/score.

alexusjonesfan
Jan 26th, 2004, 09:46 PM
If the radar gun said 211 why would it be any less true than some other radar gun saying someone else had the fastest serve?
The system used to measure serve speed is imperfect (it's usually placed at the back of the court so serves out wide are always under-measured)and is far from standardized (you can't even be sure that a Porsche gun and an IBM gun will record the same speed for the same serve). Every measurement apparatus has a degree of precision and is subject to random error. Given that, you have to discount results which are implausible (or in this case impossible). Patty is 5ft 6in. and claims to be 125 lbs on her profile, there is simply no way that she can hit the ball high enough and/or put enough force on it, to cause it to travel at 131mph over the net and fall in (which it must've if it was added to the fastest serve table). That's simple physics.

I'm not sure about the specifications of the speed guns used at the Aussie but I'm guessing they use a laser detection system (I dunno...can anyone correct me here? :shrug: ). It works in the following way:

Laser or LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) as it is sometimes known, works by using pulsed laser light instead of continuous microwaves (as is the case with Doppler radar) to measure target range. The time it takes for a laser light pulse to travel (which is known: the speed of light) from the laser to the target and back is used to compute the distance from the laser to target and back (distance pulse travels = speed of light by time). Target range from laser is half of this distance (range = 0.5 by speed of light by time). The change in target range over time (1/3 second typically) equals target velocity. Laser must transmit a minimum of 2 pulses to get at least 2 range measurements at 2 different times to compute speed. In reality laser transmits many pulses per second

So obviously, it's not great for detecting the speed of small objects (it needs to discern the ball from bugs in the air, other things etc.). If somehow the spin of the ball confused the system, the result is automatically invalid :shrug:.
still Forza Francesca for getting the fastest serve ever! :bounce:

SerenaSlam
Jan 26th, 2004, 09:48 PM
The system used to measure serve speed is imperfect (it's usually placed at the back of the court so serves out wide are always under-measured)and is far from standardized (you can't even be sure that a Porsche gun and an IBM gun will record the same speed for the same serve). Every measurement apparatus has a degree of precision and is subject to random error. Given that, you have to discount results which are implausible (or in this case impossible). Patty is 5ft 6in. and claims to be 125 lbs on her profile, there is simply no way that she can hit the ball high enough and/or put enough force on it, to cause it to travel at 131mph over the net and fall in (which it must've if it was added to the fastest serve table). That's simple physics.

I'm not sure about the specifications of the speed guns used at the Aussie but I'm guessing they use a laser detection system (I dunno...can anyone correct me here? :shrug: ). It works in the following way:

Laser or LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) as it is sometimes known, works by using pulsed laser light instead of continuous microwaves (as is the case with Doppler radar) to measure target range. The time it takes for a laser light pulse to travel (which is known: the speed of light) from the laser to the target and back is used to compute the distance from the laser to target and back (distance pulse travels = speed of light by time). Target range from laser is half of this distance (range = 0.5 by speed of light by time). The change in target range over time (1/3 second typically) equals target velocity. Laser must transmit a minimum of 2 pulses to get at least 2 range measurements at 2 different times to compute speed. In reality laser transmits many pulses per second

So obviously, it's not great for detecting the speed of small objects (it needs to discern the ball from bugs in the air, other things etc.). If somehow the spin of the ball confused the system, the result is automatically invalid :shrug:.
still Forza Francesca for getting the fastest serve ever! :bounce:
nice post :wavey:

fammmmedspin
Jan 26th, 2004, 10:16 PM
If somehow the spin of the ball confused the system, the result is automatically invalid :shrug:.
still Forza Francesca for getting the fastest serve ever! :bounce:
Thanks.The question about the spin doesn't go away though. If all balls spin and you can't measure what effect this has on the speed recorded how do you throw out the record where the spin was "excessive"? Logically Venus's record serve is no more valid than Patty's if spin was the cause of patty's record and we don't know how spin contributed to Venus's ball speed ?

You can apply common sense but then Francesca :bounce: has a 109 mph serve recorded anyway which might have been seen as impossible for someone her (or Justin's) size 5 years ago?