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View Full Version : Will you be eating less hamburgers..


ys
Dec 24th, 2003, 03:45 AM
.. because of MCD found in USA?

Will I have to cut on my beloved steaks cooked "rare"? That's bad news..

~ The Leopard ~
Dec 24th, 2003, 03:57 AM
:eek:

Jeeze, the best food in America is the steaks.

*plans next vacation elsewhere*

ys
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:03 AM
Have you had a hamburger recently? they say that the infected animal in all probability was eaten..

And how am I going to survive? I don't like pork. And even though beef is not my favourite meat - lamb is - in States it is normally only fine dining places that serve lamb.. :sad:

~ The Leopard ~
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:17 AM
What about Greek restaurants, ys? They usually have all those great lamb dishes - souvlakia, etc.

GBFH
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:32 AM
MCD? really?

shit...and my uncle just sent us some omaha steaks...hmm...oh well, fuck it. i've had a good life, and i'm eatin' steak on christmas.

Rocketta
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:33 AM
:bigcry:

I'm officially off beef until I hear more news...:bigcry:

:sad: :sad: :sad:

Lucky for me I love pork but what about our Muslim brothers and Sisters? :shrug:

Well like the that cow campaign says (I think its Chick-fil-a) "Eat Mor Chikin". :devil:

GBFH
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:38 AM
:bigcry:

I'm officially off beef until I hear more news...:bigcry:

:sad: :sad: :sad:

Lucky for me I love pork but what about our Muslim brothers and Sisters? :shrug:

Well like the that cow campaign says (I think its Chick-fil-a) "Eat Mor Chikin". :devil:

mmmmm....homemade chicken fingers. yum!

azza
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:41 AM
wtf is MCD :o is it likr STD :o :shrug: :sad: :o

Rocketta
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:42 AM
mcd = Mad Cow Disease

~ The Leopard ~
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:42 AM
Mad Cow Disease

azza
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:44 AM
ive heard of that what is it exactly...

ys
Dec 24th, 2003, 05:16 AM
What about Greek restaurants, ys? They usually have all those great lamb dishes - souvlakia, etc.

I don't know any around here. I saw few in NYC, but as it is with most of cheaper places in NYC, the quality is awful. There are though few of qutie decent Turkish places where they do have a clue on how to cook lamb..

Martian Willow
Dec 24th, 2003, 05:48 AM
Lucky for me I love pork but what about our Muslim brothers and Sisters? :shrug:

...it's going to put them right off converting to Judaism, isn't it...? :)

Knizzle
Dec 24th, 2003, 05:50 AM
Lucky for me I love pork but what about our Muslim brothers and Sisters? :shrug:



:haha:

hey_britney
Dec 24th, 2003, 05:51 AM
Get over yourselves. It was one fucking case. Not time to quit consuming beef just yet.

ys
Dec 24th, 2003, 05:55 AM
Get over yourselves. It was one fucking case. Not time to quit consuming beef just yet.

Right. One cow was tested and was tested positive, and they never had mass testing system in place. When they'll make testing mandatory and in few monthes figure out that the infected percentage is not 1 cow per country, but rather 1 farm per county, you, who would still be eating beef all those monthes will be left thinking "that I was eating it for last few monthes, maybe my brain is that bad that it deserves to be eaten by MCD?"

pReUrBrIyN
Dec 24th, 2003, 06:08 AM
:haha:

Americans......you idiots...you banned our meat and now look at you go get MCD...I was laughing when I found out. Besides its like a 1 in a million chance of contracting it or something, besides all I know is just stick with McDonalds, its definetely not 100% pure beef so you should be good. :)

King Satan
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:18 AM
oh well, i'm gonna keep eating burgers and be happy :)

decemberlove
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:22 AM
:haha:

Americans......you idiots...you banned our meat and now look at you go get MCD...I was laughing when I found out. Besides its like a 1 in a million chance of contracting it or something, besides all I know is just stick with McDonalds, its definetely not 100% pure beef so you should be good. :)


yeah mcdonalds. real fucking great for you. call americans idiots and then eat fucking mcdonalds. :lol:

anyway, i dont really eat beef in the first place. maybe once every four weeks, if that. im a chicken typa girl :lick:

King Satan
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:23 AM
i thought you loved beef? :tape:

decemberlove
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:24 AM
beef curtains :tape:

King Satan
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:25 AM
:tape:

decemberlove
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:25 AM
:devil:

King Satan
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:26 AM
:kiss:

~ The Leopard ~
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:28 AM
I would never describe you as a chicken type of girl, d-love.

Then again, you did kinda chicken out on one occasion that I'm thinking of... :tape:

decemberlove
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:30 AM
hmph! :kiss:

~ The Leopard ~
Dec 24th, 2003, 08:31 AM
:kiss:

King Satan
Dec 24th, 2003, 09:23 AM
lmao! azza, you moron! why did you give me that giant rep point full of smilies? :lol:

alexusjonesfan
Dec 24th, 2003, 03:17 PM
I didn't know they found a case of BSE in American cattle. I think going off beef completely is a little unwarranted (take it from someone's whose country still isn't allowed to export beef to Japan). To catching the human form of the disease is much more likely from consuming the brains or other nervous tissue of the infected animal. I'm not a big beef eater (I technically shouldn't even eat it :o) but my friends still enjoy their steaks and ribs :lick: :p

It was only a matter of time though before this happened across the border. The Canadian and American livestock industries are pretty interconnected with animals frequently moving between them so it was highly unlikely that only one side would have such a problem.

and no I don't work for the Cattle Farmers Lobby :angel:

Kart
Dec 24th, 2003, 04:47 PM
I don't eat beef for religious reasons :angel: but if I did I wouldn't be put off with that BSE crisis. Prion diseases exist in sheep as well (scrapie) so if you were going to give up beef you might as well give up lamb too (oh I don't eat lamb much either :p).

Look at the incidence of new variant CJD and look at the amount of people who actually get it. How much is that new onset and how much is that more awareness and better diagnosis ? I suspect the risk is very low and frankly you've probably already been exposed.

Still, you need to heat the prion protein to 140 degrees to denature it so giving up on the 'rare' steak is not such a bad idea.

Jakeev
Dec 24th, 2003, 05:46 PM
I don't eat beef for religious reasons :angel: but if I did I wouldn't be put off with that BSE crisis. Prion diseases exist in sheep as well (scrapie) so if you were going to give up beef you might as well give up lamb too (oh I don't eat lamb much either :p).

Look at the incidence of new variant CJD and look at the amount of people who actually get it. How much is that new onset and how much is that more awareness and better diagnosis ? I suspect the risk is very low and frankly you've probably already been exposed.

Still, you need to heat the prion protein to 140 degrees to denature it so giving up on the 'rare' steak is not such a bad idea.


I have a friend who's mom died of CJD in 1995. It's a disease that can lay dormant in the human body for years and then when the infected prions trigger it, WHAM, a person is usually gone in 6 months.

My friend's mom worked for a meat-processing plant in Indiana for 30 years. Since BSE is usally contracted from eating diseased meat, it's probably a mystery why my friends' mother contacted it.

Although few about only a dozen people die from CJD die annually in the US from it, I still think BSE and CJD are man-made diseases that should be left in horor movies and not everyday life....

GBFH
Dec 24th, 2003, 06:39 PM
oh my, kart...it'll be a sad, sad day when i finally decide to give up lamb! :sad: it's a good thing i love tofu almost as much! :)

mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm soy :drool:

Peter M
Dec 24th, 2003, 06:41 PM
I keep telling ya-- there is only one type of safe meat to eat. ;)

GBFH
Dec 24th, 2003, 06:44 PM
aw, man...firm tofu stir-fried with a little broccoli, green onion, water chestnuts, slivered almonds, julienned carrots, some bean sprouts, ginger, loads of garlic, soy sauce and some sesame oil over rice???

:drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool: :drool:

:sad: can you make me some and fed-ex it? lol

all i have are some peanut butter crackers....

alexusjonesfan
Dec 24th, 2003, 06:56 PM
soy blech :p

It's taking over the world :unsure:

though I do have a soft spot for szechuan mapo tofu (I could eat it all day, everyday), nobody can take away my chicken, fish and lamb/goat :mad: (unless it's tuesday or friday of course :angel: )

Amadé
Dec 24th, 2003, 07:05 PM
http://community.kournikova.com/images/smilies/king.gif
MSNBC staff and wire reports
Updated: 12:38 p.m. ET Dec. 24, 2003
Despite the discovery of mad cow disease in the United States, federal officials rushed to assure American consumers Wednesday that the risk to human health was very low.

The Agriculture Department announced Tuesday that a so-called downed cow, meaning it was unable to move on its own, had tested positive for the brain-wasting disease. The cow, which came from a farm near Yakima, Wash., was slaughtered Dec. 9.

Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said parts of the animal went to three processing plants in Washington State. But she said there was no danger to the food supply because "muscle cuts of meat have almost no risk."

Tests of tissue samples from the cow are being conducted in Britain to confirm the mad cow finding by a U.S. lab.

Agriculture Department officials and cattle industry executives tried to allay fears that American beef supplies had become infected, saying the U.S. inspection system was working effectively: The farm where the cow originated has been quarantined and officials were tracing the movement of the cow from the farm to the slaughterhouse, and the flow of the meat to three processing plants in Washington state.

“The important point is that the high-risk materials — that is, the brain and spinal column that would cause infectivity in humans — were removed from this cow,” Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman said on ABC’s “Good Morning America” Wednesday.

She noted that the United States since the early 1990s has banned the use of cow and sheep byproducts for animal feed, which cuts off a major mode of transmission of the disease.

“We are in an abundance of caution,” Veneman told NBC’s “Today” show.

Risk to humans extremely low
USDA officials announced early Wednesday that Vern’s Moses Lake Meat Co. in Moses Lake, Wash., is voluntarily recalling approximately 10,410 pounds of raw beef that may have been exposed to tissues containing mad cow. They said the beef was produced on Dec. 9 and shipped to several establishments for further processing and is being recalled “out of an abundance of caution” even though it “would not be expected to be infected or have an adverse public health impact.”

The department’s Food Safety and Inspection Service said it is continuing its investigation to ensure that all the recalled beef is correctly identified and tracked, but gave no further details immediately.

There was no answer at the telephone number listed for Vern’s Moses Lake Meat Co., after the recall, which was announced early Wednesday.

Veneman also assured Americans that no foul play was suspected, saying "this incident is not terrorist-related."

Appearing on CBS’ “The Early Show,” Veneman asserted, “The risk is extremely low to human health and I would without hesitation say that no one should be afraid to eat beef.”

Mad cow disease eats holes in the brains of cattle. It sprang up in Britain in 1986 and spread through countries in Europe and Asia, prompting massive destruction of herds and decimating the European beef industry.

People can contract a form of mad cow disease if they eat infected beef or nerve tissue, and possibly through blood transfusions. The human form of mad cow disease so far has killed 143 people in Britain and 10 elsewhere, none in the United States.

Veneman said the risk to human health in this U.S. case was “extremely low.”

Food supply concerns
Nonetheless, U.S. beef producers worried that they could suffer heavily from a mad cow scare. Restaurants that serve beef also could be affected.

“I think it has the potential to hurt our industry,” said Jim Olson, a rancher in Stanfield, Ariz., who owns about 150 cattle.

Consumers Union, the publisher of Consumer Reports magazine, called on the government to test more cows for the disease, formally known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

‘We are very concerned that the diseased animal made it into the food supply and that the processing plants could be contaminated.’

“The U.S. needs to be far more proactive in protecting the American food supply,” said Michael Hansen, a senior research associate. “We are very concerned that the diseased animal made it into the food supply and that the processing plants could be contaminated.”

The disease was found in a Holstein cow, which could not move on its own, from a farm in Mabton, Wash., about 40 miles southeast of Yakima. It tested preliminarily positive on Dec. 9. Parts of the cow that would be infected — the brain, the spinal cord and the lower part of the small intestine — were removed before the animal went to a meat processing plant — standard operating procedure in this country.

Samples from the cow were sent to Britain for confirmation of the preliminary mad cow finding, Veneman said. The results will be known in three to five days, she added. Consumers can get daily updates by reading the department’s Web site or by calling 1-866-4USDACO.

Many residents of Mabton — population 2,045 — were protective of local cattle owners Tuesday and unwilling to discuss the matter with reporters, who were turned away from businesses and farms.

The apparent discovery of mad cow disease comes at a time when the U.S. beef industry is flourishing, in part because imports from Canada dried up after a single case of the disease was found there last spring and also in part because of the popularity of the Atkins high-protein diet .

A USDA Choice sirloin steak sells for more than $6 per pound, compared with about $4 per pound a year ago. The price of pound of ground beef is $2.04, up from $1.84 last year.

“The beef cattle industry has just had a resurgence of growth,” said Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Thad Cochran, R-Miss. “This is going to be a setback.”

Swift action needed
Some American consumers said Tuesday they weren’t ready to find something else for dinner.

“We’re beef eaters,” said Carrie Whitacre of Omaha, Neb. “Plus we’re not going to get beef from Washington state here anytime soon.”

Caroline Smith DeWaal, food safety director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said that while whole cuts of meat should be safe, there could be problems with ground meat, which can be mechanically stripped from the bone near an infected part.

“USDA needs to take swift action to insure that the meat that is found in hot dogs, hamburgers and those others doesn’t pose a risk,” DeWaal said.

The beef industry said there was nothing to worry about.

“The infectious agent is only found in the central nervous system tissue,” said Patti Brumbach, executive director of the Washington State Beef Commission. “None of that made it into the beef supply. I think once consumers understand that the beef supply is safe, it should be a short-term concern.”

With an election year approaching, the news concerned some in Congress. Rep. Tim Holden, D-Pa., a member of the House Agriculture Committee, said he expected lawmakers to hold hearings when they return to Washington in late January.

But another member of the Agriculture Committee rushed to support the beef industry.

Rep. Cal Dooley, D-Calif., said, “People I think should not be frightened to have their prime rib on Christmas Eve.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report

GBFH
Dec 24th, 2003, 07:18 PM
it's just about noon there and all you have are pb crackers? oy! you need to c'mere girl! :lol:

would if i could, girlie, lol! :) we could play some chutes and ladders!

hey_britney
Dec 25th, 2003, 12:44 AM
Right. One cow was tested and was tested positive, and they never had mass testing system in place. When they'll make testing mandatory and in few monthes figure out that the infected percentage is not 1 cow per country, but rather 1 farm per county, you, who would still be eating beef all those monthes will be left thinking "that I was eating it for last few monthes, maybe my brain is that bad that it deserves to be eaten by MCD?"

I live in Canada. We had one infection a few months ago. Everybody freaked out, and it turned out only to be that ONE COW. The United States even stopped importing Canadian beef. LOL. Divine justice for them, huh?

It's not a big thing, ys. Just watch and see.

Experimentee
Dec 25th, 2003, 01:37 PM
I dont really eat burgers much anyway. I prefer chicken, lamb and fish.

ys
Dec 27th, 2003, 04:38 PM
And now they say that infected cow is in fact of Canadian origin. I knew that, I knew that, it must all have been only because of those Canadians..

Fat Frog
Dec 27th, 2003, 07:11 PM
.. because of MCD found in USA?

Will I have to cut on my beloved steaks cooked "rare"? That's bad news..

rare steaks rule..nothing like the blood flowing outta a chunky piece of sirlion!! :drool: ah no really though yer not all giving up eating beef now are ye??

Lita's Ex
Dec 27th, 2003, 07:30 PM
Will you be eating less hamburgers..

No 'cause then the terrorists will win.

Fat Frog
Dec 27th, 2003, 07:31 PM
are u saying it was terrorists who infected the animals??