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Ted of Teds Tennis
Mar 16th, 2003, 08:39 PM
In the latest Russian surname thread, I said I'd post a few comments about Czech/Slovak surnames. Anybody whose native language is Czech or Slovak is welcome to correct me. :)

Note: To see some of the Czech letters, you'll need to set encoding to ISO-8859-2.

Czech and Slovak surnames are different for men and women, much the way that Russian surnames show a gender difference. But, the way that the difference shows up isn't exactly the same.

Czech and Slovak names don't normally end in -in or -ov the way Russian surnames do. So, if they end in a consonant, one adds -ová to the male surname to get the female surname. Examples would be Cyril Suk/Helena Suková, Eduard Beneš/Ivěta Benešová or Novak/Novaková.

One important exception to this is men's names ending in -ek. In this case, the -e is removed before adding the -ová ending. So, Květoslava Hrdlíčková's father would have the last name Hrdlíček.

Some Czech and Slovak men's names end in an -a. Czech hockey player Martin Straka comes to mind, as does Slovak tennis player Karel Kučera. In these names, the -a is dropped before adding the -ová ending. (BTW: Does anybody know if Karel Kučera and Gabriela/Magdalena/Renata Kučerová are related?) Unfortunately, this means that in looking at a woman's surname, you can't always tell what the male equivalent is. (Is Daja Bedáňová's father Bedáň or Bedáňa?)

Just as Russian has surnames based on adjectives, so do Czech and Slovak. In these cases, the men's equivalent ends in -ý, while for the women, the -ý is dropped and replaced by an -á (*not* an -ová). This is how we get a name like Jana Novotná; her father would have been named Novotný. (Wasn't the first leader of the Czechoslovak communists Antonin Novotný?) I believe the same is true for Martina Suchá, whose father would be named Suchý.

The one exception to this is for foreign-derived surnames ending in vowels other than -a. As an example, Adriana Gerši's ancestors were Italian, and because her surname ends in -i, it's not declined. Indeed, it's a law in the Czech Republic that if a Czech woman gets married to a foreigner, her surname has to take on a Czech grammatical form unless she either gives up her Czech passport or her husband's name ends in a vowel. Even then, however, I've seen one of the Czech online newspapers refer to Meilen Tuová and Adriana Serra-Zanettiová. :)

AjdeNate!
Mar 16th, 2003, 08:58 PM
Venus Williamsová
Monica Selesová
Jennifer Capriatiová

lol :)

danielrosario
Mar 17th, 2003, 05:23 AM
Justine Heninova-Hardennova :)

caramel
Mar 17th, 2003, 06:10 AM
Why not Adriana Serraová-Zanettiová???? :cool:

danielrosario
Mar 17th, 2003, 06:25 AM
Is Sucha pronounced as Soo-Ha? Or Soo-Ka?

Jakeev
Mar 17th, 2003, 07:46 AM
Wow Ted if you have not finally enlightened us about this rather interestng topic I don't know who else has.

But I think Seles according to what Ted has mentioned, I guess in the Czech Republic, players like Jennifer Carpriati and Kristina Brandi would still be the same, if I am understanding it correctly.

But Zanetti is not Adriana's married name so wouldn't it stay Zanetti Ted? Nathalie Dechy would be Decha?

Gosh what a cool thread again Ted thank you.

Jakeev
Mar 18th, 2003, 05:08 AM
By the way Ted are you Czech or Slavic?

tennisrulz8
Dec 31st, 2005, 04:58 AM
I was looking at this old thread and I also came across this Czech player.
Lucie Kriegsmannova
Does that name not seem right to anyone else? it sounds german with an -ova added to the end

ezekiel
Dec 31st, 2005, 05:35 AM
boring

Andre@
Dec 31st, 2005, 06:05 AM
Martina Hingisňva
Melanie Molitorňva

LOL

TF Chipmunk
Dec 31st, 2005, 06:30 AM
Anastasia Myskinaova :lol:
Anna-Lena Groenefeldova :o
Nadia Petrovaova :confused: :lol:

Slumpsova
Dec 31st, 2005, 08:21 AM
Is Sucha pronounced as Soo-Ha? Or Soo-Ka?

i am wondering the same. i don't know how to pronounce Hantuchova :shrug:

TF Chipmunk
Dec 31st, 2005, 08:26 AM
I heard Hantuchova pronounce her name before :scratch: but that was soo long ago. It was on TV, they asked her specifically how to pronounce her name :lol: :o

Wiggly
Dec 31st, 2005, 12:32 PM
I think Iveta's father name is Benes, not Bene (wtatour info) :confused:

Š@ŽeLess
Dec 31st, 2005, 01:39 PM
Anastasia Myskinaova :lol:
Anna-Lena Groenefeldova :o
Nadia Petrovaova :confused: :lol:

are u serious? it alreay has ova at the end?

Š@ŽeLess
Dec 31st, 2005, 01:42 PM
By the way Ted are you Czech or Slavic?

this is by far the best pearl of wisdom i saw on this board this year. Thanks for the wonderful laugh you gave me :lol:

Are you czech or slavic :lol: :tape: :worship: :rolls: :rolls: :rolls:

i got to put this in my sig

Xian
Dec 31st, 2005, 03:29 PM
I was looking at this old thread and I also came across this Czech player.
Lucie Kriegsmannova
Does that name not seem right to anyone else? it sounds german with an -ova added to the end

" Kriegsmann" is german, indeed Krieg=war mann = man

adam_ads_n
Dec 31st, 2005, 04:38 PM
Not only Czech Republic but also Lithuania gives the endings to surnames. For ex. Lance Armstrong was once called "Lancas Armstrongas" in LRT 2's news :D

tennisjam
Jan 1st, 2006, 01:07 AM
Slavic surnames rock :)

Jakeev
Jan 1st, 2006, 02:09 AM
this is by far the best pearl of wisdom i saw on this board this year. Thanks for the wonderful laugh you gave me :lol:

Are you czech or slavic :lol: :tape: :worship: :rolls: :rolls: :rolls:

i got to put this in my sig

Uh nitwit that post is over two years old.......hell I don't even remember posting it........but.....whatever floats your boat babe.

andrewbroad
Jan 3rd, 2006, 01:44 AM
1. "CH" counts as a single letter in Slovak (between 'H' and 'I'), and is pronounced as a rolling "ch" (as in the Scottish word "loch").

2. The Russian "ova" is incompatible with the Slovak "ová", so Slovak adds its own "ová" - hence "Petrovová", &c.

3. If the masculine/foreign form of a surname ends in 'a' or 'o', then adding "ová" removes it, e.g.
Habšuda -> Habšudová
Petrova -> Petrovová (not "Petrovaová")
Mauresmo -> Mauresmová (not "Mauresmoová")

--
Dr. Andrew Broad
http://www.geocities.com/andrewbroad/ (http://www.geocities.com/andrewbroad/)
http://www.geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/ (http://www.geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/)
http://www.geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/ (http://www.geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/)hantu/
http://www.geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/ (http://www.geocities.com/andrewbroad/tennis/)habsu/

theprophe
Jan 3rd, 2006, 06:41 PM
Actually for around 5 years now, it is no longer required to change a females lastname.

but your comment on petrova is wrong, in czech it is also petrova

adam_ads_n
Jan 3rd, 2006, 06:57 PM
Actually for around 5 years now, it is no longer required to change a females lastname.

but your comment on petrova is wrong, in czech it is also petrova
So I guess it is kind of habit now. I remember ITF tournament in Pruhonice with Agnieszka Radwanskova ;)