PDA

View Full Version : Wimbledon Tickets - how do the they work?


Manitou
Dec 16th, 2012, 06:56 AM
Question - how do the Wimbledon tickets work? I went to the Wimbledon site, clicked on tickets and I was led to some Public Ballot site, where it says:
"The Public Ballot, introduced in 1924, has always been substantially oversubscribed. Entry into the Ballot does not automatically entitle applicants to tickets for Wimbledon, but a place in the draw for tickets.
Successful applicants are selected at random by computer. It is not possible to request tickets for specific days or courts, as the day and court offered are chosen randomly by a computerised selection process."

I admit I was planning to visit Wimbledon first time in 2013, so I am new to this. Does this all mean the only way to get a Wimbledon ticket is to be randomly selected in some kind of lottery? So is it impossible to purchase tickets in advance and then book a flight and a hotel, just like to any other tournament?

Another thing: I am not really interested in a ticket to any of the main stadiums. I just want a general admittance ticket to the grounds, again, just like in every other tournament. And the site does not have this option either. Is there such thing at Wimbledon?


--

EnglishOak
Dec 16th, 2012, 07:01 AM
You can turn up the day before you want to visit and camp overnight at the front of the queue. Show court tickets take either luck through the ballot or dedication through queueing! Queueing isn't as bad as it sounds as long as you're well prepared. The atmosphere is good and people have high spirits - usually with the aid of some Pimms!

EnglishOak
Dec 16th, 2012, 07:06 AM
By the way, the deadline for sending away for a ballot application was yesterday.

Manitou
Dec 16th, 2012, 07:09 AM
By the way, the deadline for sending away for a ballot application was yesterday.

Crap!
Is there a general admission ticket just to get to the grounds?
As to waiting overnight in a line I think it's rather for younger people. My wife and I are in our 50s and I don't think we can take it... :)



--

Jajaloo
Dec 16th, 2012, 07:15 AM
I've always found the notion of balloting at other slams so weird, considering at The Australian Open, if you want tickets, you can just buy them, first in first served basis.

TheBoiledEgg
Dec 16th, 2012, 07:17 AM
Crap!
Is there a general admission ticket just to get to the grounds?
As to waiting overnight in a line I think it's rather for younger people. My wife and I are in our 50s and I don't think we can take it... :)



--

there are lots of older people in the Q

Manitou
Dec 16th, 2012, 08:05 AM
Thanks guys! I am glad I checked the forum before booking the flights. I think we will let go with Wimbledon. I thought we would go to the tournament on the way to Poland, but now it looks we won't... :)

bobito
Dec 16th, 2012, 08:17 AM
If all you want is a ground pass to the outside courts then there is no need to queue overnight. If you are in the queue by 7am on any day in the first week then you'll have no problem getting in by the start of play.

The queue is very civilized by the way. It's in a big field and very well organised. You are given a numbered card when you arrive that denotes your place in the queue. There are cafes, coffee shops etc where you can get a spot of breakfast and then resume your place in the line.

As you can see from these pictures I took last year, it's all very pleasant and laid back.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5111/7438210424_1b9a1e42de.jpg

http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6121/6194800110_23f2eed63d.jpg

SerenaMJ
Dec 16th, 2012, 08:22 AM
Question - how do the Wimbledon tickets work? I went to the Wimbledon site, clicked on tickets and I was led to some Public Ballot site, where it says:
"The Public Ballot, introduced in 1924, has always been substantially oversubscribed. Entry into the Ballot does not automatically entitle applicants to tickets for Wimbledon, but a place in the draw for tickets.
Successful applicants are selected at random by computer. It is not possible to request tickets for specific days or courts, as the day and court offered are chosen randomly by a computerised selection process."

I admit I was planning to visit Wimbledon first time in 2013, so I am new to this. Does this all mean the only way to get a Wimbledon ticket is to be randomly selected in some kind of lottery? So is it impossible to purchase tickets in advance and then book a flight and a hotel, just like to any other tournament?

Another thing: I am not really interested in a ticket to any of the main stadiums. I just want a general admittance ticket to the grounds, again, just like in every other tournament. And the site does not have this option either. Is there such thing at Wimbledon?


--

I sent you a PM. (Wyslalam Ci prywatna wiadomosc)

SerenaMJ
Dec 16th, 2012, 08:40 AM
If all you want is a ground pass to the outside courts then there is no need to queue overnight. If you are in the queue by 7am on any day in the first week then you'll have no problem getting in by the start of play.

The queue is very civilized by the way. It's in a big field and very well organised. You are given a numbered card when you arrive that denotes your place in the queue. There are cafes, coffee shops etc where you can get a spot of breakfast and then resume your place in the line.

As you can see from these pictures I took last year, it's all very pleasant and laid back.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5111/7438210424_1b9a1e42de.jpg

http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6121/6194800110_23f2eed63d.jpg


Exactly. I queued last year too for the first time and the atmosphere was great. Nice and civilized. Definitely going to do it this year.

nevetssllim
Dec 16th, 2012, 10:35 AM
Crap!
Is there a general admission ticket just to get to the grounds?
As to waiting overnight in a line I think it's rather for younger people. My wife and I are in our 50s and I don't think we can take it... :)


Like others have said, you don't have to queue overnight for grounds admission. If you get there by 7-7.30am, you'll have no problems getting in before the start of play. The exceptions are the Friday and Saturday, where it's probably better to get there a bit earlier.

However, I cheated a bit last year. :oh: You can actually buy court three tickets the day before on ticket-master (they are about £40-45) which double up as ground passes so if you choose that option, you can just turn up at the start of play.

I don't actually mind queuing but it would have meant taking a sleeper train or an overnight bus which I do mind. :p

Viennalover
Dec 16th, 2012, 10:46 AM
glad everyone is helping him. :angel:

Thanks guys! I am glad I checked the forum before booking the flights. I think we will let go with Wimbledon. I thought we would go to the tournament on the way to Poland, but now it looks we won't... :)

sad to hear this.
I believe Wimbledon is not a closed market and hope you and your wife have a great time. :wavey:

Ksenia.
Dec 16th, 2012, 02:19 PM
This system sucks so much. I really wanted to go in 2013 but there is no way I am flying across the continent when it is not even confirmed that I get the tickets :o

Manitou
Dec 16th, 2012, 03:21 PM
glad everyone is helping him. :angel:



sad to hear this.
I believe Wimbledon is not a closed market and hope you and your wife have a great time. :wavey:

Thanks! :)
We will stop in London anyway, so after this valuable information you guys gave me we will try to see the tournament this way or another, of course. I was hoping to purchase tickets in advance, but the system is as it is. And if we don't succeed with the tickets then London itself offers enough attractions! :)


--

TheBoiledEgg
Dec 16th, 2012, 06:18 PM
Thanks! :)
We will stop in London anyway, so after this valuable information you guys gave me we will try to see the tournament this way or another, of course. I was hoping to purchase tickets in advance, but the system is as it is. And if we don't succeed with the tickets then London itself offers enough attractions! :)


--

If you really wanna see 1 day then its top $
http://www.sportsworld.co.uk/events/wimbledon-2013

Z1988
Dec 16th, 2012, 07:03 PM
I was joining the Queue this year and it was not that bad. During the weekdays, there was even more chance to still get show court tickets (usually either Court 1 or 2 though, Centre Court got sold out so quickly) if we arrived at the Queue say at around 6 or so. In the weekend though, it was more difficult to get show court ticket and maybe we had to camp overnight to get one of those...

bobito
Dec 16th, 2012, 08:41 PM
I was joining the Queue this year and it was not that bad. During the weekdays, there was even more chance to still get show court tickets (usually either Court 1 or 2 though, Centre Court got sold out so quickly) if we arrived at the Queue say at around 6 or so. In the weekend though, it was more difficult to get show court ticket and maybe we had to camp overnight to get one of those...

The weather was dodgy during the first week this year so the queues were shorter than normal some days. Next year, with Murray a slam champion and Robson and Watson on the up and up, you'll need to get there very early for a show court ticket I would think.

pesto
Dec 17th, 2012, 01:58 AM
Queuing, as mentioned, can be quite relaxed and fun if it's a warm sunny day. Wouldn't fancy it much if the weather was a bit meh.

Last time I queued was the second Monday, 2010. All the 4th rounds are played that day, so there were relatively big matches on outside courts. My idiot boyfriend arrived much later than planned - shortly before 9am. We got ticket numbers 7892 and 7893 out of 8000 guaranteed entries, so I didn't have to have him killed.

The problem is, they could sell all available tickets many, many times over. Even with a ballot where you have to be so organised that you apply for a form by mid-December, and can only receive a maximum of two tickets, they are oversubscribed by a factor of five.

Being able to get tickets for next day on Ticketmaster for Court 3 and the back rows of Centre Court is relatively new, and I don't think that everyone realises you can do it. I've had a pretty high % success rate getting tickets that way.

Then there are debenture tickets, if you are rich.

Manitou
Dec 17th, 2012, 05:01 AM
If I can ask for a bit more attention, two more easy questions. I believe the answers might be useful for everybody.
- what subway line and station is the one closest to the queues?
- how long does the subway take from Wimbledon courts to London center and how much does it cost?
We will use the trip not only for the tournament, but it will be also shared with London sightseeing, so I am trying to calculate the most strategic place for the hotel.
Plus, any useful tips will be appreciated. Again - I am sure many people may find this thread helpful.

--


--

bobito
Dec 17th, 2012, 07:03 AM
If I can ask for a bit more attention, two more easy questions. I believe the answers might be useful for everybody.
- what subway line and station is the one closest to the queues?
- how long does the subway take from Wimbledon courts to London center and how much does it cost?
We will use the trip not only for the tournament, but it will be also shared with London sightseeing, so I am trying to calculate the most strategic place for the hotel.
Plus, any useful tips will be appreciated. Again - I am sure many people may find this thread helpful.

--


--

Southfields tube station is the one you want, District line. It takes around 20 minutes to get there from central London. I think the fare is around £5.

bobito
Dec 17th, 2012, 07:31 AM
As for other useful tips, off the top of my head I'd suggest the following:


Take a hat that will shade you from the sun as there is very little shade on the outside courts.
Take a big bottle of water. You can refill it from drinking fountains inside but buying bottled water there will cost you a small fortune.
Take an umberella or poncho (British weather :rolleyes:)
If it's been raining overnight, take a sheet of plastic (a bin liner will do) to put on the ground so you can sit down in the queue without getting a wet bottom.
Check the order of play. People with show court tickets will leave the outside courts around 12.30 so, if there is a match you really want to see later in the day, you should try to get a seat on that court by then.
If you are planning to sit on Court 18 take an extra top or sweater. It's high up and can get windy and a little cold on a cloudy day. It's worth it though as 18 gets some very good matches, is the most iconic outside court in tennis and has a great view of the grounds.
Go to the bathroom before you take your seat. If you vacate your seat later, the stewards will not hesitate to let someone else in.


If I think of anything else I'll add it to the list.

Manitou
Dec 17th, 2012, 07:40 AM
Southfields tube station is the one you want, District line. It takes around 20 minutes to get there from central London. I think the fare is around £5.

Is Southfield tube station the green line between Earl's Court and Wimbledon as on this following map?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/london/travel/downloads/tube_map.html


--

GS2
Dec 17th, 2012, 07:49 AM
Yes that's the one - Southfields is on the green line - The District Line.

bobito
Dec 17th, 2012, 07:59 AM
Is Southfield tube station the green line between Earl's Court and Wimbledon as on this following map?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/london/travel/downloads/tube_map.html


--

That's the one.

When you get off the tube at Southfields there will be a fellow outside the station loudly directing you to taxis going to the tennis. Don't bother. It takes no more than 10 minutes to walk from Southfields to the Wimbledon queue.

TheBoiledEgg
Dec 17th, 2012, 09:20 AM
As for other useful tips, off the top of my head I'd suggest the following:

Take a hat that will shade you from the sun as there is very little shade on the outside courts.
Take a big bottle of water. You can refill it from drinking fountains inside but buying bottled water there will cost you a small fortune.
Take an umberella or poncho (British weather :rolleyes:)
If it's been raining overnight, take a sheet of plastic (a bin liner will do) to put on the ground so you can sit down in the queue without getting a wet bottom.
Check the order of play. People with show court tickets will leave the outside courts around 12.30 so, if there is a match you really want to see later in the day, you should try to get a seat on that court by then.
If you are planning to sit on Court 18 take an extra top or sweater. It's high up and can get windy and a little cold on a cloudy day. It's worth it though as 18 gets some very good matches, is the most iconic outside court in tennis and has a great view of the grounds.
Go to the bathroom before you take your seat. If you vacate your seat later, the stewards will not hesitate to let someone else in.
If I think of anything else I'll add it to the list.

Also if you have a HSBC card- credit/debit take them with you - free strawberries & cream :lick:

Madoka
Dec 17th, 2012, 10:37 AM
a friend and i just sent the application form we received the last week, hopefully we are going to get something :s

ozza
Dec 17th, 2012, 01:50 PM
Wimbledon has one of the worst ticketing systems in the world. It's so far behind the times. The whole ballot is just a farce. It just leads to large numbers of the fans not knowing anything about tennis, whereas tennis fans have to either queue up overnight, known someone who will get corporate tickets, or pay ridiculous amounts to get in. To get tickets to semi-finals onwards for the men you have to fork out £2-£3k a ticket. Womens isn't much cheaper than that.

It's actually cheaper to go to the US Open or French Open(including flights and hotels) which is just ludicrous. I would actually like to go Wimbledon for the full 2 weeks, but it's just not feasible when I can do the same to New York for cheaper than it is to just go to finals weekend at Wimbledon. The ticketing model used at the O2 is so much better.

EnglishOak
Dec 17th, 2012, 02:50 PM
I've always found it easy to get the train from Waterloo to Wimbledon station then the special (not free) bus service.

asdas
Dec 17th, 2012, 07:57 PM
I've never been to Wimbledon but this is really kind. :angel:
hope I have a chance to visit too.

As for other useful tips, off the top of my head I'd suggest the following:


Take a hat that will shade you from the sun as there is very little shade on the outside courts.
Take a big bottle of water. You can refill it from drinking fountains inside but buying bottled water there will cost you a small fortune.
Take an umberella or poncho (British weather :rolleyes:)
If it's been raining overnight, take a sheet of plastic (a bin liner will do) to put on the ground so you can sit down in the queue without getting a wet bottom.
Check the order of play. People with show court tickets will leave the outside courts around 12.30 so, if there is a match you really want to see later in the day, you should try to get a seat on that court by then.
If you are planning to sit on Court 18 take an extra top or sweater. It's high up and can get windy and a little cold on a cloudy day. It's worth it though as 18 gets some very good matches, is the most iconic outside court in tennis and has a great view of the grounds.
Go to the bathroom before you take your seat. If you vacate your seat later, the stewards will not hesitate to let someone else in.


If I think of anything else I'll add it to the list.

One Genie
Feb 10th, 2014, 04:29 PM
I got the letter today letting me know i was successful getting tickets.. I was given 2 tickets for day 5 on court 3 for over £100.. i went last year and got 2 court 1 tickets for £100. The two games on court 3 (Dimitrov vs Zemlja and Melzer vs Stakhovsky) last year on the same day are putting me off from going. If i ended up getting something similar to Dimitrov vs Zemlja and Melzer vs Stakhovsky for over £100 i wouldn't be happy with it.

MichaelN
Feb 10th, 2014, 04:41 PM
Wimbledon system is horrible:o I live in the UK and sent a self addressed envelope and I didn't even get an application form:o After 3 weeks I sent another one and still didn't get a reply. Going to Katowice slam instead:oh:

motorhead
Feb 10th, 2014, 06:45 PM
o get tickets to semi-finals onwards for the men you have to fork out £2-£3k a ticket
lol :eek:

motorhead
Feb 10th, 2014, 06:48 PM
so techinically one can win the ballot but being elected to choose only from semis and not been able to afford it?
or there's always a choice like u get elected for semis but u can still choose grounds courts tickets instead?

ozza
Feb 10th, 2014, 06:58 PM
so techinically one can win the ballot but being elected to choose only from semis and not been able to afford it?
or there's always a choice like u get elected for semis but u can still choose grounds courts tickets instead?

The face value of the tickets is £124 I think. But fewer tickets for the semi-finals, final are given out from the ballot, so the chances of getting one are pretty low. To get a pair of tickets for the semi-finals onwards from the secondary market you are probably looking at £2k-£3k.

Ground passes you can buy on the day.

Siderophyre
Feb 10th, 2014, 07:39 PM
so techinically one can win the ballot but being elected to choose only from semis and not been able to afford it?
or there's always a choice like u get elected for semis but u can still choose grounds courts tickets instead?

The only choice you have in the ballot is to say yes or no to the pair of tickets you are offered. There are no alternative tickets offered.

Grounds passes are only available by queuing. As others have said, the best is to try for court 3 tickets, which are available 24 hrs in advance of each day's play.

(The best way to get good tickets in the UK is to be a member of a tennis club and the LTA - they all have their own ballots with much higher chances of success than the public ballot.)

Sisyphus
Feb 10th, 2014, 07:49 PM
Queuing is the proper way to do it :oh: You just need to turn up at 5am and have a sufficient supply of booze to keep you entertained throughout the day.

Madoka
Feb 10th, 2014, 09:48 PM
I got the letter today letting me know i was successful getting tickets.. I was given 2 tickets for day 5 on court 3 for over £100.. i went last year and got 2 court 1 tickets for £100. The two games on court 3 (Dimitrov vs Zemlja and Melzer vs Stakhovsky) last year on the same day are putting me off from going. If i ended up getting something similar to Dimitrov vs Zemlja and Melzer vs Stakhovsky for over £100 i wouldn't be happy with it.

you dont live3 in the uk rite ? and you got an actual letter ?

Oizo
Feb 10th, 2014, 10:08 PM
If all you want is a ground pass to the outside courts then there is no need to queue overnight. If you are in the queue by 7am on any day in the first week then you'll have no problem getting in by the start of play.

The queue is very civilized by the way. It's in a big field and very well organised. You are given a numbered card when you arrive that denotes your place in the queue. There are cafes, coffee shops etc where you can get a spot of breakfast and then resume your place in the line.

As you can see from these pictures I took last year, it's all very pleasant and laid back.

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5111/7438210424_1b9a1e42de.jpg

http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6121/6194800110_23f2eed63d.jpg

I agree :cool:

Was also there last year :D

motorhead
Feb 10th, 2014, 10:28 PM
The face value of the tickets is £124 I think. But fewer tickets for the semi-finals, final are given out from the ballot, so the chances of getting one are pretty low. To get a pair of tickets for the semi-finals onwards from the secondary market you are probably looking at £2k-£3k.

Ground passes you can buy on the day.

The only choice you have in the ballot is to say yes or no to the pair of tickets you are offered. There are no alternative tickets offered.

Grounds passes are only available by queuing. As others have said, the best is to try for court 3 tickets, which are available 24 hrs in advance of each day's play.

(The best way to get good tickets in the UK is to be a member of a tennis club and the LTA - they all have their own ballots with much higher chances of success than the public ballot.)

Cheers.

Olórin
Feb 10th, 2014, 11:15 PM
(The best way to get good tickets in the UK is to be a member of a tennis club and the LTA - they all have their own ballots with much higher chances of success than the public ballot.)

Yup, and the better the club (producing the higher ranked players) the better your chances. I know someone who belongs to one of the top clubs in Devon and they pass ballot tickets around like candy. For example, last year they were offered tickets to the ladies semi finals at the last minute.

I buy mine off ticket master, as I can't stand queuing. Got CC tickets on middle Monday last year. Murray, Djokovic and Serena all for a bargainous £100. :)

Siderophyre
Feb 10th, 2014, 11:31 PM
Yup, and the better the club (producing the higher ranked players) the better your chances. I know someone who belongs to one of the top clubs in Devon and they pass ballot tickets around like candy. For example, last year they were offered tickets to the ladies semi finals at the last minute.

I buy mine off ticket master, as I can't stand queuing. Got CC tickets on middle Monday last year. Murray, Djokovic and Serena all for a bargainous £100. :)

I belong to a pretty low-rent public park type of club and a considerable majority of us get tickets in the ballot. Maybe not passed around like candy, but pretty good - I got Centre Court quarters last year.

Totally agree on the queuing - can't be bothered with that any more!