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Vikapower
Mar 10th, 2012, 06:27 PM
http://bdidier.fr/wp-content/uploads/drapeaux-europe-27.1235928116.jpg

Puisqu'il y a une demande assez grandissante the 'forumers' en quête de partage linguistique comme Banditoo ou encore Silesia et puis moi bien sûr, il convient donc d'ouvrir en urgence un 'thread' où chacun pourras enrichir l'autre avec des trucs et astuces de sa langue natale.

In much as there is a growing demand of 'Julianautes' in research of sharing, giving tips, little secrets and knowledge on their native language then it becomes urgent to open a thread where everyone'll be able to do just that.

:devil: Have fun and we should all learn lots of things. :D

We have :

- Howard is the English specialist :cool:
- Joy, Dispeker, Silesia, Cilly etc. the German geniuses :angel:
- Rovegun Czech, German :scratch:
- Dominatorb Slovak :p
- Banditoo (sorry I can't remember) :o
- if I could I would -- learn Turkish :eek:
- Skoo Romanian ;)
- Robpal Polish expert :devil:
- and me well, french. I'm good in Spanish too and know basic Ukrainian (grammar etc.) :D

I forgot no one hopefully :shrug:

Rovegun
Mar 10th, 2012, 06:42 PM
thanks so much, Vikapower! I have waited for this thread for a long time :D good idea, anyway!

LinusVanPelt
Mar 10th, 2012, 08:15 PM
Nice idea! Actually, very good idea. So i want you to ask you guys; i want to learn a new language. İ have the basics in German, so it is the favorite candidate now. But on the other hand, it is not that a popular language in the world -the opposite happens among Turkish people, there are a lot of Türk speaks german; due to the reasons that you already know and the artikels in German; brrrr. İn high school i almost failed in German. However; İ would like to learn spanish; because it is relatively easy compare to German and another candidate French. But although it's common, learning spanish have become "mainstream" in last years. İ want to learn French, but it is disgustingly hard. :lol: And also im thinking about learning Russian, but practice is an important thing in language-learning. And also, i study in political science. Maybe you can suggest or recommendate one.

Vikapower
Mar 10th, 2012, 08:38 PM
thanks so much, Vikapower! I have waited for this thread for a long time :D good idea, anyway!

:D No problems. :p

Nice idea! Actually, very good idea. So i want you to ask you guys; i want to learn a new language. İ have the basics in German, so it is the favorite candidate now. But on the other hand, it is not that a popular language in the world -the opposite happens among Turkish people, there are a lot of Türk speaks german; due to the reasons that you already know and the artikels in German; brrrr. İn high school i almost failed in German. However; İ would like to learn spanish; because it is relatively easy compare to German and another candidate French. But although it's common, learning spanish have become "mainstream" in last years. İ want to learn French, but it is disgustingly hard. :lol: And also im thinking about learning Russian, but practice is an important thing in language-learning. And also, i study in political science. Maybe you can suggest or recommendate one.

:lol: Well I don't want to be biased but you should should choose french :fiery:

Anyways just kidding :lol: well you take to your liking -- Spanish and french are pretty good and Germany is Ze place to be in Europe from an economical etc. stand-point so learning German would not be a a bad idea. ;)


French is quite a very difficult language indeed and I think it's easier to learn if you have people/surroundings etc. speaking the language so you can learn it by ear.

The grammar is similar to something like Russian in a little less complicated... but it can be extremely discouraging since there are lots of lots of things to learn --

It's the quantity I think.

Rovegun
Mar 10th, 2012, 08:43 PM
Nice idea! Actually, very good idea. So i want you to ask you guys; i want to learn a new language. İ have the basics in German, so it is the favorite candidate now. But on the other hand, it is not that a popular language in the world -the opposite happens among Turkish people, there are a lot of Türk speaks german; due to the reasons that you already know and the artikels in German; brrrr. İn high school i almost failed in German. However; İ would like to learn spanish; because it is relatively easy compare to German and another candidate French. But although it's common, learning spanish have become "mainstream" in last years. İ want to learn French, but it is disgustingly hard. :lol: And also im thinking about learning Russian, but practice is an important thing in language-learning. And also, i study in political science. Maybe you can suggest or recommendate one.

I can recommend you Spanish even though I am struggling with learning this nice language at university at times... I also thought it´s a pretty easy language to learn it´s not tough but you have to spend your time with learning Spanish pretty properly in my opinion then it is easy... there are a couple of words similar to English ones so it can help you sometimes as well...

I can recommend you the Norwegian language as well which was much more easier to learn than Spanish for me when you know both English and German but I guess Norway is not your interest :D

LinusVanPelt
Mar 10th, 2012, 08:48 PM
:lol: Well I don't want to be biased but you should should choose french :fiery:

Anyways just kidding :lol: well you take to your liking -- Spanish and french are pretty good and Germany is Ze place to be in Europe from an economical etc. stand-point so learning German would not be a a bad idea. ;)


French is quite a very difficult language indeed and I think it's easier to learn if you have people/surroundings etc. speaking the language so you can learn it by ear.

The grammar is similar to something like Russian in a little less complicated... but it can be extremely discouraging since there are lots of lots of things to learn --

It's the quantity I think.

it is really complicated topic :drool: but i think im going to learn german-so i can -maybe- understand julia's tweets and reading them is definetly going to ruin my grammar. :lol: French is a beatiful language,not like german ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2UHboNFQ38 ) but hard. very hard. i may even throw up if i go to a french class. That hard.

LinusVanPelt
Mar 10th, 2012, 08:54 PM
I can recommend you Spanish even though I am struggling with learning this nice language at university at times... I also thought it´s a pretty easy language to learn it´s not tough but you have to spend your time with learning Spanish pretty properly in my opinion then it is easy... there are a couple of words similar to English ones so it can help you sometimes as well...

I can recommend you the Norwegian language as well which was much more easier to learn than Spanish for me when you know both English and German but I guess Norway is not your interest :D


Norway? The only 2 Norwegian thing i know is neutrogena and Norwegian girls :lol: And maybe the only times i use the word of "Norwegian" is while i singing the Beatles song :lol: i made my point clearly i guess :D yeah Spanish confuses me. But you know it became too mainstream, everybody goes to the spanish courses and stuff.. BTW, i noticed; we dont have a Spanish fan over here! Weird.

Lisickifan84
Mar 10th, 2012, 09:55 PM
I've learned at school 4 years in french and 3 years in spanish. But that must be 10 years ago :D. Unfortunately I'm a little bit rusty with that very nice languages :(. OK not just a little, very much :lol:

I love the sound of the french language. If Bartoli speaks, it makes her 10x more attractive :lol:

Hm, now without any help let me try what I can do in french. Aujourd ui (today right? :lol:) Je m'apelle Lisickifan84. Hm very hard now to go on because I have never spoken or written or heard french since the school was over. Same with spanish.

Vikapower
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:09 PM
I'll import this here from the ITW thread.

Nicely translated Vikapower. I'm learning some new words from that article. So "canon" is slang for hottie, similar to bombshell or knockout in English. A quick google on the phrase leads me to an Alizee song (one I don't know):

:lol: Well I don't know if it's a slang (anymore) but it's in the common/usual vocabulary. :lol:

Usually we'd say : "Elle est jolie, magnifique, sublime, sexy, déroutante [de...] etc..." -- "Canon" means in the sense of hot, super hot, super sexy. :D

BTW another way of expressing that is : "C'est de la balle" for example 'C'est de la balle cette meuffe/fille' :lol: but don't use that in front of a "Lady". :lol:

Une James Bond Girl
C'est de la dynamite
Ses lettre sont J.B.G

Oh, elle est canon
Calibrée, culottée
Un canon de beauté

Would that be a good description of Julia? :lol:

:lol: Well Howard you have in the picture thread the perfect photo for this -- 'Alert in California' --

Anyways yes, it would be a good description. ;)

I also came across a phrase I hadn't seen before, "elle a du chien". Apparently it's a phrase meaning something like "she exudes an animal attraction". Do they use this phrase where you are Vikapower?

:lol: No. That's more in mainland France. Well, but that's correct. ;)

Alizee isn't well known in NZ but I've heard of her because of her infamous J'en ai marre dance.

I was a big fan of Alizée before lol she was inevitable at the time and probably one of the biggest french international signer we've ever had my guess.

The whole article is written in a very interesting way. The writer seems to like Julia quite a lot. I enjoyed the extended musical metaphor. In fact, in general this writer seems to like extended metaphors a lot. I like the phrase about "wurst" and "kartoffel" :lol:. I think I would translate that phrase as "she dished out "wurst" and "kartoffel" with her forehand to anyone who opposed her". "Dish out" is slang for "distribute freely"- you can "dish out punishment", "dish out compliments", "dish out advice", "dish out criticism". Distributed is too unemotional a word for this kind of phrase.

Well thanks :lol: I was trying to find interesting/good words to say so I kind of handled the thing in a way. :lol:

That's true you see like "la quatrième roue de la carosse" I had lots of problems with that one --. I hope I translated it correctly. ;)

Also, we would say "she possesses exceptional qualities and great potential" rather than "disposes" exceptional qualities. Dispose is usually used to mean "get rid of", "dispatch", "defeat". "They hired an assassin to dispose of him". Also we have "rubbish disposal", and online you can find advice on how to properly dispose of old batteries, old medicine, things like that. Or we could say something like "Julia disposed of Caro in straight sets." A quick google search with the words "Julia Goerges disposes" provides articles such as :"Julia Goerges disposes of Greta Arn in the first round to avenge her defeat"; "German tennis diva, Julia Goerges, faced no real difficulty in disposing of the 67th ranked Belarusian opponent, Anastasiya Yakimova"; "Local disposes of Stosur in Stuttgart"; "Julia Goerges, who disposed again of the computer's world No. 1 in three sets".

:lol: Thanks Howard -- I'll remember that. In French, we use the verb "disposer" for example "She has lots of carachter = Elle dispose de beaucoup de carachtère" (extension of the word 'avoir') -- it's the context who allows to determine the sense of the verb.

EDIT : Oops and I forgot it's main sense - "Elle dispose les objets de sa maison à sa manière" : She arranges the objects in her house to her likings. I really though they meant the same in both languages. :lol:

We would also translate "Je ne suis pas déçue" as "I am not disappointed". Deceiving means something different, like lying or misleading. "Her gentle appearance is deceiving- she's actually as tough as nails."

:yeah: I'll remember all these.

Vikapower
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:12 PM
I've learned at school 4 years in french and 3 years in spanish. But that must be 10 years ago :D. Unfortunately I'm a little bit rusty with that very nice languages :(. OK not just a little, very much :lol:

I love the sound of the french language. If Bartoli speaks, it makes her 10x more attractive :lol:

Hm, now without any help let me try what I can do in french. Aujourd ui (today right? :lol:) Je m'apelle Lisickifan84. Hm very hard now to go on because I have never spoken or written or heard french since the school was over. Same with spanish.

:lol: Nice start.

It's 'Aujourd'hui' -- 'Je m'apelle' is right but your name is not Lisickifan just today or am I wrong ? :lol:

'Bonjour/Salut, Je m'appelle Lisickifan et je vis en Allemagne'. :scratch: You live well in Germany right ? :angel:

Lisickifan84
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:20 PM
:lol: Nice start.

It's 'Aujourd'hui' -- 'Je m'apelle' is right but your name is not Lisickifan just today or am I wrong ? :lol:

'Bonjour/Salut, Je m'appelle Lisickifan et je vis en Allemagne'. :scratch: You live well in Germany right ? :angel:

No your wrong, I'm still fan of Lisicki :D

Oui, je vis en Allemagne, et tu? Je suis 28 ans.

Vikapower
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:31 PM
No your wrong, I'm still fan of Lisicki :D

Oui, je vis en Allemagne, et tu? Je suis 28 ans.

Je vis dans les carraïbes et j'ai 24 ans. Cela fait combien de temps que tu est fan de Sabine ? (For how long you've been fan of Sabine ?) :lol:


I hope you don't mind retaking some the phrases it'll install better habits. :p

Oui, je vis en Allemagne, et tu toi ? Je suis J'ai 28 ans.

'to have' = 'avoir', j'ai, tu as, il as, nous avons etc...
'to be' = 'être', je suis, tu est, it est etc...

Rovegun
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:36 PM
No your wrong, I'm still fan of Lisicki :D

Oui, je vis en Allemagne, et tu? Je suis 28 ans.

du bist so alt als mein alter Bruder (hope I didn´t make any mistake) :D your French I can understand even though I have never learned French :lol:

Lisickifan84
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:43 PM
@Vikapower: Thx, no I don't mind. Ahh yes not "tu", but "toi". Very long ago as I said it already :lol:

du bist so alt als mein alter Bruder (hope I didn´t make any mistake) :D your French I can understand even though I have never learned French :lol:

Du bist so alt wie mein älterer Bruder.

Vikapower
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:44 PM
du bist so alt als mein alter Bruder (hope I didn´t make any mistake) :D your French I can understand even though I have never learned French :lol:

That's really cool -- Latin based languages work like that I guess. :lol:

Ok I tried to understand what you wrote 'You are so tall/high [blank] my bigger brother ?'. :lol:

Vikapower
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:46 PM
@Vikapower: Thx, no I don't mind. Ahh yes not "tu", but "toi". Very long ago as I said it already :lol:

:lol: Well I was trying to find a way to entertain the conversation in a very basic way. :ras: You killed it. :angel: :lol:

Rovegun
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:52 PM
@Vikapower: Thx, no I don't mind. Ahh yes not "tu", but "toi". Very long ago as I said it already :lol:



Du bist so alt wie mein älterer Bruder.

thanks! I always fail and fail and fail! other stupid errors! :tape:I don´think about that at all how can I write "alter" when I mean "older" which is "älterer" :facepalm:


That's really cool -- Latin based languages work like that I guess. :lol:

Ok I tried to understand what you wrote 'You are so tall/high [blank] my bigger brother ?'. :lol:

not quite but almost :D "you are so old as my older brother :D

Lisickifan84
Mar 10th, 2012, 10:56 PM
thanks! I always fail and fail and fail! other stupid errors! :tape:I don´think about that at all how can I write "alter" when I mean "older" which is "älterer" :facepalm:


No that is not true. You don't fail, it's just very hard sometimes with that german language :lol:

Rovegun
Mar 10th, 2012, 11:08 PM
No that is not true. You don't fail, it's just very hard sometimes with that german language :lol:

no... that sentece was so easy to say but I totally ruined it :D I miss translating Julia´s interviews they have helped me a bit :lol: Julia has to win something or I will have to go to die Dresdner Weihnachtsmärkte :D

only just a language question: when can I use "als" in the sense of "than"? the sentece would be: Du bist grösser als mein Bruder?

Lisickifan84
Mar 10th, 2012, 11:14 PM
no... that sentece was so easy to say but I totally ruined it :D I miss translating Julia´s interviews they have helped me a bit :lol: Julia has to win something or I will have to go to die Dresdner Weihnachtsmärkte :D

only just a language question: when can I use "als" in the sense of "than"? the sentece would be: Du bist grösser als mein Bruder?

I don't speak a word of your language, so you are very good ;)

Yes that sentence is completely correct..

Rovegun
Mar 10th, 2012, 11:19 PM
I don't speak a word of your language, so you are very good ;)

Yes that sentence is completely correct..

finally a correct sentence :D

don´t worry who would like to speak Czech? only 10 milion people... we are so unnecessary for the world except of our beer :lol:

Lisickifan84
Mar 10th, 2012, 11:29 PM
finally a correct sentence :D

don´t worry who would like to speak Czech? only 10 milion people... we are so unnecessary for the world except of our beer :lol:

Someone who likes czech girls and so he wants to talk to them. :lol: :lol:

Rovegun
Mar 10th, 2012, 11:39 PM
Someone who likes czech girls and so he wants to talk to them. :lol: :lol:

:lol: I can see the legend about our Czech girls beauty crossed our mutual border :lol:

anyway, let´s keep this thread on topic....

HowardH
Mar 10th, 2012, 11:42 PM
I'll leave the words in lower case because this "lower case" style is also used in casual messaging by some English native speakers.

finally a correct sentence :D

don´t worry who would want to speak Czech? only 10 million people...

It should be "except for our beer".

However I'm struggling to figure out how to reword the "we are so unnecessary for the world" bit. Maybe "we are so irrelevant to the world" but this still doesn't sound quite right.

I feel that the sentence a native/fluent speaker would use would have a different structure. Something like "Apart from our beer/ except for our beer we have nothing of interest to the rest of the world."

This isn't true though. Prague is very well known and a famous holiday destination. One of my favourite films, "Before Sunrise" is set there. It's a very pretty city apparently. There are many important Czech inventions and products, also people who did important things, I'm sure. However, I don't know what they are. So I need to google it...

There's a list of inventions here: http://www.radio.cz/en/static/inventors/
Apparently a Czech person invented the sugar cube. I don't use it, but this has tremendous importance to the film industry, particularly for films involving horses.

Oh, contact lenses. Those are important. There are many tennis players these days who would not be able to play at the top level without these. Few players can learn to play top tennis with glasses- it affects one's peripheral vision and balance. Julia benefits a lot from this invention. I wonder if she could hit the ball without them?

And the mechanical pencil.

And yes, Czech girls have a reputation for being good looking. So many guys would want to learn to speak Czech in order to speak to Czech girls.

Actually, the completely inaccurate Uncyclopedia has a nice entry on Czech girls.

"Czech girls are famous all over the world for their attractive looks, lack of personality, and devotion to anything money-related. However a lot of them are actually gremlins in disguise. In a historical event, it is reported that the kid from the film "Mask" once walked into a bar in Prague, slapped down $100 on the table and ordered a drink. It is then reported that within seconds of this happening, he was mobbed by stunningly attractive girls who virtually tore him apart in their attempts to get him into bed, steal his money, then trick him into marrying them, at which point he would bring them to his country, whereupon they would ditch him for the nearest old guy on the verge of death, but who would leave a nice inheritance. There were no survivors"

Naturally we all know this isn't true. Well, actually this story might cause some guys to head to Prague with money to order drinks...

HowardH
Mar 10th, 2012, 11:53 PM
thanks! I always fail and fail and fail! other stupid errors! :tape:I didn´t think about that at all. How could I write "alter" when I mean "older" which is "älterer" :facepalm:

not quite but almost :D "you are so old as my older brother :D

As... as is the correct structure.
"You are as old as my older brother."

"So" is mostly used in the sense of "very". "She looks so old!" "She looks sooooo cuuuute!" "That's so sweet." "So lovely."

It also has many other usages of course, the most popular is as a filler when you don't know what to say. "So... what do you want to do tonight?" However it is not used in comparisons, unless you want to say "You are so old, as old as my grandpa." In other words "you are so old" is an insult.

The rest of the post has been corrected without notes. You might want to compare it with the original.

HowardH
Mar 11th, 2012, 12:10 AM
Nice idea! Actually, very good idea. So i want you to ask you guys; i want to learn a new language. İ have the basics in German, so it is the favorite candidate now. But on the other hand, it is not that a popular language in the world -the opposite happens among Turkish people, there are a lot of Türks who speak german; due to the reasons that you already know and the articles in German; brrrr. İn high school i almost failed in German. However; İ would like to learn spanish; because it is relatively easy compared to German and another candidate French. But although it's common, learning spanish have become "mainstream" in last years. İ want to learn French, but it is disgustingly hard. :lol: And also I'm thinking about learning Russian, but practice is an important thing in language-learning. And also, i study in political science. Maybe you can suggest or recommend one.

Your post has been corrected, without notes though. You may want to compare with the original- I made only a few small changes. I left some letters in lower case because this an acceptable casual style.

If you want a popular language in addition to English, I recommend Chinese. I like that language, particularly the look of the written characters. There are so many people in China, and many of them do not speak English well. They also will be amazed by a foreigner who speaks the language well. It would be very useful and would set you apart from most Turkish people I think- you would have a useful skill. The problem is though, if you find French hard... Chinese is surely harder. However, I think it would be worth it. You should aim to learn languages which are very different from the ones you already know. That way you broaden your horizons.

I love these European languages- German and French especially. However, we need to think about the number of people you will be able to talk to.

Because you already know English fairly well, you will be able to survive in the English-speaking world. This includes most of Europe. Therefore it makes sense to pick up a language from Asia. Then you will have almost the whole continent covered.

If you prefer anime and manga, maybe you would like to learn Japanese. Either way I think you should make your next focus a language from Asia. If you get reasonably good at that, you could add another European language, but I think it's a good idea to focus on increasing the number of people you can talk to. People from Europe tend to speak English well, so European languages are less useful for an English speaker. Even though I know a bit of German, for instance, I never end up using it (apart from the odd word) even if I meet someone who is German. Why? Because they speak English so well.

Rovegun
Mar 11th, 2012, 12:13 AM
I'll leave the words in lower case because this "lower case" style is also used in casual messaging by some English native speakers.



It should be "except for our beer".

However I'm struggling to figure out how to reword the "we are so unnecessary for the world" bit. Maybe "we are so irrelevant to the world" but this still doesn't sound quite right.

I wanted to use "unneeded" but I wasn´t sure it looked so weird to me but "irrelevant" looks better...

I feel that the sentence a native/fluent speaker would use would have a different structure. Something like "Apart from our beer/ except for our beer we have nothing of interest to the rest of the world."

this sounds to me more complicated than I wrote my sentence :D I thought like Czech so I wrote it like I did....

This isn't true though. Prague is very well known and a famous holiday destination. One of my favourite films, "Before Sunrise" is set there. It's a very pretty city apparently. There are many important Czech inventions and products, also people who did important things, I'm sure. However, I don't know what they are. So I need to google it...

There's a list of inventions here: http://www.radio.cz/en/static/inventors/
Apparently a Czech person invented the sugar cube. I don't use it, but this has tremendous importance to the film industry, particularly for films involving horses.

Oh, contact lenses. Those are important. There are many tennis players these days who would not be able to play at the top level without these. Few players can learn to play top tennis with glasses- it affects one's peripheral vision and balance. Julia benefits a lot from this invention. I wonder if she could hit the ball without them?

And the mechanical pencil.

and you forgot the robot! :D yeah, I can agree even though we´re such a small country and nation we have brought some useful things to the world and we can be proud of our history and scientists... but I meant it as a joke because we are so so small on the map....

And yes, Czech girls have a reputation for being good looking. So many guys would want to learn to speak Czech in order to speak to Czech girls.

Actually, the completely inaccurate Uncyclopedia has a nice entry on Czech girls.

"Czech girls are famous all over the world for their attractive looks, lack of personality, and devotion to anything money-related. However a lot of them are actually gremlins in disguise. In a historical event, it is reported that the kid from the film "Mask" once walked into a bar in Prague, slapped down $100 on the table and ordered a drink. It is then reported that within seconds of this happening, he was mobbed by stunningly attractive girls who virtually tore him apart in their attempts to get him into bed, steal his money, then trick him into marrying them, at which point he would bring them to his country, whereupon they would ditch him for the nearest old guy on the verge of death, but who would leave a nice inheritance. There were no survivors"

Naturally we all know this isn't true. Well, actually this story might cause some guys to head to Prague with money to order drinks...[/QUOTE]

... but something of the article suits on our girls :lol: but still foreigners don´t want to speak Czech when they visit our republic or particularly Prague there you can´t hear Czech in the centre of the city... I´ve heard a good joke when Czechs speak English: only when they feel money in the air :lol: hope you understand that...

Rovegun
Mar 11th, 2012, 12:18 AM
As... as is the correct structure.
"You are as old as my older brother."

"So" is mostly used in the sense of "very". "She looks so old!" "She looks sooooo cuuuute!" "That's so sweet." "So lovely."

It also has many other usages of course, the most popular is as a filler when you don't know what to say. "So... what do you want to do tonight?" However it is not used in comparisons, unless you want to say "You are so old, as old as my grandpa." In other words "you are so old" is an insult.

The rest of the post has been corrected without notes. You might want to compare it with the original.

thanks for correcting me! I know that as....as structure pretty well but I didn´t think at all again I was thinking in German and didn´t switch to English :rolleyes:

HowardH
Mar 11th, 2012, 04:33 AM
Je parle un peu de francais. Mais, je suis un peu rouillé. J'ai étudié le français au collège pendant trois ans.

I'll import this here from the ITW thread.

:lol: Well I don't know if it's a slang (anymore) but it's in the common/usual vocabulary. :lol:

Usually we'd say : "Elle est jolie, magnifique, sublime, sexy, déroutante [de...] etc..." -- "Canon" means in the sense of hot, super hot, super sexy. :D

BTW another way of expressing that is : "C'est de la balle" for example 'C'est de la balle cette meuffe/fille' :lol: but don't use that in front of a "Lady". :lol:


"Déroutante" means... something like confusing? I'm trying to think of the right translation. Bewitching? What is the concept here- a girl who is dizzyingly attractive? Beguiling?

What is the meaning of "c'est de la balle"? Obviously the overall sense is that "she's hot" but I don't understand what a ball has to do with it.


I was a big fan of Alizée before lol she was inevitable at the time and probably one of the biggest french international singers we've ever had my guess.

"Inevitable" is not quite the right word. I suppose you mean that "she was everywhere at the time"- on tv, on the radio, on billboards. Perhaps "unavoidable" is closer, but we would definitely tend to say "she was everywhere". Unavoidable and inevitable tend to be used more for events than for people. "After the pilot lost consciousness, it was inevitable that the plane would crash." "The accident was unavoidable." We might however say "it was impossible to avoid her."

In general we never say that someone is inevitable- we might say that something is inevitable. Also you don't tend to say that someone is unavoidable. We would say that something - a car, a boat, an accident- is unavoidable though. For a person, we would say "she was impossible to avoid", or "she was everywhere I looked".


:lol: Thanks Howard -- I'll remember that. In French, we use the verb "disposer" for example "She has lots of character = Elle dispose de beaucoup de carachtère" (extension of the word 'avoir') -- it's the context which allows one to determine the sense of the verb.

EDIT : Oops and I forgot its main sense - "Elle dispose les objets de sa maison à sa manière" : She arranges the objects in her house to her likings. I really though they meant the same in both languages. :lol:

A quick note- it's= it is. Possessive form=its. Confusing for many people, even native speakers. "Its" is like "his" and "hers"- possessive forms with no apostrophes.

Since our word, dispose, comes from same Latin (and indeed Old French) derivation, we also use the word dispose in a similar manner, but the likelihood of each possible meaning is different. The meaning of dispose as "to arrange" is archaic and rare. We would always say that "she arranged the furniture"- never "disposed the furniture" even though it's theoretically possible- no one would understand it. In terms of someone's character, (spelt this way, but the French spelling actually makes a lot more sense to me, phonetically), we usually use the noun form, disposition. "She has a sunny disposition." (A sunny personality). Or "She has a sweet disposition." (A sweet/nice personality).

The emphasis in English is on disposition=tendencies. For instance, we can say "He was abused as a child, which made him disposed to a life of crime." (More likely to commit crimes.)

Wikipedia gives this: "A disposition is a habit, a preparation, a state of readiness, or a tendency to act in a specified way."

For the verb dispose, the online dictionary gives:

dispose [dɪˈspəʊz]
vb
1. (intr; foll by of)
a. to deal with or settle
b. to give, sell, or transfer to another
c. to throw out or away
d. to consume, esp hurriedly
e. to kill
2. to arrange or settle (matters) by placing into correct or final condition "man proposes, God disposes"
3. (tr) to make willing or receptive
4. (tr) to adjust or place in a certain order or position
5. (tr; often foll by to) to accustom or condition
n
an obsolete word for disposal, disposition
[from Old French disposer, from Latin dispōnere to set in different places, arrange, from dis-1 + pōnere to place]
disposer n

Confusing right? I will summarise it. The first form is intransitive, "dispose of". This is by far the most common and most casual form of the word in English. All of the meanings in the first group have the shared concept of "get rid of" or "deal with". This is probably the most common English usage of dispose. As in "after we kill him, how do we dispose of the body?"

The second group of definitions are for the transitive form, "disposes". This is a more formal word, less likely to be used in everyday speech, unless the person has a more formal, educated way of speaking. They all have the shared concept of "arrange" and often have a subtle connotation of "arrange to create a tendency".

"Her past experience with physical abuse disposes her to emotional breakdowns under stress." That is to say her past "arranged her mind in such a way to create a tendency" to have nervous breakdowns.

Incidentally, the noun is different for these two forms of the verb. "Dispose of" becomes "disposal"- rubbish disposal. "Disposes" (someone to tend to have a certain behaviour) becomes "disposition"- a friendly disposition.

Vikapower
Mar 11th, 2012, 06:16 AM
Je parle un peu de francais. Mais, je suis un peu rouillé. J'ai étudié le français au collège pendant trois ans.

Pour quelqu'un de rouiller ce n'est plutôt pas mal. :lol:

"Déroutante" means... something like confusing? I'm trying to think of the right translation. Bewitching? What is the concept here- a girl who is dizzyingly attractive? Beguiling?

'déroutant' is astonishing, disconcerting... in the context a girl would be beautiful at the point of making you speechless. ;)

What is the meaning of "c'est de la balle"? Obviously the overall sense is that "she's hot" but I don't understand what a ball has to do with it.

:lol: Well 'balle' = 'ball' but in the context it makes reference to drugs. :lol: You know for example when a person takes a shot of whatever psychoactive substance and it goes up in there head.

Well these are the effects that phrase makes reference to. ;) So a girl for example would be beautiful and create psychoactive effects similar to drugs. :lol:

Another one, generally not used for girls is 'C'est de la bonne' also a slang for 'she's a hottie' with the same : 'Elle est bonne', 'C'est de la bombe cette meuffe' Warning : Not to use in front a lady if you want a date. :angel:

There are numerous other expressions with 'balle' :

'Etre de la balle' - to be in play
'Cette caisse vaut au moins cent balles' - This car is worth at least a $100.

Now in the original meaning :
'Elle est géniale balle au pied' - She has incredible dribbling skills [with the ball in her feet (soccer)]

A quick note- it's= it is. Possessive form=its. Confusing for many people, even native speakers. "Its" is like "his" and "hers"- possessive forms with no apostrophes.


I think I generally write any without really knowing the difference between both TBH. :scratch: 'It's' is pretty confusing indeed and could be assimilated as a possessive pronoun very easily.

I guess it's just like 'c'est', 'ces' and 's'est' and 'ses' in french -- without forgetting '(Je, Il) sait' from the verbe 'savoir' (to know) or also 'on' and 'ont'. French learners do have a lot of problems with these. :lol:

Confusing right? I will summarise it. The first form is intransitive, "dispose of". This is by far the most common and most casual form of the word in English. All of the meanings in the first group have the shared concept of "get rid of" or "deal with". This is probably the most common English usage of dispose. As in "after we kill him, how do we dispose of the body?"

The second group of definitions are for the transitive form, "disposes". This is a more formal word, less likely to be used in everyday speech, unless the person has a more formal, educated way of speaking. They all have the shared concept of "arrange" and often have a subtle connotation of "arrange to create a tendency".

"Her past experience with physical abuse disposes her to emotional breakdowns under stress." That is to say her past "arranged her mind in such a way to create a tendency" to have nervous breakdowns.

Incidentally, the noun is different for these two forms of the verb. "Dispose of" becomes "disposal"- rubbish disposal. "Disposes" (someone to tend to have a certain behaviour) becomes "disposition"- a friendly disposition.

:yeah:

Banditoo
Mar 11th, 2012, 10:13 AM
:lol: i can speak Bulgarian and Turkish. But if i would could's Turkish is so mush better than mine. :lol:

joy division
Mar 12th, 2012, 12:05 PM
Yes, the question about money or fame cannot be answered nicely.

Jigglypuff's description is a good one. It's romantic but it's too innocent to become serious.

Crush implies simply liking someone: "He has such a big crush on her." A "crush" is by definition an innocent thing. It means you get all shy and flustered around someone. It starts in school when people get crushes on schoolmates. Having a "crush" means that, like a teenager, you are probably too shy to do anything about it.

Celebrity crush means to like a celebrity: "I've got a crush on Hayley Westenra/ Kate Beckinsale/ Camilla Belle "

Similarly, there are other terms like "girl crush". A girl can have a "girl crush" on another girl, where she thinks this other girl is amazing, wonderful, beautiful. Again, innocence and a lack of physical intimacy is implied. A girl who has a girl crush on a girl will not attempt to do anything physical with the other girl, her feelings are too innocent/pure for that.

If someone says "I had such a big crush on so-and-so in high school" it is implied that this person never acted on that crush.

Okay, I see.
In Germany we would use different terms for the several contexts.

"I've got a crush on Hayley Westenra/ Kate Beckinsale/ Camilla Belle or Julia Görges "
Ich stehe (total) auf Hayley..., in the sense of being a big fan of or adoring somebody

In the teenager context -
"I had such a big crush on so-and-so in high school"
Ich war (total) verknallt in ... während meiner Schulzeit. In the sense of being in love without success.:hug::D
There are many different other similar terms in German as in English. The two mentioned expression you can use without any shame or other limitations.:lol:

HowardH
Mar 12th, 2012, 01:34 PM
Okay, I see.
In Germany we would use different terms for the several contexts.

"I've got a crush on Hayley Westenra/ Kate Beckinsale/ Camilla Belle or Julia Görges "
Ich stehe (total) auf Hayley..., in the sense of being a big fan of or adoring somebody

In the teenager context -
"I had such a big crush on so-and-so in high school"
Ich war (total) verknallt in ... während meiner Schulzeit. In the sense of being in love without success.:hug::D
There are many different other similar terms in German as in English. The two mentioned expression you can use without any shame or other limitations.:lol:

Interesting to see the German versions. You understand the "crush" concept pretty clearly now. In love, often without success, usually mentioned in terms of a crush you had when you were young that you never acted on and probably never told anyone about.

We often talk about people having a "schoolgirl crush" or "schoolboy crush".

If someone has a crush on Hugh Grant, for instance, it means that they would probably not expect to have a relationship with that person.

But there are some other variations, for instance there are songs which have the lyrics "I've got a crush on you".

In real life I don't think many people with a crush are usually brave enough to say this :lol:. That's why they are in love songs, they symbolise the feelings of the people who cannot say it out loud, and these people identify with the lyrics in the song. A lot of love songs are like that, they say the feelings that people dare not say themselves.

A big part of the concept is feeling shy and having difficulty working up the courage to approach the person they like. Many young people prefer to keep their crush a secret, since then they can admire the person from afar without risk of rejection. Generally people with a crush who are brave enough to approach the person they like might just ask them out to a movie or to go to an event with them. They would normally not mention anything like "I've got a massive crush on you", they would try to act casual and relaxed.

Having a crush on someone is similar to being a secret admirer. However, someone might "find out" or "discover" a person's (often secret) crush on them, and this might (with luck) turn into a relationship.

Success is possibly for someone who has a crush. For instance, Kate Middleton is often said to have had a "schoolgirl crush" on Prince William when she was young. She had posters of him in her bedroom, things like that. That's what a celebrity crush is like- however in rare cases, this may turn into an actual relationship. But in general a lot of people have crushes on Brad Pitt, Angeline Jolie, Alizee, Natalie Portman, but they don't expect to have a relationship with them. It's a mixture of being a fan and adoring them from afar.

The Jets song "Crush on you"(1985), covered by Aaron Carter (not the best cover ever :o, although some young girls might disagree) now remixed by dubstep group Nero, has the following lyrics. These lyrics show the similarity of the concept of having a crush on someone to being a secret admirer:

How did you know 'cause I never told
You found out, I've got a crush on you
No more charades, My heart's been displayed,
You found out, I've got a crush on you
You must have heard it From my best friend
She's always talkin when she should be listenin
Can't keep a secret to save her life
But still I trusted her with all I felt inside
I never knew a rumor could spread so fast
(cause now the) Word is out!
All over town
That I'm longing for you

Original by The Jets (1985)
Nm_QilrHkh8

Aaron Carter version (1997)
NYASWeyURMk

Nero remix (2011). The video for this one takes a darker turn and shows the connections between a schoolgirl crush and obsession.
YWK6dQOdri0

Also, this is the trailer for a 1993 movie, The Crush, Alicia Silverstone's first role (I think). Alicia Silverstone plays a young schoolgirl who gets a crush on a guy staying in a room for rent at her house. The crush turns obsessive and she becomes insanely jealous when he refuses her advances and hooks up with a woman his own age. The concept is complex but is linked to "schoolgirl/schoolboy", "first love", "naivety/naiveté", "immaturity", "lack of reciprocation". A quiz in a magazine aimed at teenage girls might ask "is it love or just a crush?" The questions would then go on to try to find out whether the teenage reader's feelings for a boy were "just a crush" (naive, innocent, or immature feelings) or love (mature, understanding, caring, capable of sustaining a real relationship).

Alicia is more well known for her starring role in the movie "Clueless" (1995). I had a big crush on her when I was in my early teens. She may be older than me, but she's still gorgeous- married however though now.

VqpJV20A5eA

Alicia's most well known film, Clueless (1995). I remember that film critic Roger Ebert wrote that the comment about tennis balls flying at people's noses was worth the price of admission alone (2:15). Also, RIP Brittany Murphy.
yHDcD_xhwAo

everythingtaboo
Mar 12th, 2012, 01:50 PM
I learned French in high school... and now couldn't speak even the basics of it to save my life. Such a shame cause it's such a lovely language.

I really wish I had the devotion to learn another language. I work full time 50-60 hour weeks and never find the time to sit down with a tutor to learn a second, sadly. If I did I would love to learn German.

Oh... almost forgot, I know some Indonesian as a result of too many trips to Bali. :lol: Selamat Pagi. Nama saya Amy. :)

Patrick345
Mar 12th, 2012, 02:01 PM
:lol: I can see the legend about our Czech girls beauty crossed our mutual border :lol:

anyway, let´s keep this thread on topic....

Well great beer and hot chicks. Are there better reasons to learn a language for a guy? Ich denke nicht. :p I wish I had learned Czech as a child, but all I learned were some curse words from my grandpa. :tape: Only been to my mothers hometown Loket once, but at least I can always see it in the James Bond movie Casino Royale. :lol:

LinusVanPelt
Mar 12th, 2012, 02:20 PM
Well great beer and hot chicks. Are there better reasons to learn a language for a guy? Ich denke nicht. :p I wish I had learned Czech as a child, but all I learned were some curse words from my grandpa. :tape: Only been to my mothers hometown Loket once, but at least I can always see it in the James Bond movie Casino Royale. :lol:

Dude, you are german. Great beer and hot chicks?? These are Germany's features :lol: but Yes czech girls are hotter i guess. German girls are more.. chubby and massy -Ofcourse this what i saw- but generally Germans are pretty hot you know. Not hot as fins or hungarians but you know..

Vikapower
Mar 12th, 2012, 03:21 PM
Czech is really difficult. I can remember I had tried it when I was looking for another language to learn a year a year and a half ago and gave up. :lol: I also tried Serbian, Croat, Polish etc. :lol:

I learned French in high school... and now couldn't speak even the basics of it to save my life. Such a shame cause it's such a lovely language.

I really wish I had the devotion to learn another language. I work full time 50-60 hour weeks and never find the time to sit down with a tutor to learn a second, sadly. If I did I would love to learn German.

Oh... almost forgot, I know some Indonesian as a result of too many trips to Bali. :lol: Selamat Pagi. Nama saya Amy. :)

I wonder what makes people thing that French is such a beautiful language ? :lol: I've always thought that Russian and similar are really the most beautiful sounding languages and still are for that matter IMO.

Is Indonesian similar like Sanskrit ? Sanskrit is really nice calligraphy. :)

Rovegun
Mar 12th, 2012, 04:13 PM
Czech is really difficult. I can remember I had tried it when I was looking for another language to learn a year a year and a half ago and gave up. :lol: I also tried Serbian, Croat, Polish etc. :lol:


I wonder what makes people thing that French is such a beautiful language ? :lol: I've always thought that Russian and similar are really the most beautiful sounding languages and still are for that matter IMO.

Is Indonesian similar like Sanskrit ? Sanskrit is really a nice calligraphy. :)

Czech is pretty difficult also for some Czechs as well :lol: therefore it is so much easier for us to learn a different language (I don´t count Hungarian or Finnish they are a different level:lol:)...

in my opinion I don´t find French such a beautiful language :D in my opinion English, Italian or Spanish sounds much nicer to my ears...

Well great beer and hot chicks. Are there better reasons to learn a language for a guy? Ich denke nicht. :p I wish I had learned Czech as a child, but all I learned were some curse words from my grandpa. :tape: Only been to my mothers hometown Loket once, but at least I can always see it in the James Bond movie Casino Royale. :lol:

have you been to the Loket Castle as well? some curse words? oh what a lucky guy you are :lol:

I don´t think there are many reasons for a guy to learn Czech just only if he likes the country... 90% of visitors go to Prague and they have no problem to speak English there if they stay in the centre of Prague they can be calm...

everythingtaboo
Mar 12th, 2012, 04:48 PM
I wonder what makes people thing that French is such a beautiful language ? :lol: I've always thought that Russian and similar are really the most beautiful sounding languages and still are for that matter IMO.

Is Indonesian similar like Sanskrit ? Sanskrit is really nice calligraphy. :)

Everyone has different tastes. I used to date a French guy and what attracted me to him most was his accent! :hearts:

I'm not sure about Sanskrit. Like I said, I know the basics in Indonesian. Greetings, some manner phrases, and the numbers for bartering with locals at the markets.

Vikapower
Mar 12th, 2012, 05:35 PM
Czech is pretty difficult also for some Czechs as well :lol: therefore it is so much easier for us to learn a different language (I don´t count Hungarian or Finnish they are a different level:lol:)...

in my opinion I don´t find French such a beautiful language :D in my opinion English, Italian or Spanish sounds much nicer to my ears...

:lol: That's what I heard -- I know there are lots of unnecessary grammatical points in the Czech language.

Oops and I forgot Italian, I really like the language but have been too lazy to learn it really since French and Italian are the same I can generally understand on the net what their news papers etc. are talking about -- when they talk though it's much difficult.

Vikapower
Mar 12th, 2012, 05:35 PM
Everyone has different tastes. I used to date a French guy and what attracted me to him most was his accent! :hearts:

:lol: Ok, well I'm not too much fanatic of the accent french people have when they speak English, it's really weird but strangers tend to like it so [...] :lol:

I'm not sure about Sanskrit. Like I said, I know the basics in Indonesian. Greetings, some manner phrases, and the numbers for bartering with locals at the markets.

Mmm, well the basics at least that's cool -- I see you're from Belgium right ? You're on the Clijsters of Justine part of the country ? Frenchie of English side ? :devil:

:lol: I hope it's not a taboo to talk about that. :angel:

everythingtaboo
Mar 12th, 2012, 06:00 PM
:lol: Ok, well I'm not too much fanatic of the accent french people have when they speak English, it's really weird but strangers tend to like it so [...] :lol:

Well, we love all accents here. Seriously boys, if you want a girl-- come to Australia. You'll be snatched up in no time.

Mmm, well the basics at least that's cool -- I see you're from Belgium right ? You're on the Clijsters of Justine part of the country ? Frenchie of English side ? :devil:

:lol: I hope it's not a taboo to talk about that. :angel:

Actually I'm not from Belgium! I'm one of those users who put their favourite player's country as their own. I'm born in England and raised in Australia. Confusing right? :lol:

Patrick345
Mar 12th, 2012, 06:07 PM
have you been to the Loket Castle as well? some curse words? oh what a lucky guy you are :lol:


Probably I was still very young. I only remember the old railroad bridge over the river, where we re-enacted "Stand by Me", buying ridiculously cheap Phil Collins tapes in Karlovy Vary, and a garden hose with a watering can attachment as a shower in the hotel room. I´d guess they have come around since then with the hotel standards. :lol:

joy division
Mar 12th, 2012, 06:08 PM
Mmm, well the basics at least that's cool -- I see you're from Belgium right ? You're on the Clijsters of Justine part of the country ? Frenchie or English side :devil:

:lol: I hope it's not a taboo to talk about that. :angel:

Not to lecture you but it`s Dutch.:lol:

Lisickifan84
Mar 12th, 2012, 06:25 PM
Czech is really difficult. I can remember I had tried it when I was looking for another language to learn a year a year and a half ago and gave up. :lol: I also tried Serbian, Croat, Polish etc. :lol:



I wonder what makes people thing that French is such a beautiful language ? :lol: I've always thought that Russian and similar are really the most beautiful sounding languages and still are for that matter IMO.

Is Indonesian similar like Sanskrit ? Sanskrit is really nice calligraphy. :)

Really? Russian? http://www.playerworlds.de/forum/images/smilies/neiiin.gif

But it's your taste ;) :)

Beautiful because, when you hear someone speaking french, it sounds like a melody. (for me).
The same with the italian language. I love to hear it. Very nice.

I love how the british english sounds, especially when I see a TV show and an artist speaks with that accent. It's even better if that artist is a woman :lol:
Very sweet, I like it a lot.

I love also the australian accent. I can understand the most of what they are telling and it sounds nice too.

everythingtaboo
Mar 12th, 2012, 06:40 PM
Really? Russian? http://www.playerworlds.de/forum/images/smilies/neiiin.gif

But it's your taste ;) :)

Beautiful because, when you hear someone speaking french, it sounds like a melody. (for me).
The same with the italian language. I love to hear it. Very nice.

I love how the british english sounds, especially when I see a TV show and an artist speaks with that accent. It's even better if that artist is a woman :lol:
Very sweet, I like it a lot.

I love also the australian accent. I can understand the most of what they are telling and it sounds nice too.

How about an accent that combines the English accent with an Australian one? Cause that's me... or so I'm told. :lol:

Lisickifan84
Mar 12th, 2012, 06:49 PM
How about an accent that combines the English accent with an Australian one? Cause that's me... or so I'm told. :lol:

Will you marry me? http://www.playerworlds.de/forum/images/smilies/herz1.gif

:lol: :lol:

Rovegun
Mar 12th, 2012, 06:55 PM
Well, we love all accents here. Seriously boys, if you want a girl-- come to Australia. You'll be snatched up in no time.

:lol: aha, maybe that´s that reason why my friend still hasn´t come back to the Czech Republic from Sydney :lol: he´s already been there for about 1 year and posts some pics on facebook with many girls :D

maybe our Czech accent is attractive :D

Vikapower
Mar 12th, 2012, 09:45 PM
Not to lecture you but it`s Dutch.:lol:

:facepalm: Yes you're right.

Really? Russian? http://www.playerworlds.de/forum/images/smilies/neiiin.gif

But it's your taste ;) :)

Beautiful because, when you hear someone speaking french, it sounds like a melody. (for me).
The same with the italian language. I love to hear it. Very nice.

I love how the british english sounds, especially when I see a TV show and an artist speaks with that accent. It's even better if that artist is a woman :lol:
Very sweet, I like it a lot.

I love also the australian accent. I can understand the most of what they are telling and it sounds nice too.

:lol: Russian is a cool nice sounding language IMO -- I really love the British accent especially when it's girls too :devil: not specifically and artist though... for example I really love to hear Lily Donaldson talk :hearts: ah no seriously it's really cool, flowing and relaxing pretty nice. :lol:

:lol: I'm already too accustomed to french, lol it's a nice language I know but my perception about it is a little bit different from a non speaker, n'es-ce pas ? :angel:

Vikapower
Mar 12th, 2012, 09:51 PM
Will you marry me? http://www.playerworlds.de/forum/images/smilies/herz1.gif

:lol: :lol:

Non elle ne veux pas. :o C'est assez désobligeant comme demande Mr. sur un forum consacré au tennis. :fiery: :lol:

Well, we love all accents here. Seriously boys, if you want a girl-- come to Australia. You'll be snatched up in no time.

Actually I'm not from Belgium! I'm one of those users who put their favourite player's country as their own. I'm born in England and raised in Australia. Confusing right? :lol:

:lol: Ah ok, yep confusing -- :lol:

hankmoody
Mar 13th, 2012, 12:54 AM
So much french in this thread. I feel like Joey::lol::lol:

DqwzvtjeYBQ

BTW: I think that the italian accent (and language) is the best! Especially when it comes to arguing and cursing!:D:hearts: Just awesome!

Lisickifan84
Mar 13th, 2012, 01:22 AM
So much french in this thread. I feel like Joey::lol::lol:


Friends :cool: One of the best TV Shows ever, miss it :sad:



BTW: I think that the italian accent (and language) is the best! Especially when it comes to arguing and cursing!:D:hearts: Just awesome!

:yeah:

Vikapower
Mar 13th, 2012, 02:52 AM
:haha: OMG Great video :sobbing: but that was an easy line 'Je m'appelle Claude' any one could say that :sobbing:

Phoebe is really good, I didn't know she spoke french. ;)

everythingtaboo
Mar 13th, 2012, 07:13 AM
So much french in this thread. I feel like Joey::lol::lol:

DqwzvtjeYBQ

BTW: I think that the italian accent (and language) is the best! Especially when it comes to arguing and cursing!:D:hearts: Just awesome!

:lol: I remember this. Gotta love Joey!

everythingtaboo
Mar 13th, 2012, 07:15 AM
:lol: aha, maybe that´s that reason why my friend still hasn´t come back to the Czech Republic from Sydney :lol: he´s already been there for about 1 year and posts some pics on facebook with many girls :D

maybe our Czech accent is attractive :D

I would say you are right about your friend. I like the Czech accent. Really, it's all European accents that do it for us girls here so I bet he is having a great time in Australia! ;)

joy division
Mar 13th, 2012, 09:11 AM
Eieiei is a word?

No. it`s an exclamation when something goes wrong, or when you find it difficult to get something managed.
I guess Julia finds that question difficult to answer and most probably also silly and gives the journalist a hint with it what she thinks about it.
The question is silly indeed and a little bit delicate, because in the former German Democratic Republic they used to do nonsense like that but not in West-Germany even in former times.

When the Frenchies have pain they say "aye":lol:, you might have heard that. We pronounce it exactly like that but 3 or 5 in more serious cases:D times consecutively.
Btw. we say "au" like Howard or "Autsch" like ouch, when we feel pain.
Andrea grunt sounds close to "ouch", or something like "Aufschlag" (serve). No wonder that she`s hurt now.:rolleyes:;)

HowardH
Mar 13th, 2012, 09:57 AM
Hm, we tend to use the same sounds. Ow or ouch for pain. For what Julia is saying then, maybe we would use "argh". Often spelt without the r, and often with repeated letters for emphasis. Aaaaagh, aaagh, aargh, aarrghh.

"Aaargh, this is so damn frustrating"

Wait, that would be too rude to the person asking the questions... what would we say...

Maybe "oi"?
Or even the exact same sound- aye aye aye. This could be confused with "aye" for agreement, as in "aye aye, captain", but roll your eyes at the same time and it's easily understood. Not written down that often, but I've heard people saying this kind of sound.

joy division
Mar 13th, 2012, 10:26 AM
Hm, we tend to use the same sounds. Ow or ouch for pain. For what Julia is saying then, maybe we would use "argh". Often spelt without the r, and often with repeated letters for emphasis. Aaaaagh, aaagh, aargh, aarrghh.

"Aaargh, this is so damn frustrating"

Wait, that would be too rude to the person asking the questions... what would we say...

Maybe "oi"?
Or even the exact same sound- aye aye aye. This coulc be confused with "aye" for agreement, "aye aye, captain", but roll your eyes at the same time and it's easily understood. Not written down that often.

When it`s meant ironically then we say it more decent. And we don`t say it like in aye... aye captain but as in one word.

HowardH
Mar 13th, 2012, 10:57 AM
No. it`s an exclamation when something goes wrong, or when you find it difficult to get something managed.
I guess Julia finds that question difficult to answer and most probably also silly and gives the journalist a hint with it what she thinks about it.
The question is silly indeed and a little bit delicate, because in the former German Democratic Republic they used to do nonsense like that but not in West-Germany even in former times.

I've been thinking about this part. What do you mean? Wasn't the question just a simple one, asking her about her first match against Mona in the juniors? How is it a delicate question?

joy division
Mar 13th, 2012, 11:13 AM
Q. We were talking to Mona here the other day, and she said she thinks it's coincidence that all of you German women are big women. Is it? One can think that Germany has encouraged big girls to play tennis.
Well, I wouldn't say we are big girls, but we are maybe good players.

It was in concern of this.
In the former "DDR" and also other socialist countries there was some kind current method to pick out kids with certain physical marks just for reason to make them successful in special sports.

It was a big theme in the media`s of West-Germany and was pretty proscribed here.
Since the incorporation of East-Germany things have changed a lot and Julia might be too young to have it still in her mind.

HowardH
Mar 15th, 2012, 10:38 AM
Zuckerschnute:)

Means something like... sweetheart? The word is pretty cute I must say.

joy division
Mar 15th, 2012, 11:34 AM
Means something like... sweetheart? The word is pretty cute I must say.

No, word by word it means something like sugarsnoot. I don`t believe that it`s a regular expression, it just came into my mind when I saw the picture. :lol:
"Schnute" is low Northern German dialect.
The most used expression is "eine Schnute ziehen" - "to pout".
You have the word "snout" in English.
In those words you can clearly see that English and German language have the same origin and are very close despite it sounds very different.

HowardH
Mar 20th, 2012, 03:18 PM
Looking at the Miami thread I can see that people also sometimes use the German abbreviations for SF, QF etc.

It seems that HF=SF (Halbfinale=semis)
And also that VF=QF (Viertelfinale=quarters)

Any other common tennis-related abbreviations of which I should be aware, which differ in German and English?

selesia
Mar 20th, 2012, 03:31 PM
^^

Rückhand=RH = Backhand=BH
Vorhand=VH = Forehand=FH

Oh man, I made these mistakes with HF&VF :banghead:

Rovegun
Mar 20th, 2012, 03:34 PM
@Howard I would like to ask you about something very similar to you asked about our German fellows... I am not sure when to use in tennis topic the QF or QFs, the final or finals etc. is there any rule?

Vikapower
Mar 20th, 2012, 05:56 PM
I think the QF's' points to all both 'quarter final' taking place -- but I've never really understood the utilization of 'final"s"' in plural like seen here --

I mean I know there are both men and women finals but I'm certain to have heard English speaking people say for example 'Welcome to the Dubaï 2012 final"s"' speaking about just only the women's one -- :lol: it's just an example, don't go searching the english videos of Julia versus Aga in Dubaï to find the 'error' or the criminal. :p

HowardH
Mar 21st, 2012, 07:17 AM
Are you guys going to be happy with me.

Just got back from Crandon Park--fulfilled lots of requests, but the main one for this forum was Jules. Got about 7-8 minutes of vid of her in practice with Flavia and some nice pics (really pretty!). Julia hurt her leg a bit, and favored it the rest of practice. Not sure how this will affect her.

Also got Pironkova. ;)

MANY others.... uploading later. stay tuned.

^^ :lol: Why would we not be happy ? :worship: Can't wait to see all. :yeah:


This isn't actually a question. It's an expression meaning "I think you guys are going to be happy about this." Often it is preceded by "boy", which makes it even clearer. "Boy are you guys going to be happy with me." Sometimes it's preceded by "man" instead, which doesn't change the meaning of the sentence at all. "Man are you guys going to be happy with me."

Now onto Rovegun's question in the next post.

HowardH
Mar 21st, 2012, 08:25 AM
@Howard I would like to ask you about something very similar to you asked about our German fellows... I am not sure when to use in tennis topic the QF or QFs, the final or finals etc. is there any rule?

I'm sure there is a pattern.

Firstly QFs is plural and QF is singular.

"There are 4 quarterfinals to be played today. The first quarterfinal is between Azarenka and Jankovic."

Secondly the plural form can also be used to refer to the round as a whole.

"Julia wins her third round match and now is in the quarterfinals/in the quarters." (Into the next round in general.)
Similarly :"In the semis, in the semifinals." (In the semifinal round.)

The singular form refers to a specific match. QF= quarterfinal match, SF= semifinal match, F=final match.
"Julia's quarterfinal with Azarenka will be on Thursday."
"This is the first semifinal of the day."

There's only one final in tennis, so you say "Julia wins and is into the final."
However, in other sports you can have final series, where more than one match determines the winner. The NBA is like this. In this case you can say "The Chicago Bulls are going to the finals."

These words are also used as adjectives. In this case the usage is quite flexible.

"Julia books a semifinal berth" (specifically this refers to her upcoming semifinal match)
"Julia books a semifinals berth" (this refers to the semifinal round in general)
"Semis berth" is also sometimes used, but I prefer not to use that. Instead I would write: "Julia books a place in the semis."

The last day of the tournament is often "finals day" when the singles and doubles finals are played. Maybe grammatically this should be "finals' day" but I think people are too lazy to write that. On the other hand people might refer to it as "the final day of the tournament" in which case the word "final" refers only to the date and not to the draw.

Incidentally "finals" is also used to refer to final exams. "I have finals coming up. I need to study."

selesia
Mar 22nd, 2012, 01:08 AM
Gimpy Julia :sad:.

What does this mean? :)


Are you guys going to be happy with me. This isn't actually a question. It's an expression meaning "I think you guys are going to be happy about this."

I also understand this as a question. Ok, but how have I know this is a expression if there is inversion (first the verb: is, are; then the noun and the rest) ??
:wavey:

HowardH
Mar 22nd, 2012, 09:15 AM
What does this mean? :)


Gimpy is a little bit of a slang word. You wouldn't use it in an official exam. Wiktionary defines it as:

Adjective

gimpy (comparative gimpier, superlative gimpiest)

1. limping, lame, with crippled legs.  
or 2. exhibiting deficiencies associated with the derogatory term "gimp", such as might inspire discomfort or revulsion

One of the kittens has a gimpy eye.

So in general it means crippled, and usually refers to someone who limps. "He has a gimpy leg."

I also understand this as a question. Ok, but how do I know this is a expression if there is inversion (first the verb: is, are; then the noun and the rest) ??
:wavey:

Yes, you are right, there is inversion there which normally indicates a question. However there is no question mark.

This is a tricky area, I'm actually trying to remember what this form is called. Maybe we should define it as a declarative rhetorical question. So I guess you guys are right, it is a kind of question. A rhetorical question. There are apparently four kinds of rhetorical questions:

Rhetorical Questions

Imperative (Would you stop talking?)= Stop talking please.
Declarative (Isn't that nice? Or "Isn't that nice.") = that isn't nice.
Exclamatory (How could you? Or "How could you!") = I can't believe you did that!
Affirmational (Right? Okay?) = Please agree with me.

Wikipedia indicates that "Depending on the context, a rhetorical question may be punctuated by a question mark (?), full stop (.), or exclamation mark (!)"

Sometimes there will be an extra clue, such as a "boy" or "man" preceding the sentence. In spoken English you can hear the different intonation compared to a question. In general though if there is no question mark it isn't a question, unless it's a mistake.

Some examples:
A conversation from "Friends". The other questions are normal, but the last sentence has a similar structure to Aravanecaravan's "Are you guys going to be happy with me."

Rachel: I can't, I can't wait that long. You have to do something...knock that door down!
Ross: I would, but I bruise like a peach. Besides, you know, everything's gonna be fine. The baby's sleeping.
Rachel: But what if she jumped out of the bassinet?
Ross: Can't hold her own head up, but yeah, jumped.
Rachel: Oh my God, I left the water running.
Ross: Rach, you did not leave the water running. Please, just pull yourself together, okay?
Rachel: Wait, ah, did I leave the stove on?
Ross: You haven't cooked since 1996.
Rachel: Is the window open? Because if a window's open, a bird could fly in there and...
Ross: Oh my god, you know what, yeah, I think you're right. I think, you know what.. listen, listen!
Rachel: Huh?
Ross: A, a pigeon. No, no wait, no, no, an eagle flew in! Landed on the stove and caught fire! The baby, seeing this, jumps across the apartment to the mighty bird's aid! The eagle, however, misconstrues this as an act of aggression and grabs the baby in its talon! Meanwhile, the faucet fills the apartment with water! Baby and bird still ablaze are locked in a death grip, swirling around the whirlpool that fills the apartment!
Rachel: Boy are you gonna be sorry if that's true.

2j2beHtZlqM

The last sentence means "You will be sorry (or I will make you feel sorry) if that's true."

The "Boy" and the intonation makes it clear.

Sometimes other interjections such as "Well" are added before the inverted verb and noun. Here's an article with the title:"Well Isn't This Great: 900 Tropical Bird Species At Risk of Extinction This Century"

http://motherboard.vice.com/2012/3/5/well-isn-t-this-great-900-tropical-bird-species-at-risk-of-extinction-this-century--2

The first sentence means "Well this isn't great." The well isn't necessary though. The title could also be "Isn't this wonderful: 900 Tropical Bird Species At Risk of Extinction This Century." But the well makes it more clear, I think.

Sometimes you just have to be familiar with the figure of speech, otherwise it might be hard to understand.

Other examples: Well, aren't you pleased as punch? (=you're pleased as punch.)
Well aren't you a happy camper. Or "Well aren't you a happy camper?" (= You look like a happy camper.)
Well aren't you special? Or "Well then. Aren't you special." (=you aren't all that special/valuable)
Boy are you going to be disappointed when the truth comes out. (=you are going to be disappointed)
Boy is she going to be happy to see you. (= she is going to be happy to see you)

"Am I glad to see you." (=I'm glad to see you.)
Also could be "Boy am I glad to see you."
The "Am I glad" structure is really common.
"I just finished my exams! Boy am I glad that's over."

It's generally easier to understand this kind of thing when spoken because of the intonation clues. Not sure I can explain this any better at the moment. Native speakers get used to certain phrases carrying a certain meaning, but the absence of a question mark and an odd meaning if the question is taken literally help to give clues.

Eleganter
Mar 22nd, 2012, 11:50 AM
This thread is really wonderful. Thanks to everybody who explains things in a very comprehensible way, especially HowardH. I never imagined I could learn english in a tennis forum, but actually I do

joy division
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:02 PM
They call her so. From Jules = to Gools :shrug:
But Jules = Geools, or not ?:scratch:
The net dictionary gives me :
tools,cools,goods,goose,pools,wools,fools,drools,g oals,schools and goofs.
So Gool(s) is just a nick name and has no meaning at all ?

Lisickifan84
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:02 PM
But Jules = Geools, or not ?:scratch:
The net dictionary gives me :
tools,cools,goods,goose,pools,wools,fools,drools,g oals,schools and goofs.
So Gool(s) is just a nick name and has no meaning at all ?

Yes I think so. Anybody else?

selesia
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:03 PM
Does anybody know what means GOOL(S) ?

It is supposed that this word has a negative meaning, but I'm too poor in English :shrug: (better to continue in the language thread):

http://www.urbandictionary.com/thesaurus.php?term=gools

So Gool(s) is just a nick name and has no meaning at all ?

No, it has meaning.

joy division
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:07 PM
^^^
Okay, I see. Thanks for the link. I have to change the dictionary.:D

selesia
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:09 PM
I've heard statements of the French, Polish and English people, that it is a terrible nickname. Americans gave it to her :shrug:

joy division
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:12 PM
I've heard statements of the French, Polish and English people, that it is a terrible nickname. Americans gave it to her :shrug:

I don`t know, but I think it sounds pretty much like a thing.:shrug:

selesia
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:36 PM
I'm curious what Howard will tell, because it sounds awful:

[
II. One who you would: a. lick, b. suck, c. nibble, d. flirt with, e. have sexual relations with

III. One who makes you: a. flip, b. crazy, c. nutty, d. pass out, e. drool, f. fantasize, G. (if girl) wet,
h. (if guy) hard, i. masturbate
]

Something like brainlessboobs or other terms from GM.

katshearts
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:40 PM
I don't like "Gools" as a nickname either. It sounds terrible, Jule is better :D

ps - this thread is great.

Lisickifan84
Mar 24th, 2012, 02:47 PM
bad nickname http://www.playerworlds.de/forum/images/smilies/klop.gif

@Silesia: Thank you for that link, now I'm a little smarter.

Yes Jule is much way better. http://www.playerworlds.de/forum/images/smilies/beifall.gif

joy division
Mar 24th, 2012, 03:17 PM
The nice pics posted by Cilly in the picture thread have subtitles, a good idea, imo.
The author tries out some German. For the nit-pickers among us, it`s wrong.;)

The ball was auf!
"Auf" means open in German in this context.:D
Rightly - Der Ball war "aus" (out) or "drin/innerhalb" (in).

Das forehand.
Hand is feminine in German, so it`s "Die Hand und die Vorhand".

HowardH
Mar 24th, 2012, 03:29 PM
Hmm. I never thought "Gools" had any negative connotation. It's just a fun nickname, from rhyming slang, Julia Gulia or Julia Goolia. It isn't a word, so you wouldn't find it in a normal dictionary.

I haven't heard of that previously given definition which people are discussing above. If you ask people here "what's "Gools"?" no one would know.

People are right, to sound exactly like Jules it would have to be Geools. However, the point is that it sounds a bit different and is therefore comic.

Blogger Forty Deuce (she loves Jules, by the way), wrote this when Julia won Stuttgart.

What a week and a half for Goolia and her German mates. To come out and beat Sam and Caro, on clay, on successive days, in front of your family and friends in your home tournament? That's nothing short of a glory run. Gools will make her Top 30 debut this week and she stopped Caro grabbing her 16th career title, which, get this, would tie her with ELENA DEMENTIEVA. That's a crazy effing stat.

In other words, ALL HAIL JULIA GOOLIA

The most likely original movie reference is probably Julia Gulia. The Wedding Singer, 1998. (Comedy with Adam Sandler, Drew Barrymore).

Julia in this movie is the "nice girl" whom Adam's character, Robbie, a kind hearted but poor wedding singer, is in love with. She however is engaged to marry a womanising, cheating and dishonest man by the name of Glenn Gulia.

There is a well known scene where Julia, in front of a mirror, pretends to introduce herself with her new surname after she gets married. When she tries to say "It's nice to meet you, I'm Mrs Julia Gulia" she breaks down and cries. But then she pretends that she married Robbie and says "Hi, I'm pleased to meet you, I'm Mrs Robbie Hart." This makes her smile, because she is really in love with Robbie.

Urban dictionary gives this interesting definition. I wouldn't say it's official or anything (Urban dictionary is less reliable than Wikipedia but it also contains new slang terms which cannot be found in other places) but it summarises the concept that Julia Gulia is a sweet girl and also implies that she is the girl whom you fall in love with, which originates from the sweet nature of the movie character. This is also why the definition contains a jumble of feelings- it reflects the tumultuous feelings of being in love with a girl. I have corrected the odd spelling error in the definition:

Honest to a fault, Julia Gulia is most often misunderstood. She is an eventful box of treasures. A contradiction and amazing for it. She is a cross between June Cleaver and Samantha. She has a backbone of steel yet she breaks like china. Deep and passionate yet frivolous and funny. Nothing gets past her yet she's been fooled once or twice. She doesn’t intentionally try to hurt others yet like most everyone, has hurt them:( She'll give you the shirt off her back never expecting it to be repaid yet if ever left barren she would appreciate it if you held her hand. She will take care of you and doesn’t want to be taken care of yet when she needs care taking you're expected to do it. She doesn’t like drama yet gets caught up in it. She doesn’t like to be alone yet loves it. Wants her space yet tends to smother. Doesn’t care what others think of her yet doesn’t want to be looked down on. Confident yet insecure. She's a fighter yet she's given up more than once. Doesn’t like to talk too much yet on occasion, talks too much. A good listener yet sometimes she doesn’t hear you. She'll give advice yet won’t take it. She knows who she is yet she is still searching. She is a bundle of joy and the sexiest woman that you will ever lay eyes on!
Her boyfriend might say something like this to her, "Julia Gulia you are the most beautiful woman in the world", "Julia Gulia, you are the future mother of my children", "Julia Gulia, you are the best thing that has ever happened to me"!
His friends might say something like, "you're the luckiest guy on the planet to be with Julia Gulia"!

There is no negative association, actually it's positive. Many girls named Julia will call themselves Julia Gulia, possibly giving themselves this nickname on websites like myspace, bebo, facebook.

I don't think the nickname sounds amazing, but it has nice origins.

I prefer the sound of Julia, however, when a female poster such as Forty Deuce calls her Gools affectionately I think it's fine.

The reason some English speakers may dislike the nickname Jules is because we may tend to think of this as a male name, like Jules Verne, who might be the only person named Jules many English speakers have ever heard of.

I quite like the nickname "Jules" though because of the lovely (and also brunette) Jules Asner.

I have never heard of that definition which Urban dictionary gives for Gools. Anyway, even if that's true, it's not the reason Julia is called Gools. It originates from bloggers and references a movie from 1998. Also, even that definition basically defines Gools as a gorgeous girl. The extra stuff is just someone being impolite while defining "gorgeous girl".

joy division
Mar 24th, 2012, 03:40 PM
Thanks Howard for your extent information about Gool(ia).
It comes close to a degree dissertation.

I couldn`t find any meaning for this word before Silesia gave me the link.
When you look at German words who sound similar to Gool you just can find Gully (drain), Gülle (slurry) or Gulag.
Therefore we might not find it very attractive as a nick name.:lol:

selesia
Mar 24th, 2012, 03:41 PM
@ Howard

You did something like bypass the topic ;)

Julia Gulia is something else: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=gulia
and Gools is something else.

There must be a reason, that people are outraged.

HowardH
Mar 24th, 2012, 03:54 PM
@ Howard

You did something like bypass the topic ;)

Julia Gulia is something else: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=gulia
and Gools is something else.

There must be a reason, that people are outraged.

The reality is that I believe that Gools simply comes from "Julia Gulia= Julia Goolia= Gools".

Forty Deuce may well be the originator. Once again, her post about Stuttgart:
What a week and a half for Goolia and her German mates. To come out and beat Sam and Caro, on clay, on successive days, in front of your family and friends in your home tournament? That's nothing short of a glory run. Gools will make her Top 30 debut this week and she stopped Caro grabbing her 16th career title, which, get this, would tie her with ELENA DEMENTIEVA. That's a crazy effing stat.

In other words, ALL HAIL JULIA GOOLIA

This paragraph makes it clear that Julia Goolia and Gools are just different forms of the same thing. And Julia Goolia is clearly the same as Julia Gulia.

Put it another way. If you carefully read the notes of all these bloggers or photographers who call Julia "Gools" you will find that they obviously all like Julia a lot. From this you can deduce that Gools is an affectionate term, not an insulting one.

selesia
Mar 24th, 2012, 04:50 PM
The reality is that I believe that Gools simply comes from "Julia Gulia= Julia Goolia= Gools".

Put it another way. If you carefully read the notes of all these bloggers or photographers who call Julia "Gools" you will find that they obviously all like Julia a lot. From this you can deduce that Gools is an affectionate term, not an insulting one.


Ok, but this is not about what people came up with the word or whether they like Julia or not - it's language thread.
I mean - what is the meaning of the word in SLANG ?? Do you know english or american slang (cause you have a NZ flag) ??

So far i have:

Urban Dictionary definition: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=gools

also - related words in slang:

goolies - (slang), (UK) The testicles or bollocks. He was getting on my nerves so I decided to kick him in the goolies. That shut him up. http://wordfamous.com/word/goolies/

goolys - Definition of goolys , meaning of goolys - Goolys are gross looking slimey stringy bits hanging off an object. Some examples : "Grandma has Goolys hanging from her under arm" said jimmy

goolsby - Definition of goolsby , meaning of goolsby - A person Who can consume liqour. Some examples : He handled his liqour like a true Goolsby. - or large erection. big penis that originated in Ireland. Some examples : The man had a Goolsby.. It was so huge I shat myself

gooly - Definition of gooly , meaning of gooly - 1. noun; testicle2. noun; Unapologetically Pathetic Loser.Some examples : 1. Ow! I just got kicked in the goolies!2. Wow, that guy is a real gooly. I kinda feel sorry for him, but then I remember that he invites the attention on himself


http://www.definition-of.net/

It seems all the words with the subject "gool" have a negative meaning. People on the tweeter are outraged against this nickname, too. It's not, that I don't like it (because I have poor English), but I've heard many complaints about, so I want to find the cause :)

HowardH
Mar 24th, 2012, 05:58 PM
Because we watch American and British shows, NZers have a reasonable grasp of slang from other English-speaking nations.

These are "false friends" linguistically. They seem similar but a single letter changes the word completely. These words are not related to the nickname "Gools". You can't do it by patterns in English, because the language is a very eclectic mix of words from different sources. The patterns are too irregular.

The word obviously resembles some other words. But it is not these words, and it is not related to these words. "Gools" is almost like lolcat language. In the picture thread a pic was recently posted with the caption "OMG GOOLS WAZ DERE". Clearly a jovial, comic post in the lolcat style. I admit that "Gools" is not a pretty word. The first word that comes to mind for me is goo. However I also know that this word is not related to "Gools" linguistically. It's just unfortunate that it resembles some other, not so nice words. That's why I don't call her Gools, the nickname doesn't appeal to me, but it is definitely being used as a term of endearment by these bloggers and photographers.

Lisickifan84
Mar 24th, 2012, 06:25 PM
They put Jules + G from Görges together = Gools :shrug:

I don't know, but I don't think it has any negative association.

HowardH
Mar 25th, 2012, 05:01 AM
They put Jules + G from Görges together = Gools :shrug:

I don't know, but I don't think it has any negative association.

This is also a possibility. The main point is that it rhymes with Jules, and because she is Julia G the nickname was always likely to start with J or G. I always thought the most natural nickname for her was Gorgeous, but then we had that incident where Julia said she didn't like to be called that because it seemed like people were mispronouncing her name. Otherwise I would be calling her The Gorgeous One.

joy division
Mar 25th, 2012, 10:50 AM
It`s still not clear what Gool means, but when you look at Silesia`s hint there must be some kind of possible "ugly" connotation, too.
Looking at Howards explanations it`s obvious that it`s not ugly meant at all.
After all Gool seems to be a mix of different words and has a no clear meaning. Whereat I ask myself why they don`t just say Gul(ia), and bring on the seemingly more notorious Gool.
You might compare it in terms of conversational use somehow to that what happened with "geil", the German expression we were talking about earlier, which originally has a very different meaning but now is used without any shame or suspicion in a lot of other contexts.

Rovegun
Mar 25th, 2012, 11:10 AM
I'm sure there is a pattern.

Firstly QFs is plural and QF is singular.

"There are 4 quarterfinals to be played today. The first quarterfinal is between Azarenka and Jankovic."

Secondly the plural form can also be used to refer to the round as a whole.

"Julia wins her third round match and now is in the quarterfinals/in the quarters." (Into the next round in general.)
Similarly :"In the semis, in the semifinals." (In the semifinal round.)

The singular form refers to a specific match. QF= quarterfinal match, SF= semifinal match, F=final match.
"Julia's quarterfinal with Azarenka will be on Thursday."
"This is the first semifinal of the day."

There's only one final in tennis, so you say "Julia wins and is into the final."
However, in other sports you can have final series, where more than one match determines the winner. The NBA is like this. In this case you can say "The Chicago Bulls are going to the finals."

These words are also used as adjectives. In this case the usage is quite flexible.

"Julia books a semifinal berth" (specifically this refers to her upcoming semifinal match)
"Julia books a semifinals berth" (this refers to the semifinal round in general)
"Semis berth" is also sometimes used, but I prefer not to use that. Instead I would write: "Julia books a place in the semis."

The last day of the tournament is often "finals day" when the singles and doubles finals are played. Maybe grammatically this should be "finals' day" but I think people are too lazy to write that. On the other hand people might refer to it as "the final day of the tournament" in which case the word "final" refers only to the date and not to the draw.

Incidentally "finals" is also used to refer to final exams. "I have finals coming up. I need to study."


thank you Howard! that makes sense now and I understand the usage :)

HowardH
Apr 5th, 2012, 06:10 AM
i think she is going to outburst in this clay season ;) im expecting her to be at least QF in rg.

"I think she is going to break through in this clay season" or "I think she's going to make the breakthrough in this clay season".

We use the phrase "break through" or breakthrough to mean rising to a new level. "She finally made the breakthrough to the next level."

"outburst" is usually used in phrases like "a sudden outburst"= swearing out loud, losing temper, or suddenly shouting out violently. The Merriam Webster online dictionary gives the first definition of "outburst" as "a violent expression of feeling < e.g. an outburst of anger>".

However we might say that "she burst onto the world stage 2 years ago." By this we mean that she appeared very suddenly (in tennis this would mean she rose quickly through the ranks and caught people by surprise).

"I'm expecting her to be at least in the QF at RG".

Kipling
Apr 6th, 2012, 04:31 PM
"Her Majesty"?!

She got a title?! Cool beans!

MardenDiller
Apr 9th, 2012, 02:58 AM
o/

HowardH
Apr 12th, 2012, 01:14 PM
Julia is a much more shy, toned down and she stands firmly on the ground (good Howard ? :P ).

Your smiley indicates you are kidding around, but since you ask, it's pretty much correct, and certainly clearly understandable.

Probably it should be "Julia is a much more shy, toned down individual and she has her feet planted firmly on the ground."

The two patterns to note here are "Julia is a.... something" and "feet... on the ground". There are many variations of the second one, often people say "she has her two feet firmly on the ground" (planted is optional). Sometimes it's "she keeps her feet planted firmly on the ground". It's also possible to avoid using the whole phrase and just say "she is a very grounded person."

The reason we normally wouldn't use the phrase "stands firmly" is because it's very similar to the phrase "to stand firm", which means to refuse to budge from a position, to refuse to alter one's opinion. "Stand firm in your beliefs, stand firm in your convictions." In the case of the sentence above, it's easy to tell what you mean though.

If you don't use "a" in the first part of the sentence then you can just use a series of adjectives (Julia is more shy), but once you say "Julia is a" we expect another noun to follow soon, such as individual, person, or woman.

Rovegun
Apr 12th, 2012, 04:00 PM
Could I use for the second part of the sentence "she´s down to Earth"?

selesia
Apr 12th, 2012, 04:43 PM
Your smiley indicates you are kidding around, but since you ask, it's pretty much correct, and certainly clearly understandable.
Probably it should be "Julia is a much more shy, toned down individual and she has her feet planted firmly on the ground."

The two patterns to note here are "Julia is a.... something" and "feet... on the ground". There are many variations of the second one, often people say "she has her two feet firmly on the ground" (planted is optional). Sometimes it's "she keeps her feet planted firmly on the ground". It's also possible to avoid using the whole phrase and just say "she is a very grounded person."

The reason we normally wouldn't use the phrase "stands firmly" is because it's very similar to the phrase "to stand firm", which means to refuse to budge from a position, to refuse to alter one's opinion. "Stand firm in your beliefs, stand firm in your convictions." In the case of the sentence above, it's easy to tell what you mean though.

You wrote to me recently, that "Standing firmly on the ground is the phrase", so I was trying to use this and was expecting a praise :rolls: Ok, I failed again, you are a good teacher, because you serve me the knowledge with small spoons, so I can understand it step by step ;)

If you don't use "a" in the first part of the sentence then you can just use a series of adjectives (Julia is more shy), but once you say "Julia is a" we expect another noun to follow soon, such as individual, person, or woman.

Aha! It's theoretically easy.

HowardH
Apr 13th, 2012, 08:46 AM
Thanks for the compliment Silesia. I hope it's true that I am a good teacher. Incidentally, compliment=praise, nice thing to say, while complement has to do with completing or matching things. Even native speakers get this one wrong all the time. Complements supplement each other, each adding something the others lack Just remember that comple- =complete. "He doesn't quite have the full complement of brain cells."

Oh, probably I wasn't clear enough before. Otherwise I'm sure you would have gotten it right the first time.
"he/she has/keeps his/her (two) feet (planted) firmly on the ground"
vs "he/she stands firm in his/her beliefs."

Could I use for the second part of the sentence "she´s down to Earth"?

Yes.

Some online examples:

Terra mobile advertising: http://www.terra-mobile.eu/home/index/4

"Terra" refers to our work and attitude which is "down to earth", with a focus on delivering immediate results and our commitment to do this; so advice and help with two feet firmly on the ground.

Psychic advertising: http://www.oranum.com/psychics/ladyempathy/?w=100217&t=37&p=6&c=1710&s=1
For the record, I am a down to earth realist, a logical thinker, and I have two feet firmly on the ground.
Yes, this seems rather ironic to me as well, a psychic claiming to be a realist with two feet firmly on the ground.

Healing power of nature blog: http://oakandindigo.wordpress.com/tag/mental-health/

The kinds of crazy thoughts that I get when I’m spending too much time in my head – when I’ve got my head in the clouds, when I’m daydreaming too much. Times when I literally need to come back down to Earth and plant two feet firmly on the ground.

Super Advertise of iPhone :lol: (don't know if I wrote it correctly)
They should be Apple Team Deutschland ;)

"Super advertisement for the iPhone" is correct grammatically. No capital letter for advertisement- I realise that's a habit from German where you capitalise a lot of nouns. It's probably more natural to say "It looks like an ad for the iPhone/like an iPhone ad."

Ad=advertisement (for something)
An ad for Dennys.
An advertisement for Burger King.
An ad for an air conditioner (Julia wouldn't like that one)
What about this website? thisisanad.com
In the digital world everything is advertising, and everyone is an advertiser. This is an ad for thisisanad.com.

Or, we use the noun as a kind of modifier.
Did you see that chick in the new KFC Ad? (unspoken implication: she's hot)
That Pizza Hut ad is so cheesy.

There is another similar word in English, "advertorial".

An advertorial is an advertisement in the form of an editorial. The term "advertorial" is a portmanteau of "advertisement" and "editorial." Merriam-Webster dates the origin of the word to 1946.[1]

In printed publications, the advertisement is usually written in the form of an objective article and designed to look like a legitimate and independent news story. In television, the advertisement is similar to a short infomercial presentation of products or services. These can either be in the form of a television commercial or as a segment on a talk show or variety show.

selesia
Apr 13th, 2012, 04:18 PM
What about 'commercial' ? like 'sony commercial'. These expressions are used: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40DykbPa4Lc

commercial = advertisement ??

HowardH
Apr 13th, 2012, 05:58 PM
What about 'commercial' ? like 'sony commercial'. These expressions are used: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=40DykbPa4Lc

commercial = advertisement ??

Yes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AcroQsUN60s
You'll notice that the title at the top says Pepsi ad, but the description below the video says commercial. Same thing.

By the way advertisement can be shortened to ad or advert.

The break in the middle of a tv program for ads is usually called a "commercial break".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commercial
Commercial may refer to:

Advertising, paid classified messages in newspapers, magazines, flyers, billboards, and paid announcements over radio and television to sell a product, item or service
Radio advertisement, paid announcements over the radio to sell a product, item or service
Television advertisement, paid announcements over the television to sell a product, item or service.


However unlike "advertisement" which has only one meaning, the word "commercial" is usually a noun meaning an ad (usually in reference to a tv ad) but is also sometimes used as an adjective meaning to do with commerce (business).

In fact, the reason that tv ads are often called tv commercials is because they are an example of "commercial broadcasting" (meaning that they make money by broadcasting the ads.)

Rovegun
Apr 15th, 2012, 06:17 PM
to the German guys: can you explain me these expressions, please?

I am taking some from twitter. Anna wrote: Meinen Glückwunsch @AngeliqueKerber !! Sehr geil! Jetzt komm schnell zu uns!;)

for GEIL my dictionary and google translate say something which I can´t understand in this expression so I understand it like "very good" or "great" or something like that...

Anna wrote further: bis gleich is it something like see you soon?:confused:

Julia: Yes @AngeliqueKerber geil...bis die tage...freu mich I am talking about "geil" above and "bis die Tage"?

yesterday´s night I was repeating perfekt, präteritum, plusquamperfekt and such things like that... I also already know the difference between "selbst" and "allein" :D so I can´t wait to read Julia´s articles from Fed Cup in German :lol:

joy division
Apr 15th, 2012, 07:08 PM
^^^
We were talking about "geil" endlessly in another thread.
It means something like great, cool, or fresh, whatever you want. Mostly young people use it.
The original meaning is hot and it`s better not to use it in an official conversation.
Bis gleich" means see you in a bit, "bis die Tage" is North German slang and means see you the next days.

Lisickinator
Apr 15th, 2012, 07:10 PM
I don't know which translator you use, but dict.cc is probably the best one.

geil (http://www.dict.cc/?s=geil)

bis gleich (http://www.dict.cc/?s=bis+gleich)

bis die Tage (http://www.dict.cc/?s=bis+die+tage)

Rovegun
Apr 15th, 2012, 07:49 PM
thank so much guys!:worship:

I have never heard of this translator so now I will probably use it... it looks pretty helpful :)

HowardH
Apr 16th, 2012, 09:40 AM
Thanks Lisickinator. That is a good translator. Gives many examples as well. I've heard that you need to see a word in many different contexts before you begin to understand it properly, so examples are very important.

joy division
Apr 16th, 2012, 09:27 PM
A nice little translation exercise for our foreign friends : :lol:

Andrea Petkovic ‏ @andreapetkovic
@AngeliqueKerber Du krasse Olle, du. Wir warten hier sehnsüchtig uff dich und die andere Olle @juliagoerges Beeilt euch, ihr Affen!

Julia Goerges ‏ @juliagoerges
@andreapetkovic @angeliquekerber die affen befinden sich auf dem weg����

What are they talking about ? Any suggestions ? :confused:

HowardH
Apr 17th, 2012, 09:42 AM
Damn. Must be using slang. Looking up twitter reveals that Angi's original tweet is about going to Stuttgart:

Angelique Kerber ‏
Road trip to Stuttgart- just 800km... PUUUSH it !!!:-)

Andrea Petkovic @AngeliqueKerber
Du krasse Olle, du. Wir warten hier sehnsüchtig uff dich und die andere Olle @juliagoerges Beeilt euch, ihr Affen!

Julia Goerges @andreapetkovic @angeliquekerber
die affen befinden sich auf dem weg����

That term of endearment meaning "old lady", Olle, appears again. I suppose krasse olle is something like "cranky old lady" and is supposedly a term that female friends would call each other.

Online translators suggest monkeys for Affen.

So, Angelique, after winning her title, is now driving to Stuttgart. I think Andy is already there and Julia is in Germany but not in Stuttgart.

My attempt:
Angelique Kerber ‏
Road trip to Stuttgart- just 800km... PUUUSH it !!!:-)

Andrea Petkovic @AngeliqueKerber
You cranky old lady, you. We're waiting eagerly for you and the other old lady. Julia, hurry up you monkey and the other old lady Julia. Hurry up you monkeys!

Julia Goerges @andreapetkovic @angeliquekerber
The monkey is monkeys are on the way

joy division
Apr 17th, 2012, 10:18 AM
^^^
You perfectly learnt the "Olle" lesson.
I`m close to say "grade A, sit down". ( It`s a German turn of phrase at school )
There`s is just one little mistake.
Monkey( der Affe ) is in plural here, means the monkeys ( die Affen ), Julia and Angie, are on their way to Stuttgart, from the North of Germany.
The monkeys are on their way.:D
Angie comes from Denmark, her hometown is Kiel which is just about 80 kilometers away from Julia`s home. So I thought their were traveling together.
After having seen the pics of Angie and Andrea at her arrival at Stuttgart, I was missing Julia, probably they traveled separately.

Andrea is brimming over in humor at times.
She uses this Berlin dialect at times on her tweets but just partially. "Uff" means auf in Berlin dialect. ( to wait for is "warten auf" )
And I never have heard talking about monkeys in concern of friends.
I don`t know where she`s got this from.:lol:
It`s all her own style, I guess.

HowardH
Apr 17th, 2012, 10:57 AM
Oh, it's her own style. :lol: I would have presumed it was in common usage, but I couldn't find any reference to monkeys being used as a term for friends.

Is it relatively common to refer to oneself as "we" in German? Andrea uses Wir where I would expect to see Ich.

joy division
Apr 17th, 2012, 11:28 AM
Oh, it's her own style. :lol: I would have presumed it was in common usage, but I couldn't find any reference to monkeys being used as a term for friends.

Is it relatively common to refer to oneself as "we" in German? Andrea uses Wir where I would expect to see Ich.

Andrea emphasizes the togetherness of the whole team here. Julia and Angie were the last missing at Stuttgart, so she was talking about "wir".
She could have said "Ich" in this case, too. I think we have the same use and meaning of these expressions in English and German.

Rovegun
Apr 17th, 2012, 11:33 AM
^^^
You perfectly learnt the "Olle" lesson.
I`m close to say "grade A, sit down". ( It`s a German turn of phrase at school )
There`s is just one little mistake.
Monkey( der Affe ) is in plural here, means the monkeys ( die Affen ), Julia and Angie, are on their way to Stuttgart, from the North of Germany.
The monkeys are on their way.:D
Angie comes from Denmark, her hometown is Kiel which is just about 80 kilometers away from Julia`s home. So I thought their were traveling together.
After having seen the pics of Angie and Andrea at her arrival at Stuttgart, I was missing Julia, probably they traveled separately.

Andrea is brimming over in humor at times.
She uses this Berlin dialect at times on her tweets but just partially. "Uff" means auf in Berlin dialect. ( to wait for is "warten auf" )
And I never have heard talking about monkeys in concern of friends.
I don`t know where she`s got this from.:lol:
It`s all her own style, I guess.

I remember their chat on twitter and I was really laughing when I read that :D

I thought that "uff" meant "auf" but I also thought Andrea had just mistaken but it is good to know it comes from the Berlin dialect...

we also use "monkeys" for people sometimes especially for kids when they are making some jokes...

and what about this "ne" in front of the noun? for example "ne Frau" (I don´t know if I can use it like this)... I guess it is just a shorcut of "eine"....

Dispeker
Apr 17th, 2012, 12:01 PM
I remember their chat on twitter and I was really laughing when I read that :D

I thought that "uff" meant "auf" but I also thought Andrea had just mistaken but it is good to know it comes from the Berlin dialect...

we also use "monkeys" for people sometimes especially for kids when they are making some jokes...

and what about this "ne" in front of the noun? for example "ne Frau" (I don´t know if I can use it like this)... I guess it is just a shorcut of "eine"....


Your guess is correct: "ne" is a short form of "eine" ("'n" is "ein", "nen" is "einen" and so on). Concerning "uff": it's not just a Berliner dialect, it's actually widely used all over Central Germany (Hesse, Thuringia for example).

joy division
Apr 17th, 2012, 12:04 PM
I remember their chat on twitter and I was really laughing when I read that :D

I thought that "uff" meant "auf" but I also thought Andrea had just mistaken but it is good to know it comes from the Berlin dialect...

we also use "monkeys" for people sometimes especially for kids when they are making some jokes...

and what about this "ne" in front of the noun? for example "ne Frau" (I don´t know if I can use it like this)... I guess it is just a shorcut of "eine"....

"Affe" in German usually is an abusive word, in the sense of idiot.
"So ein blöder Affe" - such a stupid idiot. It`s usually never meant in a friendly way.
You must be careful when somebody approaches you like that, and get away when he seems to be stronger than you.:lol:
Kids are not called monkeys, we say for instance "Rasselbande" (rascals) in the sense you mention it.
But there`s an old German school joke about monkeys which is quite nice.
The teacher proclaims - "The Menkind is descended from the monkey."
Fritzle says - "Probably you, but not me."

With "ne" you are completely right.

joy division
Apr 17th, 2012, 12:16 PM
Your guess is correct: "ne" is a short form of "eine" ("'n" is "ein", "nen" is "einen" and so on). Concerning "uff": it's not just a Berliner dialect, it's actually widely used all over Central Germany (Hesse, Thuringia for example).

You`re definitely right with the Hesse, with the Thuringian people I`m not quite sure. They have a tendency to say "üff".:lol:

Rovegun
Apr 17th, 2012, 12:35 PM
thanks guys!

so can it happen that a German will say: es gibt ne Vase üff/uff dem Tisch :D if I heard it I wouldn´t almost understand I would be pretty confused :lol: but now I am smarter so I will understand :D

Dispeker
Apr 17th, 2012, 12:51 PM
"Affe" in German usually is an abusive word, in the sense of idiot.
"So ein blöder Affe" - such a stupid idiot. It`s usually never meant in a friendly way.
You must be careful when somebody approaches you like that, and get away when he seems to be stronger than you.:lol:.

Yeah, calling someone "Affe" is normaly quite rude, because it's insulting. Petko meant it in a friendly way though. Among boys and men it's not that unsual to greet eachother with supposed offensive words (Na, ihr Penner/ Idioten, etc.). At least me and my friends used to that and sometimes still do :) But I never heard that girls do that too which makes Petko's "Affen"-expression even funnier. It basically shows that they all get along pretty well with eachother :)

Dispeker
Apr 17th, 2012, 12:58 PM
You`re definitely right with the Hesse, with the Thuringian people I`m not quite sure. They have a tendency to say "üff".:lol:

We in Northern Hesse have the same tendency (unfortunately :sobbing:). That's why we are sometimes called West-Thüringer :help:

Indianer Slobo
Apr 17th, 2012, 10:30 PM
Really a great thread!!! I have read through it with a lot of interest. Very entertaining and informative at the same time.
Now i'm trying to do my translation of the one sentence Howard translated before, so it may have little more understandable slang for native english speakers.
correct me if there are any faults in it.



Andrea Petkovic @AngeliqueKerber
You cranky old lady, you. We're waiting eagerly for you and the other old lady. Julia, hurry up you monkey and the other old lady Julia. Hurry up you monkeys!

Julia Goerges @andreapetkovic @angeliquekerber
The monkey is monkeys are on the way


The german word "krass" is a slang word which could be compared to wicked

I'd compare "Olle" in its use somewhat alike the word bitch, when it's used in a friendly way between friends.


Andrea Petkovic @AngeliqueKerber
You wicked bitch you, We're waiting desperately for you and the other bitch (Julia) to arrive. Hurry up monkeys!

Julia Goerges @andreapetkovic @angeliquekerber
The monkeys are on their way

joy division
Apr 26th, 2012, 01:40 PM
:lol: The thing is I knew "girl" was mädchen but though gilt's was a slang -- now indeed I remember Heute means "today" now that you told it to me.

Also I saw in the article that there was "schön" and "schon" any difference ? I know the first one means beautiful and sun too right ? :lol: Also "Ich hätte" is weird, I know "Ich habe" or something so, "to have/I have".

;) I'm open to mockeries -- I'm proud of my bad German Joy though I understood somewhat a little crop. :lol:

You mix these things a little up.:wavey::lol:
And you serious with that schön also means sun ?:confused::D
Where have you heard that ? Schön is just beautiful and nothing else.;)
Sun is "die Sonne" in German.

"Schon" is a very often used word. It can mean "already" and in other contexts "actually".
I wonna watch Mona against Bartoli right now.:drive: More about it later.

Vikapower
Apr 26th, 2012, 03:11 PM
You mix these things a little up.:wavey::lol:
And you serious with that schön also means sun ?:confused::D
Where have you heard that ? Schön is just beautiful and nothing else.;)
Sun is "die Sonne" in German.

Well I wasn't sure :lol: but I knew it meant "beautiful" initially -- I have basics in German from my high-school to though out certain stuffs but I have a hard time with the cases -- :help:

I recognize the prepositions but not the cases. --

For exmample, "in Stuttgart" is locative that's easy (I guess :unsure:), "zu ihrem" for example would be genitive or is "ihrem" just a pronoun at the plural genetive case to say "them" ? :scratch:

"Schon" is a very often used word. It can mean "already" and in other contexts "actually".
I wonna watch Mona against Bartoli right now.:drive: More about it later.

"Danke schön" would mean literally "Thanks nicely" ?

:lol: I didn't read all just the part concerning Julia -- how would you translate "Es ist schön, wieder hier zu sein" Sagte die Nummer
eins der Welt, Victoria Azarenka. here's my answer "This is beautiful/nice, they were all there with us/we were all there together. Said the world #1 Victoria Azarenka ".

EDIT : Here's another one I didn't get "Jetzt will ich nur noch spielen" -- "will" is future I know that, "spielen" is infinitival of the word "to talk (or play)", "Ich" is "I", "noch" is "not" (?) the rest have no idea -- but I think it's "I will not be competing/playing tonight yet".

Dispeker
Apr 26th, 2012, 04:51 PM
EDIT : Here's another one I didn't get "Jetzt will ich nur noch spielen" -- "will" is future I know that, "spielen" is infinitival of the word "to talk (or play)", "Ich" is "I", "noch" is "not" (?) the rest have no idea -- but I think it's "I will not be competing/playing tonight yet".

"Will" is future tense in English, in German it means "I want; he/she/it wants". So tranlated it would mean: "All I want to do now is playing". You can't translate it literally imo.

Edit: This would make sense too: "Now I just want to play". Hard to tell without knowing the context.

Vikapower
Apr 26th, 2012, 05:06 PM
"Will" is future tense in English, in German it means "I want; he/she/it wants". So tranlated it would mean: "All I want to do now is playing". You can't translate it literally imo.

Edit: This would make sense too: "Now I just want to play". Hard to tell without knowing the context.

So "Jetzt" means "Now" ? That's good -- Actually I thought "will" was the future tense for the infinitival of "wellen" "to want" ? In that case what would it be the future tense of "I want" ? I can recognize most non-composed verbs from the basics I have but it's not really enough to get a hold on the complete phrases. :lol:

Actually I didn't really base it on english but the without the few other words "Jetzt" and "Nur" it's quite difficult to get the sense -- especially I'm just experimenting. :lol: What does "nur" mean ?

Dispeker
Apr 26th, 2012, 05:14 PM
So "Jetzt" means "Now" ? That's good -- Actually I thought "will" was the future tense for the infinitival of "wellen" "to want" ? In that case what would it be the future tense of "I want" ?

"Ich werde wollen" (I'm going to want)

Actually I didn't really base it on english but the without the few other words "Jetzt" and "Nur" it's quite difficult to get the sense -- especially I'm just experimenting like that. :lol: What does "nur" mean ?

"Nur" means "only" or "just" - depending on context.

Rovegun
Apr 27th, 2012, 12:09 PM
Vikapower is another one who wants to learn German :D I wonder who inspires us more if Julia or our German friends on here :D

HowardH
Apr 27th, 2012, 05:24 PM
It seems that Vikapower should understand all the words now except for noch. It's not "not", more like "still", "more", "even" according to my sources.

However it does seem to be a remarkably versatile word, so everything depends on the phrase.

Not being a native speaker I'm not sure how much the "noch" adds to the meaning. As Dispeker says it depends on context.

I imagine that apart from the meaning "Now I just want to play" it could probably also be translated as "Now I just want to play more/Now I just want to keep playing." German speakers could confirm this for me.

Dispeker
Apr 29th, 2012, 12:45 PM
It seems that Vikapower should understand all the words now except for noch. It's not "not", more like "still", "more", "even" according to my sources.

However it does seem to be a remarkably versatile word, so everything depends on the phrase.

Yes indeed. In most cases noch means still, like: "We've still got time" - "Wir haben noch Zeit".

However, in combination with other words like "nur" it changes its meaning. For instance, in the sentence "Jetzt will ich nur noch spielen" the word "noch" makes clear that spielen (playing) is the only thing that's important to me at the moment. That's why I translated it with "All I want to do now is playing".


I imagine that apart from the meaning "Now I just want to play" it could probably also be translated as "Now I just want to play more/Now I just want to keep playing." German speakers could confirm this for me.

Your second suggestion is correct :) Because it also emphazises the importance of the action (playing). You don't want to play less or more - you just want to play (keep playing) and nothing else.

HowardH
Apr 29th, 2012, 06:17 PM
Thanks for that info Dispeker.


Close-up with Julia Goerges:

0YtZNyk89cs

:lol: I really like her humor

Can you translate the important parts :help: :wavey:

I second the request. (You guys all know this English phrase right? It means I also make the same request.)

I understood or guessed little bits and pieces. The presence of English questions helps but I'm disappointed they didn't also put subtitles for her answers.
... for all the many bits I didn't understand (i.e. the majority of what she said).

Something like:
What do you like most about the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix?
... ... ... the organisation is unbelievable, the arena is unbelievable ... ... ...

What do you like most about yourself? (Julia says "at yourself" lol).
Umm... ummm... I am told ... always... (:help: couldn't figure out almost any part of this answer. Not like I'm doing much better in any other part of the interview.)

As a child you wanted to be like... why?

My biggest dream as a child was to be a tennis professional... ...
Yeah I ... love ... ... ...

How would other people describe you in three words?

Umm, hmm, honest, definitely, um, I'm a ... ...
Then extroverted (outgoing?) and ... ...

Which is your biggest weakness (sweets, shoes, makeup etc.)?

Umm, I buy ... handbags, this is... ... my ... ...
and perfumes, definitely,... ... my biggest... Angi Kerber ... ... Anna-Lena ... perfume shopping...

What would you do if you were not a professional tennis player?

Uh, ... .. hotel receptionist... ... ... computer... ... ..

Who would you like to meet but have never had the chance yet, and why? (Julia says What would you like to meet :o)

... ... ... ... Magdalena Neuner, ... ... America ...

If you could give your parents any gift, what would you give them?

I think ... ... my ... ... Germany... ... ... thanks (:help:)

Describe your perfect day off!

Umm, ... ... get up... That would be a perfect day off for me. (Didn't get this part either)

Rock or Pop- Why?

... ... I-pod... ... Rihanna... Pink, Lady Gaga... ...

Please sing us your favourite song!

Oh please no. I think... ... ... ... You're welcome.

LinusVanPelt
Apr 29th, 2012, 07:42 PM
I heard a "extrovert" after "What do you like most about yourself?" question. And thats it :lol:

joy division
Apr 29th, 2012, 10:55 PM
Howard missed just a few little words. :lol: Anyway, Congrats on your brave try.

Julia does not really speak grammatically correct German and does not care very much about it:D. Nowadays it`s not easy to find Germans who perfectly do so.
I`ll translate it in a corresponding way. If somebody is interested in details, please ask me/us Germans.;)

What do you like most about the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix?


"We don`t need to talk about it, you know the players elected it for the best tournament on the tour already a few times. The organization and the arena is just amazing. Not to mention the food. It`s just perfect. I could eat the whole day long, what I usually do not.
So the whole package is just great."

What do you like most about yourself? (Julia says "at yourself" lol).
Julia was really speaking some kind of gibberish here with tons of errors against any German syntax rule. She was thinking about what to say and struggled a little bit. But her thoughts are very honorable, therefore you can forgive her.:D
You should not talk like that in Germany, the people perhaps would look at you pretty blankly.

"It`s a very nice job and it`s very important for me to stay on the ground and true to myself, also when you are getting famous."

As a child you wanted to be like... why?

"I actually always wanted to be a tennis pro since I was a little child. We have a very nice and interesting job. When you are successful you even can provide for your life after the career.(money)"


How would other people describe you in three words?
"Hmmm,... being honest, definitely..., extrovert...and from time to time I can be humorous."

Which is your biggest weakness (sweets, shoes, makeup etc.)?
Hmm... hand bags, I have about 40 or 50 of them,... and definitely perfumes, its my biggest weakness, Angie can tell something about it and also Anna-Lena. Every tournament I smell of a different perfume.

What would you do if you were not a professional tennis player?

"I actually would like to work in a hotel. Not in the reception area but more in the background. Bookkeeping or something with computer."

Who would you like to meet but have never had the chance yet, and why? (Julia says What would you like to meet )

"I`d like visit a biathlon event and meet the German biathlon stars. My biggest fav Magdalena Neuner unluckily has finished her career. I once got an invitation but I was already at Indian Wells, so unfortunately it didn`t go there."

If you could give your parents any gift, what would you give them?

"My parents did so much for me and that`s not usual and means a lot to me.
One gift wouldn`t be enough to praise what they made possible for me.
I want say thank you so, so much."
One detail
She says "Big thanks" here. Word by word "ein riesiges Danke", what I`ve never heard before. It`s Julia`s special German, I guess.
Ein grosses "Danke schön" an meine Eltern für alles was sie für mich getan haben. is the more common and correct use. Means - I`d like to appreciate my parents for all they`ve done for me.

Describe your perfect day off!

"Well, I`d really like to stay in bed the whole day long, being lazy, watching TV. Yes that would be my perfect day."

Rock or Pop- Why?

"I actually like both, I`m a music-freak and I permanently listen to it on my i-pod
I like Pink, Rihanna and Lady Gaga. I don`t have a crush on especially one them. These are all great singers, so I cannot say whether it`s Rock or Pop.°

Please sing us your favourite song!
"Oh no, please not that, I don`t want to do you a mischief (giggling) and I will not do that"

The end

Did you notice it ? Her voice was pretty husky again.

Rovegun
Apr 29th, 2012, 11:25 PM
thanks Howard and JD! I am glad to know what Julia was talking about... I would appreciate if someone could rewrite to German what she said... I know it´s going to be pretty tough because 5 minutes of talk are too long for everyone but I would really appreciate it :):worship: but I guess if Julia was using some wrong grammatical expression I wouldn´t understand it even on paper but if you try I´ll appreciate it a lot...

joy division
Apr 29th, 2012, 11:57 PM
thanks Howard and JD! I am glad to know what Julia was talking about... I would appreciate if someone could rewrite to German what she said... I know it´s going to be pretty tough because 5 minutes of talk are too long for everyone but I would really appreciate it :):worship: but I guess if Julia was using some wrong grammatical expression I wouldn´t understand it even on paper but if you try I´ll appreciate it a lot...

I can do it, but it needs a little time because I`m not the greatest typer.:(
I think I can do it tomorrow in the evening, but maybe another German member can do it even earlier ?!
When we also had a written version of her interview in correct German and a translation of that we would have the whole package.
Probably a very useful chapter in our language distance learning. I`m in.:D

Child in Time
Apr 30th, 2012, 06:06 PM
Hi everyone, I'm kinda new here and just found this thread. Always nice to meet people who learn and approve their German:) I'm happy to help so I started with the first bit of the interview. I leave out the hmmms and ehmms. During the transcription I noticed that her way of talking is very colloquial, just natural spoken German. So if you have any questions or if there's something you don't understand, please let us know. Hope I got everything right;)


What do you like most about the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix?

Ich glaub' da braucht man nicht viel zu sagen, weil... die Spielerinnen haben's glaub ich schon mehrfach zum besten Turnier des Jahres gewählt, zurecht. Erstmal die Organisation is unglaublich, die Arena ist unglaublich, das Essen darüber brauchen wir gar nicht reden, weil (da?) glaub' ich könnt' ich den ganzen Tag sitzen und nur essen, was sonst auch nicht normal bei mir ist. Nee, es ist einfach alles zusammen was (ja) was die Woche und was das Turnier so besonders macht.


What do you like most about yourself?

Ich sag mir grundsätzlich immer für mich selber ich soll (ja) der Mensch bleiben, der ich immer bin. Letztendlich ist es ein Beruf, den ich mache. Es ist nichts (ja) besonderes, was man (was man) als Mensch verändern sollte bei einem, weil man soll immer auf'm Boden bleiben, egal ob die Nummer auf einmal höher ist in der Rangliste oder nicht, weil letztendlich bist du immer noch die Person selber und das ist mir wichtig, dass ich mir auch treu bleibe da.

Rovegun
Apr 30th, 2012, 06:09 PM
http://s19.postimage.org/70orx9ta7/112304755_normal.jpg Julia Goerges ‏@juliagoerges
Anna @Annagroenefeld ist doch n cooles foto oder?http://s19.postimage.org/5v5wpos5b/jhhj.jpg hat jmd
getwittert vorhin...


why ODER in that context? is it meant like "right" at the end of the sentece?

we learned at high school that the verb should stay at the end of the sentece in the German language (I mean "hat jmd
getwittert vorhin...") but I have seen many times you put other words behind the verb and I never know which kinds of words I can put behind the verb at the end of the sentence...

for example: Ich habe Julia gestern gesehen. I think in this one I am right and everything is on its own place in the sentence but you are able to put some other words which will be placed behind "gesehen"... I don´t know if I am expressing well but hope you understand me...

can I say as well "Ich habe Julia gestern gesehen, Tennis zu spielen."? oder ist besser zu sagen "Ich habe Julia gestern gesehen, dass sie Tennis gespielt hat."? oder "Ich habe gesehen, dass Julia Tennis gestern gespielt hat."? or should I rather use Präteritum? :D

sorry guys, too many questins for you but I am very interested in knowing all stuff in your language...:D

I can do it, but it needs a little time because I`m not the greatest typer.:(
I think I can do it tomorrow in the evening, but maybe another German member can do it even earlier ?!
When we also had a written version of her interview in correct German and a translation of that we would have the whole package.
Probably a very useful chapter in our language distance learning. I`m in.:D

I am looking forward to that German part:bounce:

Child in Time
Apr 30th, 2012, 06:20 PM
As a child you wanted to be like... why?

Mein größter Traum eigentlich war's als Kind Tennisprofi zu werden oder würde ich gern auch sein. (Ja), ich find das Leben einfach schön, was wir haben und wenn man gut in seinem Beruf ist, ist es so, dass man sich später halt keine Sorgen mehr machen muss und das ist was, wo ich früher als kleines Kind wirklich geträumt von hab, was ich sein wollte.

Child in Time
Apr 30th, 2012, 06:33 PM
why ODER in that context? is it meant like "right" at the end of the sentece?

yes, "oder" functions as a question tag here: this is a cool photo, isn't it?

Indianer Slobo
Apr 30th, 2012, 06:36 PM
why ODER in that context? is it meant like "right" at the end of the sentece?

we learned at high school that the verb should stay at the end of the sentece in the German language (I mean "hat jmd
getwittert vorhin...") but I have seen many times you put other words behind the verb and I never know which kinds of words I can put behind the verb at the end of the sentence...

for example: Ich habe Julia gestern gesehen. I think in this one I am right and everything is on its own place in the sentence but you are able to put some other words which will be placed behind "gesehen"... I don´t know if I am expressing well but hope you understand me...

can I say as well "Ich habe Julia gestern gesehen, Tennis zu spielen."? oder ist besser zu sagen "Ich habe Julia gestern gesehen, dass sie Tennis gespielt hat."? oder "Ich habe gesehen, dass Julia Tennis gestern gespielt hat."? or should I rather use Präteritum? :D

sorry guys, too many questins for you but I am very interested in knowing all stuff in your language...:D



I am looking forward to that German part:bounce:


Your guess for the "oder" is right. It is translated: " It's a cool picture isn't it ? Somebody just twittered it to me."

on the other question:
All your tries are close but not quite there.
1)Ich habe Julia gestern Tennis spielen sehen/gesehen.
2)Ich habe gestern gesehen, wie Julia tennis gespielt hat.
and the closest
3)Ich habe gesehen, dass Julia gestern Tennis gespielt hat

Don't ask me on the times ... I'm not that good in the theoretical part of german either ;) I Just did it by feeling how it would be correct.
They also have slightly different meanings. The closest to what I think you wanted to express would be option No. 1.

Child in Time
Apr 30th, 2012, 06:43 PM
we learned at high school that the verb should stay at the end of the sentece in the German language (I mean "hat jmd
getwittert vorhin...") but I have seen many times you put other words behind the verb and I never know which kinds of words I can put behind the verb at the end of the sentence...

You're right, the verb should be at the end. It it's not, it's colloquial speech I think. For example, sometimes you start a sentence and end it with the verb and then you think of other things you wanna add so you place them after the verb, although it doesn't sound nice. At least that's my impression, I wish could come up with a more convincing answer;-)

Rovegun
Apr 30th, 2012, 07:11 PM
yes, "oder" functions as a question tag here: this is a cool photo, isn't it?

thank you!

Your guess for the "oder" is right. It is translated: " It's a cool picture isn't it ? Somebody just twittered it to me."

on the other question:
All your tries are close but not quite there.
1)Ich habe Julia gestern Tennis spielen sehen/gesehen.
2)Ich habe gestern gesehen, wie Julia tennis gespielt hat.
and the closest
3)Ich habe gesehen, dass Julia gestern Tennis gespielt hat

Don't ask me on the times ... I'm not that good in the theoretical part of german either ;) I Just did it by feeling how it would be correct.
They also have slightly different meanings. The closest to what I think you wanted to express would be option No. 1.

I think you guessed pretty well with me because I meant "I saw Julia play tennis yesterday" but wasn´t sure to use this way in German as well... and of course I forgot I cannot put a verb with "zu" behind or in the context with the verbs like "sehen, hören" and modal verbs;)

You're right, the verb should be at the end. It it's not, it's colloquial speech I think. For example, sometimes you start a sentence and end it with the verb and then you think of other things you wanna add so you place them after the verb, although it doesn't sound nice. At least that's my impression, I wish could come up with a more convincing answer;-)

now I think I get it... at the end of the sentence you just want to add something other which you couldn´t know that when you started the sentence so I understand your explanation... I was just a little bit confused when seeing it not only now but also when I was reading an interview or so on... you know teachers teach us how to speak grammatically right but you can confirm you speak colloquial as so do we.... I think people in German would be excited to hear the grammatical right German from other people but I think everyone expects it from a foreign speaker even though it has to seem pretty weird...:D

joy division
Apr 30th, 2012, 09:15 PM
Hi every body, there are some new posters in this subject on the thread. And you already have advanced to some other interesting stuff.
I wanted to add something to Julia`s video.

Hi, Child in time@, you are welcome !
Your translation is really very good:yeah: and you precisely describe the sense of Julia`s speaking.
You mention that Julia`s speaking in a very colloquial and natural way. I know that Rovegun is very good in writing and reading German, but it`s difficult for him to understand (her in) German interviews.
Therefore I thought it can be very useful to write down the interview word by word - also to have the writen and spoken German next to each other.
After having done it I noticed that you can read a lot of very bizarre things in there. And I think that`s also very interesting for us Germans.
When we hear and watch her talking, as German native speakers, we can mostly get the sense of what she is talking about, as you did, because we can see her. Julia`s gestures and charming speak an own language.
I guess therein is hidden what you mean with her being a very natural speaker.
Not to offend her at this point, but when you just read the pure text of her speaking it`s vaguely perceptible what she is talking about and you actually can have serious doubts that this is from a German native speaking girl.
Have a look and make your own jugdement :

0:17 - 0:48
Ich glaub`, da braucht man nicht viel zu sagen, weil die Spielerinnen haben`s glaub ich schon mehrfach zum Turnier des Jahres gewählt, zurecht. Erstmal die Organisation ist unglaublich, die Arena ist unglaublich... das Essen.. da brauchen wir garnicht drüber reden.. da, glaub` ich könnte ich den ganzen Tag nur sitzen.. und essen, was sonst auch nicht normal bei mir ist.... Es ist einfach alles zusammen was.., ja was die Woche und das Turnier so besonders macht.

0:48 - 1:18
....ich sag mir grundsätzlich immer, für mich selber, ich soll der Mensch bleiben, der ich immer
bin, letztendlich ist es der Beruf den ich mache, es ist nichts, ..ja Besonderes, was man als Mensch bei einem verändern sollte, weil man soll immer auf dem Boden bleiben, egal ob die Nummer auf einmal höher ist.. in der Rangliste oder nicht , weil letztenendes bist du immer noch die Person selber..und das ist mir wichtig, das ich mir auch treu bleibe da.

1:18-1:46
...Mein größter Traum eigentlich, war es eigentlich..war es als Kind Tennisprofi zu sein, oder würde ich gern auch sein....Ja ich finde das Leben einfach einfach schön, was wir haben und wenn man gut in seinem Beruf is`, isses so das man halt sich später keine Sorgen mehr machen muss, und das ist was ...ja, wo ich früher als kleines Kind wirklich geträumt von habe, was ich sein wollte.

1:46 - 2:11

....Ehrlich, definitif, ich bin einer der sagt offen und ehrlich seine Meinung, dann... extrovertiert,... und ab und zu kann ich ganz humorvoll sein.

2:11 - 2:44

...Ich kauf sehr gerne Handtaschen, das ist ungefähr schon meine was weiß ich wievielte, 40te oder 50te ? ..Und dann Parfums, definitiv, also das ist meine größte Schwäche, da kann die Angie Kerber auch`n paar Wörter zu sagen und die Anna-Lena, aber wir war`n schon relativ oft.. ja Parfümshoppen und ich riech eigentlich bei jedem Turnier anders...

2:44 - 3:05

..Grundsätzlich finde ich es eigentlich ganz interessant in so ei`m Hotel mal zu arbeiten, das hab` ich ja immer mal gesagt,.. ja so nicht an der Rezeption unbedingt aber so in der Buchhaltung... am Computer. Das finde ich eigentlich sehr interessant.

3:05 - 3:36

..Ich würde gern mal.., ja zu `nem Biathlonevent gehen und die ganzen Biathleten kennenlernen, leider hat ja meine Lieblingsbiathletin aufgehört mit Magdalena Neuner...Aber grundsätzlich ist das wo wo ich gerne hin würde... Ich hab` schon mal ne Einladung ja aber ich hab, konnte sie leider nicht wahrnehmen, da ich schon in Amerika in Indian Wells war diese Jahr bei der WM (Weltmeisterschaft)

3;36 - 4:04

..Ich glaube das was was meine Eltern für mich gemacht haben in meinem Leben bis jetzt...das kann man nicht mit `nem mit `nem Geschenk..ja...wiedergeben. Da gehört eigentlich `n riesiges Danke und ..ja stolz sein darauf, das man von seinen Eltern die Chance gekriegt hat das alles zu machen..
Und die hat auch nicht jeder. Darauf ist man sehr stolz und dankbar. Deswegen.. ich glaub nicht das jeder dafür ein besonderes Geschenk für gibt, sondern einfach `n riesen Danke.

4:04 - 4:20

..Den ganzen Tag im Bett liegen, faulenzen und Fernseh gucken und.. ja eigentlich garnicht aufstehen wollen. Das wär` so`n perfekter day-off für mich.

4:20 - 4:49

.. Eigentlich höre ich Beides gerne. Also da is`.. ich bin `n absoluter Musikfreak das ich die ganze Zeit mit`m I-pod höre....letztendlich bin ich so auch so`n Rihanna-Typ und .. ja, Pink und Lady Gaga. Also es ist alles gemischt, deswegen kann ich es nicht genau sagen. Aber es sind für mich einfach alles, ja ..großartige Sänger und Sängerinnen, ja deswegen... kann ich da nich entscheiden, ob Rock oder Pop.

4:49 - Ende

...Oh bitte nicht, haha...Ich glaube das würde ich Keinem antun... Und das werde ich auch nicht tun. Das war`s, Bitteschön.
________

However, it`s just a relaxed interview and as said Julia`s charming and gestures might have much more content than wise words.;)

Indianer Slobo
Apr 30th, 2012, 09:52 PM
Reading Julia's Interview written down I have to agree with you Joy Division. Could be really hard for a "non" native speaker of the german language to get what she says in some parts.If I hadn't watched the Interview before I probably as well would have had some problems to understand it all. Interestingly you don't have any problems understanding it when you watch the video. I vaguely remember from my german lessons at school that the message is only two a surprisingly small part percepted through the actual words that are said. Facial expression, gestures and tone of the said play a huge part in the way we understand something. For that reason pure transcription might lead to a whole different understanding of the said. Even more if you are not a native speaker. Going out from that your first your first translation is probably the most useful for those who don't wan't to go "in depth" with the german language.
On the other hand the colloquial tone of Julias Interview can be very informative for someone like Rovegun who (I think) want's to grasp the mechanics, as well as dialect, comic maybe even historic background in a language.
Languages are really interesting I have to sy now that I'm thinking about it, as they also can give you some sort of hint how the common sense or character of a nation is.
Example: I find the northern german dialect "Plattdeutsch" sometimes closer to english than "Hochdeutsch", going in with the fact that the humour of the Ostfriesen/Northern germans also has it's parallels with the british humour.

Hochdeutsch: fünf uhr
Platt: Klocke Fiwe (there is no standard for how to write "platt" I think --> could be "clocke five" as well)
English: Five o'clock

But I think I'm going way overboard maybe we can do it the other way round some time with an english interview, could be as interesting, especially if you have to read the transcription first :lol:

HowardH
Apr 30th, 2012, 10:31 PM
Thank you for your information everyone! Very useful.

I would also like to discuss the strategies used by a non-native speaker such as myself in deciphering a spoken interview. I know very little German and when it's spoken it becomes very tricky. I'm not at a level where I could understand a German speaker in a face to face conversation in German. If it's typed online translators can help you a lot but when it's spoken it's hard to know where to start.

My attempted translation wasn't very good, but I was very pleased that I managed to pick up a few key words and therefore make some sense out of the interview. I am also a good guesser, with some experience in language learning from school and university.

Looking at what is written above, if I didn't have access to online translators, I know only a few of the words. Things like bitte nicht, die arena ist unglaublich, handtaschen, aber, Ich, sehr, danke, schön, ja etc, I know these phrases and some more. Counting through the words it seems I have some familiarity with around 30% of the words. Not very much but I have been exposed to German words before.

Therefore my strategy is to look up words. I simply typed out some of the words I could hear Julia saying, then used an online translator. This would be very easy for a native speaker but for a non-native speaker to do this requires a fairly good understanding of German pronunciation. I've had to work on this.

Context also helped me a lot. The presence of English questions helped to give me clues.

What I'm saying is that I actually learned new words while trying to translate it. Of course I couldn't do a very good job, but using this strategy you don't actually have to know the words you are trying to translate. If you can hear the sounds and type out the word you can find out the meaning. I do have a good ear for sounds though, which helps me to use this strategy. And it isn't foolproof, it requires a bit of thought.

E.g. I didn't know the word "ehrlich"= honest. I looked it up and learned it. However this required me to realise that the spelling of the word was "ehrlich". I also did not know "traum"= dream or "kauf"= buy. But by listening, then typing the word how I thought it was spelt, I was able to find a definition for each word. There were quite a number of words which I tried to look up but because I couldn't get the spelling quite right I was not able to find them. And there were many phrases where I became "lost" and could not figure out how to type anything. But every now and then a word would jump out at me, I would type it and learn it.

Naturally I will learn even more words now that the interview is being typed out.

Anyway I'm just sharing my strategy. I've tried to develop a good ear for the sounds of the language in order to use this method. I think it's quite a useful approach for learning any language, to familiarise yourself with the sounds. I've done the same thing for French, Chinese and Japanese, so I am reasonably used to hearing the sounds of these languages. Now I have to take the next step and actually build up my vocabulary.

Because of this I also can pronounce the very few German words I know quite accurately. Same for the other languages. My vocab is tiny but my ear for the sounds and pronunciation is above average.

What I plan to do is to print out the transcripts of the interview, then listen along with Julia until I can hear the words being said.

I like to do the same thing with songs. I'm quite an anime fan, so I'll learn the lyrics to anime openings and listen until I can hear the lyrics as they are being sung.

HowardH
Apr 30th, 2012, 10:54 PM
Hi everyone, I'm kinda new here and just found this thread. Always nice to meet people who learn and approve their German:) I'm happy to help so I started with the first bit of the interview. I leave out the hmmms and ehmms.

Thank you so much!

Personally I like it if the hmms and ehmms are left in. Because this is also a part of the language, and I'm not sure whether these words are spelt differently in German.

For instance, in Japanese, the equivalent for umm is a sound like "ano". They might say something like "ano, sumimasen, toiretto wa doko?" (umm, excuse me, where are the toilets?) Because of this I realised that these seemingly meaningless sounds are important to sound like a native speaker. Your umms and ahhs have to sound like theirs. (Incidentally some people say that one of the first things you must learn is how to ask where the toilets are. A very useful question).

Since you typed them that way I presume that hmm or ehmm is the normal German way of writing the equivalent of "um" of "umm" in English? We also use hmm in English. I haven't seen ehmm before but I have seen erm (pretty rare though).

Rovegun
Apr 30th, 2012, 11:18 PM
Hochdeutsch: fünf uhr
Platt: Klocke Fiwe (there is no standard for how to write "platt" I think --> could be "clocke five" as well)
English: Five o'clock



I don´t know why but Klocke Fiew sounds to me like from Dutch:D Northern or North-West Germany has border with the Netherlands so who knows...



What I plan to do is to print out the transcripts of the interview, then listen along with Julia until I can hear the words being said.



it´s been my intention as well:D



For instance, in Japanese, the equivalent for umm is a sound like "ano". They might say something like "ano, sumimasen, toiretto wa doko?" (umm, excuse me, where are the toilets?) Because of this I realised that these seemingly meaningless sounds are important to sound like a native speaker. Your umms and ahhs have to sound like theirs. (Incidentally some people say that one of the first things you must learn is how to ask where the toilets are. A very useful question).

if anyone is interested that Japanese "ano" means "yes" in the Czech language:D

I have also noticed that you guys, in German you use "Ne" for "No"... it´s really familiar to me because we say the same for "No" but it is an official expression for "No" we don´t have any other... I guess this German "Ne" is just a colloquial expression for "No"...

Indianer Slobo
Apr 30th, 2012, 11:59 PM
I don´t know why but Klocke Fiew sounds to me like from Dutch:D Northern or North-West Germany has border with the Netherlands so who knows...



Yes you're probably right. i know that in germanys northwest is a region called Ostfriesland, while in the Netherlands there is ...now you guess ... right! Westfriesland.
Since I don't want to offend anybody with false information an I don't know if I'm 100% correct about this, but I think I may remember that the netherlands were part of the "heilige römische Reich" and became independent after the thirty year war. Anyway let alone the geographic situation suggests that the cultures, which are settled in that area are from the same origin or there has at least been cultural exchange so their languages might have similarities.

which spans the bow to Howard and his techniques of translating (span the bow = den Bogen spannen --> German Phrase for leading from one topic to another, don't know if thats used in english :lol:)
What I often use when translating (or trying to get the sense of a text in foreign languages) is, that I try to hang up on words that are similar or have been exchanged between nations during the centuries. This of course only works with languages that are culturally attached to each other. (would leave me helpless when learning chinese)
But its really useful when learning "european" languages. E.g. Italian, spanish and french in written word are quite similar. At school I had french for 4 years and spanish as well. First I had french and it helped me a lot in guessing words in spanish when I at least tried to learn it :tape: I really was to lazy to keep up the training of speaking but I am at least able to get the sense out of most of the texts I read in spanish.
Wit the Italian ... I never learned it, but when reading it I as well get quite some of the meaning of texts. Knowing the context of course helps and a lot of guessing is involved, but it works somehow.

It's really the same with the german and the dutch (to a lesser extent the english language as well). When our Football team lately beat the dutch, I was eager to read some press reaction of dutch newspapers. I was surprised, that I got like 80% of the sentences without ever having to use dictionary or sth.. The dutch words were in the german rather uncommon or not that often used words, with two or three nouns different at the end, but I could totally understand it.

Listening to those languages and understanding it is of course a totally different thing. Here I'd go with Howard. Try to hear the pronounciation as good as you can, and try to get a feel for the way things are or may be pronounced in the language and the errors you make, when you hack it in your translator will go down with time as well.

Child in Time
May 1st, 2012, 09:54 AM
Hi, Child in time@, you are welcome !
Your translation is really very good:yeah: and you precisely describe the sense of Julia`s speaking.
You mention that Julia`s speaking in a very colloquial and natural way. I know that Rovegun is very good in writing and reading German, but it`s difficult for him to understand (her in) German interviews.
Therefore I thought it can be very useful to write down the interview word by word - also to have the writen and spoken German next to each other.
After having done it I noticed that you can read a lot of very bizarre things in there. And I think that`s also very interesting for us Germans.
When we hear and watch her talking, as German native speakers, we can mostly get the sense of what she is talking about, as you did, because we can see her. Julia`s gestures and charming speak an own language.
I guess therein is hidden what you mean with her being a very natural speaker.
Not to offend her at this point, but when you just read the pure text of her speaking it`s vaguely perceptible what she is talking about and you actually can have serious doubts that this is from a German native speaking girl.

Danke:wavey:
I totally agree with what you say about those "bizarre things". It's interesting: When I first watched the interview, I didn't notice all those obvious syntax and grammar mistakes. In fact, I didn't really notice any mistakes at all, probably because I was paying attention to what she says and not how she says it. But when I transcribed the first part of the interview, I was really suprised about the multitude of mistakes. She starts a sentence, interrupts after a couple of words, continues using a different syntax, she uses "weil" as a conjunction instead of a subjunction, and she uses a lot of filler words such as uhm or ja, etc. But still, when watching the interview - despite all her errors - you would never think that she's not a native-speaker, not even for the briefest moment, even if you didn't know her at all. I think that's what I tried to express by saying that she speaks in a "natural way". I suppose the interview reflects the way our brain functions during rather spontaneous informal discourse (as just one of many registers of a language).
And I think it's so true what you say about gestures and facial expression, they're a decisive part of successful communication and help us understand what she's saying.

Child in Time
May 1st, 2012, 10:15 AM
Thank you so much!

Personally I like it if the hmms and ehmms are left in. Because this is also a part of the language, and I'm not sure whether these words are spelt differently in German.

For instance, in Japanese, the equivalent for umm is a sound like "ano". They might say something like "ano, sumimasen, toiretto wa doko?" (umm, excuse me, where are the toilets?) Because of this I realised that these seemingly meaningless sounds are important to sound like a native speaker. Your umms and ahhs have to sound like theirs. (Incidentally some people say that one of the first things you must learn is how to ask where the toilets are. A very useful question).

Since you typed them that way I presume that hmm or ehmm is the normal German way of writing the equivalent of "um" of "umm" in English? We also use hmm in English. I haven't seen ehmm before but I have seen erm (pretty rare though).


Yes, now I can see why it's helpful to leave the hmmms and ehmms in. If we just wanna get the main ideas of what she's saying, they can be left out. If we're interested in how spoken language works, they should be considered an important part of the interview.

I must admit that I didn't really think about the spelling. I think that hm is the official German equivalent to the English um. I think I made up the ehm as one variant of hm. In my ears, ehmmm reflects the sounds that I hear so I would use it, but it's not official.

Child in Time
May 1st, 2012, 10:26 AM
Anyway I'm just sharing my strategy. I've tried to develop a good ear for the sounds of the language in order to use this method. I think it's quite a useful approach for learning any language, to familiarise yourself with the sounds. I've done the same thing for French, Chinese and Japanese, so I am reasonably used to hearing the sounds of these languages. Now I have to take the next step and actually build up my vocabulary.

That's a good strategy. I also think that if you discover new words by hearing them and then try to find out their spelling, you will memorize these words (and their correct pronunciation) much better than if you did it the other way around. It takes more time but it's very effective.

LinusVanPelt
May 1st, 2012, 10:50 AM
:wavey: Child In Time. Welcome. It's nice to see a Deep Purple fan around here :)

Child in Time
May 1st, 2012, 03:44 PM
:wavey: Child In Time. Welcome. It's nice to see a Deep Purple fan around here :)

Thank you, Linus:wavey:

joy division
May 1st, 2012, 04:46 PM
Some very interesting posts again here.:)

Indianer Slobo thanks for your further leading thoughts.
Plattdeutsch is pretty close to the Old Saxon language, which was in use from the late Antics to the middle ages in Northern Germany.
It`s not a secret, and the word "English" tells it, that the Anglo-Saxons as an Old Saxon dialect speaking tribe brought their language to Britain during the Germanis migration period in the late antics.
The English language further had very different other influences as the German language as well. To name Viking, Celtic and French here for instance.
Nevertheless it`s much closer to Plattdeutsch than to the modern German language, which as said also has changed a lot from then.
At Hamburg the local Plattdeutsch dialect is called "Hamburger Englisch" not without any reason.
The living circumstances of the Northern German, as people who are very much related to the sea, are more similar to the British and that might be a factor, too, that the equal origin still is visible.

I think you`re right with the Netherlands. The dependencies and power structures in Europe at that time are very hard to overlook.
Before the Dutch proclaimed themselves as an own nation in 1648 at the end of the "30 jährige Krieg" they had been living under oppression of the catholic Spanish kingdom for a very long time.
Many different powers in Europe at that time arrogated to be the legitimate representative of the "Heilige römische Reich deutscher Nation" which had their prime time in the early middle ages. Combined with religiously motivated interests there was a hardly comprehensible and understandable political situation, which ended in the above mentioned "30 jährige Krieg", a devastating war in the Central Europe. When I remember right just 30% of the German population survived this war and it`s consequences like epidemics and starvation.

No nice theme, so back to Julia`s video,
As you and Child in time mentioned, the tone, gesture and plays a big role in communication and conversation.
Julia`s video shows that it`s not just important to have a big amount of German vocabulary knowledge to understand what she says.
When somebody watches the video knowing just some German words and expressions, but also has a very good perception and power of deduction in languages, as Howard, you can see that he has a pretty good chance to understand what her talk is about.

The question how the languages developed and how they influence each other, now and then, is multiple and very interesting.
It`s obvious that languages are closely related when they have the same origin or when the people of different countries are in a close dialogue for economical or cultural reasons.
That can be pretty one-sided as we see nowadays. The German has massive influences from the English language. We already created a new word for it – "Denglisch" and we already use for longer a kind of artificial language which reminds me pretty much of the „Neusprech“ in Orwells 1984.

Communication in spoken language is by far not just about the pure exchange of words.
It`s a difficult subject overall when you consider that you can`t understand at times the behaviour and reasoning of a conversational partner who even has the same mother language as you have.
So thinking, reasoning and intention plays big a role in this matter too, independently of the language.To put on it on the top it`s sometimes even more eloquent to say nothing at all in some situations.:D

Some other aspects to consider in learning a different language -
The daily use of the mother language also has a deep influence on the specific gesture and tone of the speakers. You can recognize it when you watch people of a different nation while talking to each other. Very good to see is that when you for example watch Italian people. Most of them have very typical and vivid gestures during their talks.
Recently I was working together with some Colombian guys. They were talking just Spanish with some kind of Colombian dialect.
I had different languages at school. Latin, English and French and I also speak and understand some Italian, but not Spanish. Spanish is related to the other Roman languages and that helped me a lot in conversation.
Equally to this typical gestures I noticed that the languages all have their different "melody".
It can be very helpful to just listen to this "melody" when you want to get to a clue on what the people say. Even when you don`t have a clue about the meaning of the words that you hear.
It tells you a lot about the spirit of the people and can give you therefore an access to their language.
A nice side effect is that, when you get to know another language better you get to know your own language better as well, because you permanently oppose them each other while thinking about and speaking it.

Rovegun
May 1st, 2012, 09:13 PM
I would like to point out a few grammatical things from which I am a bit confused and you could help me to make them clear, please....

0:17 - 0:48
Ich glaub`, da braucht man nicht viel zu sagen, weil die Spielerinnen haben`s glaub ich schon mehrfach zum Turnier des Jahres gewählt, zurecht. Erstmal die Organisation ist unglaublich, die Arena ist unglaublich... das Essen.. da brauchen wir garnicht drüber reden.. da, glaub` ich könnte ich den ganzen Tag nur sitzen.. und essen, was sonst auch nicht normal bei mir ist.... Es ist einfach alles zusammen was.., ja was die Woche und das Turnier so besonders macht.

correct me but I think the syntax is a bit different from I learned... if there is "weil" than "haben" should be at the end of the sentence I know someone has mentioned that above but I don´t get why Julia uses it in this way...

the second part I would rather say/write "Erstmal ist die Organisation unglaublich."


0:48 - 1:18
....ich sag mir grundsätzlich immer, für mich selber, ich soll der Mensch bleiben, der ich immer
bin, letztendlich ist es der Beruf den ich mache, es ist nichts, ..ja Besonderes, was man als Mensch bei einem verändern sollte, weil man soll immer auf dem Boden bleiben, egal ob die Nummer auf einmal höher ist.. in der Rangliste oder nicht , weil letztenendes bist du immer noch die Person selber..und das ist mir wichtig, das ich mir auch treu bleibe da.

the same part above...


2:11 - 2:44

...Ich kauf sehr gerne Handtaschen, das ist ungefähr schon meine was weiß ich wievielte, 40te oder 50te ? ..Und dann Parfums, definitiv, also das ist meine größte Schwäche, da kann die Angie Kerber auch`n paar Wörter zu sagen und die Anna-Lena, aber wir war`n schon relativ oft.. ja Parfümshoppen und ich riech eigentlich bei jedem Turnier anders...

I completely understand the meaning of the sentece it´s pretty clear to me but I am a bit confused with that "zu" I don´t know if it belongs to "sagen" or it should mean "dazu"... personally with my German knowledge I would say "dazu" instead of only "zu" but you will explain why Julia used it there....

My sentece would be [...]da kann die Angie Kerber auch´n paar Wörter dazu sagen[...] I know there can´t be a verb with "zu" when there´s a modal verb...



3:05 - 3:36

..Ich würde gern mal.., ja zu `nem Biathlonevent gehen und die ganzen Biathleten kennenlernen, leider hat ja meine Lieblingsbiathletin aufgehört mit Magdalena Neuner...Aber grundsätzlich ist das wo wo ich gerne hin würde... Ich hab` schon mal ne Einladung ja aber ich hab, konnte sie leider nicht wahrnehmen, da ich schon in Amerika in Indian Wells war diese Jahr bei der WM (Weltmeisterschaft)

these two parts are the ones I was talking about yesterday I get them like addition to the content because Julia (or the speaker) didn´t know at the start of the sentence she would use/add the information so she had to put it in the end and behind the verb...



3;36 - 4:04

..Ich glaube das was was meine Eltern für mich gemacht haben in meinem Leben bis jetzt...das kann man nicht mit `nem mit `nem Geschenk..ja...wiedergeben. Da gehört eigentlich `n riesiges Danke und ..ja stolz sein darauf, das man von seinen Eltern die Chance gekriegt hat das alles zu machen..
Und die hat auch nicht jeder. Darauf ist man sehr stolz und dankbar. Deswegen.. ich glaub nicht das jeder dafür ein besonderes Geschenk für gibt, sondern einfach `n riesen Danke.

the same as written above...



4:49 - Ende

...Oh bitte nicht, haha...Ich glaube das würde ich Keinem antun... Und das werde ich auch nicht tun. Das war`s, Bitteschön.

does she mean she wouldn´t do that, right? I know what she means but not sure I can translate it well...


ufff I have done many notes hope you´ll be able to help me:D

Indianer Slobo
May 1st, 2012, 10:36 PM
part 1.1 - totally right, "weil" should be at the end of the sentence. Probably just a grammatical mistake she made when scraping the answer together. :lol:
She would not have written it that way. If she had used "denn" instead of "weil" her structure would have been correct.

part 1.2 - You're right and probably she did it for the same reason as the first one. In spoken language those mistakes are often overheard or not bothered.(automatically corrected to get what she is trying to say, so its no problem for the understanding.

Part 2 - She just beat around the bush this whole answer. I think she was trying to express something she just couldn't find the right words to say, changing what she says during the thinking process so it results in an awkward structure.

Part 3 - you're right that "zu" is not used as it would normally be used. Still it's, at least in spoken language, common to say it the way Julia does. I think the reason it works is the "da" in the beginning of the sentence. You could also say : " dazu kann die Angie Kerber auch`n paar Wörter sagen "
Your version would sound awkward to the native speaker,(not necessary wrong and a lot of people in fact use it) since the "da" is doubled.

Part 4 - absolutely right - "..., leider hat ja meine Lieblingsbiathletin Magdalena Neuner aufgehört ... konnte Sie dieses Jahr bei der WM leider nicht wahrnehmen ... would be correct"

Part 5 - "..Ich glaube das was meine Eltern bis jetzt in meinem Leben für mich gemacht haben"

Part 6 - Yes she means it that way. By saying she wouldn't do this to anybody, she indicates that her singing might even harm somebody. This is in different variations a common german phrase to say when you are not good at something you're asked to present.
With this answer she also proves that she can be humorous. ;)

Child in Time
May 2nd, 2012, 03:09 PM
I'm really impressed by the way you guys analyze and explain language. I could talk about this stuff for hours and hours and wouldn't get bored;)

There's just one thing I'd like to add to the discussion about "weil". I'm studying foreign languages at university and although we usually don't refer to the German language in class, we recently had an interesting discussion about language change in which my professor brought up the issue with the German "weil". Since "weil" is a subjunction, the verb of the subordinate clause needs to be at the end, as you correctly pointed out. However, due to language change it is now accepted to use it as a conjunction in spoken language, as if it introduced a new main clause (as after "und", "oder" "aber" etc.) Interestingly, it has become so common to use "weil" as a subjunction that you find more and more examples of it in written language as well. Thus, as a result of language change, my professor said that in about 10 years time, she expects the "Duden" to define "weil" as a conjunction and subjunction.
We'll see ...;)

HowardH
May 9th, 2012, 02:04 AM
Came across this phrase in the chat threads:

Wie man in den Wald hineinruft, so schallt es heraus.

Literally it seems to mean something like "As one shouts into the woods, so it echoes back."

There are many similar phrases in English: What goes around comes around.
You reap what you sow.

In French I think this is a similar phrase:

On récolte ce que l'on a semé

hankmoody
May 9th, 2012, 02:24 AM
Came across this phrase in the chat threads:

Wie man in den Wald hineinruft, so schallt es heraus.

Literally it seems to mean something like "As one shouts into the woods, so it echoes back."

There are many similar phrases in English: What goes around comes around.
You reap what you sow.

In French I think this is a similar phrase:

On récolte ce que l'on a semé

The highlighted sentence is absolutely correct. That`s about exactly the meaning of that german phrase.;)

Dispeker
May 15th, 2012, 01:37 PM
^ I actually speak to Germans like that IRL like when I go there or when they come here (on the beach or other places where there's a lot of them). Because some of them don't speak English nor of course Dutch or French (and me no German) so there is no choice left for me but try to be understood as much as possible by other means. In that case I could end up unintentionally using lots of false friends (and there're too many of those FFs, damnit). The fun part is I have no idea whether the words I used are the right ones or FFs. I'm fine w/ it as long as I don't get an angry look on the face or slap or anything like that
.

Those Germans that are coming to your country should be grateful that there are people like you who are willing to make an effort to speak in their mother tongue. It's actually quite embarrassing that most Dutch people (I assume you are Dutch?) tend to speak German very well while hardly any German knows Dutch. So I'd say, if you get an angry look you should slap them hard (in a figurative sense, of course ;)) for their ignorance.

HowardH
May 26th, 2012, 04:37 AM
I learned a new phrase reading Julia's facebook today.

Someone wrote: Go Julia! Drück dir die Daumen!

Some research suggests that "Ich drück dir die Daumen" means "I press (or hold) my thumbs for you."

In English we would translate it as "I'll cross my fingers for you" or "I'm crossing my fingers for you."

Another example I found while looking this up:
http://www.elkes-grusskarten.de/grusskarten//wuensche/wuensche10daumen.jpg

literal meaning: I hold my thumbs really really firmly for you.
translation: I'm crossing my fingers really tightly for you.

In English we never use this "hold my thumbs" phrase yet looking at the picture I definitely recognise the gesture. I wonder why? Maybe because it's an instinctive posture someone who is supporting a player or team makes when watching a game?

joy division
May 26th, 2012, 07:12 AM
^^^
It means that you include and hold somebody else (the other person is your thumb :D) in your thoughts intensively.
What I didn`t understand from your words is whether you have this gesture, too ? Or do you have just the crossed fingers ?

HowardH
May 26th, 2012, 04:57 PM
^^^
It means that you include and hold somebody else (the other person is your thumb :D) in your thoughts intensively.
What I didn`t understand from your words is whether you have this gesture, too ? Or do you have just the crossed fingers ?

Thanks for the explanation.

We don't have this gesture in NZ, and I don't think that Australia, the UK (Britain) or USA have it either. No one here would understand if you said you were going to hold your thumbs for them.

We just have crossed fingers for luck. "Good luck for your match. I'll keep my fingers crossed."

joy division
Jun 3rd, 2012, 12:16 PM
For all those who are interested in (Julia`s:D) spoken German language - the interview after her match against Aranxta Rus. It`s here
http://de.eurosport.yahoo.com/video/03062012/73/goerges-exklusiv-konstanter.html

0:00-0-24

Q. : "Julia, 6-7, 6-2, 2-6 - die Niederlage gegen die Niederländerin Rus hier in der dritten Runde.
Woran hat`s(es) gelegen, das Du das Match nicht gewinnen konntest ?"

"Julia,... let`s face the loss against Dutch Aranxta Rus in the third round here.
What were the reasons that you couldn`t win this match ?"

Julia : "Ähm, sie sie war an Ende n`(ein) Stück solider als ich, hat keine Fehler mehr gemacht, und ähm..ich bin für meine Bälle gegangen, aber die sind halt, sag ich mal, n` (ein) Stückchen im aus gewesen und ja.. da muß ich einfach definitiv n` (ein) Stückchen konstanter werden und, ähmm..,wie gesagt, sie hat n` (ein) sehr, sehr gutes Match gespielt."

"Well in the end she play a little more solid than me, didn`t make any faults anymore, and ehmm.. I went for my shots but they were.. let me say very closely out and yes,... I definitely have to play more consistent then, and ehm.. as said she played a very,very good match."

0:24-0.54

Q. : "Ihr solltet eigentlich auf dem "Einser" spielen und weil Granoller und Mathieu so lang` gespielt haben, wurde Euer Spiel dann auf den "Siebener" verlegt.
Wie schwierig ist das, und was für `ne (eine), was für `n Einfluss hat das auf Dein Match, das Du dann auf`n (einen) anderen Platz musst, und das Du so lange warten musstest ?"


"You should actually play on court 1. The match of G. and M. match lasted very long, so your match was scheduled to court 7.
How difficult is that, or had it any impact on your game that you had to play on different court and had to wait a pretty long time ?"

Julia : "Ja, eigentlich, wenn man die Ansetzung sieht, wusste man schon, das es spät wird. Aber es hat jetzt keinen besonderen Einfluss, ob man auf dem Einser spielt oder auf`m (dem) Siebener.
Letztendlich is`(ist) man eigentlich froh, das man auf`n (den) Platz gehen kann,.. und noch relativ früh auf`n Platz gehen kann.
Ähm..deswegen war das jetzt nich`(nicht) `ne (eine) grosse Umstellung,..neee. (nein)"

"Well, when you actually look at the schedule, then I already knew that it would get late. It has no special impact whether you play on court 7 or court 1.
In the very end you are just happy that the match starts, and also, that it starts early enough.
Ehmm no,.. therefore it was not a big deal there."

0:54 - 1:32

Q. ; "Ähm, Hier hat das Match `n (ein) bisschen besser angefangen und während des Matches gab es, würde ich sagen, relativ viele sogenannte momentums/shifts.
Woran liegt es, das Du, nachdem Du den Ersten (Satz) im Tiebreak verlierst, ..dann kommst Du stark zurück und gewinnst den zweiten (Satz), ..dann aber nicht die Konstanz hast das über den gesamten dritten Satz dann weiterhin zu machen ?"

"The match started a little better, and during the match there were, I`d say, many so called momentums/shifts.
What`s the reason that you after loosing the tiebreak in the first, ..coming back strong in the second and winning the second, you then don`t have the consistency to keep it up ?"

Julia : "Ja, ich hab` ja direkt mit `nem (einem) break gestartet im Dritten und ähm.. hab` das dann unglücklich wieder verloren,..und hatte dann wieder mehr Chancen um zu breaken.
Und da hat sie einfach gut gespielt, meine Bälle gut abgewehrt, und ähm, ja.. und ich hab` dann da 2-3 Momente nicht ganz genutzt dafür und dann is` sie mir`n bischen weggezogen.
Ich hab`s versucht immer wieder ran zukommen. Ja letztendlich, am Ende hat sie halt einfach weniger Fehler gemacht als ich." (She`s a little confused in finding the right words here although she speaks rather fluently )


"Well, I started with a break in the third, and .. was a bit unlucky then,... and then again had some more chances to break. She just played well in these moments, defenfing very well.. and I just couldn`t take the opportunity 2 or 3 times,.. she got off every time.
I really was trying hard but in the very end she just made less faults than me."

1:32 - 2:13

Q.: "Seit Du das erste Mal hier gespielt hast, hast Du Dich kontinuierlich hier gesteigert.
Nun ist es hier, genau wie letztes Jahr bei der dritten Runde geblieben.
Was kannst Du dennoch Positives aus dieser Woche mitnehmen, und wie geht`s für Dich weiter ?"

"Since you have been playing here for the first time, you improved your results consistently.
Now it`s again the third round, as last year.
Anyway, what can you take out of this week , and where will you go on from here ?°

Julia :" Ähm,ja .. ich habe 3 eigentlich sehr,sehr gute Matches gespielt. Heute war es eher so`n (ein) up and down und ähm.. wobei es, sag ich mal, man muss immer sagen, (spluttering in mind) man spielt immer so gut, wie der Gegner es zulässt. Und heute hat sie definitiv mein Spiel unterbunden, mein aggressives Spiel, und ich bin halt (means "simply", a very often used word) zu früh, zu früh auf zu viel gegangen. (Julia not safe in expression here)
Ja, und wurde dann zum Teil auch nicht belohnt. Und ähm.. sie hat meine, meine guten Aufschläge, meine ersten Aufschläge gut entschärft und hat sie teilweise reihenweise abreturniert, und ähm..dafür muss man dann auch credit an ihr geben!" (Her syntax and choice of words in the last sentence is a little too strange:D. Better is " dafür muss man ihr einfach Respekt zollen or "das hat sie wirklich gut gemacht !


"Well I actually have been playing three very, very good matches here. Today is was more up and down, whereat, let me say, you have to say, you always play as good as your opponent let`s you do so. And today she definitely managed to disturbe my game, my aggressive game and I was often trying too much, too early.
And I didn`t get the reward then...She spoiled my first service and returned really well and you have to give her credit for that."

Q. : Okay, thanks a lot.

Julia : Bitte
Here you go.

joy division
Jan 3rd, 2013, 09:18 AM
(Google translate puts that as "off topic" but I noticed Joy division mentioned "babbling"... can it also mean "chat thread"?)


Yes, Laberthread is a word construction and meant in the sense of "off topic or chat thread" here.

Crazillo the thread-opener mentioned in the beginning that we can talk and argue about what ever we like in this thread. For some reason it`s all about tennis.;)

"Babbling" is not quite right. More precise in the way we mainly use it is "talking about something without having any idea of it".
It`s a colloquial term and pretty often used esspecially by the kids.
Caution - You should not use it when you talk to cops or in a job interview.:D

"Labersack"
windbag

"Alter, was laberst du da ? "
Hey man, what are you talking about ?

"Laber nich` rum hier, Alter !
Don`t talk shit man !

Banditoo
Jan 3rd, 2013, 01:02 PM
Um, I think that this forum is lovely place where you can write for everything. Julia's beauty and powerful game made me come here and I'm very glad that I am here. It's not a big problem to write put German post because I learn German now and I know how important is to practice your language skills. I've improved my English, imo, and that place really helped me. As Howard said, it would be good just to put some summarizing words in the end.

On the other hand, it's really hard to express yourself when people around you are talking in another language. It would make self-conscious and timid and that wouldn't help you to put your comment down.

joy division
Apr 26th, 2013, 01:02 AM
I still don't know what dahinplätschern means or what it had to do with this match. Something about ripples or splashing.

Petra was there for the taking today, but Julia didn't close it in two and lacked the conditioning for three.

"Dahinplätschern" is a word play that is used (pretty often) in sports when nothing happens and changes in the currency of a match, means it`s boring.
"Das Spiel plätschert so dahin."
The original sense is in context with water/creeks and means about - gurgling smoothly.

For advanced learners :D
"Dahin" is a little special and can have some different meanings.
If you`re interested have a closer look here
http://synonyme.woxikon.de/synonyme/dahin.php

2 examples how we use it in daily speech.
"Ich gehe heute abend zum Fussball. Gehst du auch (da)hin ?"
"I`ll go to the football match tonight. You`ll go there,too ?"

"Jetzt geht`s dahin." Also often used of commentators in sports,
"Now it`s over/ has definitely turned for the worse."