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View Full Version : Whom is your favorite author?


Barrie_Dude
Sep 4th, 2011, 11:15 PM
I do read an awful lot and I am aware there are a great many that do as well. I know that my favorite authour is Larry McMutry (Lonersome Dove, Terms of Endearment, etc) as I have 44 of his books, but I love other authours as well. Namely Steinbeck. I have a preference for American authours as thats where I grew up and that will be reflected in the poll. However, I will leave room for Others...

Sam L
Sep 5th, 2011, 08:04 AM
My two favourite are Leo Tolstoy and Gustave Flaubert. I like realism in literature.

Out of your list my favourite is Mark Twain. I read his novels when I was very young and I have fond memories of them. I also like F Scott Fitzgerald, Harper Lee and Gone with the Wind.

Halardfan
Sep 5th, 2011, 08:31 AM
Charles Dickens, such rich characters, emotional stories. Great.

skanky~skanketta
Sep 5th, 2011, 08:33 AM
Whom?

Wert.
Sep 5th, 2011, 08:53 AM
Anthony Horovitz.

LUVMIRZA
Sep 5th, 2011, 08:56 AM
Ken Follett followed by Dean Koontz, Jeffrey Deaver, Alistair Maclean, Michael Crichton

Victorian : Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth gaskell, William M Thackeray

moby
Sep 5th, 2011, 09:14 AM
Whom?IKR.

Mynarco
Sep 5th, 2011, 09:15 AM
Jo Nesbo :p

Patrick S
Sep 5th, 2011, 06:18 PM
Clive Barker. Books of Blood rules like nothing have ruled before (or after).

propi
Sep 5th, 2011, 06:52 PM
Ana Maria Matute, of course :worship:
Olvidado Rey Gudu is simply awesome :bowdown:

égalité
Sep 5th, 2011, 07:08 PM
Whom?

lol :hysteric:

posters whom are trying to sound smart by using "whom" incorrectly :oh:

Anyway, Toni Morrison :D

~{X}~
Sep 5th, 2011, 07:20 PM
Steven Saylor. :)

Mistress of Evil
Sep 5th, 2011, 08:59 PM
Agatha Christie, mainly I read her while I was 14-15 but still she is amazing :worship:
Currently, I just love George R. R. Martin's work. :inlove:
Paulo Coelho :lol:

Chris 84
Sep 5th, 2011, 09:09 PM
No, "whom" is not my favourite author :sad:

Orwell is my favourite author

Specter
Sep 5th, 2011, 09:13 PM
Elmore Leonard.





BTW: "Whom?" Really? Come on, English is my second language and even I know that's wrong.

Kart
Sep 5th, 2011, 10:01 PM
Am I allowed to say none of the above. Though I know it's politically correct to not bash classic writers my experience of the likes of Steinbeck / Dickens / Twain etc is that their famous novels (which are the only ones I've read) are rather cumbersome in parts.

The exception to that rule is the Harper Lee book.

Though I've read a bit of Tolstoy / Flambert / Dostoyevsky I suspect a lot of the meaning in those stories are lost in translation.

Honestly nowadays I'm far more inclined to contemporary novelists but if I were to vote for someone more classical I'd go for Jane Austen or one of the Bronte sisters.

Though that may well represent the type of classical story I'd rather read than the actual style.

Wigglytuff
Sep 5th, 2011, 10:24 PM
lol :hysteric:

posters whom are trying to sound smart by using "whom" incorrectly :oh:

Anyway, Toni Morrison :D

This thread title is a Classic fail!

Le Tenisse
Sep 5th, 2011, 10:35 PM
How on earth Bradbury is not on the list?.

miffedmax
Sep 6th, 2011, 12:50 AM
The ones I drink with.

Lena's bangs.

wta_zuperfann
Sep 6th, 2011, 02:50 AM
James Mitchener - I've read about 15 of his books with Fires of Spring being my favorite by far:

http://i43.tower.com/images/mm102155304/fires-spring-james-a-michener-paperback-cover-art.jpg

This stunning book reads like it's my biography as he and I both suffered many tragedies in our lives but somehow we overcame them.

I would likely say that Dostoyevsky was my second favorite.

fantic
Sep 6th, 2011, 02:58 AM
the incomparable, nonpareil Edward Gibbon.

his 'The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire' is the one book that I'll take to the desert island :)

Among the above probably Herman Wouk.

Ksenia.
Sep 6th, 2011, 05:26 AM
You probably haven't read enough books, otherwise, as others pointed out, you would've known it's "who" :hug:
On the topic: from the list, Hemingway, all-time favorite: Dostoyevsky

tennislover
Sep 6th, 2011, 09:57 AM
Lucretius

Super Dave
Sep 6th, 2011, 01:10 PM
I don't read much heavy stuff.

Probably Bill Bryson.

Barrie_Dude
Sep 6th, 2011, 01:24 PM
Elmore Leonard.





BTW: "Whom?" Really? Come on, English is my second language and even I know that's wrong.From Texas. Westerns? I have read him and he is good

Barrie_Dude
Sep 6th, 2011, 01:25 PM
How on earth Bradbury is not on the list?. Sci Fi does not make the cut with me

Oermi
Sep 6th, 2011, 01:30 PM
Kevin Brooks.
Nick Hornby.

:hearts:

homogenius
Sep 6th, 2011, 04:09 PM
William Burroughs

Sammo
Sep 6th, 2011, 04:10 PM
Mine :devil: I've got a personal author

King Halep
Sep 6th, 2011, 05:28 PM
You probably haven't read enough books, otherwise, as others pointed out, you would've known it's "who" :hug:
On the topic: from the list, Hemingway, all-time favorite: Dostoyevsky

yes, well said :D

dont you know american writers are the best :hysteric:

postalblowfish
Sep 6th, 2011, 05:52 PM
Julio Cortázar's probably top of my list.

Some others I like: Iain Sinclair, Flann O'Brien, David Foster Wallace, Georges Perec, Jorge Luis Borges.

Any recommendations for continental European/Latin American fiction kinda late 19th Century - about 1980-ish would be welcomed.

Mynarco
Sep 6th, 2011, 08:20 PM
I just can't read classics. I got a copy of a tale of two cities last year and I still couldn't finish it.

I just couldn't finish Crime & Punishment either.

Le Tenisse
Sep 7th, 2011, 03:15 AM
Julio Cortázar's probably top of my list. Jorge Luis Borges.
Any recommendations for continental European/Latin American fiction kinda late 19th Century - about 1980-ish would be welcomed.

You HAVE to read Leopoldo Marechal, who is one of the most important contemporary authors of Borges generation. Adan BuenosAyres and Severo Arcángelo are just awesome. I like Borges, but, i love Marechal´s writing and story telling.
Of course i would also recommend Roberto Arlt. The short story "The golden hare" from Silvina Ocampo(Victoria´s sister) is indeed gold.
García Marquez is a must have also. Probably all of Osvaldo Bayer.
The Open Veins of Latin America of Eduardo Galeano.
Lucio V. Mansilla´s "An Expedition to the Ranquel Indians".
More modern authors?....Alan Pauls.Sylvia Iparraguirre perhaps.
One more thing, probably you have read it, but there´s Cortázar´s Casa Tomada(Taken house), which is the most clever short story i´ve ever read. Not agree with the message overall, but the construction is amazing. You won´t regret.

delicatecutter
Sep 7th, 2011, 03:22 AM
Sylvia Plath no doubt. The Bell Jar is such a great novel but her Ariel poems just kill me. The enormity of her words and how she placed them are just immaculate and have always hit me hard.

Sam L
Sep 7th, 2011, 11:16 AM
I just can't read classics. I got a copy of a tale of two cities last year and I still couldn't finish it.


I started this but I couldn't finish it either. The problem with this novel is that I don't care about any of these characters. It serves more like a historical document than a piece of fiction.

My favourite novels have characters I care about and often I identify with like Anna Karenina, Emma Bovary and Dorothea Brooke for example.

Also, I read the "classics" because I find the stories and people from those eras more interesting. If you don't find those eras interesting, you will find it boring.

LUVMIRZA
Sep 7th, 2011, 12:13 PM
I just can't read classics. I got a copy of a tale of two cities last year and I still couldn't finish it.

I just couldn't finish Crime & Punishment either.

Tale of the two cities is not very interesting I'd say.

Try these. I found them interesting.

Sense and Sensibility, Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell:hearts:
David Copperfield, Old Curiosity shop, Great Expectations by Dickens
Vanity fair by Thackeray
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte:worship:
Teneant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Bronte

galadriel
Sep 7th, 2011, 12:31 PM
Dostoyevsky,Tolstoj and John Irving :D

tennislover
Sep 7th, 2011, 01:44 PM
Dostoyevsky,Tolstoj and John Irving :D

:cool:

irma
Sep 7th, 2011, 02:00 PM
I read two books from Dostoyevsky(crime and punishment and demons) this summer and I really enjoyed it, so I will definitely read some more in the future.

postalblowfish
Sep 7th, 2011, 04:46 PM
You HAVE to read Leopoldo Marechal, who is one of the most important contemporary authors of Borges generation. Adan BuenosAyres and Severo Arcángelo are just awesome. I like Borges, but, i love Marechal´s writing and story telling.
Of course i would also recommend Roberto Arlt. The short story "The golden hare" from Silvina Ocampo(Victoria´s sister) is indeed gold.
García Marquez is a must have also. Probably all of Osvaldo Bayer.
The Open Veins of Latin America of Eduardo Galeano.
Lucio V. Mansilla´s "An Expedition to the Ranquel Indians".
More modern authors?....Alan Pauls.Sylvia Iparraguirre perhaps.
One more thing, probably you have read it, but there´s Cortázar´s Casa Tomada(Taken house), which is the most clever short story i´ve ever read. Not agree with the message overall, but the construction is amazing. You won´t regret.

You've disabled reputation, so instead I'll just thank you by posting here instead.

Cheers, seriously.

Haimar
Sep 7th, 2011, 07:49 PM
:lol: What an american minded list. The only american writer I really like is Easton Ellis, other writers I love are Marquez, Nabokov and Woolf but I usually don't read more than one or two books from the same author.

antonella
Sep 7th, 2011, 08:13 PM
yes, well said :D

dont you know american writers are the best :hysteric:

And the best ones are from the South. Southerner's love to tell stories (mostly fabrications, of course).:tape:

Brena
Sep 7th, 2011, 08:18 PM
Kurt Vonnegut, Zola, Salinger, John Fowels, Dino Buzzati, Marquez. And for some reason I like Dickens. :scratch:

Le Tenisse
Sep 7th, 2011, 08:46 PM
You've disabled reputation

...:confused:

postalblowfish
Sep 8th, 2011, 07:42 AM
...:confused:

For me it's showing a kinda grey dot and when I hover over it it says something like 'Le Tenisse has disabled reputation'.

Le Tenisse
Sep 8th, 2011, 04:35 PM
For me it's showing a kinda grey dot and when I hover over it it says something like 'Le Tenisse has disabled reputation'.

Fixed the disabled reputation icon. Btw, what are reputation points,anyway?.

postalblowfish
Sep 9th, 2011, 05:13 PM
Fixed the disabled reputation icon. Btw, what are reputation points,anyway?.

Not entirely sure, really. I think it's to do with how much rep you have and the amount of reputation points that the people that have given you that rep have.

Dani12
Sep 10th, 2011, 01:49 PM
Bryce Courtenay.

The Power Of One, The Potato Factory, Jessica and Tandia are my favourites.

Barrie_Dude
Sep 11th, 2011, 12:08 AM
And the best ones are from the South. Southerner's love to tell stories (mostly fabrications, of course).:tape:
But of course! Faulkner is from Mississippi. Mitchell is from Atlanta. McMurtry is from Texas. Even Fitzgerald lived in Alabama and Hemmingway was years in Florida

Barrie_Dude
Sep 11th, 2011, 12:09 AM
Am I allowed to say none of the above. Though I know it's politically correct to not bash classic writers my experience of the likes of Steinbeck / Dickens / Twain etc is that their famous novels (which are the only ones I've read) are rather cumbersome in parts.

The exception to that rule is the Harper Lee book.

Though I've read a bit of Tolstoy / Flambert / Dostoyevsky I suspect a lot of the meaning in those stories are lost in translation.

Honestly nowadays I'm far more inclined to contemporary novelists but if I were to vote for someone more classical I'd go for Jane Austen or one of the Bronte sisters.

Though that may well represent the type of classical story I'd rather read than the actual style.
On the other hand, Harper Lee only wrote that one book,