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AJZ.
Aug 18th, 2011, 11:50 PM
So I found out today I have a traveling partner for the US Open!

I've looked up bus information, but now I'm looking for hotels. Does anyone know a hotel that isn't too pricey while being accessible to the US Open? By accessible I mean close to a subway that is a reasonable commute to the USTA International tennis center?

Thanks!

PS: Moderators, I'm sorry if this is in the wrong section - I just think more people will help me if I post this in GM..

Vartan
Aug 18th, 2011, 11:52 PM
Somewhere in Queens, I guess.

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 12:22 AM
So I found out today I have a traveling partner for the US Open!

I've looked up bus information, but now I'm looking for hotels. Does anyone know a hotel that isn't too pricey while being accessible to the US Open? By accessible I mean close to a subway that is a reasonable commute to the USTA International tennis center?

Thanks!

PS: Moderators, I'm sorry if this is in the wrong section - I just think more people will help me if I post this in GM..

In Manhattan:

I'm not sure what your price range is? But look for all the hotels on 42nd st (between 2nd-9th ave), Lexington Ave, Times Square (near 42st st) for starters. The 7 train (which goes directly there) terminates on 42st. The 4, 5, 6 train connect with the 7 train at 42 st, via Lexington Ave (hotels on 34-72 st on Lexington being optimal).

Keep in mind, The Grand Central Area of the 7 train is on the East Side (different neighborhood, different vibe then Times Sq). And you take a shuttle train (The S) to Times Sq, until they finish the current # 7 Subway expansion into Times Sq).

You can also catch the E or the F (or even the R) train, and transfer to the 7 Train, at the "74th Roosevelt Ave, Jackson Heights" stop in Queens to the Tennis Center. So all hotels near those trains work as well, if you wanna keep it down to two trains.

These are all relatively easy routes, that require only one to two trains.

The Grand Hyatt on 42st, Grand Central would be perfect. It's located at a beautiful landmark, and where the 7 train starts in Manhattan. But there's a bazillion hotels in that area, I outlined for you.

There's also a Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza in Queens (by Laguardia Airport), is not to far from the Tennis Center. Find out and ask, do they have a shuttle bus, or City bus that runs there (and see how direct the route is). If you wanna hang out in Manhattan, or a kool/hip Queens or Brooklyn neighborhood. That's another deal. Lol.

Also, the Brooklyn Bridge Marriot (in Brooklyn), is a nice hotel, in a nice location, but it's a little longer subway ride (if you don't mind; but good value for similar hotels in Manhattan). It's the F train to the 7 train in Queens.

But you'll love the location, and can look up Brooklyn Heights, DUMBO, Lower Manhattan. It's a relative good bargain, and gets good reviews.

Check the specials with all the Hotels, and you can get back to me here, if you have any other questions on neighborhoods, Subways, and commute times, etc?

They're so many!

In very Simple terms, start with Hotels near the 7 train in Manhattan To the Tennis center (optimal), Then the S train (42 st between Times Sq and Grand Central, near optimal), or The F, E or R train (near optimal above 42 st), transferring in Queens for the 7 Train, or 4, 5 and 6 train at/near Lexington (near optimal when close to 42 st, or can walk to 7 train), to the 7 train from Grand Central.

Berlin_Calling
Aug 19th, 2011, 12:27 AM
Don't stay in Queens. Normally, I wouldn't recommend anyone staying around 42nd St (disgustingly touristy/not the real NYC) but for the US Open, it is the most convenient spot as the 7 train runs along 42nd through Manhattan straight to Flushing Meadows. Times Square is 42nd St, so essentially any Times Square hotel will make your commute super easy. There are bagillion hotels around there to choose from, so it should not be hard at all finding one at a good value.

AJZ.
Aug 19th, 2011, 12:53 AM
Thanks so much!
I guess I should be super clear: I'm not interested in actually visiting the city, we're going strictly for tennis (call us die-hard fans, I've never been to the US Open hehe)
I guess I'm looking for good value + easy commute.

I'm looking into hotels around 42nd street right now, and these hotels in Queens...

Thanks so much for your help guys!

shoparound
Aug 19th, 2011, 12:57 AM
Try http://www.morningsideinn-ny.com/
Or http://www.hotel31.com/ if you're in a budget.
Lincoln Sheraton in NJ is not bad either, but far-ish from Queens.

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:00 AM
Thanks so much!
I guess I should be super clear: I'm not interested in actually visiting the city, we're going strictly for tennis (call us die-hard fans, I've never been to the US Open hehe)
I guess I'm looking for good value + easy commute.

I'm looking into hotels around 42nd street right now, and these hotels in Queens...

Thanks so much for your help guys!

Okay Kool.

So you're looking basically for value, and commute. Ok.

Well, there won't be many in Queens, cause you'd have to take a bus from most, and the Subway is faster. Subway does not run in every neighborhood in Queens. And even neighborhoods that are relatively close, may not have many hotels in the area, be close by, or have a subway near by.

Saying all that (depending how much price is important, and your lack of wanting to visit), yeah try that Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza near the airport (but call them, and ask do they have a bus directly to the Tennis center). It's actually not that far away (like 2miles).

Yeah. 42nd st, Lexington near 42 st (walk to 7 train, one train), or 6th, Broadway or 8th Ave (above 42 st) would be ideal as well, two trains, but closer to your destination). E and the F run more frequently than R train, I may add.

AJZ.
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:01 AM
Okay Kool.

So you're looking basically for value, and commute. Ok.

Well, there won't be many in Queens, cause you'd have to take a bus from most, and the Subway is faster. Subway does not run in every neighborhood in Queens. And even neighborhoods that are relatively close, may not have many hotels in the area, be close by, or have a subway near by.

Saying all that (depending how much price is important, and your lack of wanting to visit), yeah try that Holiday Inn Crowne Plaza near the airport (but call them, and ask do they have a bus directly to the Tennis center). It's actually not that far away (like 2miles).

Yeah. 42nd st, Lexington near 42 st (walk to 7 train, one train), or 6th, Broadway or 8th Ave (above 42 st) would be ideal as well, two trains, but closer to your destination). E and the F run more frequently than R train, I may add.

Thanks so much! This is really good to know.
I will look into that Holiday inn! And these other hotels. Thanks a million you've been very helpful!

Vartan
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:05 AM
I think you should definitely look into exploring the city, unless you've been here before...

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:05 AM
I recommend staying in Long Island City in Queens. It's a very commercial neighborhood in Queens so there are a lot of chain hotels for the frequent business travelers. It will be cheaper than staying in Manhattan, but you will only be staying 1-3 stops on the 7 train outside of Manhattan so you have easy access to the tourist-y parts of the city as well as the Open (which is also right off the 7 too!) Safe and convenient without paying Manhattan prices.

Long Island City, is in Queens, and has optimal Transit, and you can check the hotels there (depending on where you wanna stay).

It's an old industrial changing neighborhood, with lots of new Condo's, Skyscrapers going up, etc., but the quality of the hotels hasn't caught up. But if you don't mind staying at a small best western type hotel, yeah; I guess you can stay there to. There's also a Hotel, across the highway in Queens from the Tennis Center. But I don't remember how nice a hotel it is (i.e. is it used by the locals for love), or the name? Lol.

There also places on Queens Blvd, where you can catch the E, F or R train to 7 train.

There's also a holiday inn, in Flushing, physically not that far from the Tennis Center. That's the Asian Center of Queens (with maybe a bigger Chinatown than the one in Manhattan). It's crowded there. But the Hotel should be up to snuff. Find out, if they have a bus that runs there. It's physically close by. If not, you can take the Subway (from Main Street) to the Tennis Center. The 7 Train runs to Flushing. There very close to each other.

If/when you're intersted, you can post me an outside picture of the hotel you found in Flushing, and I'll let you know if it's the hotel, in case they changed the name (you know how that goes). Lol. It was tall and modern. But it used to be a Holiday Inn type hotel (the one in Flushing, not the Airport).

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:15 AM
PS: I know practically all of the neighborhoods in NYC (all 5 boroughs, just a general interest from my youth, then turned into real estate investor), so feel free to ask on any area, and it's transit, interest, or night life. Any hotel I know, I'll try to help, if I do, as well.

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:20 AM
Check your reps, OP ;)

AJZ.
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:22 AM
I think you should definitely look into exploring the city, unless you've been here before...

I've had the chance to go twice actually :)

I'll look into Long Island City. The hotels look nice there... Thanks again for all the help! Hopefully will be going August 31 and September 1 :)

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:23 AM
The Crowne Plaza in Queens, near the airport, is in a Quiet area, and it's a pseudo-luxury hotel (and I mean that in a nice way). Not much night live at all; but some interesting restaurants if you have a car (which you probably won't). But there are some areas on Astoria, and Northern Blvd, where you can find decent Ethnic cuisine (Greek, Peruvian, Dominican, Italian, Thai, etc.).

The Other Holiday Inn, in Flusing, is in a bustling neighborhood, very close to the tennis Center via train or bus (though you may have to walk to the train), and food options (if you're into ASIAN, or exploring, would be very plentiful.

There are also, places on Queens Blvd, and Austin Street, particularly in Forest Hills, and Kew Gardens hills, where you can dine a multiplicity of decent cuisine (also via Subway, depending where you stay).

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:30 AM
I've had the chance to go twice actually :)

I'll look into Long Island City. The hotels look nice there... Thanks again for all the help! Hopefully will be going August 31 and September 1 :)

Great!

Unless they put up some new hotels, I'm not aware of (quite possible), its' a funky kind of neighborhood; cause it wasn't designed for people, or by happen-stance. It was/is an industrial area, with large train yards that criss cross it underneath (not unusual though in NYC), so sometimes you walk a while, before you can cross certain area/streets.

It's quite large and unwieldy. So it depends on what part of LIC the hotel is, and how nice the Hotel is. Some are on the outskirts of LIC, not near any subways, in the more industrial, but not currently hip areas of LIC. So be careful of that; or you'll be walking far or taking/waiting for the bus for a while. Lol.

LIC is close by for a subway, but not for the City bus system (cause they make local stops) if you go directly there. So please watch for that. A lot of these hotels may claim LIC, but watch it, if you have to take a bus there (though you can take a bus to the subway-7 train, which is fine, if not too long, and you'd get a free transfer with a Metro Card). Lol.

If they're not within a few blocks of the E, F or maybe R; look with jaundice eye. Also parts of the area are lively, and other parts are more spread out. It depends. It's a developing area, out of a industrial one, and a few cobbled, non-contiguous charming streets/blocks.

The Court Square area there, near the Citicorp Center (should be 2nd stop outside Manhattan on F train) would be best in the area (and near by up to Laguardia Comm College, near Van Dam, as far as commuting, and safety or liveliness, till night).

Vartan
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:36 AM
I wouldn't call that commute "small" :p

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:37 AM
It's an hour on the LIRR:shrug:

I think it would be worth saving 200 bucks:shrug:

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:41 AM
If you don't mind a small commute, I can get you $$ a night at the Sheraton Long Island Hotel.

Which/What sheraton is that, in LIC, or the real Long Island (I don't think she has a car)? Lol

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:45 AM
Is that in Garden City? Where's that?

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:45 AM
Which/What sheraton is that, in LIC, or the real Long Island (I don't think she has a car)? Lol
No, I checked and LIC isn't available for the discount. It's the real Long Island. They would provide a shuttle ride to the train station, and it's 10.25 for the train. You can actually just take the LIRR all the way to Mets Willits, just have to change at Woodside.

I live on LI and this is the commute I'll be doing. If she were going the same dates as I was I'd more than happy to give a ride to the train station:shrug: I'm going the 29th and the 30th, though...

It's a significant discount, though. I think it might be worth the hour and 20 minutes it would take to get to the tennis center...

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:46 AM
Is that in Garden City? Where's that?
Here

http://www.starwoodhotels.com/sheraton/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=855

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:51 AM
No, I checked and LIC isn't available for the discount. It's the real Long Island. They would provide a shuttle ride to the train station, and it's 10.25 for the train. You can actually just take the LIRR all the way to Mets Willits, just have to change at Woodside.

I live on LI and this is the commute I'll be doing. If she were going the same dates as I was I'd more than happy to give a ride to the train station:shrug: I'm going the 29th and the 30th, though...

It's a significant discount, though. I think it might be worth the hour and 20 minutes it would take to get to the tennis center...

You know it's funny. I know what you mean (and have done things like that in the past, during travel). Lol.

But it's all up to him/her and how much money, commute, convenience, food or fine cuisine and night life, local interest that they want to dabble in, even in the minimum.

Just don't tell her, as fast as the Long Island railroad travels, it'll go past willets point to Woodside, then she'll have to take the subway back to the TEnnis Center. Lol.

It all depends on him/her, but it's nice of you to offer a ride for them.

AJZ.
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:52 AM
Great!

Unless they put up some new hotels, I'm not aware of (quite possible), its' a funky kind of neighborhood; cause it wasn't designed for people, or by happen-stance. It was/is an industrial area, with large train yards that criss cross it underneath (not unusual though in NYC), so sometimes you walk a while, before you can cross certain area/streets.

It's quite large and unwieldy. So it depends on what part of LIC the hotel is, and how nice the Hotel is. Some are on the outskirts of LIC, not near any subways, in the more industrial, but not currently hip areas of LIC. So be careful of that; or you'll be walking far or taking/waiting for the bus for a while. Lol.

LIC is close by for a subway, but not for the City bus system (cause they make local stops) if you go directly there. So please watch for that. A lot of these hotels may claim LIC, but watch it, if you have to take a bus there (though you can take a bus to the subway-7 train, which is fine, if not too long, and you'd get a free transfer with a Metro Card). Lol.

If they're not within a few blocks of the E, F or maybe R; look with jaundice eye. Also parts of the area are lively, and other parts are more spread out. It depends. It's a developing area, out of a industrial one, and a few cobbled, non-contiguous charming streets/blocks.

The Court Square area there, near the Citicorp Center (should be 2nd stop outside Manhattan on F train) would be best in the area (and near by up to Laguardia Comm College, near Van Dam, as far as commuting, and liveliness, till night).

All very good points - I'll look out for all of this!

PS: I know my display picture is misleading but I'm a guy. hahaha

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 01:54 AM
You know it's funny. I know what you mean (and have done things like that in the past, during travel). Lol.

But it's all up to him/her and how much money, commute, convenience, food or fine cuisine and night life, local interest that want to dabble in.

Just don't tell her, as fast as the railroad is, it'll go past willets point to Woodside, then she'll have to take the subway back to the TEnnis Center. Lol.

It all depends on him/her, but it's nice of you to offer for them.
This is the BEAUTIFUL thing; during the USO, they stop at mets willets. You DON'T have to take the subway back. You exit right into BJK national Tennis Center. It's really awesome.

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:00 AM
oooh. Ok.

It's in Suffolk County, in Happauge. Lol

Yeah. It's long (but not outrageously), and cumbersome. But you get a cheap, clean hotel, you save a lot of money. And you just weigh the distance, and commute, vs the money you save in hotel fees, vs the LIRR tickets, and Hotel food your paying for (unless you can walk to fast food)

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:02 AM
All very good points - I'll look out for all of this!



Where exactly is this? Google maps isn't being very helpful... a night is crazy wonderful and I'm grateful for this offer of yours (I am a total stranger)!

I don't think my friend would mind this commute, if it is 1 hour and 30 minutes that's fine, I think. Is it a complicated commute, and is it the same at night too?

PS: I know my display picture is misleading but I'm a guy. hahaha
Sorry:o

Hi, I'm Myriam:wavey:

The commute isn't bad, at all! Especially if you're with someone! If you were to stay at the hotel, you would have access to a complimentary shuttle to the train station. The ticket for the train is 10.75 (might be 13 or 14 if they feel like charging extra for Mets Willets, I don't think they will, though.)

You would transfer at Woodside train station. That train will take you straight into the tennis complex. You exit the train and go up the escalator or the stairs and you are literally, right there!

It would be the same thing at night. You'd take the LIRR to woodside, then transfer to the train going to Ronkonkoma. once on the train and you know what time you will be getting back to long Island, you'd call the hotel and tell them what time to pick you up. SHould the shuttle not be available, it's a 7 dollar cab ride back to the hotel.

:D

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:04 AM
If that's the case, there are some Hotels in Queens on Northern Blvd in Bayside, particular. He/she should find out if they're running any specials. A couple of them, maybe relatively close to the railroad (via bus, cab or shuttle), but I didn't offer them, cause I thought they would be out of the way, subway wise.

But there clean, nice neighborhood (Bayside, and Flushing on Northern Blovd), and closer.

I'm sure they appreciate your suggestion in Happauge, especially if saving, are best.

Good luck to all you guys/gals.

AJZ.
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:09 AM
Sorry:o

Hi, I'm Myriam:wavey:

The commute isn't bad, at all! Especially if you're with someone! If you were to stay at the hotel, you would have access to a complimentary shuttle to the train station. The ticket for the train is 10.75 (might be 13 or 14 if they feel like charging extra for Mets Willets, I don't think they will, though.)

You would transfer at Woodside train station. That train will take you straight into the tennis complex. You exit the train and go up the escalator or the stairs and you are literally, right there!

It would be the same thing at night. You'd take the LIRR to woodside, then transfer to the train going to Ronkonkoma. once on the train and you know what time you will be getting back to long Island, you'd call the hotel and tell them what time to pick you up. SHould the shuttle not be available, it's a 7 dollar cab ride back to the hotel.

:D

Nice to meet you :)

That's fantastic! Okay. I will get in touch with my friend.

The fares are reasonable and better than paying the extra money for a hotel! hehehe

I'll be in touch :)

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:10 AM
Good Luck to all you guys, what ever you do and go, and on the Open!

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:15 AM
Hey, Ex, you aren't hiting the Open this year?

AJZ.
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:16 AM
Thank you so much :) You've been so helpful Excelscior!

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:18 AM
Yeah, dude, you sure know a lot about NY. I work in the city but I may have to ask you for some sight seeing tips. I've lived in NY for 22 years and haven't seen ANY of the sights. I'm painful:o

Vartan
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:19 AM
So guys what days are you going? :cheer:

I am probably going for 4R & QF.

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:20 AM
Hey, Ex, you aren't hiting the Open this year?

We'll see. I didn't get any comps this year (post, lingering, Corporate recessionary cut backs). Lol.

It'll be hit and miss. Lol

I'm glad you guys are going. Good for you all!!

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:23 AM
Yeah, dude, you sure know a lot about NY. I work in the city but I may have to ask you for some sight seeing tips. I've lived in NY for 22 years and haven't seen ANY of the sights. I'm painful:o

No problem.

Just let me know when you going, who you're with, and what you, or you guys want to do (touristy, kool, hip, fun, ethnic restaurants, touristy restaurants, sight seeing, culture,Museums, parks, hidden Gems, Brooklyn, East Village, LES, Queens, other neighborhoods, etc. , and I'll make some suggestions.

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:25 AM
Thank you so much :) You've been so helpful Excelscior!

No Problem!!

Enjoy your time in NY, and at the Open.

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:29 AM
So guys what days are you going? :cheer:

I am probably going for 4R & QF.
I'm going day one and day two. That way I get to see Ana lose in the first round again:D

:sobbing:

Vartan
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:29 AM
I hope Martha and Raftha make it to 4R :hysteric:

AJZ.
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:30 AM
LOL Tennislover
I'm going on the first Wednesday & Thursday :) That way I get to see some doubles!

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:32 AM
LOL Tennislover
I'm going on the first Wednesday & Thursday :) That way I get to see some doubles!
Too bad we're not going the same days:(

It would've been nice to meet a fellow TF'er. I've only met one so far (at the US Open :lol:).

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:34 AM
I hope Martha and Raftha make it to 4R :hysteric:
Maria's been looking good. I don't know about Rafa. He's my second fave, but I've been doubting him lately.

Vartan
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:36 AM
The Wimbledon crushed me :(

AJZ.
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:41 AM
Too bad we're not going the same days:(

It would've been nice to meet a fellow TF'er. I've only met one so far (at the US Open :lol:).

Well if there were more doubles in the first days, I'd definitely go those days. But my friend and I are huge doubles fans so we'd rather go then :)

I've met a few TF'ers hehe it's a fun experience!

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:41 AM
Too bad we're not going the same days:(

It would've been nice to meet a fellow TF'er. I've only met one so far (at the US Open :lol:).

Good Luck, and if you guys do stay at the Sheraton Long Island, and go on different days, you should work out the travel heads up (like total cost of the railroad depending on when you travel, pick up from the railroad to Hotel, and what times, how longs the wait, total commute time, local fast food, LIRR night schedule, in case of late match, etc.)?

It is a healthy distance (but a cheap price); so it helps just to know what to expect. :) :eek: :( :) Lol

But if it's only for two days, it's workable, I guess. Lol.

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:42 AM
The Wimbledon crushed me :(
I was HAPPY:hysteric:

I'm sorry, but I LOVE Nole:sobbing:

Rafa will probably take his title back next year, though. I think Nole is just really in his head now:shrug:

Helen Lawson
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:43 AM
Sally Struthers and I usually get rooms at the Windjammer Motor Lodge. It's so unsafe, the washers in the laundry room have a rape cycle. I'm old and Sally is fat, we have to take it any way we can get it!

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:43 AM
Well if there were more doubles in the first days, I'd definitely go those days. But my friend and I are huge doubles fans so we'd rather go then :)

I've met a few TF'ers hehe it's a fun experience!
I've been trying to like doubles lately. Haven't quite gotten there yet:spit:

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:46 AM
Good Luck, and if you guys do stay at the Sheraton Long Island, and go on different days, you should work out the travel heads up (like total cost of the railroad depending on when you travel, pick up from the railroad to Hotel, and what times, how longs the wait, total commute time, local fast food, LIRR night schedule, in case of late match, etc.)?

It is a healthy distance (but a cheap price); so just know what to expect. :) :eek: :( :) Lol

But if it's only for two days, it's workable, I guess. Lol.
Yeah, I usually spend the entire day at the Open. I take the 11:15 train out of Penn back on Long Island by 12:45

Excelscior
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:49 AM
Yeah, I usually spend the entire day at the Open. I take the 11:15 train out of Penn back on Long Island by 12:45

Kool!

earthcrystal
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:50 AM
there's a great Clarion in Jamaica, Queens that I nearly almost stay at in NY, usually one of the best prices around, and virtually across the street from the metro. Have used it for USO twice, very convenient. Even saw a couple Qualifier-level players staying there last time

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:56 AM
Sally Struthers and I usually get rooms at the Windjammer Motor Lodge. It's so unsafe, the washers in the laundry room have a rape cycle. I'm old and Sally is fat, we have to take it any way we can get it!
Oh, dear God! I just laughed SO hard:hysteric:

:sobbing:

chuvack
Aug 19th, 2011, 09:44 AM
The benches outside the back gate of the USO complex are pretty comfortable, and there is 24-hour security. Just make sure you bring a blanket.

Fantasy Hero
Aug 19th, 2011, 10:09 AM
when i was in NYC i stayed at the park central hotel...it was easy to get from the JFK to it, so probably it's ok for Flashing Meadows :unsure:

Italian power
Aug 19th, 2011, 02:14 PM
Wanderers Inn Hostel, Harlem

very cheap, nice place :)

Ryan
Aug 19th, 2011, 03:00 PM
I learned so much about NYC in this thread. :o The subway/bus system sounds like it would give me a huge headache.

Italian power
Aug 19th, 2011, 03:04 PM
no, for me, the subway and bus system was very easy, loved so much NYC's subway :hearts:

Balltossovic
Aug 19th, 2011, 03:18 PM
I learned so much about NYC in this thread. :o The subway/bus system sounds like it would give me a huge headache.
It's really not that bad. You just need to know which number, or letter train you're taking (one track can house 3 trains:tape:)

AJZ.
Aug 20th, 2011, 01:44 AM
So one concern is rained out days. We don't want to lose our tickets so to speak, so should we buy them at the gate? My friend says when she went there were long lines to buy. My concern is more: can they sell out of Grounds tickets? Or is there an unlimited supply?

So basically; should we buy online before, or should we buy in person? Also how long do they take to mail the tickets? can we pick them up there?

Balltossovic
Aug 20th, 2011, 03:47 AM
I honestly would buy the tix online. There is an option on ticketmaster to print them yourselves. It's 2.50 extra, but you don't have to wait for it to come in the mail.

I've tried to get grounds passes and was told it's sold out before. I'd buy ahead...

knoxt
Aug 20th, 2011, 04:25 AM
Do not stay in Queens. You will be disappointed and not get the New York City experience. I would stay away from Times Square area in general, because it's very touristy and crowded.

Try to stay in the Chelsea area if you can. It all really depends on your budget though, but I would pick Chelsea, Meatpacking district or Flatiron.

AJZ.
Aug 20th, 2011, 03:03 PM
I honestly would buy the tix online. There is an option on ticketmaster to print them yourselves. It's 2.50 extra, but you don't have to wait for it to come in the mail.

I've tried to get grounds passes and was told it's sold out before. I'd buy ahead...

Alright, perfect. this is more convenient - I didn't know this was an option :)

I can't imagine grounds passes selling out, that's ridiculous, but I wouldn't want to have my trip ruined on something so dismal!

And I didn't read Helen Lawson's comment about a rape cycle... That's ridiculous hahaha

GoofyDuck
Aug 20th, 2011, 03:08 PM
CS9OO0S5w2k

Excelscior
Aug 20th, 2011, 05:21 PM
Do not stay in Queens. You will be disappointed and not get the New York City experience. I would stay away from Times Square area in general, because it's very touristy and crowded.

Try to stay in the Chelsea area if you can. It all really depends on your budget though, but I would pick Chelsea, Meatpacking district or Flatiron.

What exactly, is the NYC experience? Do you even know if the visitor has been to NYC several times (yes they have), what most important to them on their trip (price), or know that they already had come to a conclusion (yes they did, obviously you didn't, and it's not even in the city, unless they changed hotels)?

NYC is not just Manhattan. Sorry! There's a whole lot of more interesting areas in the City, outside of Manhattan, which are the true NYC experience, as well.

Manhattan, is just the touristy (or 1st time) experience. Sorry!

Manhattan is so yesterday. Only out of towners, people out of the know, and foreign travelers, cite Manhattan the way you do. NYC is bustling all over, depending on one's interest.

The first rule of travel, is ask the traveler what they want, what their looking for, and what's most important to them (before, or as you make suggestions).

edificio
Aug 20th, 2011, 10:12 PM
Do not stay in Queens. You will be disappointed and not get the New York City experience. I would stay away from Times Square area in general, because it's very touristy and crowded.

Try to stay in the Chelsea area if you can. It all really depends on your budget though, but I would pick Chelsea, Meatpacking district or Flatiron.

The neighborhoods you listed are not convenient in terms of transit. If your focus is the tournament, Times Square area hotels or Queens lodgings are the most convenient. You can always take a cab from your hotel to Chelsea or wherever for post-tennis-day entertainment from your hotel in Times Square or wherever.

Helen Lawson
Aug 20th, 2011, 10:18 PM
The benches outside the back gate of the USO complex are pretty comfortable, and there is 24-hour security. Just make sure you bring a blanket.

24-hour security stands in the way of getting some.

SoBlackAndBlue
Aug 21st, 2011, 12:23 AM
I learned so much about NYC in this thread. :o The subway/bus system sounds like it would give me a huge headache.

I could write a book on my horrible experiences commuting on the NYC subway.

Madoka
Aug 21st, 2011, 12:53 AM
i stayed in a hostel in amsetrdam avenue, there is in front of the hostel the red stop of the train, nubber 103, and 2 block away i had the orange stop of train...very well connected, i could easily go everywhere...and it was very cheap for me...

p.s. i have been 4 times in the city, always got a hostel/hotel in manhattan...

duhcity
Aug 21st, 2011, 12:57 AM
The NYC public transport system is one of a kind, and is hands down the best in the world.
Yes it's not the cleanest or most modern, but the sheer size of the bus and subway transit system on top of the Metro North, LIRR, and NJ Transit is stellar. And the fact that almost all these systems run 24 hours a day at it's current price really takes it even further.
And especially because Manhattan is laid out in such a logical way, it's really an easy map to learn. It's simple to know which train to take just by intersection

Yes, I've bitched about the system my entire life, but once you've been elsewhere, you really get to know just how great us New Yorkers have it.

Anyway, if you find finding the 7 train and taking it pretty much all the way in one direction difficult, you'll probably have trouble understanding the LIRR and Peak/Non-Peak/Cityticket/Express Great Neck or Port Washington Trains/trains not stopping at Willets Point at certain times. I would advise you to stick to the subway.

If you're not looking to go into the city, there are only one or two good hotels in Flushing. I'd advise against them if you dislike noise and Asian food. A hotel in Manhattan is probably the best bet if it's the first time in the city. As someone else said, hotels in Time Square or near Bryant Park are best as they're near the 7. Long Island City is a decent option. I've never seen a hotel there, so I couldn't tell you.

I live down the street from a two decent hotels in Bayside that gets a few regulars for the US Open. Bayside is a 20-25 minute drive from the NTC site, and it's about a 15 minute walk from the aforementioned LIRR. But they know what they're doing.

It's really all about what you're looking for. If you're here purely for tennis and plan on doing no sightseeing, stay in Flushing. Especially if you're on a budget.

And whatever idiotic asshole up there talked about Manhattan being the NYC experience, lol okay. It's clear what you know about this city.

Anyway, one tip for the Open. Skip the food there. Get a stamp on your hand and take the 3 minute ride into Flushing for better and cheaper food. That same stamp is the one the use on people who exit Ashe. So if you're there for the day, ask someone leaving the night session early for their tickets. You can enter Ashe with that stamp, and pass the ushers with the ticket. It's worked for me lots.

Have fun! I miss going to the US Open. 3 years before I can go to a MD match again.

Madoka
Aug 21st, 2011, 01:01 AM
I learned so much about NYC in this thread. :o The subway/bus system sounds like it would give me a huge headache.

actually not, about the train you have to know 2 things, where downtown and uptown are, and about the red train, the number one is local, and 2/3 are express.

really easy...

duhcity
Aug 21st, 2011, 01:05 AM
Alright, perfect. this is more convenient - I didn't know this was an option :)

I can't imagine grounds passes selling out, that's ridiculous, but I wouldn't want to have my trip ruined on something so dismal!

And I didn't read Helen Lawson's comment about a rape cycle... That's ridiculous hahaha

Try craigslist. Obviously, observe caution I bought tickets from a woman for two straight years. She bought up a few miniplans that had Nosebleed Ashe seats that cost several hundred a plan. But then sold individual tickets on days she didn't go. They're actually cheaper than grounds passes but also get you into Ashe. Don't know if she's there anymore.

But no one really lines up at the US Open. If you arrive at the site by 10am, you should be able to get a grounds pass if you're ticketless.
And they're total assholes about bags, so don't bring a big one.

Oh, tip - If you grow used to the system and you're staying in Manhattan near an F or E train, it'll be faster to take it into Queens and transfer to the 7 at Roosevelt Avenue to the site. But the 7 will be express on the way back into Manhattan when you leave for the day

Excelscior
Aug 21st, 2011, 01:26 AM
The NYC public transport system is one of a kind, and is hands down the best in the world.
Yes it's not the cleanest or most modern, but the sheer size of the bus and subway transit system on top of the Metro North, LIRR, and NJ Transit is stellar. And the fact that almost all these systems run 24 hours a day at it's current price really takes it even further.
And especially because Manhattan is laid out in such a logical way, it's really an easy map to learn. It's simple to know which train to take just by intersection

Yes, I've bitched about the system my entire life, but once you've been elsewhere, you really get to know just how great us New Yorkers have it.

Anyway, if you find finding the 7 train and taking it pretty much all the way in one direction difficult, you'll probably have trouble understanding the LIRR and Peak/Non-Peak/Cityticket/Express Great Neck or Port Washington Trains/trains not stopping at Willets Point at certain times. I would advise you to stick to the subway.

If you're not looking to go into the city, there are only one or two good hotels in Flushing. I'd advise against them if you dislike noise and Asian food. A hotel in Manhattan is probably the best bet if it's the first time in the city. As someone else said, hotels in Time Square or near Bryant Park are best as they're near the 7. Long Island City is a decent option. I've never seen a hotel there, so I couldn't tell you.

I live down the street from a two decent hotels in Bayside that gets a few regulars for the US Open. Bayside is a 20-25 minute drive from the NTC site, and it's about a 15 minute walk from the aforementioned LIRR. But they know what they're doing.

It's really all about what you're looking for. If you're here purely for tennis and plan on doing no sightseeing, stay in Flushing. Especially if you're on a budget.

And whatever idiotic asshole up there talked about Manhattan being the NYC experience, lol okay. It's clear what you know about this city.

Anyway, one tip for the Open. Skip the food there. Get a stamp on your hand and take the 3 minute ride into Flushing for better and cheaper food. That same stamp is the one the use on people who exit Ashe. So if you're there for the day, ask someone leaving the night session early for their tickets. You can enter Ashe with that stamp, and pass the ushers with the ticket. It's worked for me lots.

Have fun! I miss going to the US Open. 3 years before I can go to a MD match again.

Agreed 100%.

I said similar things in a earlier response to that person.

I had also mentioned those two Hotels in Bayside, on Northern Blvd. I like them. Forgot their names though.

But I think the poster, is going to take that deal in LI, since the price was right, and they didn't feel like looking anymore. I agree with you though, on the complexity of the LIRR. The Subway is much more simpler to understand. Plus that Hotel is way out there. But like you said, everyone has different priorities. So if the price is right; go for it. They may also have assistance, from a TF poster, who lives, and commutes from Long Island.

It's funny, we said a lot of similar things to the poster, regarding the E, F, and 7 train, coming from Manhattan as well. Good for you.

PS: Bayside, is another one of those great NYC neighborhoods, and areas.

duhcity
Aug 21st, 2011, 01:27 AM
Agreed 100%.

I said similar things in a earlier response to that person.

I had also mentioned those two Hotels in Bayside, on Northern Blvd. I like them. Forgot their names though.

But I think the poster, is going to take that deal in LI, since the price was right, and they didn't feel like looking anymore. I agree with you though, on the complexity of the LIRR. The Subway is much more simpler to understand. Plus that Hotel is way out there. But like you said, everyone has different priorities. So if the price is right; go for it.

PS: Bayside, is another one of those great NYC neighborhoods, and areas.

Ramada and Adria. There's the Anchor Inn on Northern too which is closer to the LIRR, and a motel somewhere.
But now we're getting scary close to where I live :lol:

SoBlackAndBlue
Aug 21st, 2011, 01:36 AM
The NYC public transport system is one of a kind, and is hands down the best in the world.
Yes it's not the cleanest or most modern, but the sheer size of the bus and subway transit system on top of the Metro North, LIRR, and NJ Transit is stellar. And the fact that almost all these systems run 24 hours a day at it's current price really takes it even further.
And especially because Manhattan is laid out in such a logical way, it's really an easy map to learn. It's simple to know which train to take just by intersection

Yes, I've bitched about the system my entire life, but once you've been elsewhere, you really get to know just how great us New Yorkers have it.

Anyway, if you find finding the 7 train and taking it pretty much all the way in one direction difficult, you'll probably have trouble understanding the LIRR and Peak/Non-Peak/Cityticket/Express Great Neck or Port Washington Trains/trains not stopping at Willets Point at certain times. I would advise you to stick to the subway.

If you're not looking to go into the city, there are only one or two good hotels in Flushing. I'd advise against them if you dislike noise and Asian food. A hotel in Manhattan is probably the best bet if it's the first time in the city. As someone else said, hotels in Time Square or near Bryant Park are best as they're near the 7. Long Island City is a decent option. I've never seen a hotel there, so I couldn't tell you.

I live down the street from a two decent hotels in Bayside that gets a few regulars for the US Open. Bayside is a 20-25 minute drive from the NTC site, and it's about a 15 minute walk from the aforementioned LIRR. But they know what they're doing.

It's really all about what you're looking for. If you're here purely for tennis and plan on doing no sightseeing, stay in Flushing. Especially if you're on a budget.

And whatever idiotic asshole up there talked about Manhattan being the NYC experience, lol okay. It's clear what you know about this city.

Anyway, one tip for the Open. Skip the food there. Get a stamp on your hand and take the 3 minute ride into Flushing for better and cheaper food. That same stamp is the one the use on people who exit Ashe. So if you're there for the day, ask someone leaving the night session early for their tickets. You can enter Ashe with that stamp, and pass the ushers with the ticket. It's worked for me lots.

Have fun! I miss going to the US Open. 3 years before I can go to a MD match again.

The quality of the subway has declined precipitously in the past year or so. Really it's been on a decline for a while, but this year has been a horror show. The system is quite literally falling apart, and the city isn't willing to pay for it.

Janet
Aug 21st, 2011, 03:06 AM
I'm going down and I'm staying at Andaz Wall Street

Janet
Aug 21st, 2011, 03:09 AM
I'm going down to the USOPEN and I'm staying at Andaz Wall Street

shaktincredible
Aug 21st, 2011, 03:52 AM
What exactly, is the NYC experience? Do you even know if the visitor has been to NYC several times (yes they have), what most important to them on their trip (price), or know that they already had come to a conclusion (yes they did, obviously you didn't, and it's not even in the city, unless they changed hotels)?

NYC is not just Manhattan. Sorry! There's a whole lot of more interesting areas in the City, outside of Manhattan, which are the true NYC experience, as well.

Manhattan, is just the touristy (or 1st time) experience. Sorry!

Manhattan is so yesterday. Only out of towners, people out of the know, and foreign travelers, cite Manhattan the way you do. NYC is bustling all over, depending on one's interest.

The first rule of travel, is ask the traveler what they want, what their looking for, and what's most important to them (before, or as you make suggestions).

YES its true but when people say NY they mean NYC and when people say NYC they mean manhattan.

i agree with you that people can get different experiences in NYC other than manhattan if they're staying in queens, bronx, or even brooklyn. but since NYC is famous with the buildings,lights, etc manhattan is the real vibe of NYC and obviously the first option for non american like me :)

shoparound
Aug 21st, 2011, 05:19 AM
Is the touristy areas of NYC that bad? I mean what's so much better in other parts of NY?
And are all of a good experience? I mean I've gone through Harlem and it did not look pretty.

Excelscior
Aug 21st, 2011, 05:59 AM
YES its true but when people say NY they mean NYC and when people say NYC they mean manhattan.

i agree with you that people can get different experiences in NYC other than manhattan if they're staying in queens, bronx, or even brooklyn. but since NYC is famous with the buildings,lights, etc manhattan is the real vibe of NYC and obviously the first option for non american like me :)

What makes NYC, New York City is not Manhattan, many times.

And it's funny you said "Even Brooklyn".

Brooklyn, is arguably the hottest part of NYC, and many Manhattanites are leaving Manhattan and going to Brooklyn. It's almost an inside joke with New Yorkers, and the arts and entertainment community, that Manhattan is so Passe.

And I have to disagree with you. Manhattan is not even the "real vibe" of NYC. You see the people,, the culture, and movements, that make NY famous; really don't originate out of Manhattan. It's all of NYC. It's just that many times, it ends up in Manhattan, so Manhattan get's credit. But if you look at most famous New Yorkers, they come from the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, before Manhattan. That's just the way it is (8.5 million people in NYC, 1.5million people in Manhattan).

I know what you mean as an out of towner That's why I said Manhattan are the touristy spots. Don't get me wrong. There are a lot of great things to do and see in Manhattan. And no where outside of Manhattan, is really like Manhattan (as far as the skyscrapers, concentration of world class arts institutions, business/wall st, broadcasting/media, and fashion for example). I love Manhattan dearly. But it's the neighborhoods that really make NY. And you can find many great neighborhoods (and it's cultures, vibes, movements, ethnicity, architecture, etc., all over NYC (including Manhattan of course). That's what many people miss!

A lot of people for example, that live in Brooklyn, would never have to leave their neighborhoods, to get what people in Manhattan already have; cause they have it in their neighborhood (great restaurants, vibes, lounges, arts scene, beautiful neighborhoods, interesting people, culture).

As a matter of fact, many people would rather live in Brooklyn, or parts of Queens, and Staten Island (or the Bronx for that matter), than Manhattan. I didn't say all, or most. It's just a choice, depending on what we're discussing (especially if they don't like the crowds and concrete), and individual criteria.

But yes; for what NY is famous for, outside of the US would fall in Manhattan. But you can't have Manhattan, with out the rest of the city, and vice versa. It's a symbiotic relationship.

Excelscior
Aug 21st, 2011, 06:13 AM
Is the touristy areas of NYC that bad? I mean what's so much better in other parts of NY?
And are all of a good experience? I mean I've gone through Harlem and it did not look pretty.

There some very pretty parts of Harlem, and not so pretty parts of Harlem, so it depends?

Strivers Row, Hamiltion Heights, Mount Morris Park, Edgecombe Ave, etc., you may consider nice looking, in regards to the style of town homes, and carriage houses, in Harlem. Harlem is a big area.

Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, all in Brooklyn, are considered some of the absolute best, and most beautiful neighborhoods in NYC (as a matter of fact NY Mag actually rated 8 Brooklyn neighborhoods in their most recent top 10, I think, in their Top 100 NYC Neighborhoods article)?

How many tourist, or out of towners, are even aware of these areas (and mind you, residents don't want out of towners to know of their areas either)? Lol

There's nothing wrong with the touristy areas of Manhattan. I actually like them. I love Central Park, The Metropolitan Museum, The Museum Of Natural History, The Library on 42nd, Grand Central Terminal, etc. I'm very proud of them. Obviously many of them are world class institutions, I enjoy. No doubt!

But everything's a balance. There's hip and trendy areas in Brooklyn, like Williamsburg and Dumbo, Suburban type mansions in Todt Hill in Staten Island, Riverdale in the Bronx, and Malba in Queens, just to name a few areas, so it depends on what you call the NYC lifestyle. So maybe one is for visitors, and another are for people who live there. That makes sense. Lol.

One thing I can say, you can get any type of living you want, within the confines of NYC (Urban, Suburban type, semi-suburban, beautiful carriage homes/townhouses, Big Lofts, Apartment buildings, Historic districts, post modern, various ethnic/foreign, etc. That's the true beauty and diversity of the city, most people fail to recognize (even New Yorkers, themselves). It all depends.

Ultimately, what makes NYC, is totally organic and comes from the entire city, and not just Manhattan.

If Manhattan is NYC's heartbeat, then the rest of the City, and Manhattan are it's soul!

PS: I may add, that many of the tourist company buses actually go through Northern Brooklyn now, as well as Northern Manhattan (Harlem) on their travel routes.

It's funny. Most New Yorkers don't even know about many great areas in the City, cause their confined to their own areas, friends, and experiences normally, and the City is so big, in the first place.

Excelscior
Aug 21st, 2011, 06:22 AM
Oh. And PS: There are pretty, and not so pretty parts of Harlem, as I said. But what makes Harlem interesting, is it's history. Starting with the Harlem Renaissance arts movements in the 20's onward (very famous Writers, Poets, Authors, Historians, Jazz, etc.), The Black Power/Rights movements with Marcus Garvey and Adam Clayton Powell (both before Dr. King), The National of Islam/Malcolm X in the 60's, Fidel Castro Staying at the Theresa Hotel, etc.

There's just a rich history in Harlem, which is probably the richest in any black area of the United States, as far as those movements, it's publicity and how they/it's impacted the rest of America, and the world. That's why Harlem is so famous. Today, it's gentrifying, because of all that was said, it's location in Manhattan/proximity to the subway, and much it's housing stock.

Interestingly enough, you can same the same about Bedford Stuyvesant (the largest black neighborhood in America) to a lesser degree, and Corona and St Albans Queens, with it's rich Jazz history, and homes of many of it's most famous musicians and singers. Bed Stuy has been steadily gentrifying for the past 10 yrs.

There are some people interested in these things, and some are not. For those who are, it makes a rich history of NYC, and it's endless amount of interesting neighborhoods, people, and movements that have impacted it and America.

If you're only here for a short amount of time, definitely do the Manhattan thing first. But if you're here for a longer period, or have made multiple trips to the City, definitely explore, or visit other areas. It may, or may not be well worth the trip.

moby
Aug 21st, 2011, 06:40 AM
So much borough pride. :lol: My Manhattan friends believe that Manhattan is NYC. One would venture into Brooklyn or Queens, but never Staten Island.

shoparound
Aug 21st, 2011, 06:45 AM
There some very pretty parts of Harlem, and not so pretty parts of Harlem, so it depends?

Strivers Row, Hamiltion Heights, Mount Morris Park, Edgecombe Ave, etc., you may consider nice looking, in regards to the style of town homes, and carriage houses, in Harlem. Harlem is a big area.

Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, all in Brooklyn, are considered some of the absolute best, and most beautiful neighborhoods in NYC (as a matter of fact NY Mag actually rated 8 Brooklyn neighborhoods in their most recent top 10, I think)?

How many tourist, or out of towners, are even aware of these areas (and mind you, they don't want out of towners to know of their areas)? Lol

There's nothing wrong with the touristy areas of Manhattan. I actually like them. I love Central Park, The Metropolitan Museum, The Museum Of Natural History, The Library on 42nd, Grand Central Terminal, etc. I'm very proud of them. Obviously many of them are world class institutions. No doubt!

But everything's a balance. There's hip and trendy areas in Brooklyn, like Williamsburg and Dumbo, Suburban type mansions in Todt Hill in Staten Island, Riverdale in the Bronx, and Malba in Queens, just to name a few areas, so it depends on what you call the NYC lifestyle. So maybe one is for visitors, and another are for people who live there.

One thing I can say, you can get any type of living you want, within the confines of NYC (Urban, Suburban type, semi-suburban, beautiful carriage homes/townhouses, Big Lofts, Apartment buildings, Historic districts, post modern, various ethnic/foreign, etc. That's the true beauty and diversity of the city, most people fail to recognize (even New Yorkers, themselves). It all depends.

Ultimately, what makes NYC, is totally organic and comes from the entire city, and not just Manhattan.

PS: I may add, that many of the tourist company buses actually go through Northern Brooklyn now, as well as Northern Manhattan (Harlem) on their travel routes.

It's funny. Most New Yorkers don't even know about many great areas in the City, cause their confined to their own areas, friends, and experiences normally, and the City is so big, in the first place.


Thanks for the info! So where do college kids hang out?

Excelscior
Aug 21st, 2011, 06:52 AM
So much borough pride. :lol: My Manhattan friends believe that Manhattan is NYC. One would venture into Brooklyn or Queens, but never Staten Island.

Staten Island get's a bad rap, cause of it's distance, from the rest of the city, and it's ethnic stereo types. But there are some beautiful neighborhoods in Staten Island (Todt Hill, Emerson Hill, Tottenville), etc. Obviously Staten Island wasn't involved in any arts movements like Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx, or Even Queens neighborhoods (except Wu Tang, lol); but compared to other places, it's hard to be in NY and be devoid of culture.

I mean they do have Snug Harbor, Some Big Zoo's, Richmontown Restoration, some of the oldest homes, and school buildings in the country from the 1700's, the highest elevation Eastern coastal plain form Florida to Maine, so they got that to; but most people don't care, cause it's in Staten Island. Lol.

And quite honestly, most of those Staten Islanders, like where they are. They don't want to be in Manhattan anyway. Lol.

Of course the Mafia, is famous in Staten Island; and that's very NY. So considering Big Paul Castellano was from Staten Island, and John Gotti was from Queens, and bunch of them are from Brooklyn, and they're so many movies made about the mob; that you can't have This part of New York, for example (the mob) without including all of NYC, cause it's those mobsters, from those areas, that make up that cultural (if you can call it that) network. That's what I was saying earlier. Lol.

PS: You're Manhattan friends, know that Manhattan, isn't all of NYC; though they may say/act like that. Lol. :)

Excelscior
Aug 21st, 2011, 06:56 AM
Thanks for the info! So where do college kids hang out?


Lower Eastside, East Village, Greenwich Village in Manhattan, Williamsburg in Brooklyn, Astoria in Queens (for variety).

2nd Ave in Manhattan. Those are 6 areas that come quickly to mind.

Start, or choose from those areas. The first 4 neighborhoods I listed LES, E.Village, G. Village, Williamsburg), are all close to each other walking, or via subway, by the way. You can even walk over the Williamsburg bridge, from the Lower Eastside into Williamsburg (aka BillyBurg). You can call those 4 areas ground zero. The College kids, young adults expand from there outward. Lol.

There's also Morningside Heights, Harlem, in the Columbia University area, on Broadway and Amsterdam. Obviously, lots of College Kids, up there. By the way, NYU is in the Village, in case you were wondering. Lol.

After those areas, depending on taste, they may branch out to Soho, Tribeca, Flatiron/Meatpacking District, Chelsea, Upper West side, Midtown West, all in Manhattan. Those areas are a little more expensive, than the first 4 I mentioned. Bushwick (some people call East Williamsburg now lol that area is nascently gentrifying as we speak. It's a little more gritty), Fort Greene/Clinton Hill in Bklyn (if you want a nice white/black, Hip, artsy, but mature, young Mix), Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, 5th Ave in Park Slope, Brooklyn and Dumbo in Brooklyn (though not as crowded a night life as the other areas, but a kool, funky, more mature Tribeca like vibe, and housing-i.e. Lofts). All great areas (with maybe the exception of Bushwick, which is just developing; but you may like that grittiness).

shoparound
Aug 21st, 2011, 10:55 AM
Thanks for the tips! Now are these places safe to walk around at night?

duhcity
Aug 21st, 2011, 03:51 PM
I'm a college aged kid, and I personally hang out in Union Square, Soho, and St. Marks.

Obligatory, Queens is the best.
Staten Island is a dump.

And I can't speak on the decline of the subway in the last year as I've been away at school. But it doesn't seem like it's been terrible this summer. Though the countdown clocks have been a massive waste of money even if they are helpful.

Totally offtopic :lol:

SoBlackAndBlue
Aug 21st, 2011, 04:45 PM
I'm a college aged kid, and I personally hang out in Union Square, Soho, and St. Marks.

Obligatory, Queens is the best.
Staten Island is a dump.

And I can't speak on the decline of the subway in the last year as I've been away at school. But it doesn't seem like it's been terrible this summer. Though the countdown clocks have been a massive waste of money even if they are helpful.

Totally offtopic :lol:

There were at least three delays of a half hour or more on one line (the A/C) within the past week because of water damage to signal lights. Damage they KNEW would occur, but did nothing to fix because of lack of resources. Horrible.

duhcity
Aug 21st, 2011, 05:00 PM
Well the MTA is in a tight spot. I don't envy them. Budget shortfalls, internal rumblings, and really no one wanting to fund it at all.
But despite all the problems, there's nothing like the scope and intensity of the MTA.

Still waiting for the second ave line ;)

Excelscior
Aug 21st, 2011, 05:02 PM
Thanks for the tips! Now are these places safe to walk around at night?

Of course/Absolutely!!

Bushwick, less so than the others, in certain parts(cause its not as established with night life as the others); but so many of these trendy areas, start off like that anyway. Lol.

But all those areas I mentioned, are perfectly safe. Absolutely!

I pointed out one area (Bushwick) that won't look as pretty, established or full of night life as the others (since your a out of towner). Just that one. But you're fine there as well (in Northern Bushwick, and adjacent East Williamsburg), if you're a Hipster, underground type.

It's on the cutting edge. It'll be the new "It" area in Brooklyn 5 years from now (especially the Northern part of it, down to Stanhope, Stockholm (Wykoff Hospital area), Myrtle Ave's; so the night life will have to catch up. But there's some there now. Lol. A lot of College kids go there (if they do), cause it's cheaper than all those other areas I mentioned to live, and to dine (kinda pioneering hipsters, artsy types there now, to be honest). Lol. It's a choice.

But all those other areas I mentioned are great!!! Absolutely!

Excelscior
Aug 21st, 2011, 05:20 PM
PS:

Getting back to the original post and lodging/The US Open:

If I was a player, or a visitor that planned to be here a week or two, I would strongly consider (depending on my needs) renting a house, apartment or Condo in nearby neighborhoods/areas of:

Forest Hills, Forest Hills Gardens, Briarwood, Fresh Meadows, Flushing (there's a quiet part to), College Point, Whitestone, Malba, Robinswood, Beechurst, Holliswood, Hollis Hills, Jamaica Estates, Bayside, Bayside Gables, Bay Terrace, Douglaston, Douglas Manor, Little Neck, Glen Oaks, and North Shore Towers.

I heard Federer say he was staying in a house outside of Cincinnati, cause he knew he would be in Manhattan with the Baby in NY. OK. Why not rent a house nearby when you're in NY? Many great, safe areas there! Malba, Douglas Manor, Robinswood/Beechhurst, Jamaica Estates North, or Forest Hills Gardens, may of been perfect for him.

Every area I mentioned from the start, are within 5-25 min drive to the National Tennis Center. And many times they (or their handlers) can walk to shopping or dining. Usually, the Auto Sponsor, picks up the players from their locations anyway, so getting to the Tennis Center, wouldn't be a problem. I would! Lol.

PS: There's a great/famous Italian Restaurant, not far from the Tennis Center, called Parkside in Corona. Has anyone (outsider/traveler) even been there? Lol.

Balltossovic
Aug 22nd, 2011, 09:32 PM
Have you found a place yet? One of my sister properties is available in Long Island City for 204.00 a night.

Balltossovic
Aug 22nd, 2011, 09:34 PM
The Four Points by Sheraton Times Square is also avalable for 205.00 per night (238.74 after taxes.). That might be your best bet for location and price. It's on 40th between 8th and 9th ave.

Excelscior, how is that for location? Is the 7 train close?

Excelscior
Aug 22nd, 2011, 09:38 PM
Yeah. That works.

He/she can walk to the shuttle in Times Sq (on 42st), and take it to the 7 Train at Grand Central (2-3 min ride).

shoparound
Aug 7th, 2012, 05:20 AM
Anyone have new places that weren't mentioned yet?
Looking for a hotel near subway or transportation to the US Open around the 150-200 per night range.

NashaP
Aug 7th, 2012, 05:22 AM
I would personally stay in Grigor's pants if I could

shoparound
Aug 26th, 2012, 06:59 AM
Of course/Absolutely!!

Bushwick, less so than the others, in certain parts(cause its not as established with night life as the others); but so many of these trendy areas, start off like that anyway. Lol.

But all those areas I mentioned, are perfectly safe. Absolutely!

I pointed out one area (Bushwick) that won't look as pretty, established or full of night life as the others (since your a out of towner). Just that one. But you're fine there as well (in Northern Bushwick, and adjacent East Williamsburg), if you're a Hipster, underground type.

It's on the cutting edge. It'll be the new "It" area in Brooklyn 5 years from now (especially the Northern part of it, down to Stanhope, Stockholm (Wykoff Hospital area), Myrtle Ave's; so the night life will have to catch up. But there's some there now. Lol. A lot of College kids go there (if they do), cause it's cheaper than all those other areas I mentioned to live, and to dine (kinda pioneering hipsters, artsy types there now, to be honest). Lol. It's a choice.

But all those other areas I mentioned are great!!! Absolutely!

How about where the hot college guys hang around? lol

Thirty All
Aug 26th, 2012, 07:25 AM
Waldorf Astoria.

18majors
Aug 26th, 2012, 11:39 AM
So I found out today I have a traveling partner for the US Open!

I've looked up bus information, but now I'm looking for hotels. Does anyone know a hotel that isn't too pricey while being accessible to the US Open? By accessible I mean close to a subway that is a reasonable commute to the USTA International tennis center?

Thanks!

PS: Moderators, I'm sorry if this is in the wrong section - I just think more people will help me if I post this in GM..

Sheraton LaGuardia East Hotel

135-20 39th Avenue · Flushing, NY 11354 USA ·Map · Contact Us · Phone: (718) 460-6666 · Fax: (718) 445-2655 · Special Offer Reservations: (866) 716-8115

This hotel is a 5 minutes subway ride to US Open.

http://deals.sheraton.com/Sheraton-La-Guardia-Airport-East-Hotel-994/so.htm?PS=PS_aa_NorthNY-Google-BD_sheraton_laguardia_east_hotel_Exact_110810_NAD_ FM

rockbottom
Aug 23rd, 2013, 08:16 PM
^^^ I just checked with Sheraton LaGuardia and it's $459 per night. What a rip off...no thanks!!!

croat123
Aug 23rd, 2013, 08:30 PM
don't know if you still need help, but i once stayed at a holiday inn or quality inn (can't remember) in chinatown (last stop on the 7). it's very convenient if all you want to do is watch tennis.

iWill
Aug 23rd, 2013, 08:32 PM
^^^ I just checked with Sheraton LaGuardia and it's $459 per night. What a rip off...no thanks!!!



I would say check into services that allow you to rent an apt. or room in the NYC area. Paying for a hotel that you're really only planning to sleep in is a waste of money IMO.

If you PM me I will tell you where to go. Like to keep my connects to myself when I can. :lol:

rockbottom
Aug 24th, 2013, 04:16 AM
don't know if you still need help, but i once stayed at a holiday inn or quality inn (can't remember) in chinatown (last stop on the 7). it's very convenient if all you want to do is watch tennis.
Yes I do. I've been on the phone all day today calling around and most of them just have a "don't give a rat's ass attitude". This one guy from The Jane which is about 7 miles away to the Tennis center, when I asked him do you offer shuttle to the US open and swear to god he said he didn't know where the US open was. I was like...you're flipping kidding me right?

This trip is will be my bucket list of watching US open tennis and finally tasting my love of pizza. So being near a Grimaldi's or something of that would be lovely. And being a fish out water of never having travel outside CA I would prefer to be near some subway or train.


I would say check into services that allow you to rent an apt. or room in the NYC area. Paying for a hotel that you're really only planning to sleep in is a waste of money IMO.

If you PM me I will tell you where to go. Like to keep my connects to myself when I can.
Yes pls check your PM. That would be very cool of you, TYVM :kiss:

rockbottom
Aug 24th, 2013, 04:22 AM
And can someone please tell me why does it take 1.5 hrs to take the subway from Brooklyn to USTA center..which is where the main Grimaldi's is at? What the hell, I've heard that NY subway systems were the best in the world. Yet it takes that long for a 15 mile distance travel. How is that even possible? is it because they stop a gazillion times?

knoxt
Aug 24th, 2013, 04:32 AM
There's no train that takes you directly from Brooklyn to queens. You pretty much have to go through manhattan, unless you live near the G train. Better off staying in manhattan or maybe in Long Island city..

rockbottom
Aug 24th, 2013, 09:17 AM
There's no train that takes you directly from Brooklyn to queens. You pretty much have to go through manhattan, unless you live near the G train. Better off staying in manhattan or maybe in Long Island city..
Right, but there should be a quick ride bus or subway that goes from Brooklyn to Manhattan,..then from there the 7 subway to USTA correct?

knoxt
Aug 27th, 2013, 08:44 PM
Right, but there should be a quick ride bus or subway that goes from Brooklyn to Manhattan,..then from there the 7 subway to USTA correct?

Pretty troublesome to do that. I'd just leave very early, so you don't have to worry about being late. Always travel by the subway, never by the bus (at least I haven't).

frequentflyer
Sep 12th, 2013, 02:14 AM
Was at the US open for the first three days of Week 2, stayed at Quality Inn Woodside (5305 Queens Blvd), paid just over 130 bucks per night and for that price they would sleep a family of four too. Line 7 subway is less than 200 yards from the hotel, neighbourhood looked safe if unspectacular. Access to Manhattan equally simple, less than 20 minutes to Grand Central or Times Sq. Shouldn't be writing this cos I will want to use it on my next USOpen trips and the hotel it pretty small ;)
True, I booked fairly early (mid-May prolly).

Marty-Dom
Sep 12th, 2013, 02:48 AM
Personally I found an apartment near G train in Brooklyn that I traded for a couple of tickets to US Open on Monday night. I bought a package for middle Saturday, Sunday and Monday, day and night sessions, so it was no big deal to give up one session for accommodations. So I got two nights at a private residence for about 170 dollars. Total travel time to BJK Center 45 minutes on subway and #7 train.
If you look in the right places, there are deals to be had.