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View Full Version : Bomb threat in London, take care


Halardfan
May 16th, 2011, 11:58 AM
Police have received a warning of a bomb in central London today, it is thought to be from a Northern Irish catholic splinter group from the IRA.

Remains to be seen whether it's a bluff, but anyone in central London today needs to be watchful and take care.

Hoped those days had gone.

This comes a day before the Queen's landmark visit to the Irish Republic.

Super Dave
May 16th, 2011, 12:58 PM
I was in London when this happened:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1993_Bishopsgate_bombing

Certinfy
May 16th, 2011, 01:53 PM
Won't go to central london today then, not like I had to go but I wanted to get something.

Londoner
May 16th, 2011, 05:11 PM
Here we go again...bastards. Terrorists are cowards. Irony is London is full of Irish. Not the point I know, but ironic all the same.

Halardfan
May 16th, 2011, 05:41 PM
Here we go again...bastards. Terrorists are cowards. Irony is London is full of Irish. Not the point I know, but ironic all the same.

Agree completely as regards to the terrorists. Though need to point out that thankfully these splinter groups have very little support in Ireland or anywhere else, and that even the Queens visit was welcomed by 80% of people in the Irish Republic. Most Irish people, like most Brits, want to move on.

Ciarán
May 16th, 2011, 06:01 PM
Where did you get the figure of 80%? I would say the Queen is welcomed by about 30-40% (max) of the entire islands population. Anyway, like many, I have the suspicion there is going to be BIG trouble tomorrow.

Halardfan
May 16th, 2011, 06:29 PM
Where did you get the figure of 80%? I would say the Queen is welcomed by about 30-40% (max) of the entire islands population. Anyway, like many, I have the suspicion there is going to be BIG trouble tomorrow.

That the was the poll result on the news today. Of course poll results vary depending on the question but still.

Gerry Adams has been to Downing Street. Im prepared to accept that, as part of the process of moving on. I hope Irish people can approach the Queens visit in the same way.

Ciarán
May 16th, 2011, 06:39 PM
Gerry Adams is not the King of Ireland, nor is the Queen a political figure. The British Empire, when at the time Governed by the Royal family invaded Ireland, that is all that matters in the eyes of the entire Republic and Catholic citizens of the North.

Halardfan
May 16th, 2011, 07:02 PM
Gerry Adams is not the King of Ireland, nor is the Queen a political figure. The British Empire, when at the time Governed by the Royal family invaded Ireland, that is all that matters in the eyes of the entire Republic and Catholic citizens of the North.

Those poll numbers don't seem to support your view.

My point about Adams was that plenty of Brits found it hard to stomach that he entered Downing street, bearing in mind his prior actions. But it was necessary to move on.

Doubtless many Irish people have trouble with the Queen's visit, but need to view it in the same way, a hard but necessary step to moving on.

Chris 84
May 16th, 2011, 07:20 PM
Police have received a warning of a bomb in central London today, it is thought to be from a Northern Irish catholic splinter group from the IRA.

i take issue with your use of the word "catholic". whilst it might be true that many republicans are catholics in northern ireland, the ira and the many groups before it and groups which have splintered from it usually have little to do with religion, and indeed over the years many of the most influential irish republican figures were protestant. i would suggest that "republican" is a more accurate description than "catholic" to describe these groups.

Here we go again...bastards. Terrorists are cowards. Irony is London is full of Irish. Not the point I know, but ironic all the same.

"terrorists are cowards" is a rather sweeping statement. whilst i might agree that people trying to disrupt the peace process with attacks on civilians are cowardly and quite clearly in the wrong, the IRA, and, for example, the ANC-led terrorism in South Africa could both have been seen as legitimate attempts to aid a downtrodden group of people, and both could also be seen as successful. whilst the methods may not be desirable, it is rather difficult to hit back at a system which controls the army and has a monopoly on the weapons and the money in the area.

i also find the hypocrisy rather amusing. the news led with stories of evil republican terrorists threatening civilians in london....and then continued to talk about the uk and her allies firing missiles and dropping bombs - via aeroplanes where they are totally untouchable - on libyan "targets" which, just like in iraq, afghanistan, serbia and everywhere else have killed and maimed innocent civilians. in much the same way as planting bombs designed to injure the general public is cowardly, so too is uk/us terrorism against people from all over the world. as far as i'm concerned, one is as bad as the other, but of course, we aren't meant to see it that way.

*JR*
May 16th, 2011, 07:32 PM
I'd think its probably a false threat for the purpose of getting attention (and hope so, as I hate 2C civilians hurt in purely symbolic acts). I also hope that Her "Majesty" makes some grand gesture, such as lets say calling for those residents of so-called "Ulster Province" who opt for it to have full representation in Dublin rather than London, and for a commission reporting equally to both governments replace the British position of Secretary of State for Northern Ireland as a goodwill gesture.

Halardfan
May 16th, 2011, 07:49 PM
I'd think its probably a false threat for the purpose of getting attention (and hope so, as I hate 2C civilians hurt in purely symbolic acts). I also hope that Her "Majesty" makes some grand gesture, such as lets say calling for those residents of so-called "Ulster Province" who opt for it to have full representation in Dublin rather than London, and for a commission reporting equally to both governments replace the British position of Secretary of State for Northern Ireland as a goodwill gesture.

It's not really her place to do that, she is meant to be an apolitical figure. It's the governments job to decide such things. Her visit is more a symbol, of much improved relations, and of hope for a better future. Remember the Queen herself lost family members to an IRA bomb, so the pain isn't all one-sided.

From a practical point of view the people of the Irish republic need to move on. British tourists are a major part of their tourist industry, and we were one of the few countries to stick up for them during the recent debt crisis.

watchdogfish
May 16th, 2011, 07:50 PM
I've just come back from Central London. Heard nothing, saw no extra security on the streets and tube :shrug:

Halardfan
May 16th, 2011, 07:56 PM
i take issue with your use of the word "catholic". whilst it might be true that many republicans are catholics in northern ireland, the ira and the many groups before it and groups which have splintered from it usually have little to do with religion, and indeed over the years many of the most influential irish republican figures were protestant. i would suggest that "republican" is a more accurate description than "catholic" to describe these groups.



"terrorists are cowards" is a rather sweeping statement. whilst i might agree that people trying to disrupt the peace process with attacks on civilians are cowardly and quite clearly in the wrong, the IRA, and, for example, the ANC-led terrorism in South Africa could both have been seen as legitimate attempts to aid a downtrodden group of people, and both could also be seen as successful. whilst the methods may not be desirable, it is rather difficult to hit back at a system which controls the army and has a monopoly on the weapons and the money in the area.

i also find the hypocrisy rather amusing. the news led with stories of evil republican terrorists threatening civilians in london....and then continued to talk about the uk and her allies firing missiles and dropping bombs - via aeroplanes where they are totally untouchable - on libyan "targets" which, just like in iraq, afghanistan, serbia and everywhere else have killed and maimed innocent civilians. in much the same way as planting bombs designed to injure the general public is cowardly, so too is uk/us terrorism against people from all over the world. as far as i'm concerned, one is as bad as the other, but of course, we aren't meant to see it that way.

I used Catholic to mirror the way in which people talk of Islamic terrorists.

There is a religious dimension to the conflict, and the supporters of such terror groups are Predominantly catholic just as the Protestant/Unionist terror groups are Protestant.

Halardfan
May 17th, 2011, 07:44 AM
Police today have found and defused a small bomb in the luggage hold on a coach in Maynooth, in the Irish republic. The coach was Dublin bound.

Well done to the Irish police. Hope this device is the last of it. The Queen's visit will begin, as planned, today.

fifiricci
May 17th, 2011, 08:32 AM
This makes a refreshing change from Islamic Fundamentalists - we're back to the good old days!! :)

Halardfan
May 17th, 2011, 10:58 AM
This makes a refreshing change from Islamic Fundamentalists - we're back to the good old days!! :)

Out of the frying pan, into the fire...

Hard to say which lot are more wretched, with one lot prefering to blow themselves up in the act of bombing. While the other lot prefer to be at a safe distance from their nail packed devices and provide often confusing 'warnings' which are often as dangerous as they are useful.

Ciarán
May 17th, 2011, 11:05 AM
Police today have found and defused a small bomb in the luggage hold on a coach in Maynooth, in the Irish republic. The coach was Dublin bound.

Well done to the Irish police. Hope this device is the last of it. The Queen's visit will begin, as planned, today.

Definitely not the last of it :lol: They have 4 days to kill her.

Halardfan
May 17th, 2011, 11:17 AM
Definitely not the last of it :lol: They have 4 days to kill her.

For the sake of everyone, let's hope they don't. Their agenda is insane, and would not bring a united Ireland (which I actually support) a day closer. Indeed it would make it further away than ever.

Ciarán
May 17th, 2011, 11:38 AM
I personally feel insulted she is wearing green and will deliver a speech in the garden of remembrance with no intentions of an apology.

Bismarck.
May 17th, 2011, 11:45 AM
I personally feel insulted she is wearing green and will deliver a speech in the garden of remembrance with no intentions of an apology.

What for?

Halardfan
May 17th, 2011, 11:52 AM
I personally feel insulted she is wearing green and will deliver a speech in the garden of remembrance with no intentions of an apology.

Ireland though associated with that colour, has no monopoly on it surely?

It's actually friendly gesture...it would have been more provocative if she'd turned out in red white and blue and a union jack hat!

There is not only one side than could do with apologies, this woman lost a family member to an IRA bomb. Do you imagine that just because she is Queen, she feels no pain from that? That her pain has less meaning than yours?

*JR*
May 17th, 2011, 12:43 PM
It's not really her place to do that, she is meant to be an apolitical figure. It's the governments job to decide such things. Her visit is more a symbol, of much improved relations, and of hope for a better future. Remember the Queen herself lost family members to an IRA bomb, so the pain isn't all one-sided.

Regarding her family's loss, I presume you mean "Lord" Mountbatten in 1979. This was the same guy who as viceroy in Palestine in 1947 got a lot of ppl killed by ignoring an Irgun warning about the bombing of the King David Hotel in Jerusalem, saying something like: "The Jews don't tell us what to do". (Good riddance)

In terms of Lizzie's "apolitical role", I specifically do not ask her to speak on policy matters, only to @ least partially renounce the claimed sovereignty of the so-called monarchy ova the remaining occupied part of Ireland. :boxing: (Maybe the Frenchies can launch a new Norman Invasion and coronate Julie Halard as the Queen). :p

Halardfan
May 17th, 2011, 01:30 PM
Regarding her family's loss, I presume you mean "Lord" Mountbatten in 1979. This was the same guy who as viceroy in Palestine in 1947 got a lot of ppl killed by ignoring an Irgun warning about the bombing of the King David Hotel in Jerusalem, saying something like: "The Jews don't tell us what to do". (Good riddance)

In terms of Lizzie's "apolitical role", I specifically do not ask her to speak on policy matters, only to @ least partially renounce the claimed sovereignty of the so-called monarchy ova the remaining occupied part of Ireland. :boxing: (Maybe the Frenchies can launch a new Norman Invasion and coronate Julie Halard as the Queen). :p

Speaking of the Normans...an Irish historian was moaning about the brutal English legacy in Ireland dating back to the 12th century.

But it was a Norman king who was doing the invading...the same Normans who had invaded England the previous century, and who subjected the English to great suffering and death with their Norman castles dotted oppresively around England.

So is it all the Normans fault? The English back then were as oppressed as the Irish. My own town has the remains of a Norman castle used to bring the local serfs into line.

I don't believe in inherited guilt. Because it's insane. Again, remember that I have some French ancestry, as well as other nations. The English and French fought each other for centuries, so it's possible I had family on both sides in those conflicts. So my resenting or holding a grudge about what one side did to the other soon becomes ridiculous. The best thing is to move on, look for a better future, hopefully a future that contains a united Ireland, and an independent England.

Halardfan
May 17th, 2011, 10:05 PM
I've been listening to RTE radio for a good while today, the attitude to the visit has actually been fairly positive. Even the Sinn Fein guy was rather measured and balanced on it.

Encouraging.

*JR*
May 17th, 2011, 10:15 PM
I've been listening to RTE radio for a good while today, the attitude to the visit has actually been fairly positive. Even the Sinn Fein guy was rather measured and balanced on it. Encouraging.

The 32 County Sovereignty Movement's reaction:

"Ireland’s sovereignty does not end at the border, and the restoration of our national sovereignty can only be achieved by removing that border. The 32 County Sovereignty Movement call on all Republicans to oppose this visit and to expose the true political and constitutional intent behind it."

Halardfan
May 17th, 2011, 10:22 PM
The 32 County Sovereignty Movement's reaction:

"Ireland’s sovereignty does not end at the border, and the restoration of our national sovereignty can only be achieved by removing that border. The 32 County Sovereignty Movement call on all Republicans to oppose this visit and to expose the true political and constitutional intent behind it."

Do you agree with that group of unrepentant terrorists then?

Or would you take Sinn Fein's much more measured line?

*JR*
May 17th, 2011, 10:38 PM
Do you agree with that group of unrepentant terrorists then?

Or would you take Sinn Fein's much more measured line?

32 CSM is a political movement, not a military one. :p

Halardfan
May 17th, 2011, 11:08 PM
32 CSM is a political movement, not a military one. :p

They are the political wing of the 'Real IRA'...The US government lists them as a terrorist group indistinguishable and one and the same as the Real IRA.

They reject the peace process, embrace terrorism, condemn Sinn Fein's part in it government, and have next to no support.
Theirs is a path only to endless war that they could never ever win. More British troops on the streets not less, more Unionist terrorism in response, more of everything awful.

Halardfan
May 18th, 2011, 07:25 AM
The Irish press were very positive today about the Queen's visit, and roundly condemned the few rowdy protesters that there were. So good news so far.

fifiricci
May 18th, 2011, 08:29 AM
This is more complicated than good cop bad cop, so I'm sticking with Halardfan's line on this one. Day two and the Queen is still alive!!

Londoner
May 18th, 2011, 08:42 AM
Regarding her family's loss, I presume you mean "Lord" Mountbatten in 1979. This was the same guy who as viceroy in Palestine in 1947 got a lot of ppl killed by ignoring an Irgun warning about the bombing of the King David Hotel in Jerusalem, saying something like: "The Jews don't tell us what to do". (Good riddance)

In terms of Lizzie's "apolitical role", I specifically do not ask her to speak on policy matters, only to @ least partially renounce the claimed sovereignty of the so-called monarchy ova the remaining occupied part of Ireland. :boxing: (Maybe the Frenchies can launch a new Norman Invasion and coronate Julie Halard as the Queen). :p

I know you'll never agree, but if Northern Ireland voters voted for independence then they would probably get it. The majority of people there don't want it. And it has been their home for centuries. They were born there. It's like saying black people in England or immigrants to England should have no say. Also, the Queen has no political power so she can never renounce it without the people voting for it or the Government politically handing it over.

Personally I would love to see it handed back to Ireland, but without a democratic vote there would be civil war and bloodshed and the UK would have to step in again. I had hoped with the EU all of this would get sorted, and it still may, via the creation of a United States of Europe. But I doubt very much the latter will happen now in my lifetime with all the mess in the EU.

Without a democtratic agenda I doubt Ireland would want Northern Ireland. They are totally different cultures and I can't see the South managing a civil war up North!

Londoner
May 18th, 2011, 08:55 AM
Definitely not the last of it :lol: They have 4 days to kill her.

I hope they don't. It would be a dreadful stain on Irish history plus the Queen is not there as a dominant force but as an act of goodwill. I wish we could distinguish between the true outstanding good personal relations between English and Irish and hte political situation.

What really saddens me is that there are Irish in England, English in Ireland. There are Irish married to English and the Irish are very popular as people in England. Most English do empathise with the history of Ireland and would welcome a real solution to this, a solution that supports the continued affection and good relations between the actual people of Ireland and England.

Halardfan
May 18th, 2011, 04:19 PM
An awareness of the history is important, and make no mistake, England/Britain has been part of some terrible episodes in Ireland. As well as sometimes been on the recieving end of atrocities too.

But history should never hold us back from a brighter future, that's all.

The Queen's visit is meant to mark the beginning of a new era, and the great bulk of coverage so far in Ireland has been positive.

Lin Lin
May 18th, 2011, 11:32 PM
:help: