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View Full Version : Police pepper-spray 8 year old (updated 4/8/11)


pov
Apr 6th, 2011, 03:09 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/US/aidan-elliot-pepper-sprayed-colorado-elementary-classroom-police/story?id=13307371
Second Grade Boy Pepper Sprayed by Colorado Police in Class
Boy, 8, Cursed at Teachers and Threatened to Kill Them

By CLAYTON SANDELL and JESSICA HOPPER
April 6, 2011


Colorado police and school officials are defending a decision to pepper spray a second grade boy who threatened to kill his teachers.

Aidan Elliot seems like a typical video game loving 8 year old, but what happened in his Glennon Heights Elementary School on Feb. 28 was hardly typical.

"I kind of blow up a little," Aidan said. "I said I'm going to kill you once you get out of that room."

Aidan is in a class for kids with behavior problems. He became enraged, spitting and throwing chairs and even threatening teachers and students with a sharp piece of wood he held like a knife.

Aidan told "Good Morning America" that he regrets his behavior, but when asked if he meant to injure the teachers with the piece of wood, he said, "kind of."

"I was rowdy on the bus...They didn't let me do something I wanted to do. We needed to do stuff, but they wouldn't let me. They put me in a corner with chairs and they called my mom," he said. "It was really the teachers because I just got really upset with them."

The boy's mother, Mandy Elliot, is furious with school officials and police.

"I was angry. I didn't understand. I was on my way....Why didn't they talk to him. He was red, handcuffed, crying, screaming how much it burned," Mandy Elliot said.

Lakewood Police Officer Steve Davis said that when they arrived on the scene Aidan told them, "I will kill you mother effers," Davis said.

Teachers were so worried for their safety, they reportedly barricaded themselves in an adjacent office.

"He told the teachers the same thing...if they came out, they were going to die," Davis said.

Aidan's mother said that her son never behaves violently outside of school.

"I think there is a problem, but it's with school and Aidan," Mandy Elliot said. "It only happens at school. It doesn't happen at soccer. It doesn't happen at swimming. It doesn't happen with babysitters, with family members."

Elliot is filing a complaint against the police for pepper spraying her son.

"I think they should have approached him, tried to talk to him, even if it was from a distance. You talk to him and you find out what it is that's botherhing him as well. You don't just walk in, ask him to stop and then spray," Elliot said.

Police defended their decision.

"It was a situation that had to be diffused and it had to be done very quickly. No one went home injured that day," Davis said.

School officials told the Denver Post that they are seeing more elementary and pre-school students who are increasingly violent.

"As a district we've been very concerned about it," Polly Ortiz-Lutz, the school district's director of special education told the Denver Post.

School officials said that Aidan would be welcome back to the school if his behavior improves.

"That would be our hope and goal. I hope that he is getting the services he needs so that he is able to return," said Peg Kastberg from Jefferson County Public Schools.

Aidan's mother said that she's tried putting her son on medication to improve his behavior, but it didn't work.

Aidan said that he needs to work on cooling down his temper.

"I don't know how my future is going to be--rich, happy, good life road or bad, homeless, poor road," he said.

----------
Updated 4/8

http://www.9news.com/news/article/192228/339/Grandfather-of-pepper-sprayed-boy-blames-trauma
Grandfather of pepper-sprayed boy blames past 'trauma'
12:31 AM, Apr 8, 2011

WESTMINSTER - The grandfather of an 8-year-old boy who was pepper sprayed by Lakewood Police feels his grandson has been unfairly characterized as a "violent spoiled brat."

John, who asked 9NEWS not to disclose his last name, said his grandson Aidan experienced a painful and private "trauma" prior to 2009, that has since triggered angry outbursts at school.

"Something traumatic has happened that's caused the problems," he said, "and I can't really go into it right now. It's confidential and under investigation."

"That's not excusing his behavior. But that's a reason why he acts out," he said.

Aidan spends most weekends and holidays with his grandparents.

"I couldn't love him anymore if he was my son," John said. "His dad was in the military and was sent to Afghanistan. Basically I've been his dad for all that time."

John says he and his grandson have had a lot of fun times. He worries a recent violent incident will now overshadow his grandson Aidan.

Aidan's second grade teachers called police during a violent temper tantrum at Glennon Heights Elementary School in Lakewood on Feb. 22.

According to a Lakewood Police report, Aidan was threatening teachers with a piece of wood trim he ripped off the wall.

Lakewood police officers entered the classroom and ordered Aidan to "drop the stick." When he didn't comply, the officers pepper sprayed Aidan twice, handcuffed him, and removed him from the classroom.

"I'm not here to trash the Lakewood PD," John said. "I think they were just trying to do their job. I definitely don't agree with using the pepper spray on an 8-year-old."

John, a former police officer, keeps a detailed record of Aidan's behavior at home.

"His outbursts don't happen at home," he said, "but there's something about school that triggers a reaction."

Aidan's mother Mandy, whose last name 9NEWS has also chosen not to disclose, believes the Lakewood Police officers should have handled the situation differently. She says police were called on her son at school twice before, and both times the officers were able to talk to her son and calm him down.

"I'm sure what he was doing wasn't right, but he's 8 years old," Mandy said. "They walked in, asked him to drop the stick, and then sprayed him with the spray...I think it's excessive."

Lakewood Police spokesman Steve Davis defended the officers' decision to use pepper spray on the boy, calling it the safest option considering the circumstances.

"You've got teachers barricading themselves in a room. They are obviously frightened," Davis said. "I think they not only made the right choice, they made a great choice that day to use the pepper spray."

Aidan was placed on a "mental health hold" and was transferred to a school for children with behavioral issues.

His mother says Aidan is seeing a doctor, but has not been diagnosed with any mental illness and is not currently on any medication.

"It's hard," Mandy said. "Do you listen to what the teachers tell you? Or do you listen to your child?"

Aidan admits he has problems controlling his anger.

"Just kind of like whenever anybody upsets me," he said. "Like I just kind of want to tear them apart... I think it's not ever going to go away... It's just who I am."

Certinfy
Apr 6th, 2011, 03:19 PM
Wow :eek:

young_gunner913
Apr 6th, 2011, 04:47 PM
Sounds like the little shit deserved it to me. :shrug:

Salve
Apr 6th, 2011, 05:15 PM
Sounds like the little shit deserved it to me. :shrug:

Bitch, you're a piece of shit. :rolleyes:

Dominic
Apr 6th, 2011, 05:36 PM
After reading this, tbh I don't really mind that they sprayed him. Poor parents seriously.

JJ Expres
Apr 6th, 2011, 06:37 PM
well sometimes critical behavior deserves cruel punishment.I'm against any kind of violence towards children but that boy is just spoiled brat and now he knows what's going to happen if he does anything similar again.i blame the parents, just 8yo and he is behaving like that:shrug:

JJ Expres
Apr 6th, 2011, 06:40 PM
Sounds like the little shit deserved it to me. :shrug:

actually calling him little shit is not appropriate cause he is just 8yo and he behaves like they thought him. his parents are retards actually:)

delicatecutter
Apr 6th, 2011, 06:46 PM
well sometimes critical behavior deserves cruel punishment.I'm against any kind of violence towards children but that boy is just spoiled brat and now he knows what's going to happen if he does anything similar again.i blame the parents, just 8yo and he is behaving like that:shrug:

It's not always the parents' fault. Some people are just born evil.

pov
Apr 6th, 2011, 06:48 PM
well sometimes critical behavior deserves cruel punishment.I'm against any kind of violence towards children but that boy is just spoiled brat and now he knows what's going to happen if he does anything similar again.
Which is it? You are against violence towards children or you're for violence towards children if you think it will "teach them a lesson"?

young_gunner913
Apr 6th, 2011, 07:09 PM
Bitch, you're a piece of shit. :rolleyes:

So mature, what are you? 12? Grow up.

Apoleb
Apr 6th, 2011, 07:18 PM
Better safe than sorry? I don't know if there were other ways to restrain him while inflicting less damage, but obviously there needed to be some assertive action to remove all kind of threat. Tough to judge without more information.

JJ Expres
Apr 6th, 2011, 07:20 PM
Which is it? You are against violence towards children or you're for violence towards children if you think it will "teach them a lesson"?

he took sharp object and threat to his teacher.that's not normal situation at all.i mean i think you can raise your children without physical punishment but sometimes it's really necessary:shrug:

debby
Apr 6th, 2011, 08:47 PM
lol @the mother searching for excuses

pov
Apr 6th, 2011, 09:11 PM
he took sharp object and threat to his teacher.that's not normal situation at all.i mean i think you can raise your children without physical punishment but sometimes it's really necessary:shrug:
You're confused. It's ever you can or you can't.

Also . . .it's a big deal for a child to threaten someone with a stick? Really? The only thing unsusual is that this boy threatened adults. And yeah . .cops who can't restrain an 8 year old armed with a stick without using pepper-spray are useless IMO.

The Prophet
Apr 6th, 2011, 09:34 PM
So lame for the mother to use the tired "He doesn't act like this at home" defense. :rolleyes:

Anyway, I would be shocked if this kid didn't have EBD or autism. School administrators are praying for more males to get into Special Ed. specifically because they are better at handling prone-to-violence kids like this 8-year-old.

The Prophet
Apr 6th, 2011, 09:37 PM
Also . . .it's a big deal for a child to threaten someone with a stick? Really? The only thing unsusual is that this boy threatened adults. And yeah . .cops who can't restrain an 8 year old armed with a stick without using pepper-spray are useless IMO.

I'm guessing the police used the pepper spray for the child's own safety.

Pump-it-UP
Apr 6th, 2011, 10:35 PM
Better safe than sorry? I don't know if there were other ways to restrain him while inflicting less damage, but obviously there needed to be some assertive action to remove all kind of threat. Tough to judge without more information.

Nothing else to add. :yeah:

The Dawntreader
Apr 6th, 2011, 10:43 PM
He was totally losing his shit with a plank of wood. What were they gonna do? It's standard police protocol surely? Not like they tazered him.

Nicolás89
Apr 7th, 2011, 12:27 AM
Aidan's mother said that her son never behaves violently outside of school.

"I think there is a problem, but it's with school and Aidan," Mandy Elliot said. "It only happens at school. It doesn't happen at soccer. It doesn't happen at swimming. It doesn't happen with babysitters, with family members."

obviously.

Police defended their decision.

"It was a situation that had to be diffused and it had to be done very quickly. No one went home injured that day," Davis said.

:weirdo: What about the kid?

mykarma
Apr 7th, 2011, 12:38 AM
You're confused. It's ever you can or you can't.

Also . . .it's a big deal for a child to threaten someone with a stick? Really? The only thing unsusual is that this boy threatened adults. And yeah . .cops who can't restrain an 8 year old armed with a stick without using pepper-spray are useless IMO.
Exactly. If the kid actually physically attacked the teacher then perhaps but even then people have physically attacked grown men with automatic weapons shooting at people so I know they could have found a better way to stop an 8 year old child.

mykarma
Apr 7th, 2011, 12:47 AM
Better safe than sorry? I don't know if there were other ways to restrain him while inflicting less damage, but obviously there needed to be some assertive action to remove all kind of threat. Tough to judge without more information.
What additional info. would you need? The parent was already on the way and the kid was surrounded by chairs. They could have left him in the classroom alone until he tired or until his mother arrived.

This kid sounds as though he has some mental problems but with all of the cutbacks it's difficult to get any long time mental health assistance.

Wigglytuff
Apr 7th, 2011, 12:51 AM
really, i would like to say i am shocked that people are ok with pepper spraying an 8 year old. is it ok to pepper spray a 7 year old? 6, 5, 4, 3, is it ok to pepper spray a 2 year old? an infant? there has to be a line drawn at which point are you guys going to draw it? if not 2nd grade and 8 years old than at what point?

as an aside it sounds like the kid has a chemical imbalance and needs serious trained care not the brute for you guys are advocating on a very small child. most likely he has some undiagnosed disorder, bi polar or something a long those lines. i dont like to the idea of put kids on drugs and think it is a cop out for lazy parents, but in some very rare and very extreme cases it can help if used jointly with counseling, family counseling and play counseling as well as parenting lessons and other forms of non chemical treatment.

indeed there exist a number of programs that offer that kind of intense treatment for extreme cases like this.

Wigglytuff
Apr 7th, 2011, 12:52 AM
What additional info. would you need? The parent was already on the way and the kid was surrounded by chairs. They could have left him in the classroom alone until he tired or until his mother arrived.

This kid sounds as though he has some mental problems but with all of the cutbacks it's difficult to get any long time mental health assistance.

exactly.

Ellery
Apr 7th, 2011, 03:22 AM
In the cops' defense I think it's a very delicate thing for non-family members to actually physically touch children in a remotely forceful manner. Had he tried to actually take the stick from the child and touched him or anything, I'm sure the mom would be screaming police brutality.

JN
Apr 7th, 2011, 03:27 AM
What kind of 8-year-old says shit like:

They didn't let me do something I wanted to do. We needed to do stuff, but they wouldn't let me.then shit like:

I don't know how my future is going to be--rich, happy, good life road or bad, homeless, poor road.:weirdo:

Get that boy some real help.

Mistress of Evil
Apr 7th, 2011, 03:52 AM
:tape:

meyerpl
Apr 7th, 2011, 04:34 AM
He became enraged, spitting and throwing chairs and even threatening teachers and students with a sharp piece of wood he held like a knife.
If my kid acted like that, I think I'd tell the cops, "Spray him."

darrinbaker00
Apr 7th, 2011, 04:48 AM
There's nothing wrong with that kid. He's just perpetually angry because his parents named him Aidan.

pancake
Apr 7th, 2011, 06:47 AM
In the cops' defense I think it's a very delicate thing for non-family members to actually physically touch children in a remotely forceful manner. Had he tried to actually take the stick from the child and touched him or anything, I'm sure the mom would be screaming police brutality.


This.
I mean it's even harder to touch him or anything and apparently if he's angry it's hard to talk any sense into him as well.

Apoleb
Apr 7th, 2011, 07:26 AM
What additional info. would you need? The parent was already on the way and the kid was surrounded by chairs. They could have left him in the classroom alone until he tired or until his mother arrived.

This kid sounds as though he has some mental problems but with all of the cutbacks it's difficult to get any long time mental health assistance.

I don't think it's an option to leave him in the classroom alone. He could be as much of a threat to himself as to others. Immediate action had to be taken, and I don't know if there were more feasible ways to "disarm" him and restrain him. And yes, I think one needs to be there to really assess how much of a threat the boy was. I mean an 8 year old had all the teachers locked up in a room... that sounds pretty serious.

And Nadia makes an excellent point. The good thing is that he realized later what went on in his mind, that "he lost control" and that he's wrong. His mom should be trying to find solutions rather than point out "it's only the school".

Wigglytuff
Apr 7th, 2011, 08:11 AM
What kind of 8-year-old says shit like:

then shit like:

:weirdo:

Get that boy some real help.

There is something wrong with that kid, and the parents too. They need to sue and use the settlement money to get that boy some expert help .

The Prophet
Apr 7th, 2011, 11:09 AM
Exactly. If the kid actually physically attacked the teacher then perhaps but even then people have physically attacked grown men with automatic weapons shooting at people so I know they could have found a better way to stop an 8 year old child.

Oh, really? :rolleyes: I've seen trained paraeducators fail to subdue autistic kindergarteners. Having to physically subdue a raging EBD/autism child without risking harm to the child himself is MUCH more difficult than it sounds. That 8-year-old could have been seriously injured had the police gone in for him without spraying him first. The police did the right thing.

King Halep
Apr 7th, 2011, 01:00 PM
So lame for the mother to use the tired "He doesn't act like this at home" defense. :rolleyes:

Anyway, I would be shocked if this kid didn't have EBD or autism. School administrators are praying for more males to get into Special Ed. specifically because they are better at handling prone-to-violence kids like this 8-year-old.

Maybe he has 3 bowls of sugary cereal in the morning. Thats why I think Rebecca Black's song is highly irresponsible. When it gets to the point when she cant get to school without her daily sugar rush, its become an Addiction.

Kart
Apr 7th, 2011, 01:17 PM
A bucket of cold water would probably have been as effective as pepper spray.

I'm interested to know why they didn't wait for the mother who was on her way.

I assume that they felt the need to act on his behaviour because he had a sharp 'knife like' object in his hand.

I can't imagine feeling so threatened by an eight year old to need to call the police but then I wasn't there.

Wigglytuff
Apr 7th, 2011, 01:23 PM
A bucket of cold water would probably have been as effective as pepper spray.

I'm interested to know why they didn't wait for the mother who was on her way.

I assume that they felt the need to act on his behaviour because he had a sharp 'knife like' object in his hand.

I can't imagine feeling so threatened by an eight year old to need to call the police but then I wasn't there.

Basically.

King Halep
Apr 7th, 2011, 01:44 PM
Reminds me of the African who was shot 40 times by NYPD for trying to take his wallet out of his pocket

RenaSlam.
Apr 7th, 2011, 02:09 PM
Sounds like the kid deserved it. He clearly needs help.

JN
Apr 7th, 2011, 02:20 PM
Reminds me of the African who was shot 40 times by NYPD for trying to take his wallet out of his pocket

Um, let's not go overboard, here. The 8-year-old was in possession of a non-concealed weapon and was making overt threats. There is no comparison whatsoever.

pov
Apr 7th, 2011, 03:58 PM
I've seen trained paraeducators fail to subdue autistic kindergarteners. Having to physically subdue a raging EBD/autism child without risking harm to the child himself is MUCH more difficult than it sounds. That 8-year-old could have been seriously injured had the police gone in for him without spraying him first.
A worthwhile point and one I hadn't considered. I don't agree at the moment but thanks for this input.

laschutz
Apr 8th, 2011, 02:16 PM
2 policemen cant contain a 8 year old kid? i don't care if the kid was high on LSD, surely 2 grown trained male officers could hold a kid and calm him down? obviously, the kid is mental, what has been done by the parents to help this kid out? where is the dad? didn't see him in any of the tv interviews? supposedly, this kid has been doing this stuff more than once at this school? so why hasn't the parents done anything about it? from the looks of the mother, she seems more or less either resigned to the fact that is how her kid is or "gee, what can i do, i'm helpless". no matter if she is struggling financially ( if she is that is) there is always help and always places that she can take her son to get that help!

both parties were wrong! she'll sue, the police will give her a settlement, she ( the mother) will spend it on bills and things she needs ( wants!) and the saga will start all over! havent' we've all been and done there before ( meaning reading and hearing about this type of story!)

pov
Apr 8th, 2011, 04:19 PM
http://www.9news.com/news/article/192228/339/Grandfather-of-pepper-sprayed-boy-blames-trauma
Grandfather of pepper-sprayed boy blames past 'trauma'
12:31 AM, Apr 8, 2011

WESTMINSTER - The grandfather of an 8-year-old boy who was pepper sprayed by Lakewood Police feels his grandson has been unfairly characterized as a "violent spoiled brat."

John, who asked 9NEWS not to disclose his last name, said his grandson Aidan experienced a painful and private "trauma" prior to 2009, that has since triggered angry outbursts at school.

"Something traumatic has happened that's caused the problems," he said, "and I can't really go into it right now. It's confidential and under investigation."

"That's not excusing his behavior. But that's a reason why he acts out," he said.

Aidan spends most weekends and holidays with his grandparents.

"I couldn't love him anymore if he was my son," John said. "His dad was in the military and was sent to Afghanistan. Basically I've been his dad for all that time."

John says he and his grandson have had a lot of fun times. He worries a recent violent incident will now overshadow his grandson Aidan.

Aidan's second grade teachers called police during a violent temper tantrum at Glennon Heights Elementary School in Lakewood on Feb. 22.

According to a Lakewood Police report, Aidan was threatening teachers with a piece of wood trim he ripped off the wall.

Lakewood police officers entered the classroom and ordered Aidan to "drop the stick." When he didn't comply, the officers pepper sprayed Aidan twice, handcuffed him, and removed him from the classroom.

"I'm not here to trash the Lakewood PD," John said. "I think they were just trying to do their job. I definitely don't agree with using the pepper spray on an 8-year-old."

John, a former police officer, keeps a detailed record of Aidan's behavior at home.

"His outbursts don't happen at home," he said, "but there's something about school that triggers a reaction."

Aidan's mother Mandy, whose last name 9NEWS has also chosen not to disclose, believes the Lakewood Police officers should have handled the situation differently. She says police were called on her son at school twice before, and both times the officers were able to talk to her son and calm him down.

"I'm sure what he was doing wasn't right, but he's 8 years old," Mandy said. "They walked in, asked him to drop the stick, and then sprayed him with the spray...I think it's excessive."

Lakewood Police spokesman Steve Davis defended the officers' decision to use pepper spray on the boy, calling it the safest option considering the circumstances.

"You've got teachers barricading themselves in a room. They are obviously frightened," Davis said. "I think they not only made the right choice, they made a great choice that day to use the pepper spray."

Aidan was placed on a "mental health hold" and was transferred to a school for children with behavioral issues.

His mother says Aidan is seeing a doctor, but has not been diagnosed with any mental illness and is not currently on any medication.

"It's hard," Mandy said. "Do you listen to what the teachers tell you? Or do you listen to your child?"

Aidan admits he has problems controlling his anger.

"Just kind of like whenever anybody upsets me," he said. "Like I just kind of want to tear them apart... I think it's not ever going to go away... It's just who I am."

Wigglytuff
Apr 8th, 2011, 04:34 PM
not surprised. i wanna add that people attacking an 8 year old with clear mental problems in need of serious help and love really should be ashamed of themselves. the boy CLEARLY needs help not pepper spray. this was clear before the grandfather spoke out but it is even more clear now.

pov
Apr 8th, 2011, 05:48 PM
not surprised. i wanna add that people attacking an 8 year old with clear mental problems in need of serious help and love really should be ashamed of themselves. the boy CLEARLY needs help not pepper spray. this was clear before the grandfather spoke out but it is even more clear now.
IMO the boy probably doesn't need "help" either. Nor do I think he has "clear mental problems" He's going through something and he'll likely work his way through it. The "problem" IMO is that - fed by the babble of the "experts" - many people now blow things way out of proportion.