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Bijoux0021
Mar 31st, 2011, 10:55 AM
March 30, 2011, 3:15 pm

When a Girl Is Executed … for Being Raped

By NICHOLAS KRISTOF

We’re all focused right now on Libya and budget battles at home, but this story from Bangladesh just broke my heart and outraged me — and offers a reminder of the daily human rights struggles of so many women and girls in villages around the world. A 14-year-old Bangladeshi girl, Hena,allegedly was ambushed when she went to an outdoor toilet, gagged, beaten and raped by an older man in her village (who was actually her cousin). They were caught by wife of the alleged rapist, and the wife then beat Hena up. An imam at a local mosque issued a fatwa saying that Hena was guilty of adultery and must be punished, and a village makeshift court sentenced Hena to 100 lashes in a public whipping.

Her last words were protestations of innocence. An excellent CNN blog post, based on interviews with family members, says that the parents “had no choice but to mind the imam’s order. They watched as the whip broke the skin of their youngest child and she fell unconscious to the ground.”

Hena collapsed after 70 lashes and was taken to the hospital. She died a week later, by some accounts because of internal bleeding and a general loss of blood. The doctors recorded her death as a suicide. (Women and girls who are raped are typically expected to commit suicide, to spare everyone the embarrassment of an honor crime.) I’ve covered enough of these kinds of stories to know that it’s difficult to know exactly what happened unless you’re on the scene talking to everyone who was there; maybe the imam has a different version of events. But all accounts that I’ve seen such that this was a brutal attack on a helpless girl in the name of sharia and justice.

Fortunately, Bangladesh has a robust civil society, which has reacted with outrage to the case. A court ordered the body exhumed after word leaked out, and an examination revealed severe injuries. Lawsuits are now underway against the doctors who had called her death a suicide, and several people have been rounded up — including the alleged rapist. The Bangladesh press is on the case. But Hena’s family is under police protection because of concern that other villagers will take revenge at them for getting the imam and others in trouble.

Let’s hope that the public reaction and punishments are so strong that the word goes out to all of Bangladesh’s villages that such misogynist fatwas are not only immoral but also illegal. And that the crime lies not in being raped, but in raping.

http://kristof.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/30/when-a-girl-is-executed-for-being-raped/

Bijoux0021
Mar 31st, 2011, 11:05 AM
Only 14, Bangladeshi girl charged with adultery was lashed to death

By Farid Ahmed and Moni Basu, CNN
March 29, 2011 -- Updated 2309 GMT (0709 HKT)

Shariatpur, Bangladesh (CNN) -- Hena Akhter's last words to her mother proclaimed her innocence. But it was too late to save the 14-year-old girl.

Her fellow villagers in Bangladesh's Shariatpur district had already passed harsh judgment on her. Guilty, they said, of having an affair with a married man. The imam from the local mosque ordered the fatwa, or religious ruling, and the punishment: 101 lashes delivered swiftly, deliberately in public.

Hena dropped after 70.

Bloodied and bruised, she was taken to hospital, where she died a week later.

Amazingly, an initial autopsy report cited no injuries and deemed her death a suicide. Hena's family insisted her body be exhumed. They wanted the world to know what really happened to their daughter.

Sharia: illegal but still practiced

Hena's family hailed from rural Shariatpur, crisscrossed by murky rivers that lend waters to rice paddies and lush vegetable fields.

Hena was the youngest of five children born to Darbesh Khan, a day laborer, and his wife, Aklima Begum. They shared a hut made from corrugated tin and decaying wood and led a simple life that was suddenly marred a year ago with the return of Hena's cousin Mahbub Khan.

Mahbub Khan came back to Shariatpur from a stint working in Malaysia. His son was Hena's age and the two were in seventh grade together.

Khan eyed Hena and began harassing her on her way to school and back, said Hena's father. He complained to the elders who run the village about his nephew, three times Hena's age.

The elders admonished Mahbub Khan and ordered him to pay $1,000 in fines to Hena's family. But Mahbub was Darbesh's older brother's son and Darbesh was asked to let the matter fade.

Many months later on a winter night, as Hena's sister Alya told it, Hena was walking from her room to an outdoor toilet when Mahbub Khan gagged her with cloth, forced her behind nearby shrubbery and beat and raped her.

Hena struggled to escape, Alya told CNN. Mahbub Khan's wife heard Hena's muffled screams and when she found Hena with her husband, she dragged the teenage girl back to her hut, beat her and trampled her on the floor.

The next day, the village elders met to discuss the case at Mahbub Khan's house, Alya said. The imam pronounced his fatwa. Khan and Hena were found guilty of an illicit relationship. Her punishment under sharia or Islamic law was 101 lashes; his 201.

Mahbub Khan managed to escape after the first few lashes.

Darbesh Khan and Aklima Begum had no choice but to mind the imam's order. They watched as the whip broke the skin of their youngest child and she fell unconscious to the ground.

"What happened to Hena is unfortunate and we all have to be ashamed that we couldn't save her life," said Sultana Kamal, who heads the rights organization Ain o Shalish Kendro.

Bangladesh is considered a democratic and moderate Muslim country, and national law forbids the practice of sharia. But activist and journalist Shoaib Choudhury, who documents such cases, said sharia is still very much in use in villages and towns aided by the lack of education and strong judicial systems.

The Supreme Court also outlawed fatwas a decade ago, but human rights monitors have documented more than 500 cases of women in those 10 years who were punished through a religious ruling. And few who have issued such rulings have been charged.

The government needs to enact a specific law to deal with such perpetrators responsible for extrajudicial penalty in the name of Islam.

--Sultana Kamal, head of rights organization Ain o Shalish Kendro.
RELATED TOPICS
Bangladesh
Sharia Law
Human Rights Policy
Last month, the court asked the government to explain what it had done to stop extrajudicial penalty based on fatwa. It ordered the dissemination of information to all mosques and madrassas, or religious schools, that sharia is illegal in Bangladesh.

"The government needs to enact a specific law to deal with such perpetrators responsible for extrajudicial penalty in the name of Islam," Kamal told CNN.

The United Nations estimates that almost half of Bangladeshi women suffer from domestic violence and many also commonly endure rape, beatings, acid attacks and even death because of the country's entrenched patriarchal system.

Hena might have quietly become another one of those statistics had it not been for the outcry and media attention that followed her death on January 31.

'Not even old enough to be married'

Monday, the doctors responsible for Hena's first autopsy faced prosecution for what a court called a "false post-mortem report to hide the real cause of Hena's death."

Public outrage sparked by that autopsy report prompted the high court to order the exhumation of Hena's body in February. A second autopsy performed at Dhaka Medical College Hospital revealed Hena had died of internal bleeding and her body bore the marks of severe injuries.

Police are now conducting an investigation and have arrested several people, including Mahbub Khan, in connection with Hena's death.

"I've nothing to demand but justice," said Darbesh Khan, leading a reporter to the place where his daughter was abducted the night she was raped.

He stood in silence and took a deep breath. She wasn't even old enough to be married, he said, testament to Hena's tenderness in a part of the world where many girls are married before adulthood. "She was so small."

Hena's mother, Aklima, stared vacantly as she spoke of her daughter's last hours. She could barely get out her words. "She was innocent," Aklima said, recalling Hena's last words.

Police were guarding Hena's family earlier this month. Darbesh and Aklima feared reprisal for having spoken out against the imam and the village elders.

They had meted out the most severe punishment for their youngest daughter. They could put nothing past them.

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapcf/03/29/bangladesh.lashing.death/index.html

Certinfy
Mar 31st, 2011, 11:25 AM
Beyond disgusting, I have no words for this.

currie84
Mar 31st, 2011, 11:27 AM
Sharia Law,coming to your countries in a few years.

Miss Atomic Bomb
Mar 31st, 2011, 12:14 PM
Sharia Law,coming to your countries in a few years.

Ohhh I know who you are, you used to be an Ivanovic fan on your previous account. Urgh I forgot your name, maybe Kart might help me there?

hablo
Mar 31st, 2011, 08:28 PM
This is revolting. :fiery:

Payam
Mar 31st, 2011, 08:36 PM
It is terribly sad that an Imam's fatwa can be so important. What if the Imam is crazy or stupid?

Halardfan
Mar 31st, 2011, 08:45 PM
Such is the madness of religion and in particular, regretfully of branches of Islam.

I increasingly think there is a liberal pro-women position which is willing to say enough is enough with regards to some who follow Islam.

I reject the conservative western view that merely replaces Islamic dogma with Christian dogma which has a brutal and miserable history all of it's own.

Ryusuke Tenma
Mar 31st, 2011, 10:13 PM
Revolting part of the world.

These laws in Muslim countries are sickening and disgusting.

Morning Morgan
Mar 31st, 2011, 10:56 PM
Fucking disgusting.

jacobruiz
Apr 1st, 2011, 12:57 AM
I knew it would make me sick to read this. I don't even know where to begin to write anything...

Dominic
Apr 1st, 2011, 01:48 AM
It's probably wrong but I hope they get killed.

young_gunner913
Apr 1st, 2011, 04:37 AM
Such is the madness of religion and in particular, regretfully of branches of Islam.

I increasingly think there is a liberal pro-women position which is willing to say enough is enough with regards to some who follow Islam.

I reject the conservative western view that merely replaces Islamic dogma with Christian dogma which has a brutal and miserable history all of it's own.

It's really ignorant to group all religions together just because the acts and practices of one. I understand there's numerous posters on this board who have strong feelings against religion, good for you all. But's really obnoxious that you guys feel you have to tell the rest of us how you feel about religion 24/7. This is not to you in perticular, but it's just something that's been bugging me for a while.

Meanwhile, this is a really sad and fucked up story. But in that part of the world, this probably isn't too abnormal.

Dominic
Apr 1st, 2011, 05:08 AM
But in that part of the world, this probably isn't too abnormal.

Which is even sadder and more fucked up.

Halardfan
Apr 1st, 2011, 06:41 AM
It's really ignorant to group all religions together just because the acts and practices of one. I understand there's numerous posters on this board who have strong feelings against religion, good for you all. But's really obnoxious that you guys feel you have to tell the rest of us how you feel about religion 24/7. This is not to you in perticular, but it's just something that's been bugging me for a while.

Meanwhile, this is a really sad and fucked up story. But in that part of the world, this probably isn't too abnormal.

Not just one, take the Catholic church for example, and episode after episode of grim self-serving policies and ruined lives.


The horrors of recent events in Japan marked a moment of change for me. Most of the time I'd bitten my tongue on religious matters. But in the face of what happened to Japan, Im determined to challenge the fiction of a benevolent God, such was the cruelty and horror of events. I'm still waiting for any way a person of faith can explain those events.

Truth is more important than so-called respect.

young_gunner913
Apr 1st, 2011, 07:37 AM
Not just one, take the Catholic church for example, and episode after episode of grim self-serving policies and ruined lives.

The horrors of recent events in Japan marked a moment of change for me. Most of the time I'd bitten my tongue on religious matters. But in the face of what happened to Japan, Im determined to challenge the fiction of a benevolent God, such was the cruelty and horror of events. I'm still waiting for any way a person of faith can explain those events.

Truth is more important than so-called respect.

Yes, but here you are using a platform for what has happened to one woman of a certain faith and culture to cast a comment upon all religions. I agree, there's faults in all religion but that is life. There are faults everywhere.

What happened in Japan was utterly devastating, but to me, it looks like what happened there had such a profound effect on you, you're looking for a way to channel your feelings of anger and sadness into blaming someone. Because let's be honest, it's always easier to blame someone and be mad at them rather than take a deep look within and deal with our own emotions. I could be completely wrong, but that's what I'm picking up on.

Halardfan
Apr 1st, 2011, 08:31 AM
Yes, but here you are using a platform for what has happened to one woman of a certain faith and culture to cast a comment upon all religions. I agree, there's faults in all religion but that is life. There are faults everywhere.

What happened in Japan was utterly devastating, but to me, it looks like what happened there had such a profound effect on you, you're looking for a way to channel your feelings of anger and sadness into blaming someone. Because let's be honest, it's always easier to blame someone and be mad at them rather than take a deep look within and deal with our own emotions. I could be completely wrong, but that's what I'm picking up on.

As the creator of the Universe and everything in it, God created Earthquake and Tsunami's. Does he control them directly? Certainly he does so in the bible.

Or perhaps he merely allowed it to happen? Merely allowed people in their tens of thousands to be wiped out. Is that the act of benevolent God, or a disinterested God?

Is there any faith-based analysis of events in Japan that remotely makes sense?

young_gunner913
Apr 1st, 2011, 08:39 AM
As the creator of the Universe and everything in it, God created Earthquake and Tsunami's. Does he control them directly? Certainly he does so in the bible.

Or perhaps he merely allowed it to happen? Merely allowed people in their tens of thousands to be wiped out. Is that the act of benevolent God, or a disinterested God?

Is there any faith-based analysis of events in Japan that remotely makes sense?

You do realize that you can be religious and still accept that earthquake that triggered the tsunami was caused by shifting plate tectonics and not God being angry at the people of Japan?

Just because you're religious doesn't mean you need to have blind faith. That's what makes religion dangerous.

Halardfan
Apr 1st, 2011, 09:15 AM
You do realize that you can be religious and still accept that earthquake that triggered the tsunami was caused by shifting plate tectonics and not God being angry at the people of Japan?

Just because you're religious doesn't mean you need to have blind faith. That's what makes religion dangerous.

But the old testament is full of God acting directly and destructively in human affairs.

Even if we throw out the old testament, bye Judaism, bye half of Christianity...what is a moderate Christian position for what happened in Japan?

God created everything in the universe. Did he have the power to save the people of Japan? If he is God then surely he did? Otherwise he isn't a God at all.

So then WHY didn't he save those people? Granted the power to save those people I would do so, presumably everyone would do so. So why didn't he?

young_gunner913
Apr 1st, 2011, 10:00 AM
But the old testament is full of God acting directly and destructively in human affairs.

Even if we throw out the old testament, bye Judaism, bye half of Christianity...what is a moderate Christian position for what happened in Japan?

God created everything in the universe. Did he have the power to save the people of Japan? If he is God then surely he did? Otherwise he isn't a God at all.

So then WHY didn't he save those people? Granted the power to save those people I would do so, presumably everyone would do so. So why didn't he?

Why did God allow the Holocaust to happen? Why did God allow Darfur to happen? Why did God allow Cambodian genocide happen? Why did he allow the tsunami that hit Indonesia happen? Or hurricane Katrina? Why did he allow Paul Reiser to star in another show?

The point I'm trying to make is, you can't hold God responsible for every horrendous occurance in the world. Are you really going to follow the bible so closely for the cruel acts of God when they very well could've be reasonable explainations that we're just too advanced for the people living in those times to understand? I mean if you wanna go back that far, the bible claims a man died on a cross then came back to life.

Dominic
Apr 1st, 2011, 03:06 PM
Why did God allow the Holocaust to happen? Why did God allow Darfur to happen? Why did God allow Cambodian genocide happen? Why did he allow the tsunami that hit Indonesia happen? Or hurricane Katrina? Why did he allow Paul Reiser to star in another show?


Hmm the god you believe in doesn't seem like he's that almighty, what's his role and/or use?

pov
Apr 1st, 2011, 04:11 PM
Why the sensationalism in the title. She wasn't executed - she was whipped. Whatever one thinks about that, there's a huge difference there, confusing the issue and lying by stating she was executed doesn't help make a case.

Dominic
Apr 1st, 2011, 04:25 PM
She was basically beaten to death, there isn't much of a difference.

Whitehead's Boy
Apr 1st, 2011, 04:44 PM
Why did God allow the Holocaust to happen?

Some fundamentalist Christians do have an answer for that one, but quoting them is probably considered hate speech in a lot of countries.

young_gunner913
Apr 1st, 2011, 11:07 PM
Hmm the god you believe in doesn't seem like he's that almighty, what's his role and/or use?

He's got as much power as you chose to give him. Afterall, we believe in him without proof that he's there.

Halardfan
Apr 2nd, 2011, 12:19 AM
He's got as much power as you chose to give him. Afterall, we believe in him without proof that he's there.

Not sure what you mean.

I know what the fundamentalists believe...that God used the tsunami to punish Japan. All sane people can dismiss such bullshit out of hand.

But I honestly don't know what more moderate religious people think...what role do they believe God plays in events like those in Japan? It's an important question surely?

Ryan
Apr 2nd, 2011, 01:08 AM
Disgusting that there are still such backward and hateful places in the world. Such repugnant actions can only really be eradicated by...ridding the world of such useless people. :tape:

fifty-fifty
Apr 2nd, 2011, 01:52 AM
March 30, 2011, 3:15 pm

When a Girl Is Executed … for Being Raped

By NICHOLAS KRISTOF

We’re all focused right now on Libya and budget battles at home, but this story from Bangladesh just broke my heart and outraged me — and offers a reminder of the daily human rights struggles of so many women and girls in villages around the world. A 14-year-old Bangladeshi girl, Hena,allegedly was ambushed when she went to an outdoor toilet, gagged, beaten and raped by an older man in her village (who was actually her cousin). They were caught by wife of the alleged rapist, and the wife then beat Hena up. An imam at a local mosque issued a fatwa saying that Hena was guilty of adultery and must be punished, and a village makeshift court sentenced Hena to 100 lashes in a public whipping.

Her last words were protestations of innocence. An excellent CNN blog post, based on interviews with family members, says that the parents “had no choice but to mind the imam’s order. They watched as the whip broke the skin of their youngest child and she fell unconscious to the ground.”

Hena collapsed after 70 lashes and was taken to the hospital. She died a week later, by some accounts because of internal bleeding and a general loss of blood. The doctors recorded her death as a suicide. (Women and girls who are raped are typically expected to commit suicide, to spare everyone the embarrassment of an honor crime.) I’ve covered enough of these kinds of stories to know that it’s difficult to know exactly what happened unless you’re on the scene talking to everyone who was there; maybe the imam has a different version of events. But all accounts that I’ve seen such that this was a brutal attack on a helpless girl in the name of sharia and justice.

Fortunately, Bangladesh has a robust civil society, which has reacted with outrage to the case. A court ordered the body exhumed after word leaked out, and an examination revealed severe injuries. Lawsuits are now underway against the doctors who had called her death a suicide, and several people have been rounded up — including the alleged rapist. The Bangladesh press is on the case. But Hena’s family is under police protection because of concern that other villagers will take revenge at them for getting the imam and others in trouble.

Let’s hope that the public reaction and punishments are so strong that the word goes out to all of Bangladesh’s villages that such misogynist fatwas are not only immoral but also illegal. And that the crime lies not in being raped, but in raping.

http://kristof.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/30/when-a-girl-is-executed-for-being-raped/


Nobody bothered to read that part?:confused:

delicatecutter
Apr 2nd, 2011, 01:56 AM
Not sure what you mean.

I know what the fundamentalists believe...that God used the tsunami to punish Japan. All sane people can dismiss such bullshit out of hand.

But I honestly don't know what more moderate religious people think...what role do they believe God plays in events like those in Japan? It's an important question surely?

They don't think he had anything to do with it. I should let an actual religious person speak about it. But from my experience, it's clear that any of the religious texts are full of hypocrisy, fables, discrimination, bullshit, etc. And if you look at history and all the damage organized religion has done, it's just enough to make you think critically about it all and realize what is true. But that's just me. It makes no rational sense at all. But I think it gives some people comfort, even if it is without merit or reason.

Dominic
Apr 2nd, 2011, 02:17 AM
He's got as much power as you chose to give him. Afterall, we believe in him without proof that he's there.

Who's we?

Halardfan
Apr 2nd, 2011, 02:20 AM
They don't think he had anything to do with it. I should let an actual religious person speak about it. But from my experience, it's clear that any of the religious texts are full of hypocrisy, fables, discrimination, bullshit, etc. And if you look at history and all the damage organized religion has done, it's just enough to make you think critically about it all and realize what is true. But that's just me. It makes no rational sense at all. But I think it gives some people comfort, even if it is without merit or reason.


The thing is God, in key religions like Christianity, Islam and Judaism, has a certain level of powers, and a certain list of things he did.

That is what makes him God.

I just want to know what role God is playing in the view of religious people.

Is he directly shaping events?

Is he indirectly shaping events?

Is he merely a bystander?

Does he have the power to shape events? If not, in what way is he God at all?

I can't answer those questions. I don't believe God exists so they are redundant for me. But I want to know what religious people think when they see an awful natural disaster like in Japan.

kwilliams
Apr 2nd, 2011, 03:51 AM
This is so far beyond reprehensible, I don't even know what to call it. I hope those involved are punished to the full extent of the law. The authorities need to make a statement about what is and isn't acceptable. If people are using sharia which circumvent the actual laws of Bangladesh and lead to such inhumanity and brutality, then these people need to be punished severely.

I hope her family can find some degree of solace if and when the perpetrators are made to pay.

I think a thread as tragically sorrowful as this one should just be about what happened to this poor girl and her family and it should also be about what people feel should be done to deal with her killers. There are other threads to discuss religion in, including recent ones. It'd be nice not to see more general arguments about religion here. It would also be nice not to see comments using this event to judge Islam as a whole or this region of the world. Instead it'd be nice to see all users reacting in horror and condemnation and being more particular and incisive in the criticism of how Islam is used in particular (often rural) areas.

Halardfan
Apr 2nd, 2011, 08:23 AM
This is so far beyond reprehensible, I don't even know what to call it. I hope those involved are punished to the full extent of the law. The authorities need to make a statement about what is and isn't acceptable. If people are using sharia which circumvent the actual laws of Bangladesh and lead to such inhumanity and brutality, then these people need to be punished severely.

I hope her family can find some degree of solace if and when the perpetrators are made to pay.

I think a thread as tragically sorrowful as this one should just be about what happened to this poor girl and her family and it should also be about what people feel should be done to deal with her killers. There are other threads to discuss religion in, including recent ones. It'd be nice not to see more general arguments about religion here. It would also be nice not to see comments using this event to judge Islam as a whole or this region of the world. Instead it'd be nice to see all users reacting in horror and condemnation and being more particular and incisive in the criticism of how Islam is used in particular (often rural) areas.

Half agree. Certainly some of my posts were wandering off topic and I apologize for that.

However the case is part of a much wider series of cases of religion and abuse and we shouldn't tiptoe around it whether it be Muslims and Sharia law or Catholic priests covered up abuse on an epic scale.

McPie
Apr 2nd, 2011, 08:38 AM
typical for these Islamic country :shrug: when will they grow up? :tape:

Mistress of Evil
Apr 2nd, 2011, 09:42 AM
hope all these monsters get raped and killed :shrug:

Root
Apr 2nd, 2011, 11:11 AM
typical for these Islamic country :shrug: when will they grow up? :tape:

Way to generalise.

Morning Morgan
Apr 2nd, 2011, 11:18 AM
Take what you want from this interview, but I hope people will see that no country is made up of people with one attitude or ideal. There is a contimuum from the extreme to the moderate, and there are people sitting on every point of this continnum.

In this video, a famous Pakistani female entertainer, Veena Malik, defends herself against a Mufti on national television.

MuyguCL_sO4

Halardfan
Apr 2nd, 2011, 11:24 AM
Take what you want from this interview, but I hope people will see that no country is made up of people with one attitude or ideal. There is a contimuum from the extreme to the moderate, and there are people sitting on every point of this continnum.

In this video, a famous Pakistani female entertainer, Veena Malik, defends herself against a Mufti on national television.

MuyguCL_sO4

True, but all nations are not the same. In some countries the extreme view is the norm, and that must be addressed without fear or favour.

Morning Morgan
Apr 2nd, 2011, 11:34 AM
True, but all nations are not the same. In some countries the extreme view is the norm, and that must be addressed without fear or favour.

Yeah precisely. What I meant was while there are some places where extremist views are prevalent, not all of them are nutjobs, and to generalize everyone as a nutjob is just NOT fair. Minority does not mean few. There are people who have moderate views, and while not many dare to speak up, some do. Her fame is probably what protects her, and she knows it, and she is not afraid to use it to speak out as well.

young_gunner913
Apr 2nd, 2011, 12:29 PM
Who's we?

I was using a generalizing term. It wasn't specific to you or anyone else in this thread.

young_gunner913
Apr 2nd, 2011, 12:33 PM
Not sure what you mean.

I know what the fundamentalists believe...that God used the tsunami to punish Japan. All sane people can dismiss such bullshit out of hand.

But I honestly don't know what more moderate religious people think...what role do they believe God plays in events like those in Japan? It's an important question surely?

If you're going to live the rest of your life worrying about blaming whoever for whenever something bad happens, go right ahead. But that sounds like such a sad and miserable life to live. And I'm going to be extrememly blunt, but you need some real help. It's obvious that if religion isn't such a big deal to you as you claim, you wouldn't be so obsessed with finding a valid religious reason for what happened to Japan. We know what happened in Japan. There scientific proof what what causes both an Earthquake and a tsunami yet you are so sure that it was God who did this.

Sure some people will say that it was God punishing the people of Japan. They're idiots. There's also people who say it was Karma. Do you want to have a huge debate about why Karma strikes now too?

Dominic
Apr 2nd, 2011, 02:32 PM
If you're going to live the rest of your life worrying about blaming whoever for whenever something bad happens, go right ahead. But that sounds like such a sad and miserable life to live. And I'm going to be extrememly blunt, but you need some real help. It's obvious that if religion isn't such a big deal to you as you claim, you wouldn't be so obsessed with finding a valid religious reason for what happened to Japan. We know what happened in Japan. There scientific proof what what causes both an Earthquake and a tsunami yet you are so sure that it was God who did this.


I think he's trying to find explainations as to why some ppl believe in god, I admit that I have a hard time understanding that myself.

Bijoux0021
Apr 2nd, 2011, 05:30 PM
hope all these monsters get raped and killed :shrug:
I feel the same way. Unfortunately, nothing rarely happened to these monters.

I think he's trying to find explainations as to why some ppl believe in god, I admit that I have a hard time understanding that myself.
Yeah, when there are so much sufferings and injustice in the world, it's reasonable to question why some people believe in God. In addition, some people who claim to believe in God are the very same people who keep using religion to commit atrocities against their fellow human beings...All in the name of God.

Stamp Paid
Apr 2nd, 2011, 07:20 PM
This is absolutely reprehensible.

But I hate the ethnocentric tone of these types of threads on TF. As if brutality and violence in the name of religion happens only (or even mostly) in "particular" places of the world (i.e. non-Western nations), especially when the Catholic Church is responsible for the systematic sexual abuse of millions of boys.

You think it is a coincidence that these types of brutalities typically occur in places where there is extreme poverty? Hunger, food insecurity, and marginalization are greater contributors to this kind of inhumanity than religious doctrine. You should be criticizing Western neoliberal economic policies that continue to keep these people impoverished, not the religion they cling to because they have nothing else.

Apoleb
Apr 2nd, 2011, 07:31 PM
It's kind of silly to rail on Islam when Bangladesh, a country of a crushing Muslim-majority, has OUTLAWED Shariah and these practices. If anything, this argues against the Islamophobes. We should be looking at other factors at play here: rural factors, literacy, poverty, modernization.

Wigglytuff
Apr 2nd, 2011, 08:14 PM
this thread was posted in the political subforum and this is what i said about this there

I hope to god that the outrage this caused in the civil society will get the monsters who did this the full punishment of the law!!

Every time I hear about some shit like this it pissed me off. Religion is no excuse to commit violence or the cover it up. Sadly other than providing education and press there is little I think we can do for this girl and her family.

But we can go after priests and the pope who covered up generations of child rape right under his nose. The press should also cover the story of the American billionaire who molested over 40 girls and got zero days in prison. I am fully aware that it's not the same or comparable to the criminal and brutal murder of this girl. It is within our power to affect and we should not allow brutal crimes against women and girls to go unpunished on our own soil because of the same religious cover ups or worse because the monster attacking little girls has the money to buy the justice system and get away with it.

the people who did this are sick and disgusting and we should do everything within our power to make sure EVERY SINGLE rapist in EVERY country faces strict punishment for their actions. we can not help her by letting other girls anywhere go through rape and then abuse as a result of it.

Wigglytuff
Apr 2nd, 2011, 08:22 PM
True, but all nations are not the same. In some countries the extreme view is the norm, and that must be addressed without fear or favour.

blaming the country the people who did this are from or god they worship is another way to make excuses for crimes against women and girls. you cant blame this violence on islam because all that does is continue to allow the pope and in the catholic church or people who dont believe in islam to get away it.

you have to actually care about attacks on women and children and you have to actually want to stop VIOLENCE not islam to help this girl, and other victims of violence to really end it. if you go after islam only you just give a free pass to non muslims who abuse children, you have to go after the people who abuse and attack women and children.

Halardfan
Apr 3rd, 2011, 08:04 AM
blaming the country the people who did this are from or god they worship is another way to make excuses for crimes against women and girls. you cant blame this violence on islam because all that does is continue to allow the pope and in the catholic church or people who dont believe in islam to get away it.

you have to actually care about attacks on women and children and you have to actually want to stop VIOLENCE not islam to help this girl, and other victims of violence to really end it. if you go after islam only you just give a free pass to non muslims who abuse children, you have to go after the people who abuse and attack women and children.

But Islam is a part of the story just as Catholicism was part of the huge child abuse scandals too.

This plays into a legitimate question about the broader role of women across the Islamic world, and it's often a very grim picture.

Wigglytuff
Apr 3rd, 2011, 09:19 AM
But Islam is a part of the story just as Catholicism was part of the huge child abuse scandals too.

This plays into a legitimate question about the broader role of women across the Islamic world, and it's often a very grim picture.

And what about women who suffer rape, abuse and murder in non Muslim countries? Is their pain less valid? Do they not suffer too? In the USA a Hispanic girl of 11 years old was gang raped by some 20 men repeatedly over 3 months. When the American media wrote about the story they talked about how she wore clothes that seemed more grown up and how "sad" it was that the men who did this are black and how "sad" their story was. If the men had been Muslim the story would have gotten long term media attention. The fact the GIRL had to move because of threats of further violence against HER. All of this is sick and repulsive and shows how much abuse women and girls routinely suffer in cultural attacks that get added to their pain. A billionaire in Florida created a world where he would have different preteen girls flown in and sexually abused to his liking. The girls face deprivation and the monster who did that didn't do a single day in prison. Instead he spent 13 months in a luxury jail and got go home for 16 hours everyday.

To me this miscarriage of justice is no less routine, disgusting and anti woman than the murder of this poor little girl. However because in this case it is the American legal system that is holding the whip many people are completely ok with it because it's not Islamic. .that's sick.

MegaDethly
Apr 4th, 2011, 09:04 PM
I feel like I want to kill myself.

Mynarco
Apr 4th, 2011, 10:44 PM
This is just sad.

fifty-fifty
Apr 5th, 2011, 01:17 AM
Bangladesh protest against women's rights left one dead


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-12950866

Bangladesh 'Eve teasing' protest draws students

Scores of school and college students have held a rally in the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka to protest against the sexual harassment of women.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11687647

In pictures: Harassed Bangladeshi women turn to karate ;)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11996002

fifty-fifty
Apr 5th, 2011, 01:29 AM
Why the sensationalism in the title. She wasn't executed - she was whipped. Whatever one thinks about that, there's a huge difference there, confusing the issue and lying by stating she was executed doesn't help make a case.


Do you think a 14 year old can easily survive 100 lashes?

Wigglytuff
Apr 5th, 2011, 01:35 AM
Bangladesh protest against women's rights left one dead


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-12950866

Bangladesh 'Eve teasing' protest draws students

Scores of school and college students have held a rally in the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka to protest against the sexual harassment of women.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11687647

In pictures: Harassed Bangladeshi women turn to karate ;)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-11996002

wow. and i just read about Montana, us. you pass 3 grams of pot to a friend you face life in prison and a $50,000 fine. you sexually assualt a woman however, you face a maximum sentence of $500 fine and just 6 months in county jail.

the abuse and assault on women is not just in Bangladesh its in america too. and you its really disgusting that i take this shit seriously and because of that certain male posters on this board have taken that as an opportunity to attack me for it.

at what post will different societies around the world that abuses against women and girls seriously.

jacobruiz
Apr 5th, 2011, 01:36 AM
Do you think a 14 year old can easily survive 100 lashes?

No shit! Whether she's a 13-year-old buried up to her neck and stoned to death or whipped until she dies she was executed alright.

And by a bunch of self-righteous, misogynist, religious fanatics.

Wigglytuff
Apr 5th, 2011, 01:36 AM
Do you think a 14 year old can easily survive 100 lashes?

i mentioned earlier certain posters who dont take attacks against women and girls seriously, he seems to me to be one of them.