PDA

View Full Version : Carillo's curious ESPN departure


Marcell
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:22 PM
Carillo's curious ESPN departure

Mary Carillo's departure signals possible problems with ESPN's tennis coverage


The world's best tennis players are in Australia this week. The sport's best analyst is not. Mary Carillo quietly left ESPN last year during the middle of the U.S. Open, leaving the network with one year remaining on her contract.

If you've read this column, you've read about Carillo. Last year SI.com named her the best game analyst of the 2000s for excelling in a sport that far too often soft-pedals commentary because of the many conflicts of interests and relationships. As my colleague Jon Wertheim once wrote about the analyst: "Her bold, 'I don't care who might be chapped by what I'm about to say approach' separated her from too many of her colleagues."

Deluged with e-mails on the subject of Carillo's departure, Wertheim dropped an interesting line in a column two weeks ago, saying there was a "philosophical difference" between Carillo and ESPN, and that she left the network on her own accord.

It doesn't take a leap to surmise that the philosophical difference rested in Carillo believing the tone and tenor of ESPN's coverage was closer to cheerleading than reporting. Sources told SI.com that Carillo was distressed by a culture that frowned on critical analysis of the top players on tour, particularly American stars. When last year's men's final switched from CBS to ESPN2, Carillo did not follow. It was a surreal end for a broadcaster who elevated ESPN's tennis coverage to new heights.

Reached at her home last week in Florida, Carillo declined to comment on why she left ESPN. She remains with CBS and NBC on tennis, and works as a correspondent on HBO's Real Sports. Author James Miller, whose book on the history of ESPN comes out next April, echoed what many tennis fans are likely feeling this week: "ESPN begins Australian Open coverage tomorrow without Mary Carillo," Miller tweeted. "Her choice, but departure could have been prevented. She will be missed."

SI.com spoke with ESPN executive vice president Norby Williamson last Friday to ask him about Carillo's departure. "Mary, for years, helped build ESPN's tennis coverage and she was a valuable asset which made us very strong," Williamson said. "People come and go and you can ask me that same question about different sports at different times. Bill Parcells was here with the NFL. He leaves and you try to supplement the coverage.

"The one thing about Mary is we had discussions with her agent, Sandy Montag. He called me at some point during the mid-year [of 2010] and said with sort of the grind she had -- she was working for HBO, NBC, CBS, and ESPN -- that she wanted to experiment and do some different things beyond just tennis. The load of the ESPN tennis was not allowing her to do that, and that's when the first discussions came out. She had one year left on her deal then. Given everything she had done for ESPN and the high level she had given us, if that was what she wanted to do, of course we would accommodate her. But it's very hard to replace a Mary Carillo."

Williamson said he did not have direct conversations with Carillo on tennis philosophy. Those conversations would have occurred with ESPN's event production people in charge of tennis, such as Jamie Reynolds, an ESPN vice president who oversees tennis. Asked directly if ESPN shared the same philosophy as Carillo when it came to covering tennis, Williamson said, "I think we did. ... We sort of want people that are working for us to challenge us because we are going to sit here and tell you that we are not right all the time. We may underplay some stories. We may overplay some stories. We need that give-and-take from the experts we employ that are serving the tennis fan as best as possible."

No sport does conflicts quite like tennis, dating to former agent Donald Dell, who provided commentary of matches involving players he represented and tournaments his firm owned and managed. That's morphed today into ESPN's Mary Joe Fernandez interviewing a player (Roger Federer) represented by her IMG agent husband. The affable Fernandez also draws a salary from being Fed Cup captain, where the Williams sisters' commitment is often the key to winning or losing. Patrick McEnroe, who this column enjoys as a broadcaster, makes a six-figure salary from the USTA, which puts him in a tricky situation when questions come up yearly about the U.S. Open scheduling and the stadium's need for a roof.

The sport's television entities have long fostered a climate where players are subjected to questions about as soft as a Francesca Schiavone drop shot. It's hard to believe such flagrant conflicts would be permitted in other sports. As one longtime U.S. tennis wag joked to me while watching the coverage, "We now go to Mrs. Boras for a report on Alex Rodriguez."

Carillo was the opposite of that culture, and more akin to those on the print side who often play the heavy for fans of the sport. "You always want people who played the game," Williamson countered. "You always want people who have relationships with people in the game. At the same point, you don't want to fool anybody. You want to tell people, 'Yeah, there are some relationships here but that does not pollute someone's objectivity, their ability to analyze or give you strategy or their take on a potential news story.'"

Tennis stars can be fickle when it comes to press access and there's naturally a delicate dance covering them. Last year Serena Williams posed for the cover of ESPN's Body Issue and has been a featured presenter at the ESPYs. Uncompromising journalism about Serena is particularly important because she is a polarizing figure in the sport.

"I will tell you when Serena had her issue at the Open [Williams was penalized a point on match point against Kim Clijsters in 2009 after cursing and shaking her racket in the direction of an official who called a foot fault.] I don't think any media entity covered it more, played the clips, and had diverse views on it, from Skip Bayless on First Take to Patrick McEnroe to Mary Carillo," Williamson said.

"We like to have relationships with those we are covering and we try to separate church and state," he continued. "There are issues with other athletes that we ask to pose for magazines and things like that. But if you look at the breadth and scope of our coverage with the Williams sisters, and especially the issue that Serena had and the number of times we covered that incident, and the follow up, I would stack up our coverage related to Serena Williams with anyone in the media."


http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2011/writers/richard_deitsch/01/15/mary.carillo.unlv.documentary/index.html

RenaSlam.
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:23 PM
Later, Carillo.

Hurley
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:23 PM
She was doping.

Miss Amor
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:25 PM
Interesting! I remember a lot of WS fans sending reports to ESPN about Carillo after her commentary at last year's Australian Open.

Anyways, bye girl.

http://i54.tinypic.com/fm771k.jpg

You wont be missed.

Temperenka
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:26 PM
Good riddance.

LoveFifteen
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:34 PM
I have to admit I won't miss her, but jeez, can we please get rid of Dick Enberg?!!!

Hurley
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:35 PM
It doesn't take a leap to surmise that the philosophical difference rested in Carillo believing the tone and tenor of ESPN's coverage was closer to cheerleading than reporting.

Hmmm...all you have to do is look at many of the first few posts in this thread to see that this is probably the case.

It's funny how certain tennis fans get angry when no television commentators deign to bring up Henin's relatively checkered sportsmanship, or Nadal's lengthy between-point rituals, or Sharapova's "banana-eating self" enough to please them...but when these commentators discuss aspects of certain other players, like skipping tournaments or prevaricating on injuries or, I dunno, foot faults, it's time to get out the guillotine tout suite.

rockstar
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:38 PM
i'll miss you mary

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZDn0U0w78k

goldenlox
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:44 PM
This is a good line, because Scott Boras was this guy's agent. That's a look at how incestuous MJ Fernandez' relationships to players.


As one longtime U.S. tennis wag joked to me while watching the coverage, "We now go to Mrs. Boras for a report on Alex Rodriguez."

it-girl
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:48 PM
There is a difference between critical & monstrous commentating. She also has to be delusional to think that tennis fans want her tearing their favorite tennis players apart with the same thing over & over & over & over & over again.

Not to mention the fact of how often she was talking about something personal instead of tennis related. This woman was suppose to promote women's tennis not degrade it. Clearly she did not understand her job or thought she was above what fans wanted to hear. Now she really does understand what fans want & it's not her.

:wavey:Carillo.

AcesHigh
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:54 PM
Hmmm...all you have to do is look at many of the first few posts in this thread to see that this is probably the case.

It's funny how certain tennis fans get angry when no television commentators deign to bring up Henin's relatively checkered sportsmanship, or Nadal's lengthy between-point rituals, or Sharapova's "banana-eating self" enough to please them...but when these commentators discuss aspects of certain other players, like skipping tournaments or prevaricating on injuries or, I dunno, foot faults, it's time to get out the guillotine tout suite.

Exactly....

Carillo will be missed no matter what fans on here say.

Hurley
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:55 PM
Now she really does understand what fans want & it's not her.

That's funny, because, in the article, it says she's going to continue covering tennis on CBS and NBC. So, apparently, she has determined that tennis fans actually DO still want her. It's ESPN that does not.

But, of course, to understand that, you'd have had to actually read the article, and I know it was very long, very very long.

Alejandrawrrr
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:57 PM
I don't hate her at all, but she did kinda talk too much.

AcesHigh
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:57 PM
If this is true, I actually agree with Mary. I really can't stand the cheerleading on ESPN

kiwifan
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:59 PM
I love that the standard of "objectivity" for the author, ESPN and Carillo seems to be how much they beat down Serena Williams :tape:

at least that what I got out of the conflict of interest response...:shrug:

.

Galsen
Jan 17th, 2011, 04:59 PM
Interesting! I remember a lot of WS fans sending reports to ESPN about Carillo after her commentary at last year's Australian Open.

Anyways, bye girl.

http://i54.tinypic.com/fm771k.jpg

You wont be missed.

:lol::lol:

wildemu
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:04 PM
a day into the tournament, i forgot she even commentated on the channel. Sorry Mary, you won't be missed and take Martina with you.

it-girl
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:06 PM
That's funny, because, in the article, it says she's going to continue covering tennis on CBS and NBC. So, apparently, she has determined that tennis fans actually DO still want her. It's ESPN that does not.

But, of course, to understand that, you'd have had to actually read the article, and I know it was very long, very very long.For you to respond you would have to actually understand that each network has fans and let me see since she was with Espn and received several complaints she is no longer with Espn because fans of Espn coverage did not appreciate it. Was it really that hard to understand that before you made your idiotic response:help:

AcesHigh
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:11 PM
For you to respond you would have to actually understand that each network has fans and let me see since she was with Espn and received several complaints she is no longer with Espn because fans of Espn coverage did not appreciate it. Was it really that hard to understand that before you made your idiotic response:help:

You think a couple of complaints from rabid reetards is enough to kick Mary off the air? :rolls:

The woman is an esteemed award-winning commentator and would probably get more people to watch than the mess of commentators already on there.

azinna
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:15 PM
"...It doesn't take a leap to surmise that the philosophical difference rested in Carillo believing the tone and tenor of ESPN's coverage was closer to cheerleading than reporting. Sources told SI.com that Carillo was distressed by a culture that frowned on critical analysis of the top players on tour, particularly American stars...."

I say leave it at "wanting to go in other directions" or "too much going on already" or even "difference in style/chemistry."

If you want this to be about standards for tennis journalism or commentary, Carillo comes out wanting on several issues. She's a chatterbox. She can talk her way through a point, game and set like no other before her. And since she's bound to run out of material about the match in question, she's likely to talk about anything that crosses her mind. Again, during a point. Also, her commentary isn't balanced at all. Sure, she doesn't mold it to fit corporate interests or fan preferences or to make friends with players. But that doesn't make it objective or judicious.

And what she provides when she's on form is, funnily enough, a kind of cheerleading. She's best when she's gaga over a player, gaga over the sport (read: men's tennis), and busy situating that player as a transformative figure, within the evolving context of the game. She has a tough time with a positive form of sports critique, with staying focused on the match at hand, then being insightful about what a given player is trying to do and can do better.

Compare her work to Lindsay Davenport's and the difference is clear.

it-girl
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:16 PM
You think a couple of complaints from rabid reetards is enough to kick Mary off the air? :rolls:

The woman is an esteemed award-winning commentator and would probably get more people to watch than the mess of commentators already on there.I think several complaints were received over the years. I don't believe they would get rid of anyone with only a few complaints but I do believe that a lot of constant complaints will get their attention to take action.

AcesHigh
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:21 PM
I think several complaints were received over the years. I don't believe they would get rid of anyone with only a few complaints but I do believe that a lot of constant complaints will get their attention to take action.

Maybe if ESPN had great replacements lined up... MAYBE. But Carillo is really the best they have. Fanatics on a board may prefer others, but to the casual fan, Carillo is a familiar face and someone with recognizable commentating credibility.

The article makes sense. Carillo probably rubbed some people the wrong way and they probably tried to get her to tone it down or shut her up and she left. She has enough jobs on different networks to not need ESPN

Sabatinifan
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:22 PM
Interesting! I remember a lot of WS fans sending reports to ESPN about Carillo after her commentary at last year's Australian Open.

Anyways, bye girl.

http://i54.tinypic.com/fm771k.jpg

You wont be missed.

:haha:

azinna
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:23 PM
I think several complaints were received over the years. I don't believe they would get rid of anyone with only a few complaints but I do believe that a lot of constant complaints will get their attention to take action.

I also think she would have "survived" the complaints if she were a McEnroe or Navratilova, both of whom, by the way, have toned down their egos in the commentary booth over the years, seemingly in response to outside criticism. Carillo's been comparatively inflexible. And she isn't really enough of an audience draw for ESPN to decide it works out on balance.

ZODIAC
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:27 PM
I think her criticism of the sisters was just over the top and next to go should be Patrick and Mary Jo.

it-girl
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:30 PM
I also think she would have "survived" the complaints if she were a McEnroe or Navratilova, both of whom, by the way, have toned down their egos in the commentary booth over the years, seemingly in response to outside criticism. Carillo's been comparatively inflexible. And she isn't really enough of an audience draw for ESPN to decide it works out on balance.I could not agree more.

Lucemferre
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:31 PM
Good bye man voice. Nobody will miss your over the top commentary and constant negativitiy toward certain players :bigwave:

shoryuken
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:36 PM
glad she's gone

fawnrc
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:38 PM
She was very negative toward some American players and womens tennis in general. She could have just toned that down a little.

it-girl
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:40 PM
I say leave it at "wanting to go in other directions" or "too much going on already" or even "difference in style/chemistry."

If you want this to be about standards for tennis journalism or commentary, Carillo comes out wanting on several issues. First, she's a chatterbox. She can talk her way through a point, game and set like no other before her. And since she's bound to run out of material about the match in question, she's likely to talk about anything that crosses her mind. Again, during a point. That's the second issue.

Third, her commentary isn't balanced at all. She doesn't mold it to fit corporate or fan interests or to make friends with players, sure. But that doesn't make it objective or judicious. Fourth, what she provides when she's on form is a first order of insight into tennis. Good, but very broad-strokes stuff. And a good deal of cheerleading involved. That isn't ESPN on other sports, and it should be ESPN on tennis.

Compare her commentary to Lindsay Davenport's and the difference is clear.Great breakdown:worship:
It is amazing the difference between Carillo & Lindsay.

tennisbum79
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:54 PM
She was very negative toward some American players and womens tennis in general. She could have just toned that down a little.
She was very neagtive toward women tennis, constantly complaining how the men do things better.
You will never see "men retire", not hold serve, win the first set easily to get to lose the match, and on and on.

She complains too much and is prone to instant unprovoked adverserial outbursts.

At moments in her career, she had a falling out with Andre Agassi, James Blake, Andy, Roddick, Serena Williams, Venus Williams, Monica Selles(saying she was milking her stabbing recovery to gain sympathy) culminating in each of these players refusing to talk to her.

JN
Jan 17th, 2011, 05:55 PM
Hmmm...all you have to do is look at many of the first few posts in this thread to see that this is probably the case.

It's funny how certain tennis fans get angry when no television commentators deign to bring up Henin's relatively checkered sportsmanship, or Nadal's lengthy between-point rituals, or Sharapova's "banana-eating self" enough to please them...but when these commentators discuss aspects of certain other players, like skipping tournaments or prevaricating on injuries or, I dunno, foot faults, it's time to get out the guillotine tout suite.

Right! If you're gonna bitch and moan about one player's "issues" on and off the court, ad nauseum, give the same treatment to the rest of 'em. Why should she be allowed to bring her obvious personal gripes into the mix? Carillo can get bent.

brickhousesupporter
Jan 17th, 2011, 06:04 PM
You think a couple of complaints from rabid reetards is enough to kick Mary off the air? :rolls:

The woman is an esteemed award-winning commentator and would probably get more people to watch than the mess of commentators already on there.
For all her accolades, it wasn't very hard for them to let her go now was?

Hurley
Jan 17th, 2011, 06:07 PM
For you to respond you would have to actually understand that each network has fans

So...when you said "tennis fans," for which I made fun of you, you meant something completely different which you did not say, and therefore I should have indeed made fun of you.

Good. Glad we've cleared that up. :)

Potato
Jan 17th, 2011, 06:12 PM
:wavey: I'll never forget you Mary :hysteric:

cZDn0U0w78k

I never listen to ESPN, all they do is talk about the more famous player that is playing :shrug:

it-girl
Jan 17th, 2011, 06:14 PM
So...when you said "tennis fans," for which I made fun of you, you meant something completely different which you did not say, and therefore I should have indeed made fun of you.

Good. Glad we've cleared that up. :)Last time I checked the thread that you posted to said ESPN, yet some how you don't understand that my response was about ESPN. If another network was mentioned then I could see your possible confusion but you are just grasping at straws here.

LoveFifteen
Jan 17th, 2011, 06:23 PM
I agree with other people here. There is a big difference between being an objective commentator and being a bitter, vitriolic harpy. Carillo was way too negative, and her contempt toward female players was palpable. I won't be missing her.

AcesHigh
Jan 17th, 2011, 06:28 PM
For all her accolades, it wasn't very hard for them to let her go now was?

All the sources I've read so far have said she left by her own decision. Unless you have something that says otherwise, I'll just have to go with that. Plus, she's still on NBC and CBS

ptkten
Jan 17th, 2011, 06:29 PM
I didn't care that she criticized players, it's her right to say what she thinks as a commentator. But I never understood why the sports media thought she was a good commentator, she doesn't know anything about the current players. If you asked her who someone like Alexandra Dulgheru was, she wouldn't have a clue and that's inexcusable for your top tennis commentator. I'm glad she's gone so we have commentators who actually know what has gone on in the past 10 years in the sport.

pov
Jan 17th, 2011, 06:59 PM
I'll miss her commentary. Then again I don't want commentators to cheerlead for, or not tee off on, a player just because I'm a fan of that player

brickhousesupporter
Jan 17th, 2011, 07:09 PM
All the sources I've read so far have said she left by her own decision. Unless you have something that says otherwise, I'll just have to go with that. Plus, she's still on NBC and CBS
"ESPN begins Australian Open coverage tomorrow without Mary Carillo," Miller tweeted. "Her choice, but departure could have been prevented. She will be missed."

ESPN could have prevented her from leaving, but they chose otherwise. She was not that integral to the team at least to them. They did not try to keep her, therefore it was not hard letting her go.

I don't know why everyone is upset. Both parties got what they wanted. Mary gets to keep her "journalistic integrity and we fans don't have to hear her (at least one ESPN). Win win for everyone.

treufreund
Jan 17th, 2011, 07:26 PM
I have mixed feelings about her. Overall, I think she knew the game well and that it's a bit of a loss to not have her. Now we are stuck with freaking Dick Enberg who, at times, forgets what a volley is and what the names of the players are and we have Brad Gilbert still. The mere sight of Gilbert on the screen literally makes me want to puke and forces me to change the channel. Mary could get on my nerves at times. She was a bit harsh on the women players but she was also right about a lot of stuff. Good on ya Mary for walking instead of selling out to ESPN's ueberpatriotic, PC tennis coverage.

BlameSerena
Jan 17th, 2011, 08:30 PM
"We like to have relationships with those we are covering and we try to separate church and state," he continued. "There are issues with other athletes that we ask to pose for magazines and things like that. But if you look at the breadth and scope of our coverage with the Williams sisters, and especially the issue that Serena had and the number of times we covered that incident, and the follow up, I would stack up our coverage related to Serena Williams with anyone in the media."
Ummmm..:confused:
Anyway, I'm glad Mary is gone. She was far too personal. I only want to hear analysis of the match, not who is dating who or something like that. Besides, she crossed the line with her murderous rant about Serena. Before that, I was willing to put up with her.

timafi
Jan 17th, 2011, 08:56 PM
She was THE best thing because she would actually analyze the tennis players without any biases :shrug:

Mary Jo's husband is Roger's agent and she and Shriver just can't stop with the ass kissing of Sharapova and same can and should said about Drisdale.He is down right creepy when speaking of Maria:help:

Patrick McEnroe would not be working on ESPN had his last name not been McEnroe and the way he talks about a bunch of hard court specialists hyped players like Mardy Fish;James Blake;John Isner and Sam Querrey;you'd think they're better than the likes of Federer and Nadal and it's just sickening:mad:

Brad Gilbert should go back to school and learn how to pronounce foreign names is just atrocious:o

Cahill and John McEnroe have their tongues up so far up Nadal's arse they won't find it if they sent in surgeons:o

as for Mary;she'd call out local and foreign players if they behaved badly:shrug:

Serena y Monica
Jan 17th, 2011, 08:58 PM
Good riddance to bad rubbish. Now if we can just get rid of Shriver Gilbert and yes Carillo again from NBC and CBS...pls.

Volcana
Jan 17th, 2011, 08:59 PM
Carillo has done some brilliant journalism, but her tennis commentary was way too much like reading Steffica Greles' posts.

There are some facts there, but the tone is negative negative negative and the bias simply too great, in many cases, to maintain any objectivity.

cellophane
Jan 17th, 2011, 09:00 PM
I won't miss her

Stamp Paid
Jan 17th, 2011, 09:00 PM
Also, her commentary isn't balanced at all. Sure, she doesn't mold it to fit corporate or fan interests or to make friends with players. But that doesn't make it objective or judicious.Exactly, and this quote encapsulates why a poster like AcesHigh would enjoy her on air persona. They are on par with eachother when it comes to this kind of pretentiousness. Unlike the American men, Serena Williams has never been on the receiving end of any cheerleading from the ESPN booth, and the massive criticism of her only subsided once MJF became Fed Cup captain (which this, combined with the fact that MJF's husband is a top exec at IMG is even more indicative of the obviously incestuous relationships between sponsors, agents, and commentators).

I'm glad that caustic Mary is gone, and I hope that Lindsay is brought in on a more full time role in the tennis commentator lineup.

tennisbum79
Jan 17th, 2011, 09:01 PM
She was THE best thing because she would actually analyze the tennis players without any biases :shrug:

Mary Jo's husband is Roger's agent and she and Shriver just can't stop with the ass kissing of Sharapova and same can and should said about Drisdale.He is down right creepy when speaking of Maria:help:

Patrick McEnroe would not be working on ESPN had his last name not been McEnroe and the way he talks about a bunch of hard court specialists hyped players like Mardy Fish;James Blake;John Isner and Sam Querrey;you'd think they're better than the likes of Federer and Nadal and it's just sickening:mad:

Brad Gilbert should go back to school and learn how to pronounce foreign names is just atrocious:o

Cahill and John McEnroe have their tongues up so far up Nadal's arse they won't find it if they sent in surgeons:o

as for Mary;she'd call out local and foreign players if they behaved badly:shrug:
No she was not the best.
Davenport is the best.

The one and only strategy Mary ever came against the WS is her refrain of "center the ball".

brickhousesupporter
Jan 17th, 2011, 09:04 PM
Why is it that Americans aren't allowed to cheerlead for their players. How many times have we heard how great Andy Murray is from the British commentators. Listen to the Australian commentators, you would think Sam Stosur was the second coming of Steffi Graf. I have never heard an Indian commentator dismiss Mirza. This notion that in order to be good commentator or have journalistic integrity you have to criticize or tear down a player is BS and it leads to a lot of dislike for a certain player by the general public. I am sick and tired of hearing how an opponent should play to beat the WS. When are they going to say how WS should play to beat the opponent?

Kenny
Jan 17th, 2011, 10:52 PM
Dick Enberg next please?

HRHoliviasmith
Jan 17th, 2011, 11:13 PM
Exactly, and this quote encapsulates why a poster like AcesHigh would enjoy her on air persona. They are on par with eachother when it comes to this kind of pretentiousness. Unlike the American men, Serena Williams has never been on the receiving end of any cheerleading from the ESPN booth, and the massive criticism of her only subsided once MJF became Fed Cup captain (which this, combined with the fact that MJF's husband is a top exec at IMG is even more indicative of the obviously incestuous relationships between sponsors, agents, and commentators).

I'm glad that caustic Mary is gone, and I hope that Lindsay is brought in on a more full time role in the tennis commentator lineup.

GREAT Post!

Martian KC
Jan 17th, 2011, 11:59 PM
Come to TTN, Mary!!!!!!

darrinbaker00
Jan 18th, 2011, 01:56 AM
Can someone please explain to me how a commentator's words would interfere with your enjoyment of the tennis? I've never understood that.

Slammer7
Jan 18th, 2011, 08:02 AM
There is a difference between critical & monstrous commentating. She also has to be delusional to think that tennis fans want her tearing their favorite tennis players apart with the same thing over & over & over & over & over again.

Not to mention the fact of how often she was talking about something personal instead of tennis related. This woman was suppose to promote women's tennis not degrade it. Clearly she did not understand her job or thought she was above what fans wanted to hear. Now she really does understand what fans want & it's not her.

:wavey:Carillo.
Exactly. Contrary to what some may want to believe many if not most (even rabid) fans can take fair and honest criticism. Shriver can be very critical at times, of Sharapova's service motion of Venus' serve (for 13 years and counting :lol:) and yet she isn't anywhere near as hated as Carrillo. Mary can and has gone too far at times, attacking people on a personal level which is rarely seen by commentators in other U.S sports. She puts down womens tennis more than world renown sexist John McEnroe does. :help: Mary has had her moments when she gets it right and frame the moment well, but those moment a far fewer and in between as they used to be. There is a big difference between being critical and having 'no holds barred' approach and belittling the female side of a sport on a regular basis. She has constantly gotten away with obvious bias for or against players over the years. There are many many die hard fans who will not miss her and many casual fans that weren't all that fond of her even in there limited exposure to her. She has appeared on talk radio in my area before and callers (who barely know what tennis is) found her abrasive and her humor annoying when she has done interviews promoting the sport and the current slam. :shrug:
Exactly....

Carillo will be missed no matter what fans on here say.
Some people miss their braces too, but not a large amount of people. :lol: If people knew her well enough (meaning they were more than just casual fans) to actually notice the absence of her presence I doubt it will affect them too much. :shrug:
That's funny, because, in the article, it says she's going to continue covering tennis on CBS and NBC. So, apparently, she has determined that tennis fans actually DO still want her. It's ESPN that does not.

But, of course, to understand that, you'd have had to actually read the article, and I know it was very long, very very long.
ESPN has substantially more tennis coverage then the other two networks combined. CBS has 4 tournaments (Miami, Cincinnati, the Pilot Pen and the U.S Open) NBC has two Wimbledon and the French Open. Obviously she will still be on air for the biggest events in the sport, but she will be on air less frequently. Also her tone and her level of ranting and personal attacks is for some reason far lesser when she broadcasts on those networks. Maybe because she has McEnroe and Ted Robinson to take up some of the air in the room and is often checked on air for going to far. :shrug: It's not surprising that the majority of the griping about Carillo takes place when she's on ESPN and not CBS or NBC taking my previous sentence into consideration.
You think a couple of complaints from rabid reetards is enough to kick Mary off the air? :rolls:

The woman is an esteemed award-winning commentator and would probably get more people to watch than the mess of commentators already on there.
I do think a few thousand complaints by tennis fans in general not just (an insulting name for) Serena fans worth of complaints contributed to a decision ESPN was possibility already contemplating. As well as most likely ESPN's own ombudsmen calling her words into question, and a pattern of controversial comments over the years may have lead to a parting of the ways.

Oh and in the end NO commentator no matter how respected and beloved really gets anyone to watch a sport, the sport always does.