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View Full Version : ** Masha News and Articles! ** Vol. 2


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clementine
Jul 21st, 2004, 05:05 PM
Hi everyone :wavey:

Thought maybe we could use a thread here to post all the news, interviews, and articles we find on Masha. :)

I just got my new Tennis Week magazine and Maria is on the cover again (she was also on the March cover). :eek:

If they haven't been posted already, I'll scan in the pics and article and post them here later.

Lefty.
Jul 21st, 2010, 10:52 PM
Just realized that we hit 5K posts in the other one. :p

Hopefully there will be lots of good Maria articles in this volume. ;)

Old thread (http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=124801)

Break My Rapture
Jul 21st, 2010, 10:57 PM
New volume. :hearts:

slamchamp
Jul 21st, 2010, 11:18 PM
crap now we have the recent articles in other thread:ras:

tvbsharapova
Jul 22nd, 2010, 09:16 AM
Sharapova to Open Play on Tuesday, July 27
STANFORD, CA (http://www.bankofthewestclassic.com/) – The 2010 Bank of the West Classic announced today that three-time Grand Slam champion Maria Sharapova will be the featured evening match on Tuesday, July 27 at 7 pm.


Sharapova’s opponent will not be known until the 2010 draw is announced on Saturday, July 24.


With three Grand Slam championships and 22 Sony Ericsson WTA Tour singles titles to her credit Maria Sharapova is one of the most popular and successful tennis players in the world. The former World No. 1, and future Hall of Famer, has already won two titles in three finals appearances this year.


Tickets for the 2010 Bank of the West Classic can be purchased by calling the box office at 866-WTA-TIXS (866-982-8497) or by logging on to http://www.bankofthewestclassic.com./ Single-session tickets for the tournament's opening round start at just $26.


The player field at the 2010 Bank of the West Classic, which will be played July 26 – August 1 at Stanford University, is once again loaded with many of the world’s top players.


The tournament will host three of the top-10 ranked players in the world, 12 of the top-30 overall, and a plethora of players that have been among the last four competing at numerous Grand Slam tournaments.


In addition to Sharapova, the tournament field includes 2008 French Open champion Ana Ivanovic, 2008 Olympic gold medalist Elena Dementieva, 2010 Wimbledon finalist Vera Zvonareva, 2010 French Open finalist Samantha Stosur, 2010 Australian Open semifinalist Zheng Jie, 2009 US Open semifinalist Yanina Wickmayer, 2008 Australian Open semifinalist Daniela Hantuchova, 2007 Wimbledon finalist Marion Bartoli and two-time Grand Slam semifinalist Kimiko Date Krumm.


And if that wasn’t enough, the doubles draw will feature three-time Grand Slam champion Lindsay Davenport playing with Liezel Huber, the world’s No. 1 ranked doubles player.


Tickets for the 2010 Bank of the West Classic can be purchased by calling the box office at 866-WTA-TIXS (866-982-8497) or by logging on to http://www.bankofthewestclassic.com./ Single-session tickets for the tournament's opening round start at just $26.


The 2010 Bank of the West Classic will feature a 30-player singles draw and 16-team doubles draw. The official tournament draw, and first round match-ups, will be announced on Saturday, July 24.


In addition to individual session tickets, full-week packages start at just $575 and include tickets to all 13 sessions, a pass to the exclusive Grand Marnier Plaza Club and an invitation to the Meet the Players Party. Those who purchase a pair of seats will also receive a weeklong VIP parking pass and a Bank of the West Classic Tournament program.


The Bank of the West Classic is also offering several weekend packages starting at $240.

Entering its 40th year the Bank of the West Classic is the longest running women-only professional tennis tournament in the world. The list of past champions of the event reads like a “Who's Who” of women's tennis including Lindsay Davenport, Billie Jean King, Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, Andrea Jaeger, Monica Seles, Martina Hingis, Venus Williams and Kim Clijsters.


The event is owned and operated by IMG and serves as the opening women's event of the Olympus US Open Series. Qualifying will be held July 24-25 and is free to the public.

Log on to http://www.bankofthewestclassic.com/ for more information.






ABOUT THE BANK OF THE WEST CLASSIC: The Bank of the West Classic is the longest-running women-only professional tennis tournament in the world and is the first stop of the Olympus US Open Series. A Sony Ericsson WTA Tour Premier event, the Bank of the West Classic features a 30-player singles draw and a 16-team doubles draw with total prize money of $700,000. Held on Stanford University's campus at the Taube Family Tennis Stadium since 1997, former champions include: Billie Jean King, Chris Evert, Martina Navratilova, Andrea Jaeger, Monica Seles, Martina Hingis, Lindsay Davenport and Venus Williams. The Bank of the West Classic is owned and operated by IMG.


ABOUT BANK OF THE WEST: Based in San Francisco, $61 billion-asset Bank of the West (www.bankofthewest.com) offers a full range of business, corporate, personal, trust and international banking services. For the third year in a row, Bank of the West has been ranked "highest in customer satisfaction in retail banking" in California by J.D. Power and Associates. The Bank operates more than 700 branch locations and commercial banking offices in 19 Western and Midwestern states. Bank of the West's holding company, BancWest Corporation, is a subsidiary of BNP Paribas, among the six strongest banks in the world, according to Standard & Poor's.

nelsondan
Jul 22nd, 2010, 07:55 PM
Are Maria and Wickmayer still entering as a doubles team?

Sp!ffy
Jul 22nd, 2010, 08:35 PM
Two days ago she said she was still unsure so we'll see :tears:

cyannnnn
Jul 22nd, 2010, 09:35 PM
it's stange

because yanina confirms to belgian press

slamchamp
Jul 22nd, 2010, 09:49 PM
I hope masha doesnt dump her:weirdo:

Break My Rapture
Jul 22nd, 2010, 09:50 PM
That would be so funny. :happy:

cyannnnn
Jul 22nd, 2010, 10:14 PM
no for yanina

because she says she is so excited and nervous

slamchamp
Jul 22nd, 2010, 10:24 PM
no for yanina

because she says she is so excited and nervousshe's gonna play with her idol:awww: :lol:
But after that wtt match I'd say masha needs the doubles

Break My Rapture
Jul 22nd, 2010, 10:27 PM
Yeah I agree, she should play doubles.

cyannnnn
Jul 22nd, 2010, 10:30 PM
masha was rusty at WTT and maybe sasha's presence distracts her
i'm sure she doesn't try hard

doubles is good for her to train net, she need it to win one day RG

or maybe she injured herself during training sessions nobody know...

hope for yanina; maria will play the doubles

xan
Jul 23rd, 2010, 01:03 AM
Report of the WTT thing...

Breakers finally beat Explorers
by MARK GARCIA
THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER
7/21/2010
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/38351094
Not even Maria Sharapova could salvage the Newport Beach Breakers' season Tuesday night.
Newport Beach's marquee player played a role in the Breakers' thrilling come-from-behind 19-18 victory over the Kansas City Explorers, but it was too little too late as the team was eliminated from the playoffs following Springfield's 24-17 win over Sacramento Tuesday.
Newport Beach improved to 5-7 with the win, but trail second-place Kansas City (7-5) by two games with two matches remaining. Newport Beach can tie Kansas City, but the Explorers own the tiebreaker over the Breakers by virtue of winning three of its four matches against each other. Only the top two teams from each conference advance to the postseason.
"We're out, but we don't want to have a losing season," said Breakers coach Trevor Kronemann. "If we can win the next two (matches) and finish .500, then that's our goal."
Newport Beach trailed 15-13 heading into the match's final set, but Lester Cook and David Martin teamed up to win the men's doubles, 5-3, over hard-hitting Australian Samuel Groth and Ricardo Mello, to tie the match at 18-18 and send it into a Super Tiebreaker.
Cook and Martin trailed throughout the tiebreaker and faced two match points at 6-4 before rallying to win the final three points and the match.
"This is what's great about Team Tennis," said Martin, "the drama and excitement of going down to the final point."

The win overshadowed a somewhat lackluster performance by Sharapova, who teamed up with Martin to lose the mixed doubles set before falling 5-0 in singles to Jarmila Groth. She did win the women's doubles set with Marie-Eve Pelletier, 5-3.
"I didn't play well in singles, but that's the great thing about team sports. You rely on your teammates to pick you up on your off days," said Sharapova, who was cheered on by her mom and her boyfriend, Lakers guard Sasha Vujacic.
Sharapova praised the play of Groth.
"She hit the ball really well and didn't give me time to adjust," she said.

Sp!ffy
Jul 23rd, 2010, 05:51 AM
Her mom and boyfriend was there? That really sucks.

da2nd_14
Jul 23rd, 2010, 09:04 AM
Maria's new racquet?
http://www.trulyobscure.com/images/1146.jpg

Prince Delivers a Match Point With The EX03 100
Posted by Heather Millward Jul 22, 04:59 PM to gear : -
Now we don’t claim to be Andre Agassi or one of the Williams sisters, but we do enjoy an occasional game of tennis. And even though we don’t have the expertise those players bring to the court, we feel we have a semi-decent grip on the game, enough to enjoy some pretty great racquets in the recent past.

Prince introduces the EX03 Black 100 tennis racquet which is replacing the Speedport Black. This version is offers their patented Energy Channel technology to carry you through and deliver (hopefully) your “A” game. The Energy Channel technology is comprised of a sculpted groove in the frame that lends your shots lots of power with minimal effort- in theory. It is also supposed to increase your spin by up to 25%. Big claims, perhaps, but we were fairly satisfied with performance. We must say, we could definitely tell a difference as far as the acceleration goes and the ball boost was a definite plus. Spin, though, wasn’t affected quite so much.

With the patented Tuning System a player can adjust the feel of the racquet with a choice between either the hole or port inserts. If you desire a more comfortable feel, a larger sweet spot, and more string dampening, use the port insert. If you prefer a more crisp response with added string feedback and the usual sweet spot, use the hole version instead. If you are wondering what the difference is, the string ports are open and string holes are more like traditional grommets, as there is a small hole that the string is threaded through. They don’t fill the ports in completely, though, so the increase in aerodynamics will still be there supposedly. The EX03 comes with port inserts.

The EX03 has a 100 square inch head size and a strung weight of 11.4 ounces which correlates to large amounts of spin and power from the baseline without losing control. This is perfect for players 3.5+ but advanced players (like Maria Sharapova, who uses this model) aren’t necessarily cut of the equation; they’re likely to appreciate the balance. We take an approach to tennis that goes pretty much like this: step up and hit the ball on the rise, and pound it back deep and hard. The EXO3 100 was rock solid, and we were able to stand substantially closer to the baseline and take half- or three-quarter swings at deep balls and pound them back with complete confidence in a baseline rally.

For a smaller and lighter version, we would recommend checking out the Prince EX03 Black Team 100 with is similar but with less weight (280g instead of 305g). You can purchase Prince gear at Amazon for around $185-$195 depending on the grip size. It’s a reasonable price for an extremely competitive racquet.
http://www.trulyobscure.com/article/726/prince-delivers-a-match-point-with-the-ex03-100

xan
Jul 23rd, 2010, 11:48 PM
I think this would be the racquet she stopped using.

And Maria's mum attended a match! That never happens.

shega
Jul 24th, 2010, 08:31 AM
Her mom and boyfriend was there? That really sucks.

sucks cuz she lost while they were there or sucks that...they were there... ? :confused:

Mr.Sharapova
Jul 24th, 2010, 03:47 PM
When is the draw coming out!!???
I hope Maria has a descent one!

shega
Jul 24th, 2010, 04:24 PM
me thinks any draw would be a decent one in freaking Stanford.

schorsch
Jul 24th, 2010, 06:03 PM
Yanina Wickmayer: Looks like doubles with Maria won’t happen. The WC was for top 10 (not top 20 as they do in singles). A stupid rule. We are both with the same agency IMG so we will try to play somewhere else at some point.

Seems like IMG messed up and the other WCs had already been given out...

oneandonly
Jul 24th, 2010, 07:10 PM
The draw ceremony starts in about 50 minutes. ;)

Sp!ffy
Jul 24th, 2010, 10:13 PM
sucks cuz she lost while they were there or sucks that...they were there... ? :confused:

That sucks that she lost 0-5 to Groth while her mom and boyfriend were there...and they are practically never at her matches. :lol:

That's what they get for going to WTT and not a real match.

Jovana.
Jul 24th, 2010, 11:53 PM
I have nothing particular to add to the thread, I'm just subscribing :o uhm...Go Masha!

shaktincredible
Jul 25th, 2010, 04:35 AM
I have nothing particular to add to the thread, I'm just subscribing :o uhm...Go Masha!

me too. :)

~MashyOwnThemAll
Jul 25th, 2010, 08:50 PM
from FB:
We had a nice short flight into Stanford yesterday afternoon and practised in the evening. This is a great little tournament so if you live in the area you should check it out.

cyannnnn
Jul 25th, 2010, 10:25 PM
from FB:We had a nice short flight into Stanford yesterday afternoon and practised in the evening. This is a great little tournament so if you live in the area you should check it out.

wow she need flight to go to stanford:confused:
isn't she in california these days

Break My Rapture
Jul 26th, 2010, 08:26 PM
From Stanford's FB:

Breaking News: Maria Sharapova will hold an autograph signing on Monday, July 26 at 2:30 at the Bank of the West tent.

That's in like half an hour. :p

Jacey
Jul 26th, 2010, 08:43 PM
http://www.onthebaselinetennisnews.com/

Published by Chris Oddo on Jul 26, 2010 | Print |

What’s it like to watch a Sharapova practice session up close and personal? Find out Chris Oddo’s take on the former world number one’s game in his latest article, live from Stanford’s Bank of the West Classic!


Before I get to into the details of the WTA’s All Access media hour (which featured the top four seeds in the draw), I’ll take a moment to share some of the brilliance I saw again today out on the practice courts.

- Maria Sharapova hitting backhand after crosscourt backhand, each one whizzing about 3 inches above the net. Awestruck is the word that comes to mind, and each time she made contact the pop of the racquet made the little hairs on the back of my neck stand up. Note to self: Never ever convince yourself into thinking you could last on the court with a professional tennis player, not even for one single rally.


;)

Marilyn Monheaux
Jul 26th, 2010, 08:44 PM
:drool:

Break My Rapture
Jul 26th, 2010, 08:45 PM
I love it when people are amazed by Masha's power. :drool:

Marilyn Monheaux
Jul 26th, 2010, 08:45 PM
From Stanford's FB:



That's in like half an hour. :p

Stil 45 minutes where I live.:lol::p

Break My Rapture
Jul 26th, 2010, 08:49 PM
OMG I forgot about the 30 minutes. :happy:

Sp!ffy
Jul 27th, 2010, 10:48 PM
Russia's most powerful celebrity: Sharapova

BEIJING, July 27 (Xinhuanet) -- Russian tennis star Maria Sharapova is the only Russian national on the Forbes list of 100 most influential celebrities, unveiled on Monday night.

Sharapova appears in commercials for such brands as Canon, Prince, Tiffany, Tag Heuer and Land Rover. Her biggest contract was signed with sports products company Nike, which re-signed the athlete in January to an eight-year contract worth up to 70 million U.S. dollars. She also receives money from sales of her own tennis line and a line of bags and shoes through Nike subsidiary Cole Haan, according to RT reports.

The Forbes rating of the most powerful celebrities is based on the frequency of their names being mentioned in the mass media, and also on their financial success.

Sp!ffy
Jul 28th, 2010, 09:37 AM
Maria Sharapova is not the top seed at this week's Bank of the West Classic, but she remains a top draw.

A near-capacity crowd of 3,580 showed up Tuesday night at Stanford's Taube Family Tennis Stadium to watch one of the sport's biggest attractions continue her march toward the top once again.

Sharapova did not disappoint.

In a match that didn't lack for drama or a story line, Sharapova, seeded fifth, held off a hard-hitting Jie Zheng 6-4, 7-5.

"She's a great player," said Sharapova, who is ranked 15th. "She's a very good competitor. There is no doubt I had to be ready. I really had to be on the top of my game."

The match was Sharapova's first on a hard court since Indian Wells last spring, when Zheng defeated her in three sets and an elbow injury sent Sharapova to the sideline for six weeks. Sharapova called the match "scratchy," adding, "I wasn't feeling too good there."

Tuesday, in Sharapova's first match since a fourth-round loss to Serena Williams at Wimbledon last month, the 23rd-ranked Zheng gave the Russian all she could handle again, at times forcing the action by charging the net.

Sometimes that backfired — Sharapova nicely hit a few lobs for winners — but Zheng's grittiness made things interesting.

Still, Sharapova gave herself an opportunity to close out the match when she broke serve in the ninth game of the second set as Zheng hit a backhand long after a tense rally. But on match point in the next game, Sharapova double-faulted, and Zheng went on to even the set 5-5.

Sharapova responded by breaking serve again in the next game and then held to win the match, her 21st victory this year in 27 matches.

"I returned better when I had to," Sharapova said. "There was no choice. I couldn't rely on the serve the whole match. I don't think I took advantage enough on her serves, especially the second serve. That's something I'll want to improve going forward."

The first set was mostly routine, with both players holding serve through the first eight games. Then Sharapova raised her game, breaking serve at love for a 5-4 lead and then holding in the next game to win the set.

The second set for Sharapova was more tense, but the outcome was satisfying.

"My mentality is to keep going and keep fighting," said Sharapova, who last year at this time was coming back from a shoulder injury.

Sharapova will next play in the day session Thursday against Olga Govortsova.

Also Tuesday, eighth-seeded Victoria Azarenka defeated Ayumi Morita 6-0, 6-2; No. 6 seed Shahar Peer rallied to oust Daniela Hantuchova 0-6, 6-4, 6-3.

NewShoulderPlz.
Jul 29th, 2010, 03:24 AM
Directed Sharapova Looks to Take Next Big Step

By Matthew Cronin

FROM THE BANK OF THE WEST CLASSIC, WEDNESDAY, JULY 28 – Stanford is a level of tournament that Maria Sharapova needs to win, not that’s she the only one competing at the Bank of the West Classic this week with a gap in her 2010 resume.. Yes, she might be reasonably satisfied in reaching the final and say, being on the short end of a tough two set loss to Sam Stosur, but at this stage in the season, she playing well enough to bag sizebale titles and what she needs to do if she’s going to be a major threat at the US Open and put together five solid wins in a row over a slew of notable players.

Consider this: it wasn’t until Tuesday night in her powerful 6-4, 7-5 over China’s Jie Zheng that she had beaten a top 25 player this year. In fact, you have to go back to October 2009, when she overcame Victoria Azarenka in Beijing, to find the last time she beat a top 25 player. Yes, the three time Slam champ won two Tier III titles this year in Memphis and Strasbourg and yes, she played Justine Henin and Serena Williams close in losses at Roland Garros and Wimbledon, but she isn’t that patient of a person and after her press conference, she told me in private that she does not jump up and down for joy with near misses. She was in those matches and thought she could win them. She's the very opposite of a happy-to-be-there player.

"I could have done better and I've had my fair share of opportunities, but that's the past," she said in her press conference. "My mentality is to keep fighting, getting the most out of my matches and work myself toward the US Open."

Sharapova faces Olga Govortsova on Thursday, could face Elena Dementieva in the quarters and Shahar Peer or Aggie Radwanska in the semis. That’s a difficult, but not impossible draw. She is serving much better and much faster than she was last year and although her return game was spotty against Zheng, it will never really go away. I’m not yet convinced that her commitment to a slap and charge off her foe’s second serves is a good move for her because her feet aren't that quick and she has trouble covering the net unless she gets a very reasonable volley, but at least she trying new things.

The question is, just how long will this super intense competitor be patient with good but not great results? Its almost been two years since she seriously injured her shoulder and although she knows better than anyone how long it takes to rehab from surgery, she was used to winning a lot as a pro beforehand.
"I worked on patience so long during the injury and obviously wanted good results and wanted to go far in the Slams and this year it hasn’t happened. But that the way it is and I’m not going to quit because I didn't,'' said Sharapova. "I was No. 1 in summer I got injured and had just won a Slam [the Aussie Open] and little do you know, I’m out of game next nine moths. I’m not one to sit and say what could have been and I’ve said this from day one that I’m just really fortunate to have come back.”

In private, she does expect excellent results out of herself and pushes herself time and time again. She understands what a winning formula is and doesn’t get too caught up into trying to compete reconfigure her game, a la Ana Ivanovic in recent times. She’s very good at dealing with expectations because they are largely her own, although her father’s Yuri’s hopes for her cannot be completely dismissed. But she says that she plays and sets goal “not for anyone but myself.”

Sharapova has evolved though, partly due to the all the time she has spent off the tour because of her injury. She has woken up and discovered that she’s woman who didn’t exactly choose her entire life path.
The 23-year-old laughed when thinking about her history, but there’s serious side to her commentary.
"If you really think about it it's so dumb,” she said. “You have a grip in your hand, strings in the racket, and this yellow fuzzy ball and you're hitting it since four years old. It's ridiculous. It's dumb if you think about it. But it's what we do.”

denny5576
Jul 29th, 2010, 02:26 PM
Serve is final piece of the puzzle for Sharapova
Reported on July 28, 2010


After defeating Jie Zheng 6-4, 7-5 in the first round of Stanford, Maria Sharapova says she has been able to return to her old service motion as her shoulder recovers.

"I knew eventually I would go back, I just didn’t quite know when,” said Sharapova, who underwent shoulder surgery in October 2008. “But I knew that if I was going to come back when I did last year, I had to start with an abbreviated motion.
"It was just really inconvenient... Apart from the serve, I really felt like the shoulder was feeling really good on all the other parts of my game. Even my backhand volley, which I really couldn’t hit with the shoulder, was getting a lot better.
"I'm just trying to work myself toward the U.S. Open," she added. "I'm just happy to be back playing."

http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/t...53&zoneid=6 (http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/ticker.aspx?articleid=6753&zoneid=6)

slamchamp
Jul 29th, 2010, 03:44 PM
Still isn't the new service motion a bit shorter? I mean it wouln't be wise to return to the motion that got her injured in the first place:shrug:

~MashyOwnThemAll
Jul 29th, 2010, 03:52 PM
Interesting articles,
Thanks for the sharing. :inlove:

~MashyOwnThemAll
Jul 29th, 2010, 04:20 PM
FB

I had a tough match last night but it was nice to get through. Zheng is such a tough player and always plays her best tennis against me. I just really enjoyed being out there competing in front of a great crowd. My coach and I are going to work on a few things today and get ready for my next match.

Reptilia
Jul 30th, 2010, 12:30 AM
Still isn't the new service motion a bit shorter? I mean it wouln't be wise to return to the motion that got her injured in the first place:shrug:

I wonder that too but I guess her team knows what they are doing:confused:

NewShoulderPlz.
Jul 31st, 2010, 09:21 AM
“I just wasn’t swinging through well today; sometimes my arm just doesn’t want to swing. I didn’t want to take too much off the serve because that was not going to get me anywhere. I just wanted to find it the right way and keep going forward. Today was one of those days were I made a few more errors than I should have, but in the beginning that is actually what saved me because I wasn’t making many balls in the court from any side. I was trying to find the right balance to win the match.”

“When things are not going that well, you just try to keep doing the right thing and ultimately you will get your chances. I got them and picked them up. That’s what I needed to do in order to win the match. At the end of the day, that is the most important thing. You can only learn from the match itself. Hopefully tomorrow I can go out and not have to wait for such a long time and lose five games in a row to start figuring things out.”

“I think it’s tough to feel perfect all the time. One of the toughest things in the game itself is keeping your concentration and focus. You know that if you play a few good games, you are likely to have a bit of a letdown. It’s not really about the kind of letdown you have, it’s more about how you get yourself out of it. You want to think clearly out there about what you need to do and stay positive.”

“She (Radwanska) is a great retriever and a challenging player because she is very tricky. She has a lot of different tricks in her bag. She can play really aggressive or mix it up and throw a change of pace. I will really have to be on top of my game.”

http://www.bankofthewestclassic.com/matchupdatecalendar/2010_Bank_of_the_West_Classic/Player_Quotes_July_30th.htm

Ace_S
Aug 1st, 2010, 06:49 AM
Player Quotes July 31st

Maria Sharapova

“I was just all over the map a little while in that first set. There were way too many errors. I just started being a little more patient and giving her a chance to play. In the first set, I was making so many errors and it’s not like she was making me run or hitting winners. I was making three unforced errors a game, which is quite a lot. I needed to cut down on those, which I did. Little by little, I played really solid over the next two sets.”


“That’s the type of player she is and that’s how she wins the majority of her matches. She manages to wear down a lot of her opponents, getting many balls back and making them hit another shot. She’s had a lot of success doing that so you always have to be ready for the next shot to come back.”


“From the beginning I didn’t want to find myself having too long of rallies with her, because that’s what she wants. I think I overplayed myself a little bit in that first set, maybe over-thinking it or something instead of just really playing my way. But that was just the first set, and no matter how unsuccessful it was, you still have a match ahead of you.”


“She (Radwanska) is playing great and is always tough and aggressive. She is always moving on her feet. She is another player who hits many balls and you have to be ready and return well. It will be important to return well, serve well and really take advantage of the next ball.”


“It’s been a really long road but I’m so happy that I can come out and not really have to worry about too many things like I maybe did last year. Just to know that I can come out every day and even if I don’t feel 100 percent, I don’t feel like many things are on my mind like they were before … I’m happy to find myself just playing, trying to work out the kinks and really just go for it.”

Shafanovic.
Aug 1st, 2010, 09:28 AM
subscribing :D

atominside
Aug 2nd, 2010, 12:38 AM
ok i'm not sure if theres any rules in this thread but w/e.
Some quotes from her interview.

Maria's run at the Bank of the West Classic in Stanford came to an end at the hands of #8 seed Victoria Azarenka of Belarus in the final.* Maria lost 4-6 1-6 in 1 hour and 27 minutes.

After the match, Maria said: ."I was a bit up and down in the beginning. I went up 4-3 and played a really sloppy game on her serve and she didn't serve that great of a game. I really started making unforced errors off the return and she really stepped it up and took advantage. I was always on the defensive after that. I think when I tried to get the ball rolling, it was a little late."

"She has many advantages in her game. She gets a lot of balls back and they are really heavy. There is no doubt she is a great player. She has already been in the top-10, so it's not like she is moving up. She has been there, had great wins in her career already and is always a tough one to play against."

"I don't think I served that smart. It was tough on one side to really be consistent and have a higher percentage of first serves. I gave her too many looks on second serves."

"She has always served consistently well when I have played against her. She doesn't have a huge serve, but is pretty smart and mixes it up. I felt like I had a good read on her second serve, but wasn't really making them so it doesn't matter how you read it."

"You do what you have to do with what you have, no matter what it is. It's part of the job. It probably would have been a little easier for me if I hadn't spent so much wasted time on the sets that I lost in the previous two days. That probably would have made my life easier today but that's the way it goes. I also wish I would have played a couple more day matches to get more of a feel because it is a different atmosphere and different feel."

theres why she lost. lol.

slamchamp
Aug 2nd, 2010, 12:45 AM
more or less what we said..she shouldn't have wasted all that energy in previous matches ..like the one against aga. For example, what the fuck was that 1st set 6-1?? I mean it seamed she lost it on purpose to go to three sets:weirdo:

Vartan
Aug 11th, 2010, 01:54 AM
My friend sent me this:

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=ru&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fkp.by%2Fdaily%2F24534%2F678657%2F

The translation doesn't make any sense :sobbing:



Masha Sharapova's father insulted her boyfriend

Yury vain dream of a rich son-.
Андрей КЛИНКОВ, Экспресс газета — 04.08.2010 Andrew Klink, Express Newspaper - 08/04/2010
Sharapova
Мария ШАРАПОВА Sharapova

Мария ШАРАПОВА недавно поссорилась с папой. Sharapova had recently quarreled with the Pope. Произошло это после возвращения в Америку из Гомеля, куда бывшая первая ракетка мира летала вместе с отцом и своим бойфрендом - баскетболистом Сашей ВУЯЧИЧЕМ. This happened after his return to America from Gomel, where the former first racket of the world was flying with her father and her boyfriend - a basketball player Sasha Vuyachich.

В самолете Юрий Шарапов позволил себе выпить лишнего, и его развезло. In the plane Yuri Sharapov allowed himself to drink too much, and it grew weak. Сначала он стал приставать к молоденькой стюардессе, но та быстро его одернула. First, he began to stick to a young stewardess, but she was quickly pulled down. Юрий Викторович уже собирался было вздремнуть, но на сон грядущий решил дать наставления дочери на будущее. Yury was about to take a nap, but sleep has decided to give instructions daughter's future.

Из сбивчивой речи подвыпившего родителя выходило, что словенец Саша Вуячич ему не очень-то нравится. Out of confused speech, drunken parents turned out that the Slovenian Sasha Vuyachich it is not very much. Как выяснилось, Юрий Викторович мысленно уже видел себя тестем американца Чарли Эберсола - сына известного в США телемагната Дика Эберсола. As it turned out, Yury mentally already saw himself as an American father Charlie Ebersol - the son of a well-known in the U.S. telemagnata Dick Ebersol. Именно Чарли, с которым Маша раньше встречалась, и познакомил ее с Вуячичем. That's Charlie, with whom Maria had met, and introduced her to Vuyachich. Это было в Лос-Анджелесе на одном из баскетбольных матчей с участием «Лейкерс». It was in Los Angeles on one of the basketball tournament with the Lakers. Как говорится, познакомил на свою голову. As the saying goes, introduced at his head.

- Зачем ты бросила Чарли? - Why did you cast Charlie? - громко спросил папа. - Aloud to Dad. - К чему тебе этот неуклюжий баскетболист? - What do you need this hulking basketball player?

Последнюю реплику отец теннисистки произнес в тот момент, когда «неуклюжий баскетболист» Вуячич вернулся из туалета в салон бизнес-класса. The last remark father said tennis at the moment when the "clumsy basketball player" Vuyachich returned from the toilet in business class. Саша услышал эти слова и понял, о чем идет речь. Sasha heard these words and realized what was going on.
Charlie Ebersol, Sasha Vuyachich
Чарли Эберсол, Саша Вуячич Charlie Ebersol, Sasha Vuyachich

Маша поспешила обратить все в шутку, но вышло не очень удачно. Maria hurried to turn everything into a joke, but it was not very successful. После этого она встала и вышла из салона. Then she got up and left the salon. Больше с папой в самолете Мария не разговаривала. More and dad in a plane Maria did not speak.

Грубый лексикон Robust vocabulary

К сожалению, краснеть за своего экстравагантного папашу знаменитой теннисистке приходится не первый раз. Unfortunately, blush for his extravagant dad's famous tennis player had not the first time. Юрия Шарапова часто штрафовали на матчах за нецензурные выражения. Yuri Sharapova often fined for games for using indecent language. Однажды Юрий Викторович, приняв на грудь, едва не сцепился в рукопашном бою с отцом другой российской теннисистки - Анны Чакветадзе. One day, Yuri V., taking on his chest, nearly tangled in a close fight with the father of another Russian tennis player - Anna Chakvetadze. В какой-то момент представители компании «IMG», которые ведут дела Шараповой, дали понять ее папочке, что его присутствие на тренерской скамейке рядом с дочерью неуместно. At one point, representatives of the company «IMG», which do business Sharapova made it clear her daddy, that his presence on the coaching bench next to her daughter inappropriately. А потом Юрию Викторовичу и вовсе рекомендовали не сопровождать Машу в поездках на теннисные турниры. Then Yuri Viktorovich and did not recommend follow Masha to travel to tennis tournaments. В Гомель, однако, он полетел. In Gomel, however, he flew.
И теперь не знает, как показаться на глаза бойфренду дочери. And now do not know how to show the eye of her boyfriend's daughter.

КСТАТИ HANDY

Юрий Шарапов в последнее время всерьез увлекся виндсерфингом. Yuri Sharapov has recently seriously interested in windsurfing. Однажды после сильного порыва ветра его доска перевернулась и он с трудом доплыл до берега. One day after a strong gust of wind capsized his board and he had difficulty swam to shore.

gc-spurs
Aug 11th, 2010, 02:07 AM
omg the second paragraph after transalation :lol:

atominside
Aug 11th, 2010, 02:07 AM
thats so fake, its a satirical spoofy thingy.

Lachy
Aug 11th, 2010, 02:14 AM
The second paragraph :lol: :haha:

crux
Aug 11th, 2010, 02:18 AM
so, It is a joke, isn't it ?

cyannnnn
Aug 11th, 2010, 03:28 AM
the writer

:drink::drink::drink::drink::drink::drink::drink:: drink::drink::drink::drink::drink::drink::drink::d rink::drink::drink::drink::drink:

swissmr
Aug 11th, 2010, 03:57 AM
Quotes from today's match:

"I'm actually serving a lot better than I did last summer," Sharapova said.

"I'm hitting bigger serves. Maybe I'm missing a few more first serves and second serves, but I'm not hitting second serves 70 miles an hour."

"I'm gonna win tournaments by going for my shots, Sharapova said. "Whether it's off the groundstrokes and playing my game, or off the serve. Rather than waiting for my opponents to miss and maybe not making as many unforced errors. That's not my game."

gc-spurs
Aug 11th, 2010, 06:49 AM
"I'm gonna win tournaments by going for my shots, Sharapova said. "Whether it's off the groundstrokes and playing my game, or off the serve. Rather than waiting for my opponents to miss and maybe not making as many unforced errors. That's not my game."[/B]

translation: screw you pushers!

Maria Croft
Aug 11th, 2010, 07:22 AM
Quotes from today's match:

"I'm actually serving a lot better than I did last summer," Sharapova said.

"I'm hitting bigger serves. Maybe I'm missing a few more first serves and second serves, but I'm not hitting second serves 70 miles an hour."

"I'm gonna win tournaments by going for my shots, Sharapova said. "Whether it's off the groundstrokes and playing my game, or off the serve. Rather than waiting for my opponents to miss and maybe not making as many unforced errors. That's not my game."

And it's true as well, when she didn't hit a double fault she nearly won all of her second serve points.

It's incredible she only got broken twice throughout this match with a first serve % of only 51, that's promising. She needs to cut down those double faults though.

Sp!ffy
Aug 11th, 2010, 07:36 AM
She's never really offered a real answer as to why she is double faulting so much lately. At Birmingham, she didn't hit these many double faults (except the Na match). So...what's the deal Maria? :shrug:

MaitaBaby
Aug 11th, 2010, 07:50 AM
She's never really offered a real answer as to why she is double faulting so much lately. At Birmingham, she didn't hit these many double faults (except the Na match). So...what's the deal Maria? :shrug:

She's said it time and time and time again. There is no way in hell she'll play a second ball safely. A 70, F, even an 80 MPH second will come once in a blue moon from M's racket. So, if she serves at such high risk like that then there will definitely be at least a handful of DFs per match.

Sp!ffy
Aug 11th, 2010, 07:53 AM
:confused:
She didn't play 2nd serves safely during the clay and grass season and didn't hit that many double faults.

MaitaBaby
Aug 11th, 2010, 08:03 AM
Against stronger opponents, she goes for her seconds more so more DFs.

7 DFs in her losses to Henin, Serena and Li Na.

Maria Croft
Aug 11th, 2010, 08:08 AM
It's true, against every tough opponent she has played her double faults went up. But she has been hitting more these last two tournaments. She still has to cut those out of her game.

MaitaBaby
Aug 11th, 2010, 08:09 AM
With 2 tough draws ;)

Look, I'm not defending Maria's DFs because I want her to keep serving them. Obviously, I don't and I'm guessing nor does she but none of us here can do anything about it.

Maria Croft
Aug 11th, 2010, 08:15 AM
I think what most of us (including me) are worried about is, that every time in her career when she started to hit many double faults she was injured. But Maria usually doesn't say anything about it until months later.

However, this time she's hitting more aces and she isn't hitting 10+ doubles every match. So it doesn't have to mean anything.

Sp!ffy
Aug 11th, 2010, 08:16 AM
I do agree with Maria, however, that she is serving much better than last year. Despite the high amount of double faults still.

perseus2006
Aug 11th, 2010, 11:53 AM
I think I have said this before: When Pova's second serve finally gets to where she wants it to be, she may never lose another service game.

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 11th, 2010, 03:04 PM
An interview with:
MARIA SHARAPOVA


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.
Q. Seemed like you had a lot of unforced errors tonight. Is that something that maybe is indicative of the first time you played here, just trying to get used to the court?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah. Also, I played a tournament about nine or ten days ago, and it's your first match and you have a tough opponent. Completely different conditions than you're used to. Um, you know, started off the match really muggy, and just felt like a lot of the balls from both my side and hers were just flying. You know, you just kind of try to get control of everything, you know, from the groundstrokes to the serves. Sometimes I felt like I got a little unlucky and some were pretty close.
So just a matter of kind of staying consistent, and, you know, just really focusing on what I had to do instead of unforced errors.

Q. The guys usually say this court plays faster than Toronto or Montreal.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Right.

Q. Did you agree with that assessment?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it's -- I think the ball is pretty light. I don't think the court itself is super fast. I think it's pretty average. But since the balls are really light, it goes through the air almost like we're playing in altitude a little bit and jumps pretty high.
Against her that's tough, because she has so much spin on the ball. I think in the beginning I was just trying to adjust to that, and I was having a little bit of trouble.

Q. When did you realize that maybe she was a little bit injured?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: You know, when you're out there playing, you really worry about yourself and just trying to win the match.

Q. You took that heat index break between the second and third sets. You talked about how it affected your game, but physically how is the heat hitting you at that point?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, I definitely felt fresher after I came back from that place. It's good that it's in place, because it's quite important. Even though we're playing a night match, everyone in the stands has some sort of fan or something waving to make themselves cooler. It's pretty crazy to think that even in the night match that the fans have to do that. So it's something that we have to adjust to. You're not used to playing a night match and sweating a lot and playing a long point and getting ready to serve or return on a big point. You know, those are kind of the little things that I had to adjust to today.

Q. You hit 11 double faults today, and you've been sort of hitting more double faults recently, over the last year or so. How have you been able to shake off what must be a frustrating part of your game so effectively and still come away with wins?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: To be honest, I'm actually serving a lot better than I did last year summer. I'm hitting bigger serves. Maybe I'm missing a few more first and second serves, but I'm not hitting second serves 70 miles an hour. I mean, I'm gonna win tournaments by going for my shots, whether it's off the groundstrokes and playing my game, or off the serve rather than waiting for my opponents to missand maybe not making as many unforced errors. That's not my game.

Q. Does that confidence come from your shoulder feeling better? Is that directly related?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, if I'm doing the right thing -- and, I mean, today maybe I was certainly making a lot more errors off everything, off the return, you know, off my forehands and backhands. I mean, I definitely have to cut down on that.
But if I stick to doing the right things and not, you know, going in different directions, sooner or later that's gonna come back to me.

Q. In your first game of the second set, first service game, you had two double faults and two unforced errors, and you got broken at Love. Was that a case of being maybe too aggressive?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Sloppy.

Q. Sloppy?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah. I mean, you win the first set and play a good game to break her and then get the set, and, you know, come out and, you know, didn't play the first game aggressive.
You know, little things here and there, and all of a sudden it's -- tennis is a lot about momentum. You're playing against a tough opponent, certainly one that has a lot of experience. You give her a little fresh breath of air, and there's no doubt that she's gonna take it.

Q. Do you remember the last time you played in this type of heat?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, it's not so much the heat; I think it's more the humidity. Just muggy. But probably Australia. But the good thing about Australia is you have those days in between to recover. This is an event for someone that's not seeded, ahem -- oh, I am, actually. Wait. I am. I don't have a bye -- you play six matches in seven days. So, yeah, it's one of those things, but everyone has to go through it. We all have to adjust. That's the way it is. Sometimes you almost have to think the Grand Slams are a bit easier because you have the day in between to rest, recover, and get your body ready.

Q. You said in the second set she came on a lot stronger. What was your mindset at the beginning of the third set then to try and change the momentum?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, just be aggressive. Um, you know, I feel like I let her off the hook in the beginning of the second set, and she went with it.
Like I said, against a player that has a lot experience, you can't do that. She's not gonna give it back to you. You have to earn it back. The only way I was gonna get that back was by being aggressive.

Q. What are you most pleased with about in your game tonight in terms of things you did well?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I think I played some of the important points well. I took my breakpoint opportunities. You know, on days when you don't feel like your game is where you want it to be, you know, you try to look at the positives.
I feel like on some of the important points I got through them. The good thing is I got through the match, and you have another one ahead of you.

Q. You've won a lot of tough matches obviously at the Grand Slams without on-court coaching. How does it change the match, do you think? When you talk to Michael, what does he talk to you about? Is it ever helpful? Not helpful? What's that like for you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It's more words of encouragement than anything else. It's not like -- you know, a coach, certainly not for me, are not gonna start telling me to change something technically. You know, sometimes you see a little bit different from an outside perspective of what's going on of the few mistakes you're making or the patterns that you're doing a bit wrong. But it's actually pretty straightforward. It's more to get yourself going than anything else. There's not much that --if you can't play on your own and try to figure out tactics and all those things on your own, then at the Grand Slams, like you said, it's gonna be pretty tough to do on your own.

Q. I believe your father is still listed as your official coach even though Michael is doing most of the traveling. Do you plan on that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Where is thatlisted?

Q. On the WTA website.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh. Got to change that. He hasn't been traveling for like a year and a half. I don't know why it's on there.
Um, I mean, my dad is still a big part of my tennis career. During the off-season or when I'm home, probably 50% of time he's there just on the court and he has a few pointers. It's great to have him, because I was used to having him travel all the time. There's no one like him that knows me as best as he does from my mistakes and my attitude and the way to get me going and to get my intensity up. So it's always fun to have him. But Michael has definitely taken that role from him.

Q. After taking four weeks off after Wimbledon, you came back and you only played one World Tennis event, but you still made it to the semifinals at Stanford. How did you accomplish that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: There's an error in your question, because I made it to the finals of Stanford. (Laughter.) But that's okay. We all make mistakes. I made plenty of them today. (Laughter.)
Yeah, after -- I was on the road -- you know, before I played the French Open until after Wimbledon, I was on the road for about ten weeks, so I definitely needed some time off to recharge my batteries and to get back to the roots and get back on the practice court.
It's always important before that last hardcourt season to work on the few things that you feel like you need to work on, and, yeah, and get ready for the summer tour.

Q. But to follow that up, you didn't do that much. You had all that time off, and then you come back so strong though so quickly.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, I had some tough matches over there, and, um, you know, tough opponents in Stanford. Some that I lost to in my previous matches, so it was really important to -- I mean, in all these tournaments you really got to be ready from the first match. There are no easy opponents now. You got to be ready.
I mean, you know, playing Kuznetsova in the first round is not -- unfortunately, she wasn't seeded here, so it was unfortunate that we had to play. Usually it's a match that we play in the quarters or semis or finals. So like I said, every tournament you got to be ready from the getgo.

Q. Speaking of that, seems like there's a lot more of those types of the matches where Grand Slam champions are playing in the first round. Do you feel like at this point more than at any other time in your career you're seeing more of that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think the level of the game is a lot higher than it ever was. You know, maybe before the first few rounds were, you know, a bit of a cake walk in a way, or the score's a little on the easy side. You don't see that that much these days. I the level of someone, even someone that's 50 in the world is a really solid, tough player that has won tournaments, that has also had experience. And also, you know, the young ones that are coming up. It's crazy I don't consider myself young anymore. (Laughing.) But they're also tough because they're fearless and they go out there and they're opponents that really have nothing to lose.

Q. How do you like Cincinnati so far?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, which part, the Waffle House? (Laughter.) It's like back to the challenger days. I played many of those in my career.
No, it's great. I mean, like I said, it's good to be at a tournament for the first time for me, because I'm so used to the routine of the same tournaments throughout the year. And my schedule this year, um, you know, a change in the summer coming here. But it's great. I mean, conditions are obviously tough for all of us, but it's something that we get used to.

Q. Do you feel like tonight's match set the tone for the tournament?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I feel like it was definitely -- from my perspective it was definitely a match I can take a lot of things and try to change maybe a few things going into next round. You know, take the positives of winning the match and not playing my best tennis and going forward and trying to work on a few things in the next one.


:)

Mr.Sharapova
Aug 11th, 2010, 04:26 PM
I'm gonna win tournaments by going for my shots, whether it's off the groundstrokes and playing my game, or off the serve rather than waiting for my opponents to missand maybe not making as many unforced errors. That's not my game.

Wozniacki should learn from this:angel:

Break My Rapture
Aug 12th, 2010, 11:32 AM
From Nike Tennis' FB:

SAVE THE DATE! On August 25th, we'll light up NYC with an action and star-packed event, exclusively for our Facebook fans and anyone lucky enough to make it there. Stay tuned for more details

Hmmm.

Sharapowerr
Aug 12th, 2010, 12:43 PM
Wozniacki should learn from this:angel:

I was exactly thinking the same.:lol:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 12th, 2010, 03:06 PM
An interview with: MARIA SHARAPOVA

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please. .

Q. You seemingly broke her serve at will today. Seven breaks. What was it about her serve that made it a little bit easier for you to read tonight?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, yeah, I mean, I thought it was really important to just be aggressive on the return and put a lot of pressure on her from the beginning. It was the first time we played against each other, so from the getgo I wanted to play my game and figure things out quickly and figure out her game as quickly as I could. I think did a good job of that.

Q. Playing someone for the first time, how did you prepare? Do you do the scouting yourself? Do you get tips from your coach?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I've season her play a couple times on TV just randomly. You know, it's pretty rare to play against somebody for the first time. So when you do, it's just about trying to figure their game out when you're playing them. It's much different than seeing and knowing they're results. She's had some pretty good wins this year, and I knew that she was tough, and also quite a different opponent than someone I played last night.

Q. Do you work on situational hitting in practice? For instance, your second return game showed a big improvement from last night to tonight.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, well you have to as the tournament goes on. Improvement is what it's all about. I played a pretty scratchy match yesterday, got out of it, fought through, and you have to work on the things that can help you in the next few rounds and ultimately later in the tournament.

Q. How would you rate your defense tonight?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It was pretty good, but I played against somebody that plays a pretty aggressive game. You know, if I was the one on the defense, I would probably not be doing the right thing from the getgo. She plays pretty flat and tries to take the first ball on the rise, so my goal was really not to be on the defense.

Q. You talked last night about control of the ball and control of your strokes. Do you feel like you improved on that tonight?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I did. I was supposed to kind of play a day match today, but it almost turned out to be another night one. And tomorrow I have a day match, so it's good, you know, all types matches that I can get. And like I said, today was an a little bit different opponent, so I dealt with a little bit of a flatter ball than yesterday, someone that hits a lot of heavy spin. I thought I adjusted pretty well.

Q. Seemed like your second serve was a little bit off today in terms of at least the points you won. You only 16% of your second-serve points?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, that's low.

Q. Was that you being so aggressive or maybe her being to aggressive on your second one?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I think maybe it was just about the placement and maybe not being smart enough on the first serve. You know, sometimes that gives your opponent a little bit more confidence on the second serve to swing away. As I got in the rallies, when the points got a little bit longer, I felt like I had the advantage. I think her goal was to be aggressive, because that's her game and what she wanted to do. You know, today those were the points that she won.

Q. How much can you tell about an opponent just from hitting with them in the warm-up?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Not too much. Not at all.

Q. Were you happy with the way you served in general? You were only broken three times tonight, but last night was two in two sets.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I think I could be still a little bit smarter, you know, in the way we're just mixing it up a little bit more and things like that. But overall, it was all right.

Q. And then it looked like you had some trouble converting some breakpoint opportunities. You were only 7 of 18 tonight. Why do you think you missed so many chances to break?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, that's low. Just didn't happen. Yesterday's percentage was a little bit better, and today's was low. The score was also different, so I don't know. The stats sometimes don't tell too much about the match.

Q. When you're playing a point, do you like longer rallies, or do you want to kind of quick and just to put it away?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Usually when the rally is longer, that means that from the beginning you're doing something wrong. Especially me, because I'm a pretty aggressive player. I like to take the first ball and be in control of the point and not stand 20 feet back behind the baseline and play defense. That's not really my game. So if I'm in a long rally, it's not really about panicking, but about trying to get out that point and doing the best you can about winning it and going into the next one and being a little bit smarter.

Q. This isn't about your game tonight, but earlier this year I think you came out with Maria Sharapova clothing line with Cole Haan. Do you get to design your own outfits when you play, and did you design your outfit for this year's US Open?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I have an accessories line with Cole Haan that I actually started a couple years ago that I enjoy very much, and I also help design the dresses that I wear on court every tournament that I play at. It's really fun, because ever since I was young I love being creative and playing around with materials and making things in shapes and forms and stitching and all that. So to be able to work with incredible, talented people with Nike and Cole Haan and make things that come from a sketch to reality, to see people wear it is a lot of fun.

Q. The only question I was told to ask you is nontennis about your handbag. Where did you get it?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: About my handbag? This is actually my Cole Haan bag. Yeah, it's the fall collection.

Q. Do you prefer day or night matches, or does it not matter?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I played a bunch of all of them pretty much.

Q. Any preference?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think the night matches are special. They're quite different, and a lot them are during the summer, especially during the US Open series. You prepare a little bit different because you have the whole day to yourself and then go out and play at night, and kind of the excitement is on that night match, which is fun, especially at the Open.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports


:)

Sp!ffy
Aug 12th, 2010, 06:56 PM
Ah, thanks. I was waiting for this :kiss:

Vodkapova
Aug 13th, 2010, 05:29 AM
From Nike Tennis' FB:



Hmmm.

Is that the "star-studded" thing she was talking about on Facebook a while ago? Don't know why she posted a picture of her USO 2008 outfit though.

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 13th, 2010, 09:33 AM
^^Maybe it's gonna be a event where their outfits will be reveiled?:shrug:

Vodkapova
Aug 13th, 2010, 09:39 AM
Revealed. :p

I thought you were the Grammar Police. :lol:

gc-spurs
Aug 13th, 2010, 09:48 AM
Unless she means re-veiled because Maria's outfit is so granny.

Sp!ffy
Aug 13th, 2010, 09:49 AM
Unless she means re-veiled because Maria's outfit is so granny.

:lol::lol:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 13th, 2010, 10:08 AM
Revealed. :p

I thought you were the Grammar Police. :lol:

Typo :o

That's not grammer, it's spelling. :ras:

Vodkapova
Aug 13th, 2010, 10:30 AM
Typo :o

That's not grammer, it's spelling. :ras:

^ Grammar.

Your spelling. :help: :lol:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 13th, 2010, 10:32 AM
^ Grammar.

Your spelling. :help: :lol:

Ei dohnt giff ä fakk.

Vodkapova
Aug 13th, 2010, 10:38 AM
Ei dohnt giff ä fakk.

Somewhere in this world Miloti is laughing.

Mr.Sharapova
Aug 13th, 2010, 02:21 PM
Revealed. :p

I thought you were the Grammar Police. :lol:

^ Grammar.

Your spelling. :help: :lol:

Somewhere in this world Miloti is laughing.

That's it Teerin Take her down:haha:.

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 13th, 2010, 03:21 PM
An interview with: MARIA SHARAPOVA

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. The last match played you against her in Stanford you went the distance, and today looked like you were in total control. What did you do differently this match that maybe didn't happen in Stanford?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I started really slow in my previous match, and that really hurt me. I didn't break her once in the first set of that match, which, you know, is not a really good sign. But I was able to change things around, and won pretty comfortably in the next two sets. So I went on the court today with a similar frame of mind, where I really got to have a good beginning if I wanted to have a chance today and not spend three hours out there.

Q. You broke all but one of her serves in the first set. Were you really confident with your returning today?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I think, you know, I really had to be, because her return is one of her strengths. You know, she's makes you run a lot balls back, so it's really important if you can get a good hit on the first ball.

Q. Only one of the top eight seeds is left in the draw now. Does what make you more excited or more sort of, you know, excited about the prospect of making it to Sunday?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I've got my own side of the draw to worry about, and my next opponent. That's the only way I can look at things.

Q. So it doesn't change your mindset at all, what happens in other matches?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, absolutely not.

Q. What does that say to you, though? Does it speak to the balance of the draw or of women's tennis when that many seeds are falling so early in the tournament?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I think it just speaks a lot about the depth of the game right now. And as I mentioned in my previous press conference, I think the depth of the game is a lot deeper than it was, say, a few years ago, where maybe in the first few rounds you could have gotten a few easy matches, easy scorelines. I think now from the getgo you really have to be ready for the first round. You're facing really tough opponents, and some of them are not seeded or dropped in the rankings. But to be honest, at the end of the day, that doesn't really matter. You still have to go out there and face them.

Q. Talk about the set up the Olympus Shot-of-the Day, that gorgeous overhead lob that she did. Talk about the point construction. Seemed like a spur of the moment thing that you decided to do. Take us through this point, because it was pretty critical?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I think that was to break her, right?

Q. Uh-huh.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I was all actually up Love-40 in that game, and she got back to 30-40, so, you know, it was a crucial point, and it was fortunate I made it. I was pretty far back behind the baseline. But, you know, I actually didn't really know if she was moving forward or not. I was really on the defense.

Q. Also looked look you really crushed a lot of return winners deep in the court. Is that something that you didn't do as much in Stanford on her return?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Probably not. Not enough, obviously. I didn't break her in the first.

Q. But you kept the pressure on her a lot.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: You have to, because she can run on the court all day long and just retrieve balls and get them back. You have to play the game, my game.

Q. Your presence and your face have been used to market a lot of tournaments and sell tickets around world. With that in mind, do you have any thoughts on Ana Ivanovic -- I don't know if you know about her dispute with the Montreal tournament next week -- being denied a wildcard, and saying that she thought she would because she had helped promote the event. She thought she would be able to get in because of that. As someone who's done a lot of promotions, do you think players should earn goodwill in tournaments to use in the future?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Obviously it's up to the tournaments to decide. At the end of the day, it's their decision. At the end of the day, it's the ranking and it's about how you get in. It's on your own -- I mean, things are on your own terms basically. That's women's tennis. It's an individual sport. Everything is on your terms. Ranking usually says a lot of things about your results, whether you're No. 1 or whether you're 100. That is the way things go. Maybe sometimes you're a bit unfortunate and you feel like you need a little luck on your side. But, I mean...

Q. How much do you look at statistics, and do you have any rules of thumb in your head? Like if it's more than ten double faults or three aces, unforced errors, anything like that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, usually the percentage of first serves. A lot of the times the stats are -- it's pretty tough to look at a match based on stats. I mean, maybe if there's a crazy amount of unforced errors or something like that, but it's based on the winners as well. The only thing I usually look at is percentage of first serves.

Q. After each point, seems look you walk around behind the baseline about ten feet or so. Are you reviewing the point you just played? Are you setting up the next point? What exactly is going through your mind when you do that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Just concentrating. Telling myself to focus and not really thinking about what happened and just moving forward, whether I won or lost the point. Just trying to keep myself going.

Q. You play Marion Bartoli in the next round. She's a unique player on the tour. What are your thoughts about her game and what it'll be like playing her?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: We haven't faced each other in a while. Like you said, she plays a different type of game: two hands on both sides. She's a really aggressive player and someone that likes to take the ball really early and goes for her shots. A little bit different than my opponent today. I'll have to be ready.

Q. A nontennis question. When is the last time you remember getting asked a question in one of these things that you haven't heard before?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I can't tell you.

Q. That's pretty sad.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, I wouldn't say it's sad. You know, it's part of the deal. I guess it's what we're here for. We're here to play the tennis matches; we're here to answer questions about the match and so on. We do press conferences after every match, so you're bound to ask the same questions. Not your fault.

Q. On that note, since you do have so many press conferences a week, is there anything that you'd like to talk about that you never really get the chance to?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, goodness. All the pressure on me. (Laughter.) Goodness, I don't know. Something off the top of my head I have to think of. Um, I'm not sure. I think a lot of us spend so much time committing ourselves to not only the game of tennis, you know, with tennis comes a lot of things. We're very fortunate to have what we have, and a lot us are able to give back. I think it's an incredible thing.
Many men and women on the tour are able to help with their time and money all over the world to causes. That's something that we like to create awareness of.

Q. How did you relax off the court? Like the tournament here there isn't as many things to do as there is in New York obviously. Do you go to a movie?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: To be honest, there really isn't that much time. I woke up today and got treatment.

Q. Go to the Waffle House?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, not today. Got treatment, went here and warm-up, played. By the time I get back
it's gonna be late. I got to go do treatment again, and by the time you know it, you have to sleep. Maybe, I don't know, watch something on the computer or movie or read a book. It's pretty routine.


:)

~MashyOwnThemAll
Aug 13th, 2010, 03:48 PM
Q. Go to the Waffle House?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, not today. Got treatment, went here and warm-up, played. By the time I get back it's gonna be late. I got to go do treatment again, and by the time you know it, you have to sleep.
Maybe, I don't know, watch something on the computer or movie or read a book. It's pretty routine.

The Siberian Siren forum posts :angel:

Sp!ffy
Aug 13th, 2010, 08:50 PM
The Siberian Siren forum posts :angel:

Hi Maria. :wavey:

gc-spurs
Aug 13th, 2010, 09:08 PM
Hi Maria. :wavey:

= JamieOwen :secret:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 13th, 2010, 09:10 PM
= JamieOwen :secret:

:confused:

Jovana.
Aug 13th, 2010, 09:14 PM
^ we used to joke around that Jamie actually is Maria :lol:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 13th, 2010, 09:29 PM
^ we used to joke around that Jamie actually is Maria :lol:

Really?:rolls: Why that?

Jovana.
Aug 13th, 2010, 09:30 PM
Really?:rolls: Why that?

I don't really remember , something about him being so awesome with his vids that he actually is Maria :haha: I think :lol:

Mr.Sharapova
Aug 13th, 2010, 10:31 PM
I don't really remember , something about him being so awesome with his vids that he actually is Maria :haha: I think :lol:

I think it was a phrase that Jamie used just like Maria :lol:

Like he said I did everything good but at the end of the day she has a W or something :lol:

Sp!ffy
Aug 13th, 2010, 10:32 PM
JamieOwen IS MARIA SHARAPOVA! I knew it!!!!

Jovana.
Aug 13th, 2010, 10:32 PM
our memory sux miloti :haha:

Mr.Sharapova
Aug 13th, 2010, 10:50 PM
:hysteric:

nelsondan
Aug 14th, 2010, 01:01 AM
Q. How did you relax off the court? Like the tournament here there isn't as many things to do as there is in New York obviously. Do you go to a movie?

translation: What have you and sasha been doing this week?

A. umm, I have been showing him by my example, just what is required in terms of dedication, concentration, and focus, for a person to be a true world class athlete.

Reptilia
Aug 15th, 2010, 11:46 AM
Anyone have the interview from the semi?

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 15th, 2010, 02:20 PM
August 14, 2010

Maria Sharapova

CINCINNATI, OHIO

M. SHARAPOVA/A. Pavlyuchenkova
6-4, 3-6, 6-2

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Did the power failure upset your rhythm on your serve? You had just broken to go 2-1 in second and lost your next three service games. Kind of curious what happened there.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I think, um, it kind of changed many things. You know, not that I did much different on the serve. I think I just, you know, maybe stepped back a little bit and let her play -- I mean, I wasn't doing the things that I was doing to get up in the match. I really stopped doing that.
I made her hit some -- by giving her the opportunity to step in and hit some shots, she did what she does best what, get her in the semis. So I think I really gave her the chance to come back into the match.

Q. Speaking of the light failure, has that ever happened to you before?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No.

Q. What are your impressions of her game? It was the first time you played her. Talk a little bit about her game. What do you think she does really well?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, mean, I think she plays really good tennis. You know, she has a big first serve, and you know, she has pretty big groundstrokes, likes to change direction a lot.
But overall, I think you can see how, you know she's been doing really well and that she's beaten good players.

Q. Did she play the way you expected her to?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I didn't really know what to expect, to be honest, because I've never played against her. Just watching is never really the same as getting a feel from the other side of the net, the way the ball is coming off her racquet or the intensity or where she stands on the court, things like that. So just kind of pick up on that.

Q. What did Michael tell you at the beginning the third set just before you came out on court?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: He just told me to step in a little bit more and be aggressive. I was giving her a lot of time. And because she was standing so far back, I even gave her more time. I really didn't utilize my own strengths.

Q. What do you think about playing Kim tomorrow?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I'm excited. It's been a while since we played, and both of us have been through different things in our lives. She's been back for a year now and I've been back for a year and a half, and we still haven't played against each other. I'm excited to play her again.

Q. About her game, you're 3-4 in head to head meetings with her. You've won the last three after losing the first four. What is it about her game that you've figured out that has enabled you to be successful the last three times you played her?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't know. I think when I first played her I was quite young. At that point, it was a learning experience. You know, it was wonderful to be able to play against someone like her. You learn a lot of things from someone that has a lot of experience and knows what to do in different situations and the way she plays.
I think I learned from those experiences and from her game. You know, when you play someone a few times, you look for things you want to change, especially when you lose four times in a row.
But like I said, it's different because we haven't played in a while, so it's tough to look back at those. I mean, she's a great player. She gets a lot of balls back. Great mover around the court. A lot waste pace on her shots. It's always challenging when we play against each other.

Q. I believe Pam mentioned on TV that if the results keep coming for you throughout the US Open Series that you'll have a pretty good shot at getting a top 8 seeding at the US Open. Is that something that you're aware of, and does that motivate you?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: At the US Open?

Q. Right.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, no. Motivation is just to keep winning and keep winning match. The more you win, the better ranking you're gonna get and the better seed you're gonna be the better you're gonna get.
So it's not really about where I'm gonna be seeded in the tournament a couple weeks from now.

Q. Do you think that you'll have a slight disadvantage tomorrow just from the late start and the fact you had to go three sets? Is there anything you can do to try to give it your best shot tomorrow?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, I've dealt with it the past. It's not the first time. I mean, I've had times when I played at night and I came out and won the final; sometimes I lost it.
I'm not sure. We'll see.

Q. When you're serving, do you hear the photographers clicking sometimes, and does it disturb?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No. No, I don't hear them.

Q. Kim said the important thing for her tomorrow is above all to be playing good tennis at this time of the year. After losing the final at Stanford, do you have a real extra motivation to go out and win a final?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, absolutely, because the final is always the last one of the tournament. (Duh!) There are no matches after that in this event, even though you may have to go to the next one and play again.
All your motivation is on that particular match because it is the last one, so I certainly want to give it all I have, all the energy and the power and everything.
Yeah, absolutely.

Q. You had 62% on first serves. Started somewhat low but then really increased, especially towards the third set. Are you pretty happy with that?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I mean, she stands so far back on the returns that it's, you know, tough to get really easy points. But I think the first ball was more important than anything else today.

End of FastScripts


:)

Vodkapova
Aug 15th, 2010, 02:49 PM
Maria, please tell me how much "all" of your power and energy is. :lol:

Good luck tomorrow. :bigclap:

perseus2006
Aug 15th, 2010, 02:59 PM
Maria, please tell me how much "all" of your power and energy is. :lol:

Good luck tomorrow. :bigclap:

I'll answer for her, as only a presumptuous like I am would do!

"All of it" is definitely more than a teaspoon but less than the 5 gallon pail a rested Pova would normally bring. Actually, I don't think Pova even knows where she is at. She'll find out by the middle of the first set, though...

Pump it up, Pova! Remember what you can do like in the third set last night: 81% first serves winning 88% of them! Go and Do it again.

Vartan
Aug 15th, 2010, 03:50 PM
She seems to be unaware of the possibility of being a top 8 seed if she wins today and makes SF's @ Montreal. Hopefully this is not her giving up.

nelsondan
Aug 15th, 2010, 05:33 PM
Several of us noted just how far back pav was staying---Maria mentioned it in the interview.

The clueless media seemed to be unaware, or dismissed it as not anything significant. I thought it was, because I do not remember anyone staying that far back, especially on second serves. There were times, especially on some second serves, that it enabled her to calculate where Maria was going with the serve and anticipate. Maria seemed to notice it, and dealt with it in the third set.

gc-spurs
Aug 15th, 2010, 08:42 PM
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, absolutely, because the final is always the last one of the tournament. (Duh!) There are no matches after that in this event, even though you may have to go to the next one and play again.

ummm thanks for the lesson...

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 16th, 2010, 02:45 PM
Maria Sharapova

CINCINNATI, OHIO

K. CLIJSTERS/M. Sharapova
2-6, 7-6, 6-2

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How much do you think fatigue might have been a factor today? You played 12 sets of tennis over six consecutive days without a day off. Do you think that may have influenced it a little bit?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Maybe towards the later stages in the match. But, you know, it's hard to say. If.
I would have won a couple of those points in the second, then we wouldn't really be talking about fatigue.

Q. When you asked for the challenge and it wasn't granted seemed to lose your way a little bit. I was sitting on that line and I saw that it was a double fault. Unfortunately, the chair didn't give the opportunity to have that challenge. Can you take us through that time frame.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, you know, there are different moments in the match which we can talk about but, you know, it's tough to pinpoint just one of those.
Obviously we don't know. Maybe what you saw was wrong, too. I mean, we don't know. Doesn't matter now.

Q. Is your foot okay? I saw that you had a medical tight for your foot or ankle.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I haven't really had any time to talk with the trainer or the doctor and see how it is. It just kind of flared up out of nowhere, so we'll see how it is.

Q. What do you think are the things that you did well today?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I think, you know, I served in the first couple sets pretty good. You know, I was keeping her guessing a lot and keeping her off balance in the rallies.
Um, yeah, I mean, I felt like I had control of the match.

Q. Do you feel that your game was effective when you came back after the rain delay? Conditions were a lot different. Seemed like you were just steam rolling right through the match, and then it got a little bit cooler and breezier. Do you think that affected your game at all?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it certainly gave her time to relax, and -- more than the conditions themselves, I think it was about just maybe her going in and having a chance to think about what she needs to do differently.
She came out and started playing really good tennis, you know. Yeah.

Q. Were you dwelling on the three match points you had at all during the rain delay? That had to be tough having the break come when it did.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, but there's not much to it. She had two good first serves and we had another long rally and I went for a winner. So those are obviously -- we could talk about those as well.
They're there are different points in the match that maybe I should have done something differently.

Q. What did Michael tell you at the start of third set?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Just forget about what happened and, you know, we still have -- the match is not over. Just keep your head up. Keep going for it.

Q. When you handed your racquet to your coach, was it a stringing issue or a grip issue?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Grip.

Q. Did your ankle start bothering you in the third game of the third set? How long had it been bothering you?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: It's not the ankle. It's more the heel area. No, it was actually -- I think it was the second or third game when we came back.

Q. How do you feel about your game as far as preparation for the US Open?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Good. I've had a solid week. Obviously I would have loved to win this tournament, but didn't happen today. I just look forward to the next one.

Q. Do you think this puts you in doubt for Canada?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Like I said, I still haven't really gotten a chance to evaluate anything. I will, and I'll probably see how it feels tomorrow.

Q. What do you think you might want to try to do differently in your next match with Kim that you maybe didn't do today?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, it's tough to say. Because I was up a set and a break before we went off court, so I was doing many things right.
And then a change of things, and all of a sudden she looks like the one that was up a set and a break. That's the way tennis is. I think I have to stick to my game plan and just execute it.

Q. What did you do? You had like an hour and 15 minutes. What did you do during that time? Are you just sitting in the locker room?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, pretty much. Just eat something and listen to music. Nothing special.

Q. How do you feel about your service motion? I've seen you change it throughout the year from full motion to and abbreviated motion, and now you're back to a full motion. Do you feel that you'll stick with it, or how do you feel about your service motion?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, my motion is feeling much more comfortable. Overall, my serve is feeling a lot better than it did last year at this time of year.
Last year I was just trying to adjust to my shoulder. Now I'm just -- I'm not worried about that anymore. I'm just playing tennis.

Q. Looked like you were missing your first serve a little bit more in the tiebreak. Is that a fair assessment? If so, what was giving you the problem there?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I was having trouble landing on this foot.

Q. Which foot was it?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: The left one. You know, yeah, my service percentage absolutely went down in the breaker and the third set.

Q. What were the conditions like on court as the storm front moved in? The wind was whipping around and it was getting dark. It looked like it was hard to play?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, you're playing a day match, and within 30 seconds you're almost playing a night match. And then you get off the court and you're playing a day match again.
So those are just the circumstances that we have to be used to. It's an outdoor event, and anything's possible.

Q. You were getting a lot of velocity on both first and second serves. You hit a second serve well over 100 miles an hour. Is that something you were making a conscious effort to go for more power on your serve?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, you know, against an opponent like Kim you have to serve well and hit your spots well. It's not always just about power. But, you know, I want to make sure that I definitely had something on the ball, or else she's a good returner.

Q. You converted 4 of your 12 breakpoints today. What was giving you the problem when you got a breakpoint on her serve? Did she do anything different?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, yeah, maybe I could have taken my chances a little bit more, but I didn't. (Laughter.)

End of FastScripts


...

Jovana.
Aug 16th, 2010, 02:55 PM
poor gurl :hug:

Break My Rapture
Aug 16th, 2010, 03:06 PM
:awww: :sad:

It's so obvious she still isn't as confident in her serve as she was before the shoulder injury, hence why her serve deserts her in important moments.

Vartan
Aug 16th, 2010, 03:09 PM
Q. Looked like you were missing your first serve a little bit more in the tiebreak. Is that a fair assessment? If so, what was giving you the problem there?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I was having trouble landing on this foot.

Q. Which foot was it?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: The left one. You know, yeah, my service percentage absolutely went down in the breaker and the third set.

:sobbing:

Jovana.
Aug 16th, 2010, 03:34 PM
I honestly think the foot just got some cramps and started hurting, I mean she did play such long matches, and I hope some good massage will take care of it in no time!

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 16th, 2010, 03:36 PM
I don't the injury is that serious either...

cyannnnn
Aug 16th, 2010, 03:36 PM
she just need a break

rucolo
Aug 18th, 2010, 02:06 PM
Links to the Cincinnati interviews::p

R1, Maria def. Kuznetsova:
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=65455
http://assets.usta.com/assets/663/15/M%20%20Sharapova%20-%2008%2010%2010.pdf

R2, Maria def. Petkovic:
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=65477
http://assets.usta.com/assets/663/15/M%20%20Sharapova%20-%2008%2011%2010.pdf

R3, Maria def. A.Radwanska:
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=65541
http://assets.usta.com/assets/663/15/M%20%20Sharapova%20-%2008%2012%2010.pdf

QF, Maria def. Bartoli:
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=65600
http://assets.usta.com/assets/663/15/M%20%20Sharapova%20-%2008%2013%2010.pdf

SF, Maria def. Pavlyuchenkova:
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=65625
http://assets.usta.com/assets/663/15/M%20%20Sharapova%20-%2008%2014%2010.pdf

Final, Clijsters def. Maria:
http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=65654
http://assets.usta.com/assets/663/15/M%20%20Sharapova%20-%2008%2015%2010.pdf

gc-spurs
Aug 19th, 2010, 04:12 AM
Just for good vibes...

http://tennis.fanhouse.com/2010/08/18/wta-power-rankings-maria-sharapova-steps-it-up/


o Knox Bardeen
o Tennis Writer

Maria Sharapova

I'm not talking about looks when I say that Maria Sharapova is hot!

Don't get me wrong, I'm not discounting her beauty. I'd just rather talk about how she's dominating the U.S. Open Series right now.

Sharapova has made it to the finals of both U.S. Open Series tournaments that she has entered. Now, she lost both, but the fact that she's playing deep into tournaments again shows me that she's almost ready to reemerge in Flushing next month at the final Grand Slam event of the season.

Along the way over Sharapova's two weeks of play, she's beaten two top 10 players two more in the top 20. Her game is sizzling right now.

As for the rest of the power rankings this week, I've only considered the U.S. Open Series matches, nothing else. That's a bit of a stretch from the normal full-season view I usually consider, but that's OK, I'm an American and I'm supposed to give hard-court tennis special attention.

So, before you comment and belittle me for not including either of the Williams sisters, remember that they haven't played any hard-court events lately.

* 1. Maria Sharapova | Record: 29-8 | Previous Power Ranking: 7 | WTA: 12
She hasn't won a tournament yet, but Sharapova is playing extremely well right now. She was defeated in the finals at Stanford by Victoria Azarenka and then, once again, in the finals by Kim Clijsters in Cincinnati.

* 2. Agnieszka Radwanska | Record: 28-14 | Previous Power Ranking: 8 | WTA: 9
Radwanska is benefiting from playing a lot this hard-court season as well. She made it to the semis in Stanford before losing to Maria Sharapova, and then lost in the finals in San Diego to Svetlana Kuznetsova in three sets. Once again, Sharapova did her in. This time in Cincinnati.

* 3. Kim Clijsters | Record: 26-5 | Previously Unranked | WTA: 4
Clijsters has only played once in the U.S. Open Series, but the one entry was a winner. She beat Sharapova to win in Cincinnati and only dropped one set along the way.

* 4. Victoria Azarenka | Record: 30-14 | Previous Power Ranking: 6 | WTA: 13
Sure, she lost in the first round of the Cincinnati tournament to Ana Ivanovic, but she started the U.S. Open Series off for the women by winning in Stanford. To do that she had to beat Marion Bartoli, Samantha Stosur and Sharapova.

* 5. Flavia Pennetta | Record: 38-17 | Previously Unranked | WTA: 20
The Italian has been impressive all summer and has not been ousted from a tournament before the quarterfinal round since Wimbledon. Pennetta has impressively defeated Hantuchova and Kelybanova in straight sets at the Rogers Cup. She also defeated Samantha Stosur earlier this summer in San Diego.

* 6. Svetlana Kuznetsova | Record: 18-12 | Previously Unranked | WTA: 16
The two-time Grand Slam champion won in San Diego, defeating Pennetta and Radwanska on her way to the title. Although she slipped up against Sharapova in Cincinnati last week, she handled the rising Russian star, Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, in first round action at the Rogers Cup.

* 7. Samantha Stosur | Record: 34-12 | Previous Power Ranking: 3 | WTA: 6
Since losing in her second match at San Diego, the Australian has been out of action. The French Open finalist will look to use her strong kick serve to her advantage on the hard court in Flushing Meadows where she should prosper.

* 8. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova | Record: 33-15 | Previously Unranked | WTA: 22
The 19-year-old Russian is rising up the ranks on the WTA tour and creating havoc for players on the tour. She rattled off nine straight wins – including a title at the Istanbul Cup -- before losing to compatriot Maria Sharapova in the semifinal round at Cincinnati.

* 9. Daniela Hantuchova | Record: 24-17 | Previously Unranked | WTA: 28
Hantuchova's form has been in question of late, and she has not been able to find any groove to her game. What looked like a promising summer in San Diego, has turned disastrous by exiting in the first round of her last two tournaments in Cincinnati and Montreal.

* 10. Ana Ivanovic | Record: 16-13 | Previously Unranked | WTA: 39
Ivanovic, who did not receive a wild card to play in Montreal, injured her foot and had to retire just as she was regaining her form in Cincinnati. She impressively paved her way through Cincinnati before having to retire in the semifinal round at Cincinnati to Kim Clijsters. Her injury may keep her out of the U.S. Open.


In one person's opinion :)
Makes me excited for when the Spurs are on top of the power rankings :p

lefty24
Aug 19th, 2010, 04:52 AM
Sharapova is a major Slam factor again.

http://msn.foxsports.com/tennis/story/maria-sharapova-is-a-major-grand-slam-contender-once-again-081610

Maria Sharapova will enter the U.S. Open with her best chance of winning a major since she returned from shoulder surgery in October of 2008.

But as she showed in her late breakdown in her 2-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2 loss against Kim Clijsters in the final of the Cincinnati Women's Open on Sunday, she's going to have to pull something special out of herself physically and mentally if she's going to win an elusive fourth Grand Slam title.

If she had been able to take care of three match points ahead 5-3 in the second set, or serve out the match at 5-4, or hold on to a 3-0 lead in the tiebreaker, Sharapova would have walked away from the tournament with her head held very high.

Instead, she will likely brood over the result for awhile. She won't be able to erase the sour taste of Cincinnati at this week's tournament in Montreal either — she pulled out of the event Monday due to a foot injury she sustained in the match against Clijsters.

While Clijsters — the defending U.S. Open champion — played extremely well to come back and seize control of the match, Sharapova is sure to ruminate on the one ridiculous backhand unforced error she made on the third of her match points, how she double faulted away the ninth game of the second set and how in the breaker, she committed five unforced errors, including two double faults.

By the third set, she was all but gone, receiving treatment for an ankle injury down 1-2 and losing steam off the ground and on her serve.

But Sharapova has always proved to be resilient, and if she can manage to put her harrowing loss to Clijsters aside, she'll realize that she's played better in her last two tournaments — Stanford and Cincinnati — than she has the rest of the year and she is close to being able to close out big-time matches again. Sharapova is right there with a very up-and-down WTA top 20.

Prior to Stanford, Sharapova hadn't beaten a top 25 player since October 2009, but there and in Cincinnati she beat No. 23 Zheng Jie, No. 6 Elena Dementieva, No. 9 Radwanska (twice), two-time Grand Slam victor Svetlana Kuznetsova, No. 22 Marion Bartoli and the red-hot teenager Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova before Clijsters used her stronger legs to trip her up.

“These tournaments have been great for me. I've played against different types of players, some have been challenging and I've had to come through,” Sharapova said.

Only one player — top-ranked Serena Williams — has shown herself capable of dominating the majors this season, and Serena will enter the U.S. Open not having played a match since winning her fourth Wimbledon crown due to a foot injury.

Even though Serena is certainly capable of working her way into the tournament, in her previous three title runs in New York (1999, 2002 and 2008), the 13-time Grand Slam winner has always contested at least a few matches before stepping into Arthur Ashe Stadium.

Since Sharapova returned from elbow problems two weeks before the French Open, she has compiled a 23-6 record and has lost to only to one player out of the top 25 — then-No. 30 Lucie Safarova in Madrid.

It's been nearly three years since Sharapova won her last Grand Slam at the 2008 Australian Open and she's overdue to make a strong run. Since her shoulder surgery, she has only come into two Grand Slams with her formidable serve at pre-surgery speeds — early this summer at the French Open and Wimbledon. In those locales, she pushed both multiple Grand Slam champions Justine Henin and Serena in respectable defeats.

But just because she's performed well at times during those matches, she was not pleased with being on the losing end. She expects to play well and it's a rare day when she comes off court when she thinks she was simply outplayed.

“You have to be a little cocky," Sharapova told FOXSports.com. “As athletes we have to be or we wouldn't be so tough on court. After the Serena match I knew I played solid, but I was bummed out because I know I could have won. I believed that then and still do.”

When she hasn't been too pooped from playing in back-to-back night and day matches, she's playing just as well as when she won her Australian Open crown and has more options in her bag.

She's junked the abbreviated service motion that she was using to protect her shoulder, and now she's going for both her first and second serves. While she is still double faulting too much, one of the reasons for that is she's hitting her second serve in the mid-90s and giving herself little margin for error as she's trying to place them very deep.

While she's criticized for double faulting, her mentality is that she's much more apt to hold service games when her foes can't jump on soft second serves and she'd rather double fault once a game than see three outright return winners scream past her.

Sharapova takes much the same attitude with her return of serves, consistently going for outright winners rather than just trying to get them back in the court. While on bad days this might be too risky of a proposition, her attitude puts tremendous pressure on her opponents.

Unlike her first few years on tour, she occasionally uses the slap and charge off second serves and while she much prefers a swing volley to a standard one, she is willing to stand her ground at the net to pull off spectacular volleys.

On great days, all those positive elements to her game shine through, but on mediocre ones, she remains vulnerable as the field has slightly improved since 2008. Plus, even though she's quicker than she once was and plays respectable defense, Sharapova is not a burner and can be yanked off the court in long rallies. She is not a brilliant shotmaker on the run and needs to dictate to win, which was evidenced in her loss to Clijsters.

Sharapova is not a patient person by nature. Not raising one trophy after the next, or not being able to deliver her money shots on a dime did bother her. She says she keeps things in perspective, but that perspective also includes a belief that she will win another major.

"I worked on patience so long during the injury and obviously wanted good results and wanted to go far in the Slams and this year it hasn't happened. But that the way it is and I'm not going to quit because I didn't,'' said Sharapova, who won her sole U.S. Open crown in 2006. "I was No. 1 in summer, I got injured and had just won a Slam (the Aussie Open) and (then) I'm out of the game the next nine months. I'm not one to sit and say what could have been and I've said this from day one that I'm just really fortunate to have come back.”

Assuming her foot injury heals in time, Sharapova has established herself as a substantial contender for this year's U.S. Open. With Henin out and both the Williams sisters hurt, only Clijsters and Kuznetsova will likely enter the tournament healthy and with resumes close to Sharapova's.

So now the 23-year-old Sharapova has edged closer to being able to declare herself a legend in the making once again. But whether she can put it all together in New York remains to be seen.

“I want to perform my best at the Open and peak there,” she said.

She went from not beating a top 40 player to being a major slam contender. :p
These positive articles are making me really happy. I have really good feeling about the US Open.

gc-spurs
Aug 19th, 2010, 05:04 AM
Good draw + day in between matches :drool:

Sp!ffy
Aug 19th, 2010, 06:04 AM
I don't want to be a debby downer but they've been saying Maria's a "slam contender" since RG 09 :lol:

However, I think she is a definite slam contender now...more than ever before at least. :shrug:


And wow, I never heard that quote from Maria where she said that she thought she could have beat Serena at Wimbledon.

gc-spurs
Aug 19th, 2010, 10:35 AM
Least they can back it up quantitatively this time round. Not just for her fighting spirit.

cyannnnn
Aug 19th, 2010, 11:21 AM
Maria Sharapova returns to her roots in the wasteland of Chernobyl
You would think that Maria Sharapova's trek through the irradiated wilderness of eastern Belarus should end, definitively, her portrayal as the selfish little rich girl.

By Oliver Brown in Gomel, Belarus
Published: 7:30AM BST 19 Aug 2010

Future hope: Maria Sharapova with children from the stricken area of Gomel, near the Chernobyl disaster site Photo: A.Poltier-Mutal/UNDP
But for the young woman who has established herself as the highest-paid female athlete on the planet, some trappings of extravagance must endure even in the most blasted landscapes.
The scene is a remote regional airfield outside Gomel. Its terminal building is a stark Soviet monolith and it is scattered with rusting Tupolevs you would only dare to board after several vodkas. But this is far from an average day, as a vision in the flawless midday sky soon shows.

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For coming in to land is one gleaming and highly incongruous private jet, bearing the self-styled princess that is Miss Sharapova.
The 23 year-old, wearing a simple grey dress, emerges from the aircraft, then is garlanded with bouquets by fawning local dignitaries. My own journey involved a stopover in Vienna and a profoundly unpleasant, three-hour interrogation by consular officials at Minsk airport.
But then, Belarus is run by a repressive autocrat, Alexander Lukashenko, and announcing myself in the dead of night as a visa-less English journalist does not open quite as many doors as if I were a blonde, beautiful Russian tennis player.
Still, after a £300 payment and many rather undignified pleas for clemency, I am here in the country's heartland to watch Sharapova come home.
Well, not home exactly, but to the Chernobyl fall-out zone; to the place whose grotesque fate she escaped only fractionally. It was during the early hours of April 26, 1986, when newsreels began running with the words: "There has been a nuclear accident in the Soviet Union.
There is speculation that people have been injured, and may have died." Almost a year later, once parents Yuri and Yelena had fled the poisoned streets of Gomel for western Siberia, Maria Yuryevna Sharapova was born.
Yuri, who had to take a job on the Siberian oilfields, is accompanying her on this trip, her first to the region for 11 years.
You may remember him as the boisterous father from the Wimbledon ladies' final in 2004, driven half-mad with joy as he embraced his 17-year-old starlet, who had just swept Serena Williams aside in straight sets.
Since he is a notoriously volatile soul, Sharapova has dispensed with him as a coach, but not as a companion for her return to the land that shaped her future.
"It's very emotional," Yuri admits. "There's a big sense of her reconnecting with her roots, even though she wasn't born here. Back in '86, it was just crazy. People panicked, packed up their bags and if they had chance, tried to escape."
He was one of them, terrified by the radiation cloud gathering over Gomel and the growing incidence of neighbours falling sick. Yelena, too, who became pregnant with Maria four months after the catastrophe, has talked of the birth defects she feared would arise.
At several points during this visit Yuri, who having transplanted Sharapova to Florida aged six, spends private time with his daughter, whether walking through sun-dappled forests to share his memories or taking her to the municipal hospital to see her grandmother, Galina.
Sharapova grasps the pain of her family history and has read, voraciously, about the impact of the Chernobyl catastrophe.
She is keenly aware that 9,000 people around Gomel will die prematurely because of their exposure to radioactive dust and has not hesitated in her work as an ambassador to the region, on behalf of the United Nations Development Project.
"My dad's family still live here, so there are a lot of people I'm coming back to," she says. "I was too young to appreciate all the details, apart from the fact that there had been a big disaster, but as I grew older I became more interested, wanting to help people who had been affected or been born here.
"Too many people have forgotten about Chernobyl, but I'm determined to remember. I'm trying to help the kids who have been born since, to find a way of their own, to give them perspective."
Assuredly, the children of the 'Gomel Oblast', as this area is known, need her care and the money the attention can bring – as she discovers in Chechersk District Hospital, there has been a 1,400 per cent increase since the disaster of those being born with thyroid cancer.
Sharapova is often depicted as an ice maiden, as a shopaholic who would rather be pouting in shoots for her fashion label than be acquainted with the depths of human misery, and yet her interaction with the gravely ill children of Chechersk is affecting.
Few in the hospital's 'Fairytale room', designed for healing psychotherapy, exhibit any physical deformities, but all too many harbour cancerous tumours. Spotting one boy playing with a smiling toy fish, she tells him: "There's a kids' film called Finding Nemo. That one looks like Nemo."
After learning from the resident doctors how her donations have helped pay for more advanced cancer-screening equipment, she explains: "Those are the touching moments that make you smile, when you can witness how your efforts are helping people."
For Yuri, the experience is almost too much to bear. As I walk with him around Chechersk's arts centre, he says: "You've seen it for yourself. This town is in the middle of nowhere and it feels like nothing can happen. But you give the people hope."
It feels only fitting, then, that the children supported by her funding stage a concert in her honour. Sharapova has pledged more than £250,000 for their rehabilitation, and the UN have sought to channel this into reviving the rich musical culture that existed here before the safety test at Chernobyl's nuclear reactor No 4 went so hideously wrong.
It is hard to deny the success: Yana Grishanenko, a 10-year-old girl from the village of Krasnoye, has just won an international diploma for her singing.
"When everything is destroyed, what grows in its place?" Sharapova asks. "I want to visit these children to find out how they are doing. Tennis is only a game, but it is my platform, my opportunity to help people.
"I'd like to do more of this, when my sports career is over. I can have dresses, cars, my own fashion label, but it doesn't necessarily make me happy. Coming here, though, gives me an unbelievable feeling of happiness."
Sharapova's smile is never broader than when she stands in the evening shadow of the decrepit apartment block where her parents used to live. From a top-storey window an old woman recognises the glamorous figure in the courtyard, and tells all who care to listen about how a two-year-old Maria once cheekily tugged her hair.
Gomel might be as far removed from her cosseted California lifestyle as is possible to conceive – for one night only, she is forced to stay in the two-star Hotel Tourist, even if it is the presidential suite – but she relishes the sense of community.
I say to her it is my first time in Belarus, when we sit down to talk in Irina restaurant, which has laid on a champagne reception for her appearance.
"Culture shock, huh?" she grins. "Belarus has a tragic history, a lot of things have gone wrong for it. There's so much poverty, despair and drug abuse in these towns, but I want to make people feel greater pride in themselves.
"My connection here is very real. It's probably one of the closest places I can call home. Even though I didn't actually live here steadily, all my family are from here.
"So this is where it all started. It was a big part of my childhood. My parents took a lot of chances in their life and, growing up, I was always surrounded by those decisions – I think, in a way, I subconsciously learned from that. It really meant that they wanted me to do something that I loved in my life. I loved playing tennis, and I couldn't wait to go out on the court and play."
While Sharapova can cut a sulky figure on court, she has rarely looked happier than when delivering a tennis masterclass to Gomel students, or when meeting the three recipients of a scholarship named in her honour.
Yulia Supichenko, at 18, is never likely to have the chance to earn, like Sharapova, £15 million a year, but through her idol's commitment to giving some of that money back she will soon be enrolling at the state academy of arts to learn easel painting.
"If Chernobyl had never happened, my life would have been very different," Sharapova acknowledges. "I probably wouldn't even be playing tennis.
"It's crazy to think I could have been born in the midst of all that. I remember my mum and dad saying that it was chaos. So I'm extremely lucky that I got out of it. There are 'what ifs?' What if I was never a tennis player?
"It does cross my mind sometimes. But I don't know want to know what that feels like, but I'm really grateful for what I had and what I did, for what I became and what I achieved."
It is nearly time for Sharapova to step back inside her luxury jet. Her boyfriend, Sasha Vujacic, point guard for the Los Angeles Lakers, and Max Eisenbud, her Jerry Maguire-style agent, both seem moved by the warmth of emotion she has inspired among Chernobyl's survivors.
Alas, one so in demand cannot stay longer than 24 hours, and already she must head to Sweden to satisfy some promotional jaunt for Sony Ericsson.
But you sensed, as she took to the skies over Gomel, that her brief, powerful impressions would linger. She was taking a little of this forsaken place with her, and leaving more of herself behind.
The stark monument to the world’s worst nuclear accident
Images of the shattered sarcophagus that had encased the Chernobyl power plant started to spread around the globe on April 26, 1986, and would come to stand as grim reminders of the world’s worst nuclear accident.
On the evening shift of April 25, engineers at the No 4 reactor had embarked on an experiment to see whether the cooling pump system could still function using power from the reactor, should the back-up electricity supply fail.
At 1.23am, power surged to dangerous levels, 100 times normal. Fuel pellets in the reactor’s core started to explode, and a minute later two huge explosions ripped off the dome-shaped roof. Large amounts of radioactive debris escaped into the atmosphere. Only when radiation levels set off alarms in Sweden, over 1,000 miles away, would the Soviet Union admit that an accident had occurred. By then the disaster had released at least 100 times more radiation than the atom bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Much of the fallout was deposited in parts of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine, forcing the resettlement of more than 350,000 people. But radioactive deposits have been discovered in almost every country in the northern hemisphere. Greenpeace expects up to 93,000 cancer deaths as a direct result of the disaster.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/tennis/mariasharapova/7952877/Maria-Sharapova-returns-to-her-roots-in-the-wasteland-of-Chernobyl.html

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 19th, 2010, 11:27 AM
Fans: Evian will be co-hosting an event in New York City with Maria Sharapova, 11 AM – 7 PM August 24 at the Openhouse Gallery in SoHo.

via twitter

da2nd_14
Aug 20th, 2010, 03:49 PM
Found this on Twitter.
AllistairMcCaw:On court next door is Maria Sharapova, hitting it good. Expecting a good US Open from her.
about 1 hour ago via mobile web

so im guessing the heel is better & that she is practicing in Florida

Dieter.
Aug 20th, 2010, 04:06 PM
Found this on Twitter.
AllistairMcCaw:On court next door is Maria Sharapova, hitting it good. Expecting a good US Open from her.
about 1 hour ago via mobile web

so im guessing the heel is better & that she is practicing in Florida

:cheer: That's good news.

cyannnnn
Aug 20th, 2010, 04:08 PM
Comme les amateurs de tennis québécois, Lapierre pensait au moins compter sur la présence de Maria Sharapova, mais la Russe s'est blessée à la cheville dimanche en finale du tournoi de Cincinnati. «On avait réservé la piste d'atterrissage à Trudeau pour son jet privé, dit Lapierre. Son chum Sasha (Vujacic, le joueur de basket des Lakers de Los Angeles) m'avait même demandé le numéro de sa chambre à l'hôtel pour lui envoyer quelque chose à son arrivée. Avec ça, je ne pense pas qu'on peut dire que Sharapova ne prévoyait pas venir à Montréal...»

google translation
As tennis fans in Quebec, Lapierre thought
at least count on the presence of Maria Sharapova, but
Russia has injured his ankle in Sunday's final
Cincinnati tournament. "We had booked the track
Landing at Trudeau for his private jet, said
Lapierre. Her boyfriend Sasha (Vujacic, basketball player
Los Angeles Lakers) had even asked for the number
his room at the hotel to send something to
arrival. With that, I do not think you can say that
Sharapova does not plan to come to Montreal ... "

http://www.cyberpresse.ca/sports/tennis/coupe-rogers/201008/19/01-4307857-ciel-gris-sur-la-coupe-rogers.php

so that means she really intends to come in montreal

JadeFox
Aug 20th, 2010, 04:39 PM
Found this on Twitter.
AllistairMcCaw:On court next door is Maria Sharapova, hitting it good. Expecting a good US Open from her.
about 1 hour ago via mobile web

so im guessing the heel is better & that she is practicing in Florida

:cheer: That's good news.

Maybe it's just one of those temporary boo boos and she'll be ready for the US Open. :woohoo:

Aaron!
Aug 20th, 2010, 04:43 PM
Found this on Twitter.
AllistairMcCaw:On court next door is Maria Sharapova, hitting it good. Expecting a good US Open from her.
about 1 hour ago via mobile web

so im guessing the heel is better & that she is practicing in Florida

Great news :)

da2nd_14
Aug 20th, 2010, 05:48 PM
From the same guy on Twitter

AllistairMcCaw:Yep, foot looks good from here! I think with another week preparing it should be ok.
about 1 hour ago via Twitter for BlackBerry®

Jack89
Aug 20th, 2010, 10:15 PM
Nice to see her foot is healing good

slamchamp
Aug 21st, 2010, 12:57 AM
Thank god we have a spy:angel:

crux
Aug 21st, 2010, 01:19 PM
Found this on Twitter.
AllistairMcCaw:On court next door is Maria Sharapova, hitting it good. Expecting a good US Open from her.
about 1 hour ago via mobile web

so im guessing the heel is better & that she is practicing in Florida

AllistairMcCaw, sorry but Who is he??

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 21st, 2010, 02:51 PM
^^I think he's Michaella Krajicek's coach.

slamchamp
Aug 21st, 2010, 04:58 PM
^^I think he's Michaella Krajicek's coach.Shouldn't he be focusing on his player?:lol: :p

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 21st, 2010, 05:16 PM
^^He might just be the fitness coach. He's also involved with Malisse and training at Bollettieri's.:shrug:

Jovana.
Aug 21st, 2010, 05:26 PM
Shouldn't he be focusing on his player?:lol: :p

How can you focus on anything but Maria when she's around :shrug:

Jack89
Aug 21st, 2010, 07:49 PM
Shouldn't he be focusing on his player?:lol: :p

Krajicek and her coach are in a relationship too!

Wonder if she knew he was checking out Maria whilst they were practising. :lol:

MaitaBaby
Aug 22nd, 2010, 03:28 AM
Who doesn't check her out?

MaitaBaby
Aug 22nd, 2010, 09:44 AM
From Masha's FB:

Hot hot hot!!!! I am traning hard back home in Florida and the weather is brutal!! I am looking forward to getting to NY next week. I hope everyone is having a good weekend.

Was posted around 5:45AM Florida time. :weirdo:

Vodkapova
Aug 22nd, 2010, 09:46 AM
Was posted around 5:45AM Florida time. :weirdo:

:haha:

She's being naughty. http://www.jonrb.com/emoticons/kinky.gif

cyannnnn
Aug 22nd, 2010, 09:51 AM
Just get up or go to sleep after a party
But 5 am....

MaitaBaby
Aug 22nd, 2010, 09:53 AM
Nobody gets up at 5 in the morning on a Sunday or updates their Facebook about training after a drunken night out. :lol:

Even if it's PR that's updating this, it's still an odd time. :weirdo:

Jacey
Aug 22nd, 2010, 10:10 AM
Nobody gets up at 5 in the morning on a Sunday or updates their Facebook about training after a drunken night out. :lol:

Even if it's PR that's updating this, it's still an odd time. :weirdo:

:drink: I'll drink to that!

Lachy
Aug 22nd, 2010, 10:13 AM
Maybe she got up early to hit the gym

Break My Rapture
Aug 22nd, 2010, 11:08 AM
From Masha's FB:



Was posted around 5:45AM Florida time. :weirdo:
:spit: Hence the spelling mistake.

denny5576
Aug 22nd, 2010, 02:08 PM
she wake up so early because simply is traveling today to NY

gc-spurs
Aug 23rd, 2010, 10:51 AM
Masha makes another top something list
Underranked!

Celebrity malware bait list - beware super hot downloads! Part 2
August 22nd, 2010 10:49 am

Maria Sharapova downloads are likely to carry malware
Photo: Wiki Commons

Earlier this week we reported that Cameron Diaz led the list of the most dangerous celebrity downloads, as reported by antivirus company McAfee. Search strings using Diaz's name have a one-in-ten chance of coming up with a site infected with or spreading malware.

What other celebrities make the top list of the most dangerous downloads?

Dangerous Athletes: Tennis stars Maria Sharapova and Andy Roddick came in at (#13) and (#14) respectively. Most of the risky sites were uncovered when searching for screensavers featuring these athletes.

http://www.examiner.com/canada-social-media-in-canada/celebrity-malware-bait-list-beware-super-hot-downloads-part-2http://www.examiner.com/canada-social-media-in-canada/celebrity-malware-bait-list-beware-super-hot-downloads-part-2

Vartan
Aug 23rd, 2010, 11:39 AM
:lol:

Break My Rapture
Aug 23rd, 2010, 12:00 PM
:spit:

Vodkapova
Aug 23rd, 2010, 12:11 PM
:scared:

Jovana.
Aug 23rd, 2010, 04:22 PM
she's a hot dangerous download :inlove:

Sp!ffy
Aug 24th, 2010, 12:14 AM
No wonder why I have so many viruses :bigcry:

Sp!ffy
Aug 24th, 2010, 12:14 AM
....just kidding :unsure:

Jacey
Aug 24th, 2010, 06:48 PM
Want to guess what made the Yahoo front page news stories....

http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/blog/ball_dont_lie/post/Sasha-Vujacic-may-be-the-NBA-s-best-tennis-playe?urn=nba-264745

Break My Rapture
Aug 24th, 2010, 06:49 PM
I saw it too. :hearts:

Mr.Sharapova
Aug 24th, 2010, 06:51 PM
They are so in love.

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 24th, 2010, 07:03 PM
Oh, super cute. She'll help him with his backhand, stamina and mental preparation, and he'll help her with missing open corner three-pointers, annoying almost everyone and the development of hilarious nicknames. Machine zing!

:rolls:



j/k They're cute. :lol:

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 24th, 2010, 11:56 PM
Sharapova's Long Scrap Back
Two Years After Shoulder Surgery, Questions Remain About Her Serve—and Her Toughness


By MATTHEW FUTTERMAN
AND TOM PERROTTA

Maria Sharapova is one of the hardest workers on the women's tennis tour. :yeah: She beats balls across nets and labors through agility training for hours on end. Those who know her and have coached her say unlike a lot of pros, she actually seems to enjoy playing tennis.

She was such a precocious talent and has been so prolifically photographed in glamorous advertising campaigns it's easy to forget that she's only 23, that she won three Grand Slam titles before attaining legal drinking age and has reached No. 1 on four different occasions—most recently in May, 2008, after she took the Australian Open without dropping a set.

As the U.S. Open approaches, Ms. Sharapova is still trying to fully regain the form she lost that same year after undergoing shoulder surgery, a procedure that sapped much of the bite from her lethal serve.

Last year, as she double-faulted her way across the globe while using an abbreviated service motion, the sport's chattering classes were willing to give her an injury pass. But this year, after she bowed out in the first round at the Australian, suffered an elbow injury, then was ingloriously bounced in the third round at the French and the fourth round at Wimbledon, there's a big question hanging in the air: Will Maria Sharapova ever be one of the world's great tennis players again?

So far this season, Ms. Sharapova has two tournament wins, both at small events where she didn't play anyone who was ranked higher than No. 49. At the tour stop in Cincinnati two weeks ago, she showed flashes of her old form, making it to the final against Kim Clijsters, the defending U.S. Open champion.

Then Ms. Sharapova blew three match points. Then the rain came. When the players returned to the court more than an hour later, Ms. Clijsters ran Ms. Sharapova ragged, ultimately prevailing in three sets.

Ms. Sharapova injured her heel and had to withdraw from this week's tour stop in Montreal. She is expected to be fit for the U.S. Open.

Robert Lansdorp, the California coach who fine-tuned Ms. Sharapova's strokes when she was a girl, watched his former pupil's collapse on television. "When I saw her play the first set I said, 'this girl could win the U.S. Open,'" he said. "I was disappointed that she let it go. She has been doing that the last year. She used to be tough all the way through, that's why she was number one."

After undergoing rotator cuff surgery in October 2008, Ms. Sharapova spent more than six months on the sidelines and dropped to No. 126 in the world. When she came back, she was forced to shorten her service motion to compensate for the weakness in her shoulder—which led to a torrent of double faults. "To go from something that you've done all your life, which is pretty loose and flowy, to something really short, it took a while," she said at a press conference before a tournament in Stanford, Calif. last month. "It was just really inconvenient."

Finally in the fall of 2009, her shoulder was strong enough for her to drop the truncated motion for her old form, where her racket head grazes the ground before whipping around in a full loop. Still, her serve seems a work in progress. Ms. Sharapova barely cracks the top 10 on the women's tour in total aces and isn't in the top 10 in break points saved, first-serve percentage or the percentage of points won on her second serve.

Mr. Lansdorp has a theory about this: "She's tossing the ball too frickin' high," he said. "It looks like she wants to play tennis with Jesus. :haha: Her elbow is not up early enough."

With a weakened serve, opponents can exploit the 6-foot-2 Ms. Sharapova's limited mobility, especially on fast courts. "When you're that tall, unless you're super-athletic, if you don't have that weapon in the serve like you had before, you're not going to have all those free points that you need," said Nick Bollettieri, her former coach. "Once the ball is in play five, six, or seven times, the tide begins to go against her." Ms. Sharapova declined to be interviewed for this story.

"There are not a lot of players who come back from shoulder surgery," said Max Eisenbud, an agent at IMG worldwide who has worked with Ms. Sharapova since she was a child. "Here's a woman who could be sitting on the beach but instead she's working her tail off." :worship:

Mary Carillo, the longtime tennis analyst, said Ms. Sharapova is still one of the favorites at the Open, but she will never be a player who can grind out victories against better opponents when she and her serve aren't at their best.

And until her ranking improves—she's currently ranked 16th—she won't be seeded high enough to avoid top players before the late rounds.

"Only Serena is ahead of her in terms of willpower," Ms. Carillo said. "You look at the competition. Serena has been laid off, Venus hasn't won anything off grass in years. How can you not take seriously someone like Maria? Yet the court is very fast at the U.S. Open, and that may not be a great thing for her."

Mr. Lansdorp agreed that Ms. Sharapova could win another Grand Slam title, or more. "She has to get that old self back," he said. "Sometimes, she's unbeatable."

:)

Nina.
Aug 25th, 2010, 12:01 AM
She used to be tough all the way through, that's why she was number one.

:sobbing: I want that Masha back :awww:

Mr.Sharapova
Aug 25th, 2010, 12:01 AM
The Jesus thing was hilarious!

And yeah sometimes she is unbeatable.Maria win USO!

nelsondan
Aug 25th, 2010, 12:29 AM
Lansdorp's remarks seem calculated to catch Maria's attention with the message "demote (or dump) Mike, and hire me, Maria".

madmax
Aug 25th, 2010, 06:24 AM
I actually agree with Landsdorp that her ball toss is a mess at times and cost her plenty of important matches so far. Joyce better do his thang and employ the most effective tossing technique for her, because these close loses are getting damn annoying and US Open is no place for experiments

-NAJ-
Aug 25th, 2010, 11:08 AM
;)

Maria Sharapova helped the Serbian church in California
Was it because of love for the Slovenian basketball player of Serbian origin, Alexander Sasha Vujacic or religious solidarity, Maria Sharapova has recently generously helped SPC (Serbian Orthodox Church), California. Beautiful Russian donated tennis rackets with her autograph, which were then sold for $ 4,000 at auction, exclusively in the latest issue written show "Arena 92".
Beauty from the tennis courts is in contact with the Serbian Orthodox Church in Orange County California district came over boyfriend, basketball LA Lakers Sasha Vujacic, who for years engaged in humanitarian work within the Serbian diaspora in the U.S.. For this gesture, the Russian picked up the sympathy of our people in California, and soon they could become more like, given the fact that the information appeared to be the famous couple engaged. A big wedding would therefore easily could happen just in one of the temples of Theology in California, where Maria and Sasha now live!

gc-spurs
Aug 25th, 2010, 11:49 AM
Whoa I didn't know She-she's real name was Aleksander. Thats wayyyy cooler. He just got some points with me.

Vodkapova
Aug 25th, 2010, 11:52 AM
Aleksandar >>>>>>> Sasha.

I'm going to call him that from now on. Alex. :lol:

Jovana.
Aug 25th, 2010, 02:24 PM
he's Serb? :speakles: Serbian church? :speakles: okay this changes things, hai Sasha :hearts: :bowdown:

Mr.Sharapova
Aug 25th, 2010, 03:41 PM
Well he is not Serb Serb lol

Jovana.
Aug 25th, 2010, 04:01 PM
Well he is not Serb Serb lol

Well I got that lol.

-NAJ-
Aug 25th, 2010, 04:18 PM
he's Serb? :speakles: Serbian church? :speakles: okay this changes things, hai Sasha :hearts: :bowdown:

He was born in Slovenia have Slo passport but have Serbian origin
Few years ago Sasha wanted to play for Serbian pro team but there was a problem because he played for Slovenian national juniors team and there is rule that about that. he had administrative problem

His father Vaso Vujačić is a Serbian basketball coach.
If you look at his site he is helping Serbian Orthodox Church all around the world and it's not the 1st time that Sharapova took participation in helping SOC

slamchamp
Aug 25th, 2010, 04:43 PM
he's Serb? :speakles: Serbian church? :speakles: okay this changes things, hai Sasha :hearts: :bowdown:I thought you kinda disliked ivanovic and she's serbian:p

Jovana.
Aug 25th, 2010, 04:47 PM
I thought you kinda disliked ivanovic and she's serbian:p

my dislike towards her turned to "not giving a shit" over the years ;) and I am merely happy that Maria is dating a Serbian origin dude :o

Mr.Sharapova
Aug 26th, 2010, 12:20 PM
Sharapova feels recent success can extend to U.
Thu, 26 Aug 05:48:00 2010

Maria Sharapova, who has shot back up the rankings after a shoulder injury that almost ended her career, feels she is hitting her stride and has a chance to capture her second U.S. Open title in four years.

After suffering a shoulder injury in 2008 that required surgery, the three-time grand slam winner spent several months on the sidelines and dropped as far as 126th in the rankings.
But Sharapova is now ranked 16th in the world heading into the Aug. 30-Sept. 12 tournament and said reaching the finals of two straight tournaments in recent weeks has convinced her she can snap a grand slam drought nearing three years.

"I feel like I'm getting there," Sharapova, who pulled out of the WTA tournament in Montreal last week with a heel injury, told Reuters.
"I've had great successful memories in New York as well as tough ones. Having to miss it two years ago because of my shoulder and then coming back last year with pressure ... well that wasn't easy."
Sharapova has not won a grand slam title since she triumphed at the Australian Open in 2008. Eight months after the victory, the 23-year-old had right shoulder surgery and was slow to find the form that once vaulted her to the number one ranking.

She lost in the August finals to Victoria Azarenka at the Stanford Classic and to defending U.S. Open champion Kim Clijsters at the Cincinnati Open but is heartened by recent victories over top players.
Until late July, Sharapova had not beaten a player this season ranked in the top 25, but in the past month has toppled world number six Elena Dementieva and two-time grand slam victor Svetlana Kuznetsova.
Sharapova is counting on her recent form to help erase the memories from last year's U.S. Open where she struggled with a reconstructed service motion and was upset by U.S. teenager Melanie Oudin in the third round.
She has done away with her abbreviated service motion and has been serving at pre-surgery speeds during recent tournaments where she has shown glimpses of her former self.

While Sharapova said Wimbledon is her favourite tournament, she is is looking forward to returning to the bright lights of New York for the U.S. Open, which she won in 2006.
"In New York it's all about the buzz, the craziness, the rivalries and the night matches," Sharapova said. "It's exhilarating. I want to perform my best at the Open and peak there."
:angel:

MaitaBaby
Aug 26th, 2010, 05:56 PM
My friend Betsy got a one on one interview with Maria at the evian thing last.. whenever it was.. and you can read about it here (http://yourvolleyssuck.wordpress.com/2010/08/25/yvs-exclusive-sharapova-loves-fashion/). I told her to ask about the recent loss in Cincy and now I feel awful about it.

gc-spurs
Aug 26th, 2010, 07:01 PM
You're friend is sooooo lucky!

Dieter.
Aug 26th, 2010, 08:41 PM
Now healthy, Sharapova looks for her second US Open title
By Erin Bruehl
Thursday, August 26, 2010

At the start of the 2009 US Open, Maria Sharapova was still finding her way back into her game after being back on the WTA Tour for just three months following a nine-month layoff from singles because of a torn rotator cuff that required surgery.

She reached one final on the Olympus US Open Series in Toronto leading up to the US Open last year but had not yet won a title and was still seeing how her arm felt as she continued to recover and get back.

In Flushing, she was one of American upstart Melanie Oudin's upset victims, falling to the teenager in the third round.

But now in 2010, Sharapova's top game is back, she is healthy, and she enters the US Open after a great summer that included reaching two finals. She is now looking for her second title in Flushing Meadows and first Grand Slam tournament title since winning the 2008 Australian Open.

"I am really excited about this year's Open because last year I was kind of on the comeback trail, and at this time of the year, I was feeling and seeing where I was, where my game was, where I was physically, how my arm was feeling," Sharapova, 23, said. "And this year, I am feel like I am a real competitor, having a good summer, and I am enjoying myself and not worrying about the injury, which is just great when you are on the court."

Sharapova had an up-and-down start to 2010, as she was upset in the first round of the Australian Open to start the year, losing to Maria Kirilenko in three sets. A few weeks later, however, she won her 21st career tour title in Memphis but then lost her second match in Indian Wells and did not play again until May because of an elbow injury.

At Wimbledon, where she won her first Grand Slam tournament title at age 17 in 2004, she lost in the fourth round to eventual champion and world No. 1 Serena Williams. Williams is unable to compete in the US Open, as she continues to recover from a cut to her foot that required surgery.

Since then, however, Sharapova has played great tennis, reaching the final in back-to-back tournaments in Stanford and Cincinnati. In Cincinnati, she held three match points before losing to 2009 US Open champion Kim Clijsters in three sets.

She also had an emotional start to her summer, visiting the Gomel area of Belarus near where the Chernobyl nuclear accident occurred in 1986 that released a lot of radiation into the area. At the time, Sharapova's parents, Yuri and Yelena, lived just 80 miles away from the accident and left the area a few months later, when Yelena was pregnant with Maria. Maria was then born in a city in Siberia.

Sharapova has been a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) since 2007 and has The Maria Sharapova Foundation, which helps children around the world, including The Maria Sharapova Foundation Scholarship for students from Chernobyl-affected areas that she launched with the UNDP.

On her trip in July, she visited a local hospital with many children stricken with cancer among her stops, and she has donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to charities in the area, including money to build sports and recreation facilities. She anticipates her work in the area only increasing once she retires from tennis.

"I still want to keep working with Chernobyl-affected areas as I started to do years ago, and I think that is going to venture out into something bigger and even better when I am done with my career and have more time," Sharapova said.

And she is now in New York, which is one of her favorite places to visit and play tennis.

She does not have lots of free time to sightsee in New York City but enjoys visiting Central Park among the city's attractions because of its uniqueness in comparison to most of Manhattan. Sharapova, the world's highest-paid female athlete, does enjoy going out to restaurants or shopping when time allows.

"When I was younger, I thought the city was too busy and too hectic for me, but over the years, I have gotten to love its energy, and I love coming back," Sharapova said of New York City.

Her fashion and style inspires as much talk about her as her play on the court, as she designs her own line of shoes and bags for Cole Haan, and her Nike on-court fashions usually generate as much discussion during US Open matches as her tennis, including the night black cocktail-style dress she wore when she defeated Justine Henin to win the 2006 US Open under the lights and the diamond-studded red dress that followed.

She debuts different dresses for both day and night matches and this year will be wearing a deep purple dress for the evenings and a brighter green dress for the daytime. They are both an update to a more classic style, and she will also be donning earrings from Tiffany.

"It is quite a classic look this year," Sharapova said of her US Open attire. "It is triggered around the old-school collar that we have modernized a bit. The color is deep purple for night and a little livelier green for day. I am also wearing diamond earrings with a yellow diamond drop."

On the court, Sharapova is known for her power and ferocious hitting style, although she can be prone to double faults, which can be her undoing in matches. Prior to surgery, serving with an injured shoulder was a serious problem, but she says now she is feeling good.

A former world No. 1 with three Grand Slam tournament titles and now ranked No. 16, Sharapova will be one of the favorites to make a run for the US Open title this year, along with Clijsters and two-time defending champion Venus Williams, with Serena and seven-time Grand Slam champion Justine Henin both out.

But she knows not to take anyone for granted and that many other dangerous players lurk in the draw.

"There is still a very deep field ahead of us," she said of the women's draw minus Serena and Henin. "You still have to get through a lot of tough players in order to win the tournament."

Sharapova especially enjoys playing night matches in Arthur Ashe Stadium under the lights with a packed crowd of over 20,000 cheering fans. Her fondest evening match memories of course come from hoisting the US Open trophy in 2006, and each year she loves playing in the US Open.

"I think it is one of the most exciting times of the year. There is nothing like the New York crowd and its energy, the build-up to the matches and the excitement," Sharapova said. "It is the biggest stadium we play in the whole year, and probably one of the most exciting moments was when I played in the final in 2006 and got to win and see all the people standing up. The whole stadium was full and was really vibrant."

.....

~MashyOwnThemAll
Aug 26th, 2010, 09:05 PM
Great article, come on!! :tennis:

pokey camp
Aug 29th, 2010, 02:47 AM
Maria Sharapova & Cole Haan Fall 2010 Collaboration -- an Interview

Mihal Freinquel
Professional New Yorker.
Posted: August 27, 2010 12:52 PM

Last night Cole Haan and Interview Magazine hosted a party to celebrate the launch of tennis star Maria Sharapova's Fall 2010 collection. This is the third collection she has designed for Cole Haan and the soiree did more than salute it. Set in the posh Sky Room at the New Museum, DJ Lindsey killed it on the one's and two's, Todd Selby circulated as his signed prints waited patiently to be auctioned off for charity, and the who's who of industry insiders ate delicate hors d'oeuvres and delighted in the flawless view of the New York City skyline.

Not only did I get to meet photographer Todd Selby and Dan Ragone (top dog at Interview Magazine) -- and not only did I get to chat with Cole Haan CEO Dave McTague (one of the most humble and fascinating people I've met in this industry) -- but I also got to interview the tallest, hottest, sweetest, blondest Russian tennis player out there: Maria Sharapova.

Mihal Freinquel: How would you describe your personal style off the court?
Maria Sharapova: My lifestyle is really hectic. I travel a lot, I'm always running around to meetings, a press conference, a meal after practice -- so all of the pieces in my wardrobe are really representative of that crazy lifestyle. If it's a dress I want to make sure that it's versatile enough to either wear with boots or heels, or with a jacket over it or tights under it. I also like to accessorize so I can get more out of a casual outfit.

MF: In your collection with Cole Haan this season you have a pretty solid mix of heels and flats. Are you a heels or flats girl yourself?
MS: I'm a flats girl, I live in ballerinas. When I started working with Cole Haan I knew I wanted a really solid, comfortable ballet flat. We came up with the silhouette and began with only three colors. They became so popular that now for fall, a few years later, we have about ten or twelve colors -- it's really exciting.

MF: On both your shoes and bags you're using a similar lace-up, corset-type detailing. Where did your inspiration come from for this?
MS: At my very first meeting with Cole Haan I had put together a lot of tear sheets and things that I had doodled. It was all a lot of lacing -- French corset, Moulin Rouge style -- and that concept always came back into every meeting we had. I like it because it's feminine, it's young, and you can dress it up or down.

MF: Do you plan to continue collaborating with Cole Haan?
MS: Definitely, this is a long-term partnership. We started with very few colors and styles, and now we have double or triple what we started off with. We're really seeing things grow now, it's awesome. It's amazing for me to see people wearing my stuff -- the way they wear it, what they wear it with. I saw a girl wearing one of my designs in my hotel in Paris and I just wanted to hug her! It was so exciting!

Could she be any sweeter? I have a toothache! Or maybe it was all the sugar I ate from the candy table.

Happy Shopping.
Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/mihal-freinquel/maria-sharapova-cole-haan_b_697129.html)

pokey camp
Aug 29th, 2010, 02:52 AM
Maria Sharapova’s Tennis Outfits Never Clash With the Court Color

Maria Sharapova, who designs all of her own competition outfits, considers every slightest detail when crafting her tournament wardrobes. For example, there's the color of the clay: "You don't want to clash with the court. Like, say the French Open, you have the red clay, so you have to think about that red background," she said at last night's party for her Cole Haan shoe line. "And it's Paris," she continued, "so you're thinking about Coco Chanel. For one of the dresses I wore for that tournament a couple years ago, I had a little Tiffany pearl on the back of my dress. It was a very simple detail that maybe no one could even see, but it's just about the tradition and the feeling." There's no need to look ladylike at the U.S. Open, though: "In New York, you have that crazy crowd and you feel like you can be a little bit more risqué. I always feel like I can be a little bit more glitzy than I usually am in my everyday life, so it's fun."

Sharapova took a similarly hands-on approach during the development of her Cole Haan shoe line, even providing "some really bad sketches" for the design team. Her artistic labors yielded a mix of ballet flats, heels, and boots with crisscrossing lace-up details, all featuring the Nike Air cushioning in the sole that actually make them comfortable, Sharapova insisted, tilting her foot sideways so that we could see the stiletto spike of her peep-toe bootie.

Speaking of heels, Sharapova's really tall. Not just high-heels-tall, but crick-in-your-neck-when-you-talk-to-her tall. (She's six foot two in bare feet, which places her at around six foot six in her heels.) Has she ever felt self-conscious about adding extra inches to her height, since she's already so vertically well-endowed? "I'm just so used to always being tall," she added, shrugging. "Sometimes even when I'm in flats I'm taller than everyone else." Being an athlete, though, with very fine-tuned leg muscles to look after, Sharapova usually sticks to ballet flats. She's also quite modest off the court: "I don't wear many skirts or short things in my everyday life. Maybe it's because I have to wear them so much on the court," she said. If you associate skimpy bottoms with stuffing tennis balls in your underwear, such a choice is understandable.
New York Magazine's Fashion Blog (http://nymag.com/daily/fashion/2010/08/maria_sharapovas_tennis_outfit.html).

Vodkapova
Aug 29th, 2010, 04:09 AM
...Andre Aggassi was like a pop star when I was a kid. I love the Williams sisters, I simply adore Maria Sharapova, and I'm a huge Nadal fan!...

- Lil Wayne :spit:

http://us-open-tennis.si.com/2010/08/27/lil-wayne-backs-nadal-clijsters-in-u-s-open/

He tells us from prison. :unsure:

Sp!ffy
Aug 29th, 2010, 05:29 AM
Lil Wayne....


just, no. :o

MaitaBaby
Aug 29th, 2010, 06:46 AM
Oh, look, a journo who thinks Mash is sweet. :rolleyes:

cyannnnn
Aug 29th, 2010, 03:00 PM
i see that federer re-elected as president of ATP World Tour Player Council

and in the wta, who is the president???

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 29th, 2010, 03:19 PM
I think Venus is. Not sure though.

Vodkapova
Aug 29th, 2010, 07:56 PM
OTB predicts Maria as the USO champion. :scared:

http://www.onthebaseline.com/2010/08/28/2010-us-open-main-draw-preview/

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 29th, 2010, 08:04 PM
So do I.:shrug:

Break My Rapture
Aug 29th, 2010, 08:06 PM
All this pressure suddenly. :o It would be amazing if she came through though.

nectar69
Aug 31st, 2010, 02:51 PM
Here is a link to a column I wrote about Maria! http://www.nvdaily.com/sports/2010/08/new-era-begins-for-sharapova.php

Marilyn Monheaux
Sep 1st, 2010, 03:28 AM
Q. What happened out there tonight?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I won the match in three.

Q. What were you thinking in between sets during changeovers, especially after the first set?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think she came out today and really swung and didn't give me much time to do anything out there. She served really well in the first set. I wasn't returning that well, giving her a lot of looks, you know, on second serves. Against a player like that, who kind of plays the 1 2 punch type of tennis, you know, it's quite difficult to get a rhythm in the beginning. You know, I just hung in there. Between the first and second set, I knew that it wasn't over. In tennis you have either two or three sets to play. So I still knew I had my chances.

Q. She was really attacking the ball through the entire match.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah.

Q. Could be very troublesome serving. What goes through your mind when you toss the ball up to serve these days? Trying to think of some sort of image that I could describe as you're staring down a break opportunity for her, she's swinging at the ball, you hit some great second serves in the match.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: You're making this a little way too dramatic for what it was. It's like a Shakespeare poem. No, you focus on what you need to do. You think of the patterns. You think of where you're gonna serve, things like that. I mean, it's not really complicated. You just have to do it.

Q. Do you feel like you're playing well enough right now to win the Open, or do you feel like you need to play your way into that kind of form still?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uhm, I mean, based on, you know, my results in the past, I've been in different situations coming into a Grand Slam playing really well in the beginning, playing well throughout, or starting quite slow and then finding my game throughout. So it depends. It really depends on the tournament, the situation, your opponent, really getting through matches. Days like this where your opponent was playing really well, you really have to find, you know, ways to hang in there and ways to fight. And at the end of the day, just hope you give yourself another opportunity.

Q. Which way do you prefer? Do you like to start out slow and finish fast or be fast the whole time?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I don't think there's a perfect scenario. I don't think anyone, uhm, has a perfect Grand Slam. Everyone has their ups and downs and everyone's going to be put in situations, tough situations, where they're going to come through. Even being up isn't necessarily the easiest thing. Doing the right things to win every match is tough. That's the tough part about tennis is you have to be out there for two weeks, seven matches in a Grand Slam environment, and you have to come up with the goods when it really matters.

Q. Four years ago you won. You had the problems with surgery. Does it make you feel, hey, I'm back to where I had success?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it's always good to come to a place where, you know, you've lifted the trophy, you've had great memories. Even though in the couple last years I haven't had the best results, even the year that I won, all that is past. This is a new year. It's a new match. You go out there. It's a new opponent. You're just trying to get the win.

Q. Are you glad Serena is not here or would you like her to be here to have the best here?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, obviously it's always a shame when the No. 1 player in the world is not in the draw. But the tournament still goes on. You still have to beat a lot of tough players in order to win the tournament.

Q. Somebody said you saw her foot the other night. Did she show you her injury?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I saw her during the Nike event that we did, yeah. She was in a boot.

Q. What's it like? How bad does the laceration look? Did you actually see the laceration?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No.

Q. What are your thoughts of the effectiveness of the Hawk Eye system? If there were anything you'd like to change about it, what would you like to change?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it's been great for the game, great for the fans. The human eye is imperfect. I think it's really a great way to change a few things around in a match. Obviously, I think if a player runs out of the challenges and it's towards the end of the match, I think maybe we should have an opportunity to have a few more, especially if the umpire is not quite sure of the call. As it is right now, it's only three, I believe. We also know if we're going to have more, then everyone is going to challenge quite easily even if they know the ball is in or out, so...

Q. How much more confidence do you feel in your serve today than you did when we saw you last at the US Open?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, you know, last year with my whole game, I was just trying to find, you know, where my feet were on the ground, just trying to find my position, see how I could handle playing a lot of matches under different circumstances. You know, this year, you know, a whole year with the tournaments and experience, it feels really good to be healthy coming in, just playing and not worrying about, uhm, how physically you feel.

Q. How would you rate the status of your service game now? Are you confident in it? Still have a ways to go?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I mean, you know, on this particular day, I think my percentage was quite low today, but I think I did a really good job of hitting some great second serves when I needed to. You know, especially in the third set, I wasn't getting too many first serves in. But, you know, I hurt her from my second serve. I probably could say that that was one of the shots that won me the match today. You know, every day's different. The conditions might be different. Sometimes you're playing in Europe where everything's pretty cool, the balls are heavy, so things are not swinging through the air as much. You might feel a little drawn back from what you're used to. But overall I feel good.

Q. The other day John McEnroe made some strong comments about women, the women's tour, the schedule. Could you tell us what your thoughts were on his point?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I'm not sure what he said, so...

Q. He said basically women were not strong enough to play the full schedule and should have a shorter schedule than the men because they were not strong enough.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think every individual is different. You know, I've always played a certain amount of tournaments throughout my career. It's always been around a Grand Slam. I think your tournaments are a personal choice. I think, you know, before we had to play I believe maybe it was 14 tournaments as a requirement. Now it's only 10. So if you play those 10 and you play the Grand Slams, we don't really have to make a commitment to play any more than that. It's a personal choice of how many we play. I think I only played nine or ten this year. So it's a personal decision. I think, you know, if only everyone could come and join us in our off seasons and when we practice, how much we work, how many hours we spend on the court in training, getting our bodies ready to be where they are.

Q. So you're saying there's a kind of core strength with the women athletes on the tour to sustain them through the schedule, that the women have a core strength as athletes to carry them through the schedule that they face each year?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Like I said, it's an individual choice about your scheduling. And I think we have a pretty good rule in place of how many events we have to play. Based on that, after that, it's a personal decision. Everyone's body is different. Some girls like to play many events during the year, 25, something like that. I personally don't. I'm not physically ready for that, and I never have been throughout my career. I always try to gear up around the Grand Slams since those are quite important ones.

Q. How do you feel about the way you played today? How do you come out of that match? Happy? Satisfied? Worried?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, at the end of the day, even though I know I wasn't playing my best tennis, I know I came out with a win. And sometimes it's more important than anything because you're giving yourself a chance to go out on the practice court tomorrow. You're giving yourself a chance to play another match and to get better, you know, maybe work on the things that today weren't working that well for you. Like I said in the beginning, it was tough to figure many things out because, you know, there weren't many rallies in the games. It was two or three balls where the point was over.

Q. Is there anything you take, being a Grand Slam champion, that is most important in your head about knowing how to win seven matches in a major that's maybe an advantage over girls who haven't done that before?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uhm, I mean, sure, experience helps. But, I don't know, it's really at the end of the day about going out there and doing it and finding the mental strength, the physical strength, you know, challenging yourself to go out there and be better every day.

Q. Did you see Roger Federer's trick shot last night? If so, what are your thoughts?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I didn't see it, no.

Q. Have you seen his video on the Internet where he serves a can off somebody's head?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, I really haven't. I don't spend much time there.

Q. Will we see you trying a between the leg shot anytime soon?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, you don't want to see me attempt that. Not pretty.

:)

Sp!ffy
Sep 1st, 2010, 04:17 AM
Very dumb interview.

Vartan
Sep 1st, 2010, 04:29 AM
Q. Somebody said you saw her foot the other night. Did she show you her injury?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I saw her during the Nike event that we did, yeah. She was in a boot.

Q. What's it like? How bad does the laceration look? Did you actually see the laceration?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No.

:spit:

As if Serena would take the boot off and show her the lacerations. Or maybe it did get in the way of their business.

gc-spurs
Sep 1st, 2010, 05:36 AM
Q. Which way do you prefer? Do you like to start out slow and finish fast or be fast the whole time?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I don't think there's a perfect scenario. I don't think anyone, uhm, has a perfect Grand Slam. Everyone has their ups and downs and everyone's going to be put in situations, tough situations, where they're going to come through. Even being up isn't necessarily the easiest thing. Doing the right things to win every match is tough. That's the tough part about tennis is you have to be out there for two weeks, seven matches in a Grand Slam environment, and you have to come up with the goods when it really matters.

Effing liar! Australian Open 2008??

Break My Rapture
Sep 1st, 2010, 12:25 PM
My god, what dumb questions. :tears: At least let her go earlier if you have nothing better to ask than that trivial nonsense.

Jovana.
Sep 1st, 2010, 02:47 PM
MARIA SHARAPOVA: You're making this a little way too dramatic for what it was. It's like a Shakespeare poem.

:haha: :haha: you tell 'em gurl :bowdown:

nelsondan
Sep 1st, 2010, 06:44 PM
What goes through your mind when you toss the ball up to serve these days? Trying to think of some sort of image that I could describe as you're staring down a break opportunity for her, she's swinging at the ball, you hit some great second serves in the match.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: You're making this a little way too dramatic for what it was. It's like a Shakespeare poem. No, you focus on what you need to do. You think of the patterns. You think of where you're gonna serve, things like that. I mean, it's not really complicated. You just have to do it.

How many 23 year old athletes in any sport answer a question by saying "you are making this too complicated. It is as simple as poem by Shakespeare"?

Maybe I misinterpreted her reference.Maybe she meant it is not as complicated as a Shakespeare poem.

denny5576
Sep 1st, 2010, 09:32 PM
A Princely Sum: Sharapova Drops Company Stencil, Retail Racket
By: Darren Rovell (http://www.cnbc.com/id/15837548/cid/97537)
CNBC Sports Business Reporter

At 5:47 p.m. ET on Tuesday, Maria Sharapova took the court at Arthur Ashe Stadium to play her first round match against Jarmila Groth. She was carrying two bags. One, a Nike Cole Haan designer bag. The other? A bag with the words “Prince” on it.
There was nothing strange about either bag. But there was something different about what the 23-year-old took out of the Prince bag. You see, the company’s most marketable tennis player –- who has what is termed as a “lifetime deal” -- wasn’t playing with a Prince racket that you can actually buy on the shelves.
Whether she was playing with a disguised competitor’s racket or something Prince has made for her remains a mystery, but what is clear is that Sharapova hasn’t played with a racket whose strings are stenciled with the company’s famous “P” since March.
While a consumer might not notice the difference, insiders in the business are abuzz about the change because of the stakes involved. Sharapova’s deal, signed in 2006, was reported as a 10-year, $25 million deal.
Stringers and tennis geeks guess the frame of Sharapova’s racket is made by Head. One online message board said it was definitely Head’s YouTek Radical, while one stringer told CNBC that his best guess is that it’s a Head Prestige due to the eight string holes in the throat of the racket and the very thin frame profile. The stringer, who asked for anonymity, said that it appears like Sharapova’s team has had some custom strips placed over the clamshell stringing strip that closes over the strings as the racket is strung to further disguise that she is using a competitor’s racket.
Tennis players have long had a love-hate relationship with the rackets they use, and marketing deals make the game even more complex. Some players are marketing one racket while simultaneously playing with another; other players aren’t even playing with the brand that they say they are.
Tomas Berdych played in the Wimbledon finals against Rafael Nadal this year. He came out onto the court with a Dunlop bag, but pulled out Head rackets (http://www.cnbc.com/id/38040955/?Berdych_Getting_Paid_To_Play_Competitor_s_Racket) . Berdych wasn’t even coy about it. Close up pictures could show the words “HEAD” on the racket frame. He’s still playing with Head rackets, even though he’s listed on the Dunlop Web site as an endorser.
Then there’s the story of Fernando Verdasco, also paid by Dunlop, but was playing with an old Technifibre stick. Perhaps because of some pressure, Verdasco went back to the Dunlop racket as indicated on his strings, but after a series of bad losses including a first-round Wimbledon exit to Fabio Fognini, Verdasco was back at the US Open Tuesday with an unstenciled racket again. This time, he beat Fognini in five sets.
Even though it appears like Sharapova has been using the very same racket since the switch, Prince officials suggest that she’s trying a variety of rackets in order to help the company with future initiatives.
“Sharapova has agreed to participate in a very innovative, pioneering product development program with Prince,” the company said in a statement provided to CNBC. “She will be using some experimental frames over the next few months in practice and in competition. We are well aware that some of the frames she may be using may include racquets that Prince does not carry in its current line. That is part of our program. During this phase of experimentation, she may or may not stencil, but she is a Prince contracted player. We are using one of our marquee athletes to play test, under match conditions, products to help future offerings.”
While Prince officials admit Sharapova might not be playing with a racket available in retail stores, they continue to use her to market the Prince EXO3 Black, which is the fourth best selling racket at US pro specialty shops this quarter.
So here’s the essential question. How long with this testing go on and is it possible that, at some point, Prince and Sharapova have to go their separate ways? Prince officials told the media that James Blake, who had switched from Dunlop to Prince in Dec. 2005, was working with them to develop new equipment when he was spotted using his old Dunlop. But after 18 months, Blake and Prince parted ways after the American tennis star had a hard time getting use to the company’s O3 technology. Blake returned to Dunlop.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/38956396

Nina.
Sep 1st, 2010, 09:43 PM
A Princely Sum: Sharapova Drops Company Stencil, Retail Racket
By: Darren Rovell (http://www.cnbc.com/id/15837548/cid/97537)
CNBC Sports Business Reporter

One online message board said it was definitely Head’s YouTek Radical

Is it us? Is it us? Is it us? :bounce::lol:

Marilyn Monheaux
Sep 1st, 2010, 09:46 PM
Is it us? Is it us? Is it us? :bounce::lol:

It's tt.tennis-warehouse I guess.:o They have like 6 threads about the racket (but I opened the first one!:D)

Jovana.
Sep 1st, 2010, 09:46 PM
Is it us? Is it us? Is it us? :bounce::lol:

it's usss!! we're famous! :D

Marilyn Monheaux
Sep 1st, 2010, 09:48 PM
It's tt.tennis-warehouse I guess.:o They have like 6 threads about the racket (but I opened the first one!:D)

it's usss!! we're famous! :D

:rocker2:

Nina.
Sep 1st, 2010, 09:53 PM
Whatever :lol: it's funny that those writers check forums for information as well

Marilyn Monheaux
Sep 1st, 2010, 09:58 PM
I'm juts glad "mainstream media" is finally catching up with it.:lol: She's been using the DIY rackets since May.:tape:

Jovana.
Sep 1st, 2010, 09:59 PM
they just started writing about it. I mean come on :haha: They should ask us for information .

Nina.
Sep 1st, 2010, 10:04 PM
die-hard fans will always realize changes sooner :shrug:

Mr.Sharapova
Sep 1st, 2010, 11:44 PM
You guys are celebrities now:D

gc-spurs
Sep 1st, 2010, 11:50 PM
What goes through your mind when you toss the ball up to serve these days? Trying to think of some sort of image that I could describe as you're staring down a break opportunity for her, she's swinging at the ball, you hit some great second serves in the match.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: You're making this a little way too dramatic for what it was. It's like a Shakespeare poem. No, you focus on what you need to do. You think of the patterns. You think of where you're gonna serve, things like that. I mean, it's not really complicated. You just have to do it.

How many 23 year old athletes in any sport answer a question by saying "you are making this too complicated. It is as simple as poem by Shakespeare"?

Maybe I misinterpreted her reference.Maybe she meant it is not as complicated as a Shakespeare poem.

Watch the video. It makes sense then when you hear the way she says it. She's talking about how dramatic the guy is making it and says the Shakespeare bit under her breath, referring to that. Its hardly a whole new sentence on its own.

pokey camp
Sep 2nd, 2010, 12:18 AM
Healthy Maria Sharapova has draw to advance deep in U.S. Open and bring star power to late rounds

FILIP BONDY
Wednesday, September 1st 2010, 4:00 AM

It's not as if the U.S. Open has gate attractions to spare at the moment. There are only about five legitimate stars here, and one of them, Maria Sharapova, threw away the first set Tuesday night as if it were a broken tennis racket.

Sharapova was playing Jarmila Groth, an Aussie by way of Slovakia, who was desperately trying to hand this first-round match to the 14th-seeded Russian as quickly as possible, but failing.

Groth kept whaling away at the ball during rallies, hoping to end them as quickly as possible, with little care whether her groundstrokes or second serves landed inside the lines. It became a match without rhythm or subtlety, because Sharapova plays very nearly the same way, only a bit more sensibly and without nerves.

Points were not so much built as demolished. Eventually Sharapova won this ugly thing, 4-6, 6-3, 6-1, hanging in the tournament for at least another round, and perhaps much longer. Groth finished with remarkably careless stats: 14 double faults and 48 unforced errors.

"She came out firing and didn't give me much opportunities," Sharapova said. "I wasn't returning well, giving her lots of looks on my second serve. She's a one-two punch kind of player. Those are the kind of matches you want to hang in there, and do what it takes."

As usual, Sharapova's grit and poise under pressure were commendable. But she is not yet the same player who captured three different majors from 2004 to 2008, before her shoulder started falling from its hinge and requiring surgery. She's getting there, though.

"Last year, I was just trying to find where my feet were on the ground," Sharapova said. "This year, it feels real good to be healthy, not worrying about physically how you feel."

Some of the changes in Sharapova, the parts off the court, are quite positive. She is no longer daddy's frazzled teenage girl, looking to her player's box in search of stern Yuri Sharapov's instructions between points.

Remember 2006, when Sharapova was ordered to eat a banana and followed that clumsy command during a changeover? On the in-house feed that night, one announcer said during a commercial, not for broadcast, "How dumb do you have to be if somebody has to tell you to eat a banana?"

Here it was her finest hour, a straight-set final victory over Justine Henin, and reporters were asking Sharapova mostly about a banana and her father's coaching. She told them to stop. It was sad and embarrassing for the Russian, who happens to be a sharp, articulate woman.

Yuri was nowhere to be seen Tuesday night, which was a good thing. But there were clues that not everything was yet right, like when Sharapova won the toss and elected to receive rather than trot out her sometimes erratic serve. Her first serve was erratic, her second serve better. Sharapova's baseline game vanished too often.

There are many reasons to admire Sharapova, who never fell back on her looks for anything other than selling a few cameras. This woman worked hard, always fought harder, and quite often overcame her athletic limitations. You don't win Wimbledon, the U.S. Open and the Australian Open without that kind of right stuff.

"You look at the trophies, you have great memories," Sharapova said.

She's still only 23, although it feels as if Sharapova has been here forever. Like many of the top women, she has endured seasons when injuries sabotaged all her good intentions. Given the lack of competition on the women's tour, Sharapova appears poised again for a run at a major, and it might as well be this one.

Her bracket is inviting enough. She's in the weaker top half of the draw, while Venus Williams and Kim Clijsters are in the bottom.

"I don't think there's a perfect scenario," Sharapova said. "I don't think anybody has a perfect Grand Slam. Everybody has ups and downs. The tough part about tennis is you have to come up with the goods when it really matters."

You hope she hangs around, for the sake of the Open. The tournament began with limited star power. Sharapova cuts a fetching figure. If she can clomp her way to the final weekend, it won't matter a bit if the tennis is ugly.
NY Daily News (http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/more_sports/2010/09/01/2010-09-01_healthy_maria_sharapova_has_draw_to_advance_dee p_in_us_open_and_bring_star_power.html?r=sports)

perseus2006
Sep 2nd, 2010, 12:55 AM
Filip Bondy, Asshole In Residence, NY Daily News, demonstrates New York Nice. His Motto: If there is something good, informative or constructive to write, you won't read it here.

pokey camp
Sep 2nd, 2010, 02:19 AM
Filip Bondy, Asshole In Residence, NY Daily News, demonstrates New York Nice. His Motto: If there is something good, informative or constructive to write, you won't read it here.
What? That column is a love letter by NY media standards. :lol:

And yeah, Bondy's a classic NYC media jackass. I haven't read him since I moved, but he's a major columnist and by far the most knowledgeable tennis writer at the Daily News. Lupica was too busy vomiting out the usual cliches about Fed and that exciting non-American kid Rafa... thank goodness. :tape:

nelsondan
Sep 2nd, 2010, 05:03 AM
Watch the video. It makes sense then when you hear the way she says it. She's talking about how dramatic the guy is making it and says the Shakespeare bit under her breath, referring to that. Its hardly a whole new sentence on its own.

That was really helpful---I could not hear anything---then I realized my speakers were not working---I am not good at stuff on computers, but I finally blundered into fixing it with system restore---then I could not hear it clearly, but the fourth time---I finally got what you were talking about.

Still---casually comparing him to making it dramatic like a shakespeare poem--

Maria is so unique.

Marilyn Monheaux
Sep 2nd, 2010, 05:16 AM
That was really helpful---I could not hear anything---then I realized my speakers were not working---I am not good at stuff on computers, but I finally blundered into fixing it with system restore---then I could not hear it clearly, but the fourth time---I finally got what you were talking about.

Still---casually comparing him to making it dramatic like a shakespeare poem--

Maria is so unique.

You are unique.

swissmr
Sep 2nd, 2010, 02:17 PM
Everyone is unique ;)

pokey camp
Sep 3rd, 2010, 05:55 AM
Maria Sharapova Deserves More Respect

Christopher Botta

NEW YORK -- She's the most glamorous star on the women's tennis circuit and a three-time champion at Grand Slam tournaments, yet sometimes it seems like Maria Sharapova is under-appreciated.

Yes, the young woman with the world-class athletic ability, stuffed trophy case, megawatt smile, her own fashion line and lucrative endorsement deals. That Maria Sharapova.

Allow me to be clear here: no one is saying woe is Maria. The 23-year-old Russian with the dazzling beauty and groundstrokes, who won 6-1, 6-2 over Iveta Benesova on Thursday night to advance to the third round of the U.S. Open, lives quite the charmed life. She has been the best-paid female athlete in the world, and in January signed an $80 million deal with Nike. She loves her adopted town of Los Angeles as much as it loves her.

But in tennis circles, such as the real-time capital -- the U.S. Open in New York, N.Y., with its National Tennis Center filled with players, coaches and commentators from all over the globe -- Sharapova is written off as a movie star instead of a deeply respected talent. Angelina Jolie more than Meryl Streep.

Fact is, she's more than a little bit of both.

In a sport in which Anna Kournikova serves as the poster model for fame over ability and achievement, Sharapova is the rare combination of all of the above. If she chooses to pass on a photo shoot on any given day, it sure isn't for a lack of suitors. As for Sharapova's achievements on the playing surface, the list is topped off by the trio of titles at majors: 2004 at Wimbledon, 2006 here and 2008 at the Australian Open. Among her colleagues on the WTA Tour, only Serena and Venus Williams and Justine Henin have more. She has advanced to the semifinals of slam events six times -- at least once at each of the four majors. Sharapova has won 19 additional tour titles, and only a major shoulder injury that sidelined her from August 2008 to May 2009 broke up a five-year run in the top 10.

At still such a young age, Sharapova -- with Venus Williams and Kim Clijsters, the biggest name left in the Open's women's draw -- is admirably unveiling a worldly conscience. She is a global ambassador for the United Nations Development Program. After Wimbledon in July, she visited the Belarus region where her parents fled months before she was born, months before the disaster at Chernobyl took place just a hundred miles away in 1986. The goodwill tour came with ESPN cameras and an abundance of Nike swooshes, but there isn't anything wrong with a star using a high profile and adoring sponsors for good.

Just as impressively, she honors her game and those who came before her. Warming up prior to her match on Monday night, she saw Martina Navratilova and Jimmy Connors hitting two courts away. Since she was facing a lefty in Benesova a few hours later, Sharapova shyly asked Navratilova if she would hit a few serves her way. "She aced me," said Sharapova.

After her straight-sets victory, Sharapova relayed something about her interactions with Billie Jean King, whom the National Tennis Center is named after.

"When I talk to Billie Jean King, she says, 'There's always going to be somebody in your spot. No matter how you do, how much you achieve, there's always going to be the next person that comes along that's going to be No. 1. There's going to be tons of them coming ahead. But at this point you guys are setting the bar for the younger generations to come. We are. We try to be good examples."

Frequently in the spotlight off the court, Sharapova flourishes in prime time on it. After her victory on Monday over Benesova, Sharapova is now 12-0 under the lights of Arthur Ashe Stadium at the U.S. Open. Funny thing about her tennis, though. As she demonstrated once again on the Open's grandest stage against Benesova, there is very little glitz to her play. Grunting while whipping backhand winners behind the baseline past her overmatched opponent from the Czech Republic, Sharapova had the substance of a respected workhorse on the tour.

Sharapova occasionally drops hints about retiring early. When Henin retired -- the first time -- at age 25, Sharapova remarked that if she had "all those majors" at that age, she'd walk off the court, too. On the notion of playing on the tour into her 30s, Sharapova said she hoped to have a husband and a few kids by then.

Appreciate Sharapova's game while you can. It's time the tennis community recognized her for more than the obvious.
FanHouse (http://tennis.fanhouse.com/2010/09/02/maria-sharapova-deserves-more-respect/)

gc-spurs
Sep 3rd, 2010, 06:25 AM
That Maria Sharapova sounds like a top notch cat.

shaktincredible
Sep 3rd, 2010, 08:42 AM
Here is a link to a column I wrote about Maria! http://www.nvdaily.com/sports/2010/08/new-era-begins-for-sharapova.php

i like your column a lot. :)

Vodkapova
Sep 3rd, 2010, 09:50 AM
12-0. Does that mean she has never ever lost a night match at Arthur Ashe? :hearts:

Marilyn Monheaux
Sep 3rd, 2010, 10:24 AM
12-0. Does that mean she has never ever lost a night match at Arthur Ashe? :hearts:

Yes.

As I remember, 2004 was a day match, 2005 also, 2006...(:inlove:), 2007 against Rad, 2009... don't think she played a night match before 2004.:shrug:

Dieter.
Sep 3rd, 2010, 11:41 AM
Second round interview

THE MODERATOR: Questions for Maria.

Q. Pretty routine? You didn't have to play great, but steady enough, served pretty well, good off the ground.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I thought I just had to be consistent today, you know, because I'm playing a lefty. It's a little gusty out there. You know, it's just important to hang in there and, you know, not normally go for the lines as much, try to be a little more consistent.

My first‑serve percentage was quite low in the first set, but in the second set that got better. I got a few free points off of that.

Yeah, overall it was solid. I played the important points well.

Q. So second set, when you're well in control, did you think, Maybe I'll try a couple things to use in the next round?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, the main thing is to do the things that you feel are gonna help you win, you know, not just this match but the matches coming up, what's gonna make you better even if you make a few more mistakes.

For me, it's being aggressive, not being tentative, really going for it, you know, having something on the ball instead of letting the opponent kind of dictate.

Q. What goes through your mind when you hear an opponent, even though you're still young, having looked up to you since she was young as your next opponent spoke about earlier today?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it's pretty crazy because I still somewhat consider myself pretty young, as well; I'd like to think so, at least. You know, to see someone coming up that's 18, that's a lot younger than I am, in the third round of the Open is great. I think it shows, uhm, a lot about the younger generation that's coming up. To see someone especially that's an American and doing well at the Open is really great.

Q. She spoke about your mental toughness as something she's used as an example. That's her strength, too. When you think about the example you've set, what is your feeling about that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uhm, it's strange. It's really strange because I've always had a difficult time accepting, you know, when little kids, whether I'm doing a clinic, talking to them, when they tell me they want to be just like me not only is a bit overwhelming and a bit of a shock, it's kind of strange.

I mean, I'm certainly far from perfect. I have many things I'm not good at. I always say to them, You should want to be better than, uhm, me or anyone else.

I think maybe that's one of the reasons growing up, you know, I idolized a certain part of someone's game but I never thought that someone was so good that I wanted to be like them. I think that's a good point is, you know, she probably said one of my strengths. Obviously, that's something that's gotten me through so many matches in my career. In tennis, being strong and steady mentally sometimes more than physically is more important on certain days.

Q. Are you going to research or study tapes of opponents you're not familiar with or just go out and play your game?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, it's not really my job. That's why I have a coach to study that, to scout your opponent, yeah, have a little bit of a game plan.

Q. What, if anything, do you know about Capra?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Not too much. I know that she's American and she's 18, I believe (laughter), and she's in the third round of the Open. So that says a lot.

Q. Back to what you were saying about the little kids saying, I want to be like you. Are you not the type of person that takes compliments and flattery well?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, I get kind of shy about it.

Q. Do you shut it down and say, I know all my imperfections?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't openly talk about my imperfections in front of them (laughter). Uhm, but I just smile and say, Thank you. Then I just think about it. Like, No, you want to be better than me.

Q. Did you ever ask anyone for an autograph?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yes. A chef (smiling).

Q. Must have been some dinner.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: A chef whose name is Jose Andreas, a Spanish chef.

Q. In Washington?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: In Los Angeles. I've never been to Washington, so never been to his restaurant there. Who else? Peter Lindbergh, who is a photographer.

Q. You're normally a crowd favorite. You won't take it personally if the crowd is rooting for your underdog opponent in your next match?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it's absolutely understandable. We're playing in New York. When you have someone that's coming up, having a great Open, I mean, there's no reason why there shouldn't be any support behind her.

Q. Michael Jordan said the same thing. He never really asked certainly an athlete for an autograph. He didn't understand why you would do that, especially if you're in the field.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I mean, one of the coolest things about our jobs is we obviously get to meet many different people in different industries. You get to talk to them.

I mean, I don't know. I've never really met anyone that I was just kind of star‑struck about. Once, many years ago, like four or five years ago, we pulled up to an airport in Miami, and Michael Jordan was in front of us in a car. I didn't even see him. For some reason, I was in the car with my coach Michael. I said, I think that's Michael Jordan. I saw Nike bags. He walked out of the car. I was like, Oh, my goodness, I can't believe it.

I don't know where that came from. It was him. That's the only time where I was right.

Q. I take it you didn't ask for autographs, but a couple courts over from you was Martina Navratilova and Jimmy Connors. I don't know if you have any reaction to that.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I get to see both of them quite a bit during the Grand Slams. They do some commentating. I just asked Martina to hit a few lefty serves at me because I was playing against a lefty, yeah.

Q. How were the serves?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Good.

Q. Service winner, an ace?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: She did ace me. I was expecting the one out wide. Aced me down the T.

Q. Did she come in behind it, backhand?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No. I just stood there. She's like, Yes!

Q. When you were out at Stanford, Billie Jean King was there, celebrating the 40th anniversary of that tournament. When you hear about the grass‑roots beginning of the women's tour, are you amazed how far you have come?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, goodness, yeah. I mean, you look back, I think so many players take what we have for granted because I think without, you know, people like Billie Jean King, I mean, we wouldn't have the opportunity not only to play in such big and great events, we wouldn't have equal prize money. We wouldn't have someone that was so strong behind so many issues. We wouldn't be getting paid so much.

So many of those things you realize were done at a point where I think then, you know, none of those players really knew what was going to happen 20 years from then, how much effect and how much of what they did really mattered to the upcoming generation.

I think that's something that all of us really have to look at today and say what we do now is ultimately, when we're done and retired, whatever we're doing with kids, families, commentating, whatever it is, we're going to have some sort of piece, a part of what's going to happen in years to come. We really have to be thoughtful.

When I talk to Billie Jean King, she says, There's always going to be somebody in your spot. No matter how you do, how much you achieve, there's always going to be the next person that comes along that's going to be No. 1. There's going to be tons of them coming ahead. But at this point you guys are setting the bar for the younger generations to come.

We are. We try to be good examples by doing that.

Q. What do you remember about last year's Melanie match here? It was probably a low moment. What were some of the memories about that night?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Why do we need to remember that one?

Q. You and Michael Jordan are with Nike. I take it Phil Knight doesn't arrange parties?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I never got my invitation. Maybe they don't have my address. No, I think our schedules are too busy for everyone to get together, yeah.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

Vodkapova
Sep 3rd, 2010, 11:57 AM
She loves BJK, always talks so much about her. And has some inspiring quotes every time. :lol:

gc-spurs
Sep 3rd, 2010, 12:36 PM
Got an autograph from a chef... typical Maria lol.
I love the full presser vids. 2nd question in a hand comes in and puts the Maria Sharapova nameplate out. Pfft as if we didn't know.
And I loved the answer to the Oudin match question.

Mr.Sharapova
Sep 3rd, 2010, 03:01 PM
Q. What do you remember about last year's Melanie match here? It was probably a low moment. What were some of the memories about that night?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Why do we need to remember that one?

Stupid Question.Deserved Answer;)

Maria Croft
Sep 5th, 2010, 06:55 AM
THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Last year you had this type of matchup with a young upstart; you lost. This year you pretty much dominated. What was the difference today?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, you know, this was a new day. And what happened last year, you know, I didn't really want to go into the match thinking about it. You know, obviously I had lost the match and made way too many unforced errors. On a day like today, I just wanted to make sure I was consistent and did the right thing, and, you know, maybe didn't go for the lines as much and just played smart tennis.

Q. You're probably going to play the No. 1 seed on Monday.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uh huh.

Q. Is it a disadvantage to come off of the 6 0, 6 0 win going into that match and not being that tournament tested in your last match?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, every match is different. You don't worry about a match that's, you know, two rounds away when you're going into, you know, a particular match like today. You go out and just try to win the match, and you worry about the next one when it's over. Whether it's a tough one or whether it's an easy one, you've still got to win it no matter what the score ends up being.

Q. How would you describe the biggest difference between your style of play and Wozniacki's?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, you know, she can run all day and get a lot of balls back and make you hit tons of balls. She changes the pace really well, and gets her opponents offbalance. She does many things well, you know. That's why she's at the top of the game.

Q. Is there ever any point in a match like that where you feel any mercy for the person on the other side? How do you deal with that when you see that you're just completely dominating this teenage girl on center court and all that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, to be honest, going into that type of situation, you know, even before the match not knowing who you're playing against, not knowing her game, knowing that the conditions are tough, it actually equalizes many things before the match, because none of you are able to really play your game, you know. You have to be a little bit more careful than you usually are. But I mean, I don't really -- I don't think about the score. I just think about winning the next point.

Q. She obviously was quite overwhelmed by your game and the conditions and everything. But despite all that, were you able to see potential in her? Could you comment at all on what she might do well if she continues to work hard? A bit about her game.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, it's obviously really unfortunate that, you know, she had to come out first time on Ashe and be in those types of conditions. I mean, I've -- obviously I've been in those types of conditions and actually lost a few matches in those types of conditions during the day, and, you know, some tough ones. You know, overall it's obviously really tough to tell. But, you know, she tried to be consistent, and, you know, she I think she actually, you know, did really well on her serve and maybe not gone for big serves and tried to get that in. That was really smart. But, you know, overall I think I had a little bit too much firepower in the beginning, and that kind of really maybe caught her offguard, and she was late for a few balls. And then towards the end of the match, I think she started going for a little bit more and making a few more errors.

Q. You're 12 out of 14 since Wimbledon. Have you been on this type of hot streak before? If so, what's the difference now than when, say, when you're struggling? How do you see the court differently?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I think a lot of it is match play. You know, looking back at the start of the trip in Europe, I started the trip in Madrid where I was coming off the elbow injury. I wasn't playing much tennis, not even practicing much. I kind of had to go there and play, and I knew I wasn't ready. So the step that I made from there to the last match at Wimbledon, you know, where I had my chances, I knew that I was playing better. You know, physically I was feeling good and I was feeling confident. You know, I used the opportunity of the two weeks that I had off before Stanford to really work, and, you know, work hard on a few things. You know, I had some -- a lot of -- not a lot, but I played two tournaments, and, you know, did quite well; could have done better. You know, here we are. I think the more matches you play, the better you feel, and the different types of opponents.

Q. What do you think you do better than Caroline Wozniacki?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I don't know. I think we have different types of games. I haven't played her in a while, so I'm not sure. I really don't know. I don't know how to answer that question.

Q. Can it help you in any way that you have already won the US Open?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, she was the finalist here last year, so she's accustomed to the court and the atmosphere. She obviously, you know, knows how to play good tennis on the court. You know, it will be interesting.

Q. You're regarded as one of the toughest mentally out there on court, if not "the" toughest. Do you believe that in yourself? Also, how has the surgery and injuries since then, how have they really affected your confidence and perhaps showing you a little bit of vulnerability that you didn't have before?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, I do feel that, you know, especially in certain situations that I feel I don't know if the word "tougher" is the right word, but, you know, it's something that's, you know, won me many matches in my career. Growing up I was never the biggest, the strongest girl on tour. You know, even though I have big shots, there are many girls that are more powerful that were quicker. But in certain situations -- you know, coming into juniors, I was playing girls that were much older than I am. You'd be in a position where it's 6 all in the third, and I'd have to battle it out. You know, I found a way to stay calm, and, you know, be tough inside of me. It wasn't really about, you know, seeing an error from the other side, and, you know, saying, come on or pumping the fist. It was more of a feeling you had inside of staying calm. That's kind of the toughness that I felt. Like I said, it's certainly won me many matches.

Q. In your career, what moment are you most proud of in terms of mental toughness and coming through? Where do you think you have shown your toughness the most, including coming back?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, obviously coming back was one of the toughest things for me, I mean, off the court. Because I had so many expectations and so many others had expectations of me being able to come back at a certain period of time, and I was never ready. I would go on the court, we'd set a date of when I can start hitting the ball and hitting a few serves, and I'd hit forehands and backhands and I was fine. I tried to hit a serve, and I couldn't. I was still in a lot of pain. That was even after the rehab and after surgery. Coming back from that and setting another timetable for yourself and doing it over and over again until, you know, I slowly found myself working myself up to hitting 10 to 15 serves, 20 serves, and being able to do that without pain and really being patient, and, you know, going back to Phoenix over and over again for months on end, I mean, that, I think that took a lot. You know, because I think I could easily at this stage in my career just say, you know, I have won Grand Slams; I have been there and done that. But I never felt like I had enough. I always felt like I could be a better tennis player. Even if at that point I couldn't go out and hit a serve, I just physically just couldn't. Um, but starting from when I was young, I think winning Wimbledon at 17, the reason I'm looking back and being proud of that is because I was so fearless, you know, throughout the whole tournament. I mean, I was happy to be in the semifinals, I was down and out against Davenport. I was already booking my plane ticket when the rain delay hit. And then pulling that out, going into the final, you know, against someone that has so much experience and was so much physically stronger than I was at that point, so much more experienced, went out there and really just didn't really care about the situation; I just played tennis. So I guess that, yeah.

Q. You said your type of game was different from Wozniacki's. What do you think the key of the match against Wozniacki will be?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, I still have to play my game, you know. I still have to be aggressive. You know, she's the type of opponent that's gonna make you hit a lot of balls and is gonna make you hit that extra ball. I think I have to be aggressively patient. Obviously the serve and return on a quick court is really important, as well.

Q. It wasn't that long ago, but do you think it's tougher even now for a 17 year old to break in, to win a Grand Slam on the tour? Have things gotten progressively tougher for everybody?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think you see a lot more depth I really do than there was, you know, years ago. You definitely -- I think there were a lot of complaints a few years ago that the first few rounds were quite easily won 6 0, 6 1, and, you know, we were talking about equal prize money and all that. Now, you know, from the first round on you're seeing three setters from the top seeds; you're seeing tough matches. I think that just shows you how deep the field is.

Q. Does it surprise you that there's only one American left in the tournament, the bracket?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, to be honest, I get asked this question every single Grand Slam. We're in Australia, you get asked about the Australians.

Q. So it doesn't surprise you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No. You really have to worry about your own results, to be honest. But to see, you know, younger players doing well, and, you know, someone that's 18 years old getting into the third round and having an upset in the round before is great to see. Hopefully that will only keep getting better and improving.

Q. Not knowing how much tennis you watch in your spare time, how much have you actually see of Caroline and her game in recent months?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: In recent months?

Q. Or recent years.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think I saw a little bit of the first round that she played here. I was getting treatment during that and I got to watch it.

Q. Other tournaments?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Not really, to be honest. No.

Q. You spoke the other day about having a funny feeling when somebody says they look up to you because you're so young.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah.

Q. How did that play out today in your interaction with Capra?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, to be honest, when you're on the court your goal is to win the match. I wasn't thinking that I'm playing someone that's younger than me, that, you know, is the first time playing there. If you start thinking about all those things, I mean, the last thing you're gonna do is win the match. So it was just really important just to stay focused on the game more than anything else.

Q. And your conversation with her at the end of the match, what was that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, I said the conditions are really tough, and it's you know, like I said here. It's quite unfortunate that her first experience, you know, on Ashe had to be in those tough conditions. I mean, it's not easy for anyone.

Q. Who do you think will win this tournament? Yourself or somebody else?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: That's a funny question. Going into a tournament, if you think that anyone else is gonna win but you, you've got some serious problems. You shouldn't enter it.

Q. Can you just compare where you are now to 2006, both physically and mentally?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, I mean, it's tough to compare, you know obviously there's been different stages of my career winning, you know, the three Grand Slams. But I felt like going into that US Open you know, before I won Wimbledon I had gotten to a few semifinals of other Grand Slams. For some reason, before this one I just -- you know, I really felt physically and mentally ready to, you know, to push through. You know, I was quite excited to beat Amélie in the semis, and then obviously win against Justine. But, you know, different stage of my life, obviously. I've been through, you know, one other Grand Slam, was out for a year. It's quite difficult to compare, you know.

Vodkapova
Sep 5th, 2010, 07:08 AM
My Safari counted 61 "you knows" in that transcript. :worship:

shaktincredible
Sep 5th, 2010, 08:19 AM
so her match against Davenport at wimbledon 2004 is her favorite match all the time :hysteric:

Mr.Sharapova
Sep 5th, 2010, 01:06 PM
so her match against Davenport at wimbledon 2004 is her favorite match all the time :hysteric:

I love that match too!For sure she has to love it the most cause did an amazing comeback:)

Break My Rapture
Sep 5th, 2010, 01:13 PM
My Safari counted 61 "you knows" in that transcript. :worship:
:hysteric: :crying2:

~MashyOwnThemAll
Sep 5th, 2010, 02:11 PM
Q. In your career, what moment are you most proud of in terms of mental toughness and coming through? Where do you think you have shown your toughness the most, including coming back?


MARIA SHARAPOVA:

Um, I mean, obviously coming back was one of the toughest things for me, I mean, off the court. Because I had so many expectations and so many others had expectations of me being able to come back at a certain period of time, and I was never ready. I would go on the court, we'd set a date of when I can start hitting the ball and hitting a few serves, and I'd hit forehands and backhands and I was fine. I tried to hit a serve, and I couldn't. I was still in a lot of pain. That was even after the rehab and after surgery. Coming back from that and setting another timetable for yourself and doing it over and over again until, you know, I slowly found myself working myself up to hitting 10 to 15 serves, 20 serves, and being able to do that without pain and really being patient, and, you know, going back to Phoenix over and over again for months on end, I mean, that, I think that took a lot. You know, because I think I could easily at this stage in my career just say, you know, I have won Grand Slams; I have been there and done that. But I never felt like I had enough. I always felt like I could be a better tennis player. Even if at that point I couldn't go out and hit a serve, I just physically just couldn't. Um, but starting from when I was young, I think winning Wimbledon at 17, the reason I'm looking back and being proud of that is because I was so fearless, you know, throughout the whole tournament. I mean, I was happy to be in the semifinals, I was down and out against Davenport. I was already booking my plane ticket when the rain delay hit. And then pulling that out, going into the final, you know, against someone that has so much experience and was so much physically stronger than I was at that point, so much more experienced, went out there and really just didn't really care about the situation; I just played tennis. So I guess that, yeah.

:hug:


Love you

nelsondan
Sep 5th, 2010, 07:27 PM
My Safari counted 61 "you knows" in that transcript. :worship:

I wonder if she does anything comparable to that when she speaks Russian, or Spanish, or whatever other languages in which she is interviewed.

As one who can barely handle the English language, you know, I am willing to, you know, cut her some slack.

nectar69
Sep 7th, 2010, 05:53 AM
My thoughts on Wozniacki match. http://bleacherreport.com/articles/453586-wozniacki-deserves-credit-for-win-over-sharapova

Nina.
Sep 7th, 2010, 12:13 PM
An Interview With: Maria Sharapova
Monday, September 6, 2010
An interview with:

MARIA SHARAPOVA

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. 36 unforced errors, 9 double faults. Do you think you kind of gave the match to her?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uhm, even with those, you know, unforced errors, I still had my chances and I was 1 for 8 on breakpoints. You know, against someone that's playing really well, you know, playing with a lot of confidence, it's really important to take those chances that you have, the very few that come your way. I felt like I played a couple of good points and then, you know, make an easy error, hit a return long or miss a first serve, give her many looks at second serve returns. You know, didn't feel like I put much pressure on her, you know.

Q. What is she doing especially well?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: She's retrieving a lot of balls. You know, she served really well today. She used the wind really effectively, you know, especially when she was playing against the wind. You know, she was able to use many things to her advantage. I wasn't able to capitalize.

Q. When was the last time you can remember double faulting three times in a row?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uhm, I don't know, probably last year.

Q. Were you surprised that she played so fast and so stable?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, not at all. I mean, I can't be surprised by how well my opponent plays. Obviously, she's at the top of her game, playing her best tennis of her career. Never go into a match underestimating her ability.

Q. How far do you see her going in the tournament?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think she's playing quite well. This is a great opportunity for her.

Q. You held your serve pretty easily at 3 2. The next two, three games you lost your range. Did the wind pick up?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Which set?

Q. The second set.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uhm, yeah. But you could say that about so many different areas in the game today. Like I said, I played two good points and then made two return errors. It wasn't like she was hitting 120 serves out there. You know, in those situations, I didn't really give her a chance to play. I felt like I was just giving it out there.

Q. What are your thoughts on the state of your game now, your return from the shoulder problems, what you foresee down the road?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uhm, I think it just needs to be more stable and not so up and down, especially against an opponent like her. Uhm, you know, I need to string a few more things together than I did. It's all really capitalizing on what you have. You work hard for something, and then you let it slip away. I think I've just got to capitalize on that. Obviously, a bit unfortunate in the Grand Slams. I had my fair share of chances and didn't take them throughout this whole year in the big events. Uhm, you know, that's just the way it's gone. But keep moving forward, keep working hard.

Q. What kind of feelings do you have in your body after a match like this where you kind of can blame yourself for losing it?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: In the body?

Q. What kind of feelings do you have?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Obviously, losing a match, 30 minutes later, you're not the happiest person in the world. But at the end of the day, I'm sure you've heard it many times, but it's a tennis match. You've just got to look back at the match and what you should have done differently, what you need to work on.

Q. For you was it a case of lack of execution or a case of lack of aggression? What do you think was the reason you lost?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, I certainly could have been more aggressive. I did quite well when I was moving forward and being aggressive. But I don't think I did that enough. And that really allowed her to stand, you know, far back behind the baseline and keep retrieving balls. And that's just what she does best. When she had the opportunity to step in, she took it and went for her shots. Then I was on the defense.

Q. It appeared you were trying to execute more aggressive game plans. There were times that the serve let you down, the forehand, too. Want to talk a little bit about that.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Was that a question (laughter)?

Q. Do you feel it was just a lack of aggression or was it sometimes just on execution?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It was a combination. Like I said, I mean, there's no doubt she played really well, the best she's played against me. You know, she served extremely well. But I still had many opportunities in the match. Being 1 for 8 in breakpoints, that's pretty bad, to say the least, especially when you have second serve opportunities, easy unforced errors. It's maybe a little bit of a lack of concentration. :hysteric:

Q. How is she a different player from when you played her in the past?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: She's much steadier. She's improved a lot. Like I said, she served a lot better today. She capitalized. She was really smart on big points.

Q. You're going to play the Asian season. What is the goal?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uhm, yeah, right now just to take a few days off and get back on the court and get ready for them.

Q. Who is now your favorite player for the victory of the tournament?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't really have favorites. You know, when you lose, the tournament is pretty much over. You go back to improve yourself. You're not really worried about the rest of it.

Q. Do you think Francesca Schiavone has any chances against Venus?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: She's a Grand Slam champion. She certainly has the experience. Looks like she's playing really well. So, yeah, absolutely. I think everyone has a chance.

gc-spurs
Sep 7th, 2010, 01:13 PM
so freaking pc haha

Aaron!
Sep 7th, 2010, 01:28 PM
Maria to play in Tokyo and Beijing

Maria will be next in action at the Toray Pan Pacific event in Tokyo which begins on 26th September. The following week, Maria will play the China Open in Beijing

Both events are played on hardcourts and are two of the biggest Sony Ericccson WTA Tour Events. Tokyo is a Premier 5 event and Beijing is a Premier Mandatory event.

Last year Maria won in Tokyo and reached the 3rd round in Beijing.

- - - -

From her website.

joão.
Sep 7th, 2010, 01:42 PM
So many points to defend :unsure:

Marilyn Monheaux
Sep 7th, 2010, 01:54 PM
Is Caro playing Tokyo? I want revenge.:o

Nina.
Sep 7th, 2010, 01:56 PM
I don't know if I'm mentally prepared for another meeting :o
But Caro plays everything so she'll be there for sure

Dieter.
Sep 7th, 2010, 02:00 PM
http://www.toray-ppo.co.jp/en/player/

Looks like she will be there.

Marilyn Monheaux
Sep 7th, 2010, 02:00 PM
Really disappointing loss yesterday, credit to Caroline for playing her best tennis on a big stage. I had my chances and just could not take them. Back to the practice court to get ready for my trip to Asia.

:sobbing:

WTAtennisfan15
Sep 7th, 2010, 02:02 PM
Dont be hysteric Maja! At least Maria is trying to do something! She just needs Papa Yuri!

Mr.Sharapova
Sep 7th, 2010, 03:31 PM
Can't wait to see these two clash in Tokyo again!

Where probably Caro will be number 1 in the world by then!

joão.
Sep 7th, 2010, 06:02 PM
Caro is too consistent for Maria and I doubt she can get ready in less than a month for another clash unless Woz is super tired :unsure:
Yes, she needs to bring Yuri back for a while lol :( But seriously he should at least attend some Grand Slams for support :sad:

joão.
Sep 7th, 2010, 06:05 PM
http://www.toray-ppo.co.jp/en/player/

Looks like she will be there.

Why did everyone besides Venus decide to play Tokyo this year? :unsure:
I hope Masha draws that Sachie Ishizu chick :rolleyes:

atominside
Sep 7th, 2010, 11:41 PM
i dont think she will win tokyo, but im always here for maria. i thought i would have given up but guess not. Bitch better win me a fucking grand slam next year, or i'll really kill myself :sad:

gc-spurs
Sep 7th, 2010, 11:57 PM
Maria and Vika's pic on the site are funny. All smiles and headbands. She has a lot of good results in Japan hopefully she can make up most of her points, and hopefully she doesn't burn out without breaks in between days.

Jacey
Sep 8th, 2010, 02:15 AM
Maria and Vika's pic on the site are funny. All smiles and headbands. She has a lot of good results in Japan hopefully she can make up most of her points, and hopefully she doesn't burn out without breaks in between days.

I thought she gained points during the USO series and USO?

gc-spurs
Sep 8th, 2010, 02:22 AM
meant make up all her asian points from last year so she doesn't drop again.

Vodkapova
Sep 8th, 2010, 03:18 AM
Why did everyone besides Venus decide to play Tokyo this year? :unsure:
I hope Masha draws that Sachie Ishizu chick :rolleyes:

Why? Did I miss something? :lol:

I was rooting for her in the Wimbledon final.

lylux
Sep 8th, 2010, 07:05 PM
Sharapova still 'queen' of tennis - Russia's head coach (17:01 08/09/2010)

Former World No. 1 Maria Sharapova of Russia will always be the "queen" of tennis whether she wins or not, the head coach of the Russian national tennis team said on Wednesday.

Earlier this week, Sharapova failed to reach the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York after she suffered a straight sets defeat against Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki 3-6, 4-6.

"Sharapova is the queen of tennis, whether she wins or loses. She is the queen in everything. Wozniacki of course has more stability, but Sharapova looked more interesting," Vladimir Kamelzon said.

He said that Sharapova, who holds three Grand Slam titles including the 2006 U.S. Open, will definitely win one more in her tennis career.

"Everyone must learn from Maria, particularly the class of game, which she demonstrates. She is a unique athlete, ready to repeat her success and win a Grand Slam title once again," Kamelzon said.

Sharapova, 23, became an overnight tennis sensation at the age of 17 when she won Wimbledon in 2004, and quickly showed her business acumen by signing lucrative contracts with the global brands Canon, Motorola, Tiffany, Land Rover, and Colgate-Palmolive.

Last month Forbes magazine named Sharapova the world's highest-paid female athlete.

MOSCOW, September 8 (RIA Novosti)

http://en.rian.ru/sports/20100908/160517236.html

makes me feel good :D

~MashyOwnThemAll
Sep 8th, 2010, 07:12 PM
will definitely win one more in her tennis career.


:unsure:

BeaglesLuvTennis
Sep 8th, 2010, 07:25 PM
just saw this blog (http://www.tennisnow.com/Blogs/Tennis-and-stuff-/September-2010/Maria-Sharapova-Most-Searched-Female-Athlete-on-Go.aspx) about Maria being the most-searched female athlete on google. go girl!

slamchamp
Sep 8th, 2010, 10:30 PM
:unsure:

I think so too:shrug:

Mr.Sharapova
Sep 11th, 2010, 10:38 AM
Sharapova returns to Tokyo for Pan Pacific Open
AFP, Aug 23, 2010, 01.56pm IST

Article
Comments



Tags:serena williams|pan pacific open|maria sharapova|kim clijsters|elena dementieva


TOKYO: Defending champion Maria Sharapova will return to Tokyo next month, spearheading the star-studded Pan Pacific Open women's tennis tournament, organisers said on Monday.:wohoo:

Twenty-seven players out of the current world top 30 will take part in the $2 million hard court tournament from September 26 to October 2, with only Kim Clijsters, Venus Williams and Justine Henin missing.

Sharapova captured her first WTA singles and doubles titles at the 2003 Japan Open, and also won her first professional title on the ITF Circuit series in Gunma, north of Tokyo, a year earlier.

The Russian heart-throb has won four titles in Tokyo out of her 22 WTA titles, including the Japan Open twice and the 2005 Pan Pacific.

Last year, Sharapova put an end to a long lay-off caused by a shoulder injury by winning her first title since Amelia Island in April 2008, beating Jelena Jankovic of Serbia in the final.

Along side world number one Serena Williams, the singles field includes former Pan Pacific champions Elena Dementieva of Russia, the Beijing Olympic gold medallist who won here in 2006.

Other former champions are Japan's Kimiko Date Krumm, the winner in 1995, and Dinara Safina of Russia, the winner in 2008. Both picked up a wild card.

Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic and Tsvetana Pironkova of Bulgaria, who caused a sensation by reaching the semi-finals at Wimbledon, will make their Japan debuts.:bounce:




All I want for her is to play Moscow:sad:

xan
Sep 11th, 2010, 11:42 AM
Maria needs to defend Tokyo. Moscow. She has never done well at. Moscow can wait till (hopefully) Maria is dominating as Number 1.

Vartan
Sep 13th, 2010, 10:53 AM
I want her to win Moscow to put a new title on her resume.

slamchamp
Sep 13th, 2010, 05:49 PM
Serena is playing there:scared:

Break My Rapture
Sep 13th, 2010, 07:05 PM
Good!

Nina.
Sep 13th, 2010, 07:48 PM
Serena is playing there:scared:

Really? The week before the YEC? Let's wait if she shows up

slamchamp
Sep 13th, 2010, 08:13 PM
in Tokyo:p

Nina.
Sep 13th, 2010, 08:19 PM
oh I misunderstood :lol: I think I read the Moscow thread before :shrug: