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Advantage Me
Aug 31st, 2012, 10:24 PM
Once the news is out Maria has no choice but to admit and answer questions about the break up. No doubt she had been warned by Max and therefore was very prepared. I thought her answers were very classy. Just like her.

MM_1257
Aug 31st, 2012, 10:31 PM
Anyone of us could have poked the journalists at Wimby and intrigue them. Cronin, Myles, you name it... But we didn't, because we didn't want Maria to be distracted by those questions, did we??

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 31st, 2012, 10:43 PM
Maria is such a sneaky little liar. :p Her and Sasha did announce their relationship when it first started (via their reps). They did announce their engagement via their reps. They did stage a photo-op to show off the ring. :p And she knows she's full of it with that whole "nobody asked me directly" schtick. She kept talking about Sasha as if they were still together and she knows it... :p

18majors
Aug 31st, 2012, 10:47 PM
Maria is such a sneaky little liar. :p Her and Sasha did announce their relationship when it first started (via their reps). They did announce their engagement via their reps. They did stage a photo-op to show off the ring. :p And she knows she's full of it with that whole "nobody asked me directly" schtick. She kept talking about Sasha as if they were still together and she knows it... :p

I'm glad you weren't present at the press conference to ask Maria all these questions, VirginMary.

MM_1257
Aug 31st, 2012, 10:54 PM
Maria is such a sneaky little liar. :p Her and Sasha did announce their relationship when it first started (via their reps). They did announce their engagement via their reps. They did stage a photo-op to show off the ring. :p And she knows she's full of it with that whole "nobody asked me directly" schtick. She kept talking about Sasha as if they were still together and she knows it... :p

Yup. But I really do believe she didn't want to tell it. Now she was forced to.

Marilyn Monheaux
Aug 31st, 2012, 10:54 PM
Yeah, its just gotten better #clayseason


Nah, she has CGI hair, he has a mop. It was never going to work.

But in no seriousness at all, what about the secret person she made a dedication to when she won Wimbledon?


Camilla. Duh! :angel:


I'm glad you weren't present at the press conference to ask Maria all these questions, VirginMary.

OK! I'm hip to Pova's game. :cool:

jameshazza
Aug 31st, 2012, 10:56 PM
So classy, almost brought a tear to my eye.

MM_1257
Aug 31st, 2012, 10:59 PM
Camilla. Duh! :angel:

:spit: :rolls: I laughed out loud. Yeah, DUUUH! Maria and Camilla were meant to each other since in diapers.

Crux Squall
Sep 1st, 2012, 01:51 AM
Friday, August 31, 2012

PRINT
THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.



Q. Pretty routine, huh?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it was. I expected her to play a big, solid match. I mean, she came out, she has pretty huge groundstrokes, and she likes to go for it. Yeah, my opponents have been quite different last few rounds. She's certainly somebody who could be dangerous if you give her the time to do what she likes to do. Overall, I was happy with the way I played.



Q. First few matches overall despite the wind and little problems with the serve, seems like you're fairly confident and have the rhythm and all of that now.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, as you say, routine, but with each match different situations. Yeah, of course I would have loved to have served a little better in that second set today. I gave her that break. But overall, it was pretty solid. I mean, considering the conditions, I thought I served good and placed the ball well.



Q. Does the scoreline reflect how you're feeling on the court?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I didn't know too much going into this event because I hadn't played on hard in a few months. I think that made me extra focused, and I wanted to really get going from the beginning and be aggressive. Yeah, took a little bit of a break after Wimbledon and went home. I think I kind of recharged a little bit. Certainly feel a lot more energy than I did maybe after the French.



Q. A lot of people are talking about Robson and Stephens as the way of the next great female players. They are having a great Open so far. Can you comment a little bit on both of them?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I have played both of them. You know, Laura was someone who was obviously throughout the years ‑‑ I think she won junior Wimbledon, and she's someone that I think a lot of people expected to do well at an early age. I mean, this is definitely her breakthrough tournament, her breakthrough Grand Slam where she's been playing extremely well. I've practiced with her a few times. Played her at the Olympics and last year at Wimbledon. She has a big game, and also a lefty, which adds to her strength. But Sloane, I played against her in Miami, I think. I don't remember the score, but she's a great athlete. Moves so well. I watched a little bit of her match yesterday. She's a great fighter and, you know, was able to come back from that match. Obviously that's the newer generation, and I'm somewhere in the middle there. (Smiling.)



Q. What were your thoughts when you saw Kim's last match? Have you been able to talk to her at all? What did she mean to you and your career?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, well, I was very fortunate to play a lot of matches against Kim and follow her career. I mean, she was such a great athlete, a great competitor. We always had really tough battles against each other. It was amazing to see her career unfold. The way she came back after, you know, becoming a mom and having that dedication and, you know, that fire again, it was pretty incredible. It showed how much she loved the sport and how much passion she had for it. Yeah, I actually didn't get to see her after.



Q. How about Roddick?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, crazy tournament. (Smiling.) Anybody else add to the list? Not me, but... I mean, it was fun watching his career. I mean, he always had so much energy on the court, especially in New York. I think everyone embraced him as an athlete and as a personality. You know, he worked extremely hard. It puts things perspective a little bit, because you think, Well, tennis does come to an end at some point, and you actually start thinking about that. Yeah, it's crazy how two great players are going to be out after this tournament.



Q. It comes to an end at a point maybe earlier than any other sport I can think of.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It does definitely. Everything is so routine in our sport, and since a young age it's just such a huge part of our life. Then I guess that decision, it's an interesting decision of how you decide to stop or if your body isn't able to continue or if your mind is not there anymore. But it's certainly an exciting chapter in their lives.



Q. It's really kind of a fleeting window of opportunity to contest for Grand Slams, and obviously you have played them at a very, very high standard. Are you at a point where you say to yourself, you know, This isn't going to last forever?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Of course.



Q. When you're 19, everything is going to last forever.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I'll tell you, when I was 18 or 19, if someone told me I was going to be playing at 25, which was seven years from then, I'd be like, Stop, this is ridiculous. You're crazy. But here I am at 25 years old. Although I didn't play for nine, ten months in my career, I'm 25, and I feel like I have so many more years left. I still wake up in the morning and feel like I can be better and motivated. I have energy and I'm healthy. What else can you ask for.



Q. Roddick said yesterday he just didn't want to exist on tour, meaning outside of the top 20, top 20, 25, maybe not competing for Grand Slam titles. Is that pretty much the same for you? Could you see yourself just saying, Oh, fourth round or quarterfinals are okay, win a small tournament here or there?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It's difficult when you've tasted such great success and when you have expected yourself to be in later stages of tournaments, you know, on a consistent basis. It's challenging as a professional athlete when you've been at the top and you've experienced greatness, to kind of see yourself fall down a little bit and just think that, Oh, it's okay if I'm, you know, in the third or fourth round. Of course it's okay maybe when you've battled things and you've gotten through things to get yourself in a position to play professional tennis. Of course in a big perspective, that's pretty incredible. But overall, when you've had that feeling of winning and, you know, losing on a weekly basis to maybe players you expect to beat, it's tough. Then your body is not exactly, you know, as it was when you're in your early 20s or teenage years. Then it all comes together. You're like, There are other things in life, as well.



Q. I was watching the junior girl qualifiers and boy qualifiers. I saw a lot more serve and volley players than before. We see Federer coming in more to end points quicker. Is that something we will see in the future?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Not from me. (Laughter.)



Q. Not from you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Definitely not from here. I would hope so. I think it's fun to watch. It's quicker; it's something different. I grew up with it on TV, not so much in real life. I didn't face too many players that served and volleyed. But, yeah, I guess if that happens, I don't know if I'll still be playing then. (Smiling.)



Q. The other day when I asked you about your wedding, you seemed surprised that some people thought it was true about your wedding in Istanbul. Today Sasha Vujacic wrote on Twitter that since months you're not anymore together.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yes, that's correct.



Q. So that was before Wimbledon that you split up or...

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, it's been since the end of spring actually. I was waiting for someone to actually ask me that question, but nobody did directly. (Laughing.) Yes.



Q. It was a bit confusing.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I know. It is.



Q. People were talking about the wedding and you split up. It's not important, but...

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, but, you know, I have never really been the person to announce things. I never announced when we were together or never announced that we were engaged. I never have in any of my previous relationships, as well. It's not really the type of person that I am or the way I like to go about things. I'm not an announcer, you know. I don't go and do interviews about it or photo ops.



Q. I was hoping to be invited to the wedding.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: You still have a chance. (Laughter.) I mean, I still have many years ahead of me.



Q. I guess it's fair to say you have done a really good job of separating the off court and on court since the spring then.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it was obviously a challenging decision, you know, from both of our ends. Yeah, it was a really nice period of time for both of us, but, you know, our career schedules just made it extremely difficult to see each other with the traveling, and especially his career move to Turkey. You know, the playing there was a little bit different in terms of he wasn't able to travel much. He wasn't home one time during the ten months that he was in Turkey, so that made it extremely difficult. Yeah, but we have a tremendous amount of respect for each other. Still would love to call him as a friend. Yeah, we spent really great years together.



Q. Nadia is your next match.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, look, she's been playing really good tennis here. Just saw a little bit of her match against Safarova. She's someone that likes the faster courts, especially in New York. I have had some tough matches against her. Although I have a good record, they have always been really tough and have gone to some three‑setters, some tough two‑setters. She has a big game, great serve, a difficult opponent, but I'm looking forward to that challenge.



Q. It's obviously well‑documented that you have so much in your life: the titles and No. 1 and you love business and fashion and meet wonderful people. Kind of hard to have a social life when you're in Stuttgart one day and, you know, Paris the next, and Tokyo; is that a challenge?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I make time for that. You know, I'm able to have a normal life which I'm pretty happy about, although when I'm at tournaments and I'm doing events and business‑related things, it seems like my life is very hectic and very glamorous, very popular. But at the end of the day, when I'm home, I'm just like everybody else ‑‑ although my office is my tennis court. I put those hours in. Then outside of it I have so many friends, my family, and I'm able to have a normal social life. I consider myself lucky.



FastScripts by ASAP Sports

Shivank17
Sep 1st, 2012, 06:21 AM
Seems more of a mutually accepted light split. I mean when Maria can still call him as a friend after the split. :lol: So we know who obviously broke up. :oh:

Ksenia.
Sep 1st, 2012, 06:38 AM
Well, this is no big news but it's nice to have a confirmation, I guess :shrug:
And I am really impressed that it hasn't affect Maria's tennis at all. Mental GOAT, as always.

Maria Croft
Sep 1st, 2012, 07:53 AM
Tremendous interview from her. She's so mature and classy, as always.
You'd think this would have affected her on court game, but it hasn't.

She's really something else :worship:

Advantage Me
Sep 1st, 2012, 10:20 AM
Tremendous interview from her. She's so mature and classy, as always.
You'd think this would have affected her on court game, but it hasn't.

She's really something else :worship:

The fact that she has great family, friends and team around her helps tremendously. She might give the impression that she is alone most of the time but in reality it is the opposite.

MM_1257
Sep 1st, 2012, 10:49 AM
The fact that she has great family, friends and team around her helps tremendously. She might give the impression that she is alone most of the time but in reality it is the opposite.

IMO she creates strong bonds with the people who surround her. Even though Juan said in an interview that hs tends to distance himself from his work and doesn't go to vacations with the players (aka Maria), I think they are quite good friends, you could see his girl with her on several occassions, and the reaction of his girl at RG was so so nice that you see they like each other... So they are friends. Then she has a special relationship with Michael Joyce... And with Max they seem to have the uncle niece relationship aswell. So no, she is not alone. She finds people she can trust to work with her and lets them quite close IMO. And she also had her mum with her since Madrid up to London 2012. Or maybe she is with her now, too, who knows... And last year also, when she started the work with Thomas (and we know how she felt about it, she is not hiding it) - her mum was with her, and then was Sasha...
Actually, I am surprised, she is relatively open on a lot of things lately, has matured a lot and is prepared to take the questions with dignity... And yet the journalists still have the "cold", "b*thcy", "stone-faced" Maria in their mind...

To me the funny part of the presser was when she joked with that journalist of him having chances (is he Italian? Like "the Italian" that she seems to have a love/hate interaction with him?) and the way she said: "that's correct" and "We spent great years together" - there IMO she was a bit of a softy...

Valkyre
Sep 1st, 2012, 11:02 AM
now that Maria is not with Sasha only one thing has to happen... Djoker should break up with Helena and hook up with Maria... seriously these 2 are throwing vibes all over the place for years now...

Just look at the behind the scenes video of the head commercial... this is not acting... Maria and Novak seem geniunely happy and not in a friendly way happy... if you know what i mean! ;)

MM_1257
Sep 1st, 2012, 11:08 AM
Maria should not rush into another relationship. Who was it who said - that in the beginning of a relationship is normal to drop a bit in tennis?? I read it somewhere and I forgot it... Right now TBH, I do not want any kind of distractions for her.

lefty24
Sep 1st, 2012, 02:40 PM
now that Maria is not with Sasha only one thing has to happen... Djoker should break up with Helena and hook up with Maria... seriously these 2 are throwing vibes all over the place for years now...

Just look at the behind the scenes video of the head commercial... this is not acting... Maria and Novak seem geniunely happy and not in a friendly way happy... if you know what i mean! ;)

That's how I hang out with my friends all the time. ;)
Maria should not rush into another relationship. Who was it who said - that in the beginning of a relationship is normal to drop a bit in tennis?? I read it somewhere and I forgot it... Right now TBH, I do not want any kind of distractions for her.

Agreed. I have feeling she's not gonna be in a other relationship for awhile now.

humanabstract
Sep 1st, 2012, 02:55 PM
What a classy presser from Maria. As usual :oh:

With all this big news just want to say one thing: Masha, I'm coming!!! :rolleyes::haha:

Advantage Me
Sep 1st, 2012, 09:44 PM
Maria should not rush into another relationship. Who was it who said - that in the beginning of a relationship is normal to drop a bit in tennis?? I read it somewhere and I forgot it... Right now TBH, I do not want any kind of distractions for her.

Agree. Look what happened to Caro.

Mrs. Dimitrova
Sep 2nd, 2012, 06:26 AM
Well, this is no big news but it's nice to have a confirmation, I guess :shrug:
And I am really impressed that it hasn't affect Maria's tennis at all. Mental GOAT, as always.

In fact, she has been playing much better post-break up. :lol:

MashaFan01
Sep 3rd, 2012, 01:29 PM
*waits for a transcript from Masha's latest presser* - I'll be ever so grateful - Thanks in advance :)

18majors
Sep 3rd, 2012, 03:43 PM
In fact, she has been playing much better post-break up. :lol:

Yes, I wonder whether she's been bothered by the relatiionship all year, and her transformation to higher quality plays starting from 2012 Stuttgart is a direct consequence of finalizing that breakup decision.

Advantage Me
Sep 3rd, 2012, 04:02 PM
*waits for a transcript from Masha's latest presser* - I'll be ever so grateful - Thanks in advance :)

The transcript is available on US open official site under 'interviews'

Shivank17
Sep 3rd, 2012, 04:08 PM
Here :) :

An interview with: MARIA SHARAPOVA

Sunday, September 2, 2012


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.



Q. Were you happy when the rain came a little bit?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, it's a tough situation because I felt like there's so many ups and downs between the beginning of the first till that break. She was up a break and it was a little bit difficult going in because I felt like I started getting a little bit of momentum back in the second set and then just didn't really take my chances when I had them and played a sloppy game at 4‑5. But I didn't really mind. I have the experience of getting off the court and waiting a little bit and trying to start from scratch.



Q. How proud are you of yourself you served the final game?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: That was really important, especially against Nadia. One of her strengths is her serve. You know, when it's on and she's holding easy, that obviously puts more pressure on the service game. You really try to concentrate on that, you know, be smart and mix it up a little bit more. But, yeah, overall I'm really happy with the way it came out in the third. I didn't let that little letdown bother me. I just kept on fighting. So, yeah.



Q. You looked so pumped up during the third set when you came back on the court. What does this quarter mean to you? It seems something special.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, of course. You're playing a night match at the US Open, you have a rain delay, you come back, and all the same people that were there waited through for 45 minutes and they came back to watch the end of the match. So that energy in the stadium with the music and the cheering, it's just unique. You know, I think it really, really pumped me up and got me going. I wasn't going to leave that court without a fight.



Q. Did you call your dad or did he call you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Thomas told me he wanted to talk to me.



Q. And you took the call?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Then I called him. I didn't want to hear it after if I didn't call him. I didn't want to have that conversation.



Q. I can't imagine he just said, Fight. He must have said more than that. Did you tune him out after he said, Fight?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, he knows by now, like, where to stop and where to keep going. He has that experience with me. (Smiling.) No, he just said, You know, your energy dropped in the beginning of the second set. That's over. That's done. Now you got to go out there and fight.



Q. Petrova was just asked about the rain delay. She said really that's why you won and called it your lucky day.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Great. I'm the winner, so whatever she wants to call it is fine with me.



Q. Any win is a good thing. You're 11‑0 this year in matches that go in three sets. What kind of pride do you take in having that kind of success? Why do you think you are so successful?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it's a nice statistic. I don't really think about it going into a new third‑set situation. Certainly wasn't on my mind, because every match is different, different circumstance, whether you started slow and came back in the second or whether you had a letdown in the second. Overall, you know, I always think that no matter how you start the match, it's always how you finish. Whether it's an hour or whether it's three hours that you're out there, I don't want to give up until the last point. That's pretty much the mentality I try to have going into a third set.



Q. Being demonstrative, is that something you sort of learned in your career? Just more, C'mons and vocal. Is that something relatively new for you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think I've always been pretty vocal. I think we can all agree on that one.



Q. Can you talk about the mentality on second serves? Seems like now you've decided, I'm going to go for it and hit my spot. Last couple games you were going for some pretty big serves.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, because I think against someone that likes to take chances like that, you know, she loves to step in and go for it. I wouldn't blame her. If I had second serves at 80 miles per hour, I probably would want to step in, too, and hit them in the corners, you know, and take advantage of that. She's an aggressive player. She goes for it. That's not something I wanted to give her.



Q. Can you talk playing Marion Bartoli in the next round.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: We haven't played in a while. It was a great win for her today, someone who has been playing really good this summer. Yeah, it's nice to see her back in the quarterfinals of a slam. I think she's been a little bit up and down, but obviously her level has stepped up here. Honestly, I haven't watched any of her matches here. I played her before; I know her game style. It's always a little bit different, nontraditional. But, yeah, it's the quarterfinals and I'm excited.



Q. Does it feel like so long for you since the quarterfinals, or does it seem like just yesterday you were in the quarters here?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: A little bit of both. Sometimes you look back and you think, Wow, that was many years ago. I had baby cheeks still. But then you think, Oh, where has the time flown? It's so fast. But, yeah, I missed a year, so that chance was taken away from me of getting far. But, you know, we're here now and I'm back in the quarterfinals. It's a nice feeling. I've got to go from here.



Q. Do you feel like more of a veteran now?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I kind of feel somewhere in the middle really. I started when I was very young, and now I'm playing a lot more opponents that are younger than me. I don't think that necessarily means that I'm a veteran, but I've been on the tour for a long time. I'm experienced. But there's still many years ahead of me. I don't think I'm at the end of my career.



Q. Last three times post surgery obviously wasn't the best tennis, but do you look at those matches as a just process of coming back from the shoulder, or do you say to yourself on this occasion that you just didn't play your best and I had chances in all those matches?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Here at the US Open?



Q. Against Melanie, Caroline, then Pennetta last year.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't like to look back at those, especially a couple of them. But, you know, every circumstance is different. Every match you play you've got to bring your A game. Obviously in those situations my opponents played a lot better. They won the match. There's a reason why they did. But obviously those losses make you hungrier to come back and do better.



Q. What I'm saying is do you take the bigger picture or compartmentalize?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it's the only way to look at it. I think if you look at it in a negative perspective it's pretty tough. You have a whole 'nother year; that's pretty depressing.



Q. You have a lot of crowd support here. Did it seem like you had even more crowd support than you usually do?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I certainly felt that energy today, especially when we came back. Maybe just gave an opportunity for people to drink more so they're more excited, I'm not sure. But it was nice. It was a really nice atmosphere.



Q. Can you describe what it's like to be on that court?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It's amazing.



Q. It's that loud?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It is.



Q. So it's not like you're checking out on it; you can really hear the noise?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: When we describe all the different Grand Slams, 'energy' is the word I think of when I think of the US Open. Just from the tunnel and the bright lights there, then you walk out, and then the fans are kind of right there in that little tunnel. They're screaming. They want your autograph before the match. They're putting their hands out. Then you walk out and it's this massive stadium. When it's filled up, when it's night, you have the lights on, it's just so special. It's so unique to be a tennis player in that atmosphere.



Q. You talked about your hunger that you have. You won a career slam this year and an Olympic medal. Is that at all hard to keep yourself going, saying, I still need more in my career?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it gives you extra motivation. I'll tell you, it's a lot tougher mentally, more challenging, to lose a match and say right away, I'm hungry for more just because losing is not always fun. Obviously, the faster that you turn around and change that mentality the better. When you have moments of victory, when you're holding the trophy, you think back of the work you put in. That's when you realize that it's worth it. That's when you know that there's no better motivation. So absolutely. If I didn't have that I would be announcing a retirement, but I'm not. I still feel like I have a lot more left in me, things that I certainly can improve in my game. That's why I get up and want to work hard.

Cosmic Voices
Sep 3rd, 2012, 04:16 PM
I really want to know what Yuri said to Masha :oh:

Thanks for the transcript careerslampova :yeah:

domon17th
Sep 3rd, 2012, 04:17 PM
Here :) :

Great one, thanks Shivank (I got your name right?)

Maria's interview always comes across as thoughtful and witty. Of course not many people can appreciate that but I guess, it's fine with me. ;)

os400
Sep 3rd, 2012, 04:29 PM
lol maria seems afraid not calling her father right away. maybe he will berate her non stop if she didnt call ?

but im really really glad yuri stepping in even just a little to give a small advice.. even if maria seems to dismiss it lightly in this conference, i thnk her father's call give a small mental boost to her... glad yuri helping maria again, especially since her admission of breakup with sasha (she handled it correctly but i guess she felt the pain inside)

as for the breakup secrecy, i think sasha started it by tweeting his breakup , so that gave masha no reason to pretend anymore.. in fact just before USOpen and at the opening of Sugarpova, masha still pretend to be engaged when asked in NBC morning interview.. maybe sasha really back to his old italian girlfriend now and dont want to embarrass masha so he break the news 1st?

Shivank17
Sep 3rd, 2012, 04:29 PM
Great one, thanks Shivank (I got your name right?)

Maria's interview always comes across as thoughtful and witty. Of course not many people can appreciate that but I guess, it's fine with me. ;)

yep. ;)

MashaFan01
Sep 4th, 2012, 10:04 AM
The transcript is available on US open official site under 'interviews'
Thanks

And thanks to you too CareerSlamPova

Crux Squall
Sep 6th, 2012, 05:57 AM
An interview with: MARIA SHARAPOVA

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

PRINT
THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.



Q. You had a long time to think about 4‑Love.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I did.



Q. How did you get through all that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I tried not to think about it too much. Yeah, it was good to have that period of time just to get a good night's sleep and come back. It's not always a good feeling to come into a match to knowing that you're down 0‑4. It's like you're going to try to win that set, but if you don't you're down 0‑1. It was a tough position to be in, but I'm just so thrilled to be in the semis here.



Q. The third set was pretty high‑quality stuff, wasn't it?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, like there is a reason why she reached the quarterfinals. I mean, I think her level of play really showed today and yesterday why she was in the top 10 and why she's such a high‑quality player. Yeah, there's a lot of good things that she did. I'm happy that I pulled through no matter how tough it was.



Q. She's a little unpredictable as to when she's going to be hitting the lines and when she's not. Just talk about contending with that.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I mean, I guess unpredictable is good in a way ‑ for her. A little bit on the serve, as well. She was going a lot for her second serves. I think she probably had like 30 serves that were 99‑miles‑per‑hour second serves. It's like she worked consistently to get 99 miles an hour. Every time I looked at the clock it was like 99, 99. If I lose this match, I'm going to have nightmares. (Laughter.) No, I mean, I guess she just has that nontraditional game where it's kind of sneaky. You don't know if she's going to come in or if she's gonna hit the ball or be flat or hit the frame. But, yeah, she's worked a lot on it. That's why it's good.



Q. So you haven't lost a three‑set match since Pennetta last year. That's a lot of them to win in a row. Do you feel like going into those three sets, okay, I have done well all year; I think I can pull it out again?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Honestly, every time I've gone to a third set I haven't thought about it, because every single match is different. It's a different situation. Sometimes you can be coming back; sometimes you win the first set and then you have a letdown. It's a great statistic. It shows that I enjoy the battle no matter what the score is. The third set, it's the last set out there, and there's no reason why you shouldn't put everything out there. That's kind of how I treat those situations.



Q. Rain has become such a regular feature here. There has obviously been a lot of talk of putting on a roof. Talk about what yesterday was like, going out and having to come back on again and off, and then finally when they gave you the word you were playing the next day?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: All right yesterday, but a lot today. Maybe you guys didn't see. We were on like four times today.



Q. Today?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah. Right when we were walking literally in the hall of the locker room we went back on because it started drizzling. I mean, I have done like 20 different types of warmups in the gym. I was so sick of it. I was like, Let's just play tennis. (Laughter.) So I was really happy that we got it in without another break. Another break means another warmup. I can't handle it anymore.



Q. Was it kind of like a reboot, though?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It's kind of like a gym workout every time. I'm like, this is not what I signed up for here.



Q. Already tired when you get out there.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah. No, no, I mean, it's great. You've got to get going, but it's like, Get me out there.



Q. How would you describe you and Victoria as competitors and then your respective styles of play?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I think we both play a pretty aggressive game. You know, we're good competitors and we love to win. I mean, who doesn't? But she's had such a solid year this year, kinda her breakthrough in terms of winning the Grand Slam, being so solid, so consistent, being No. 1 in the world for the first time. So a lot of firsts for her, which I think a lot of people expected in the last few years. This is kind of the year where she's come out and, yeah, played really great tennis.



Q. You talked after the match on court about how you wanted to exact your revenge for her victory. Was there any extra motivation there?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, well it's always tough to lose in that final stage of a Grand Slam. You know, last time we played I think I was in Stuttgart where I beat her, but before that she got me a couple of times. You know, I played a really good match in Germany against her. Obviously I want to take the things I did well there and ‑‑ but that was on clay; this is a different situation. So every match is new. She's been playing great tennis. I'm in the semifinals since '06, I think, so this is a great opportunity for the both of us.



Q. What are the keys when the two of you have been playing and what have been the keys in the rivalry?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Game style?



Q. Yeah. I mean, when you've been successful, what has determined that for you? And by contrast, when she's been successful, what has been the difference?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, she's a great returner, so you have to serve pretty good. Yeah, she's aggressive. If you give her a good first ball she likes to take advantage of that. Yeah, I mean, there's not a lot I'd talk openly about.



Q. Seems like you had the crowd support here in these big matches on Ashe, Petrova and against Bartoli, as well. Azarenka is someone who almost never has the crowd on her side when she's playing. Do you have any idea what makes a crowd ‑‑ what makes certain players more popular to crowds than others?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't know. I think maybe the intensity, the passion they have. I mean, I have lived in the States since I was seven, so this is my base. This is my home. Not New York but Florida and California. So, you know, I have a lot of fans here, a lot of friends that come out and watch. You know, in a way, it feels like a second home for me. I certainly feel that support. This is where I ‑‑ basically after three years of tennis, starting tennis, this is where I developed my game and where I really learned the sport. I have been around for many years, so I feel like the fans have kind of watched me grow here and watched me since the days I was a junior here till now. They followed my career. Yeah, and also, we have a big Russian community in Brooklyn. They come out.



Q. The crowd is always for you, which is cool. Today do you think they may have been for you because they were pulling for the one who was struggling coming from behind? If so, how much did that help you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think that's ‑‑ I think fan support when you're down ‑‑ also, you know, it's normal in sport when fans are rooting for the underdog because they want to see a match. They want to see the competition. They want it to be entertaining. That's why they pay the money. So I understand that. I have been a part of that. I mean, I felt the energy. I've felt it switch from one side to another during matches. That's for sure. I have been a part of many incredible matches where it's kind of slow, and then you get going and then it's up and down. You know, people get into it. But I understand that energy that comes of supporting an underdog, someone that's not necessarily the favorite. But they want to see you pull through.



Q. You and Andy grew up together in Florida. When he walked by, did you see him today? Any words exchanged? Andy Roddick.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, well, we actually didn't grow up in the same part of Florida.



Q. I know. But he wins the Eddie Herr, you win the Eddie Herr.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Was that the same week?



Q. Yeah, it was. The same Sunday. You were 12 and he was 17 or so.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: He didn't say hi to me then. (Laughter.) But neither did I, obviously.



Q. The third set, you know, you got the break early. In such a close match, how frustrating was it for you when you lost the break?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it is. Obviously I was up 30‑15 and I gained, but she played a very aggressive, solid game there. I mean, of course there are things I could have done to get that, and it's always unfortunate to not hold your serve. But then I got another break; made up for it.



Q. Serena Williams obviously plays on the other half of the draw. When you think of her serve, what to you impresses you most or do you think makes her serve as successful as it is?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think the consistency and the power and the strength. She finds the corners extremely well, but on a consistent level. It's one thing to, you know, to serve a big serve, but it's another thing to do it consistently match in, match out.



Q. How much of her success do you think depends on the success with the serve?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think a lot. And I think it also builds, you know, a player game because it is that first shot. So if you're feeling confident and if you feel like that's a shot that's working for you, I think all other pieces of the puzzle kind of come together.



Q. Do you think it's pretty natural that the younger players go after the established Grand Slam champions and get a little more motivated? Do you think that was the case with Victoria when she first started playing you back a few years ago and even today? Meaning you're the hunted one more.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Maybe before but not so much now. You know, she's obviously won a Grand Slam already. So, you know, it's almost like other players are also wanting to beat her and she's No. 1 in the world. I mean, absolutely when you see the level of play that, you know, Bartoli played against and you look at her, the other results she had during the year, you think, Well, there is no way she played like that losing to some of the players. It's really the honest truth. It's the reality sometimes. But in a way, that's what makes it so much tougher to be at the top. I mean, it's tough to get there; it's extremely difficult to stay there, because everybody ‑‑ they almost have the feeling of not having much to lose. They're not expected to win, so I think everything is kind of free and they really go for it.



Q. When you first played her, I think it was in Moscow and it was close. I think it was Moscow...

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Who are we talking about?



Q. Victoria.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't know.



Q. First couple times did you know she was going to be a really good player?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I did. I mean, I think many people expected her to win a Grand Slam earlier than she did. I think her level, I mean, she always had a solid game. I mean, she was always a little mentally fragile. Felt like she would bang her racquet and yell, and you kind of see that on the court. But I think with age and maturing that obviously you learn so much by playing matches. You learn what helps you get motivated, what helps you get going. I mean, I thought she would be at a high level, definitely.



Q. You played Errani in the French Open final. Now she's made another semifinal; doubles No. 1 next week. What do you think she's doing so well?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it just shows you you don't have to be tall and to have a lot of power. (Laughter.) She has so much variety in her game. She's obviously so successful on clay. She won so many titles and got to the finals of the French. Extremely tricky; moves really good around the court; makes you hit so many balls. Yeah, I mean, I was going into the French Open final as, you know, people were saying the favorite, but I was playing a clay‑court specialist in a way, which people never really considered me to be. So it was funny how all of a sudden I was considered the favorite to go in and beat her in a Grand Slam final when she was playing so well on that surface. She's proven that she can play really well on hard. I think she did pretty well in Australia, as well. But consistency, her consistency this year has been incredible.



Q. Back to Serena, am I wrong in thinking that both the Williams love power? They seem to want their opponent to bang it with them. Even when Hingis was younger, when she was playing, she mixed it up a lot with them. I don't think they like that. Is that correct, or what's your thoughts on that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I can't help but laugh at your question. I'm sorry. No, it's a good observation. But I think if you're going into a match in which you feel like you have to play a different game than what you've worked on or what has won you matches before in order to beat that one person, I don't know if it's extremely smart. I mean, I think it's always good to have options in your pocket if things are not going well. Sometimes those don't work. But to prepare for a match and not believe that if your game is power or being aggressive that that's not going to work, then, I mean, it's not a good confidence booster.



Q. I know you wouldn't want to change your game, that's for sure.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah.



FastScripts by ASAP Sports
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2012-09-05/201209051346878879890.html

ziros
Sep 6th, 2012, 06:12 AM
Q. Back to Serena, am I wrong in thinking that both the Williams love power? They seem to want their opponent to bang it with them. Even when Hingis was younger, when she was playing, she mixed it up a lot with them. I don't think they like that. Is that correct, or what's your thoughts on that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I can't help but laugh at your question. I'm sorry. No, it's a good observation. But I think if you're going into a match in which you feel like you have to play a different game than what you've worked on or what has won you matches before in order to beat that one person, I don't know if it's extremely smart. I mean, I think it's always good to have options in your pocket if things are not going well. Sometimes those don't work. But to prepare for a match and not believe that if your game is power or being aggressive that that's not going to work, then, I mean, it's not a good confidence booster.



Q. I know you wouldn't want to change your game, that's for sure.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah.

In other words,she's screwed for life against her

perseus2006
Sep 6th, 2012, 06:59 AM
In other words,she's screwed for life against her

I disagree. It means that one day Pova will actually step up and play tennis against her.

tennis-insomniac
Sep 6th, 2012, 07:22 AM
I always love listening her interviews, she's so articulated and composed, plus her grammar and sentence structure shows she's just not a regular tennis player. I love that about Maria. That's why she's so popular.

graffite
Sep 7th, 2012, 11:34 PM
Today's presser (http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2012-09-07/201209071347058024401.html) up.

An interview with: MARIA SHARAPOVA
Friday, September 7, 2012

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. It looked like you had done everything, the winners, dictated the game, and still you have lost. How frustrating is it?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, it's frustrating, but it's the game of tennis. A lot of swings in the match today. You know, certainly had the lead and the advantage. She picked up her game. You know, in the third I think a lot of it had to do with the returns. I didn't do much on her service games. You know, she was winning them pretty easy. You know, on mine they were quite long and just making too many errors not putting any pressure on her. So that's, I think, the most frustrating part.



Q. You want to talk about the last game? You were serving from behind the whole third set. That's tough anyway just trying to hold. What are you feeling going out there at 4‑5?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it's a tough position, but I got myself back from Love‑30 and from match point. Like I said, she returned much better in those situations than I did. I think I gave her too many free points, and that's this type of match and these circumstances that, you know, you're not putting that much pressure on your opponent it's a difficult situation to go into, definitely.


Q. Starting out up 3‑Love, you were confident at that point. What happened at that moment after you were down 3‑1 and then you were up 4‑1?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I was up a set and a break. I had game points to go up 2‑0. There's no doubt she raised her level and she started playing better and moving better. A few little things here or there certainly could have changed things around.


Q. What's the toughest thing in your game, in her game, when you're facing her? What's the toughest thing for you when you're playing Azarenka?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, when you're in that battle you're not thinking about your opponent. Of course you have a strategy. You're thinking of a few things that will help you. But a lot of it is instinct and believing your game will eventually win you the match. But like I said, I think I didn't make her play in certain situations of that third. We can discuss the first and the second, but ultimately when it gets to that third set, I just don't think I did enough on those games to put any thought in her mind.

Q. It's not like she's bombing serves like Serena, and I know she's consistent with her first serve, but were you just not getting a good hit on the ball or tougher to read?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, especially in the third I wasn't doing anything with it. I think I was making one or two errors and not even making her play, which is, you know, not good. I thought I was doing a much better job of that in the first and the second, and I think that put a lot of pressure on her service games. But you know, not in the third.


Q. Was there any moment you thought about your third set record this year?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It was 4‑All, and anything can happen that point; this one didn't go my way.


Q. How different a player is she on hard court versus on other surfaces?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I think I've only played against her on hard and clay. She's certainly improved her movement on the hard courts. You know, she's in good shape right now. Yeah, I don't think we ‑‑ I mean, we were out there for over two hours. I think both of us could still run and play for a while. I mean, I still felt I didn't feel too tired in the end and she certainly had a lot of energy. But as far as the differences, I only played her one match on clay.


Q. You have been off court for just a little bit, but the slam season is now over for you. You had some fabulous results. Could you just talk about your year, particularly in the slams, and, well, overall, what it's meant for you, including flag bearer?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I'll take them. I'll take the results I had this year. (Smiling.) I look back in the beginning of the season and not really ‑‑ I remember going to Australia early and not really sure I was going to play that warmup tournament. My ankle was still not feeling great. So if anyone had told me when I had that uncertainty going into the Australian Open that I would have this type of season ‑‑ and it's still not over; we still have a few more events to play ‑‑ I would have been pretty happy. I think you mentioned this is the last one. That's really where I would have loved to get even further, but it's certainly a step better than the last few years I have been here.


Q. If you had to grade yourself on this, the way you have played at this tournament given what you know you can do and how you felt match after match, where would you put yourself?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: In terms of what? Numbers?


Q. Did you go out there feeling like top of your game, everything was working well, or was it a struggle for you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I mean, I can look at it so many different ways. You know, like I said, there were a lot of swings in the match. I was up, and, like, I mean, who knows, if it's 2‑0 and she starts thinking. But, you know, when I had my opportunities I don't think I took them. I think when you're in the situation of a third set you have to put pressure on your opponent. I just don't think I did that at all.


Q. Given that Serena, as you can tell, is dominating right now against Errani ‑‑ it's 5‑1 ‑‑ assuming she does play Vika in the final, is there anything anybody really can do against Serena when she's playing the dominating tennis she's playing right now? What does Vika have to do?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I'm not her coach. (Smiling.) It's not in my job description. There's a reason why everyone is in the draw. There is a reason why everyone puts the net up in the morning for us to play matches. No matter who is going in there as the favorite, no matter how confident they are, everyone has a chance. She's No. 1 in the world, and there is no reason why she shouldn't have a chance.


Q. You seemed to obviously want this win, no question. You were demonstrative about it. Is there anything about this title that really made it more important to you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, it's New York; it's a Grand Slam; it's the US Open. I mean, of course it's meaningful. You want to perform well. You're in a battle out there. This is what you practice for, is to get in those situation and try to get out of them; today I just didn't.


Q. Are you going to stick around for fashion week or do you head home or what do you do?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't know. I have been in the city for three weeks. It's been a while. But I'm looking forward to checking out the ice cream truck that's around the corner from my hotel. It's been haunting me. (Laughter.) I'm telling the driver, like, Get out of here. I can't look at you anymore. So I'll have time for that. But other than that, I think I miss home and I just want to be in a home atmosphere for a little bit.


Q. What flavor?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Vanilla with rainbow sprinkles.


Q. So do you say to yourself, I'm happy I played Victoria much closer than I did at Australia and Indian Wells and I came close to beating her, or do you say, big missed opportunity; I should have won that match?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I can look at it so many different ways. Yeah, it's always a little bit tougher when you feel like you have those chances. The scoreline was a lot tougher this time, obviously, but the result wasn't what I wanted, so... In both of them.


Q. With everything you have gone through, how gratifying is it for you to be now consistently in the hunt for big titles and to feel you're in that battle and in that game all the way to the end?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, it's incredible. I mean, I try to get a sense of that perspective as much as possible because you can lose it so fast. The grinding, the days, and the work that you put in and then the tournaments, everything kind of just happens. It's a groove. It's easy to forget where you came from and what you had to go through to get to that point. But when I do think about it, I'm so lucky that I get to play this sport, that I love playing it still, and that I feel like I have a lot in me. Yeah, I'm No. 3 in the world right now and was back at No. 1 winning Grand Slams again, so it's certainty a great feeling.


Q. Jimmy Connors was saying last week that no matter what you do after you're done playing, nothing is going to be like being out there in front of 25,000 people showcasing your talent.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I agree. There is nothing in life that gives you that ‑‑ it's like that moment that you experience. You know, the losing is always not fun, but the victories and everything just happens in moments; whereas in other careers I think it's such a different process. I always, you know, try to compare it to maybe other careers where, you know, you can be such a great actress or a model, but if nobody puts you on a cover of a magazine, you can be so good, extremely talented, but your career is always in the hands of other people. It's just so difficult to think about. Or sometimes you can be kind of so‑so, and then you're made into a star. So it's such a unique situation. I was in a position where I was out of the sport and I got to do many things, but there's nothing like being in that moment. I mean, as tough as these days are, it's always so gratifying when you're sitting in a press conference at the end of winning a Grand Slam, you know, and talking about how you got to that point. You can talk all day. It's such a great feeling.

Q. Is it also controlling your own destiny, where you say instead of somebody else choosing you for that magazine cover, you're making it happen on the tennis court?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: A little bit, definitely. You're controlling a lot more of your life than maybe ‑‑ and not that ‑‑ I'm not trying to put down anybody else. It's just how it works in those situations. You know, I know many people in different industries, but I always relate so much to athletes in terms of just the feelings that they experience. You know, it's almost like when someone does a movie for so many months, and then they go to the Oscars. And in that moment that their movie is good is that they win the Oscar. It's such a different thinking process for me. I'm so happy I'm not in any other career. I wouldn't trade this for anything.


Q. Our sport is built around these great slams with their center courts. You talked about the thrill of being out there. Of the four center courts in the slams, what has the most meaning? What gives you the biggest charge? What do you love the most?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, each one is so different. I mean, the energy that you experience here in New York is so unique. I mean, when you're in the changeover and the music is just blasting, you don't even ‑‑ even in Australia it's not like that. And in Wimbledon, there is so much tradition. I love the fact that you walk out on the court and there's no introductions. It's a matter of two athletes going out there, and it's all about them and their tennis. This is, of course, much more of a show and production. It's great to have all of these different atmospheres, I guess.


Q. Tennis thrives on rivalries. How would you describe the state of your rivalry with Vika and where it might go?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: We both have many years ahead of us. I'm sure we will be facing against each other many more times in Grand Slams and other tournaments. You know, she has the better record right now against me. Hopefully when I'm done I can change that around.



Q. How do you get over this kind of loss? Do you have a special routine?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, I think just putting things in perspective. Certainly in the last few years, especially after my injury, I have been a lot better about accepting wins and accepting losses. I try to think that if you're level‑headed about difficult defeats and then if you get something in your career that's incredible, but if you take it as ‑‑ in a calm way, then the defeats don't seem as difficult. So I try to ‑‑ I mean, after I won the French Open of course I was so happy, but I had this really calm feeling that, you know, like a settlement in my career. Like it wasn't like I wanted to go out and party and tell the whole world that I had won. It was just this feeling within in me that I had achieved something that I had worked for. And losses, of course, they're difficult and the world knows you lose. That's sport. At the end of the day, that's what makes me better. It motivates me to go back on the court and to practice.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

Vanilla with rainbow sprinkles. She's such a kiddo sometimes :) Never change, Maria.

lefty24
Sep 8th, 2012, 03:55 AM
OMG SHE HAS THE SAME FAVORITE FLAVOR OF ICE CREAM AS I DO!

I'm way more excited than I should be.

Craig.
Sep 8th, 2012, 04:22 AM
That interview was just beautiful. Some lovely quotes in there. I fucking love you Maria.

lefty24
Sep 8th, 2012, 04:28 AM
Maria is so eloquent. Just by hearing one press conference you can tell that she's smart.
I wish more tennis player were like her.

Andy.
Sep 8th, 2012, 04:29 AM
She definitly answered those questions with more tact than I would have.

ziros
Sep 8th, 2012, 05:46 AM
She reads a lot of books,probably more than most. I guess that's a large reason why

nectar69
Sep 8th, 2012, 06:48 AM
She always handles herself so well in those pressers after losses. She's always so classy in defeat. It makes me so proud to be a fan.

Maria Croft
Sep 8th, 2012, 07:26 AM
As always, wonderful interview after a loss.

Trih
Sep 8th, 2012, 08:38 AM
You already said it all, great interview after a loss. :inlove:

Shivank17
Sep 8th, 2012, 09:16 AM
As always a great interview in spite of the loss. Now rest up, eat some vanilla with rainbow sprinkles ice cream and then kick everyone's arse in the Asian swing.

Advantage Me
Sep 8th, 2012, 12:09 PM
Sheer class from Maria. Win or lose she will always be a champion.

dsanders06
Sep 8th, 2012, 12:53 PM
I have to admit, I was worried that she'd be a bit bitter in this interview, after how she scowled at Azarenka at the handshake :lol: Glad to see she's as much of a champion off the court as ever :D

Tennisvampire
Sep 8th, 2012, 01:00 PM
I have to admit, I was worried that she'd be a bit bitter in this interview, after how she scowled at Azarenka at the handshake :lol: Glad to see she's as much of a champion off the court as ever :D

Damn, I wasn't watching the handshake, I pretty much turned off the TV the moment she lost :lol:
Amazing interview, but what else could we expect from Maria? :angel: She is a true champion in her heart
:worship: Her talk about ice-cream made my day :lol:

Craig.
Sep 8th, 2012, 04:37 PM
I loved this:

"After I won the French Open of course I was so happy, but I had this really calm feeling that, you know, like a settlement in my career. Like it wasn't like I wanted to go out and party and tell the whole world that I had won. It was just this feeling within in me that I had achieved something that I had worked for."

jameshazza
Sep 8th, 2012, 05:53 PM
I really liked this interview, stated the obvious in how it was on her terms and she blew it with those UEs, but stated it in the classiest of manners. It's all in HOW things are said.

MM_1257
Sep 8th, 2012, 07:04 PM
I have to admit, I was worried that she'd be a bit bitter in this interview, after how she scowled at Azarenka at the handshake :lol: Glad to see she's as much of a champion off the court as ever :D

Well if we play on complete honesty, Maria has had bitter/b*thcy pressers after she lost and sometimes even after she won in the past; but not due to opponents, due to press being harsh towards her.

Craig.
Sep 8th, 2012, 08:57 PM
I really liked this interview, stated the obvious in how it was on her terms and she blew it with those UEs, but stated it in the classiest of manners. It's all in HOW things are said.

Exactly :yeah:

dsanders06
Sep 8th, 2012, 11:15 PM
Well if we play on complete honesty, Maria has had bitter/b*thcy pressers after she lost and sometimes even after she won in the past; but not due to opponents, due to press being harsh towards her.

Honestly, even without my Stan hat on, I really do think there's been VERY few post-loss interviews where she's been bitter. The most bitter I ever saw from her was after she lost to Wozniacki at the USO in 2010 (she basically said she dictated the course of the entire match, and when asked if she thought Woz could win the tournament, she made some really bland comment like "This is a good opportunity for her" in a really grudging tone of voice :happy: ).

Tbh, as lovely as she is generally, even Kim has slightly more of a track record for being bitter after losses than Maria does (thinking particularly of her interview after that "WTF" loss to Petrova at the AO2010).

MM_1257
Sep 8th, 2012, 11:26 PM
There is nothing wrong in being bitter!!! Big and real champs hate losing so I fogive them when they are not sweet in pressers, actually, I even like them being b*tchy sometimes.

ziros
Sep 13th, 2012, 07:54 AM
Maria confirmed to play Brisbane:
ocZOnCqTKac&feature=player_embedded
OMG - her butt at 0:12 is just:drool:

Angelpova
Sep 13th, 2012, 10:02 PM
http://thecitizen.co.tz/sport/-/25675-serena-and-sharapova-set-to-start-2013-season-in-brisbane

Serena and Sharapova set to start 2013 season in Brisbane

Brisbane. Reigning US Open and Wimbledon champion Serena Williams and French Open winner Maria Sharapova will start their 2013 seasons at the Brisbane International, organisers said yesterday.Williams, who defeated world No. 1 Victoria Azarenka to win the US Open this month for her 15th Grand Slam title, said she was looking forward to being back in Brisbane.

"It helps me prepare. I get a great tournament -- tough field," she said of the lead-up event to the Australian Open, the first Grand Slam of the season. "I had so much fun this year but unfortunately it ended fast for me with the disaster of an injury. I want to do well there (in Brisbane)."

The 30-year-old American reached the quarter-finals of the 2012 event but withdrew prior to the match with a left ankle sprain.Sharapova, whose French Open win crowned her return from a serious shoulder injury that nearly wrecked her career, is set to make her first appearance at the December 30-January 6 tournament.

"Going into Australia after a long off season you always want to have the best possible matches," she said."I tried to put Brisbane on the map last year but unfortunately couldn't make it out of injury -- I have heard so many great things about it. It is such a big event for all the players." (AFP)

:bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

MM_1257
Sep 14th, 2012, 01:26 PM
I digged this out:
http://www.juanqui.net/20041015/equelite-is-home-away-from-home-for-sharapova/
Equelite Is “Home Away From Home” For Sharapova
from Equelite.com
15 October 2004

This past week, Equelite was graced once more by the presence of the beautiful reigning Wimbledon champion, Maria Sharapova. Besides the personal friendship that the lovely Russian has with Juan Carlos Ferrero, she was so impressed with the extensive installations in the tranquil countryside in her first visit, that the academy has become for her her “house in Europe”.

This opinion was shared by her new coach, ex-ATP tour player, Michael Joyce. He was equally impressed by the installations and the quiet setting. Yuri, Maria’s father, a fan of hiking, could also be seen enjoying the surroundings.

Throughout her stay, Maria was able to combine her rigorous training with moments of relax, almost like a regular teenager, like a night out to the movies. The Russian champion was absolutely graceful and charming to all she met, making her superpopular and a welcome guest always. All at Equelite wish her sincerely the best in her next tournaments and in the Porsche Race to the Championships.

And this:
http://www.runningforehand.com/2012/07/17/a-place-of-tradition/
When she passed by Equelite after completing her Career Grand Slam in Paris, Sharapova acknowledged those who believed in her and helped her for so long:“I remember that two years ago, Juan Carlos told me that he thought that with a few little adjustments in my game, I could win Roland Garros. I don’t think many more people thought that. [...] I wanted to come to the Juan Carlos Ferrero – Equelite Academy to rest and share this triumph with them, as they have always treated me fantastically and believed in me, as well as because of my friendship with Juan Carlos. On top of my family and my coach [Thomas Hogstedt], I would also like to thank my physio, Juan Reque, and the doctor Nacho Muñoz for the last few years, in which they have helped me overcome physical issues that threatened my tennis career.”

Shivank17
Sep 27th, 2012, 12:47 PM
Sharapova, Wozniacki to compete in Korea
Maria Sharapova will visit Korea for the first time in seven years. Tennis marketing agency JS Management said Sharapova and Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark, currently ranked No. 11, will have an exhibition match at Jamsil Stadium in Seoul on Dec. 28.

Sharapova won the French Open in June to complete a career Grand Slam as she won all four majors eight years after her triumph at Wimbledon in 2004.

Caroline Wozniacki
She gained huge popularity in Korea when she won the Hansol Open on her first visit to the country that same year. Her last match in Korea was against Venus Williams back in 2005. Sharapova lost in straight sets to the American.

Wozniacki won the KDB Korea Open, which ended last Sunday.

Her boyfriend Rory Mcllroy of Northern Ireland, the world's top-ranked male golfer, will accompany her to Korea at the end of the year.

:spit: Exo vulturepova? :lol: Prague vs Kvitova, Milan vs Errani(and doubles with Ana), Gillette Federer tour and now this too.

Sharapovian
Sep 30th, 2012, 12:07 PM
Maria Sharapova
On being injured last fall but healthy this fall...
"Everything after the US Open this year is kind of a bonus for me, because last year I sprained my ankle in Tokyo and pretty much missed the rest of the season, missing this tournament and not really being fit for Istanbul. So this week, every match I play, win or lose, I'm really happy to be healthy, really happy to be No.2 in the world, and really happy to have had the year I've had."

On how long she plans to play...
"I'm sitting in this position and thinking I still have so much passion for what I do. I love going out and competing and learning and trying to get better. This career only goes on for so many years - it would be stupid to not take advantage of the fact that you really enjoy doing something, and like waking up in the morning and getting better at it. I've done this from a very young age, and I don't see my life without it. So there's no reason to even think of retirement." :rocker2:

On whether she sees more Asians winning Grand Slams...
"Li Na set an incredible example last year, what she accomplished when maybe not so many people believed it would happen so soon. She certainly set the example for so many young girls and boys in this country, and also all of Asia."

http://www.wtatennis.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~2934321,00.html

MM_1257
Sep 30th, 2012, 10:08 PM
The Spaniards trying to stir up things on internet... Bloggers getting their mind on work and writing "facts".
Denny will have to help us.

http://www.lamagiadeltenis.com/2012/09/juan-carlos-ferrero-el-hombre-que.html

So.. the entry is about Juan Carlos Ferrero and it says:
- Maria Sharapova was obsessed with Juan Carlos Ferrero in the period of 2004, 2005.
- She is very extrovert and goes for it when she likes someone, despite the false image we get about her from media.
- Juan was pretty much reserved, didn't speak much to the media. He was dating Patricia Bonilla at that time and the article says that the relationship survived the hurricane Maria. She was seen on practice courts, watching Juan; when he and Maria were training.
- In 2005 the Juan Maria relationship "intensified". In AO 2005 she was watching his matches and he was watching her matches. And that there were rumours that she was looking for him in hotels aswell and that she kept writing SMS messages to him and that she became known as "a stalker" among his friends.
- At the time of Wimbledon 2005 there were published photos of the two of them eating in Chelsea in Spanish restaurant “Tendido Cero”. They were with some friends but they were sitting next to each other.
- Then they say that the special person she thanked in Wimby 2004 was Juan.

:lol: :lol: :lol:
Masha, you obsessed stalker! :p :oh: :angel:

ziros
Sep 30th, 2012, 10:13 PM
I thought I remembered hearing a story around that time period of Maria seen coming out of JCF's hotel room early in the morning. She probably banged him at least once

MM_1257
Sep 30th, 2012, 10:43 PM
Oh, I do think they were dating, but I hope she wasn't a stalker and a man stealer. Those who steal a man, from my experience (with people around me, that I know that stole someone's BF), end up short in the end. When things cool down, those men usually dump that GF.

nectar69
Oct 1st, 2012, 01:07 AM
It makes you wonder. I find it strange that she went to his academy and stayed for a few days after winning the French Open. I wonder if they hooked up? You figure after completing a career slam, Maria needed to unwind and celebrate with someone right?

lefty24
Oct 1st, 2012, 03:29 AM
It makes you wonder. I find it strange that she went to his academy and stayed for a few days after winning the French Open. I wonder if they hooked up? You figure after completing a career slam, Maria needed to unwind and celebrate with someone right?

She went to Spain because that's where her candy was being made.

Stonerpova
Oct 1st, 2012, 04:26 AM
It makes you wonder. I find it strange that she went to his academy and stayed for a few days after winning the French Open. I wonder if they hooked up? You figure after completing a career slam, Maria needed to unwind and celebrate with someone right?

I strongly doubt they've been carrying on a secret affair for 8 years :lol:

That this is even a rumor is news to me.

ziros
Oct 1st, 2012, 07:23 AM
http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=258161

LOL Maria - "It’s impossible to have guy friends. There is no such thing as a friend that’s a guy. That’s just impossible.”
http://www.onthegotennis.com/storage/Speed%20vs%20Instinct%20tennis%2002.jpg?__SQUARESP ACE_CACHEVERSION=1345834147855

Mr.Sharapova
Oct 1st, 2012, 08:22 AM
She went to Spain because that's where her candy was being made.

You're so naive :oh:.

ahoura
Oct 1st, 2012, 11:09 AM
So there's no reason to even think of retirement :banana::woohoo:

Angelpova
Oct 1st, 2012, 04:33 PM
Tennis Grunting Ban? New Plans Backed by Maria Sharapova

A tennis grunting ban has long been touted by former players and fans who find the extraordinary loud grunts from certain female players distracting and not part of the game. It now looks like the International Tennis Federation is prepared to do something about it.

The Women's Tennis Association, the International Tennis Federation and all four major tournaments are proposing a new device that can be carried by umpires to measure on-court grunting levels, and decide whether action need to be taken.

However, the proposals would not implement anything on the current generation of grunters, but would impose the restrictions on the coming generations of tennis players.

It has been reported that star women's tennis player Maria Sharapova, who is one of the worst offenders of grunting, has backed proposals to educate players on the problem and to help train them from a younger age how to tone down their grunts.

Sharapova has been famously measured as having a grunt of 101 decibels, which is comparable to a speeding train or a pneumatic drill.

"Bottom line is the right answer has been taken by the tour," Sharapova has said to Reuters.
Speaking from the Pan Pacific in Tokyo she added, "I started grunting since whenever I can remember. I see videos of myself and I've grunted for that long. Nobody told me to do it in Russia or in Florida. It's just a natural habit."

Grunting has been a common issue in women's tennis for years now, but this year the arguments became further amplified after two of the biggest grunters, Maria Sharapova and Belarusian Victoria Azarenka dominated, each winning grand slam titles in 2012.

"The information going towards coaches and academies that are developing talent from a young age is teaching them a certain breathing technique," said Sharapova. "Because when you start something from a young age and continue it, it's a habit - whether you do grunt or don't grunt. The WTA created a plan. That's the smart way to go about it, rather than like taking someone's forehand and grip in the middle of their career and telling them to change it."

http://global.christianpost.com/news/tennis-grunting-ban-new-plans-backed-by-maria-sharapova-82488/

lefty24
Oct 1st, 2012, 05:41 PM
You're so naive :oh:.

I doubt she went to Spain to visit him and then decided oh I might as well visit the factory where my candy is made while I'm at it. :p

MM_1257
Oct 1st, 2012, 06:12 PM
I doubt she went to Spain to visit him and then decided oh I might as well visit the factory where my candy is made while I'm at it. :p

She had to go to Murcia, to the factory where Sugarpova was made, because they were doing some changes in the candies. And then she visited his academy, too. She has been a regular visitor of his academy for years now, both have said that.
And if they khm.. how to say it not to be rude, em, if they had something or not, is something only they know. Isn't he in a relationship now?

And about that statement "it is impossible to have a guy friend" - first of all, I personally do not agree with that, but my opinion aside, I think Maria changed that opinion since 2006 aswell - let's see.. Michael Joyce Masha? Then Adir? You see... It is possible. :lol:

NashaMasha
Oct 1st, 2012, 06:17 PM
JCF was/is a handsome, well-off and young men. I don't care if Masha had an affair with him. It's not like having sex with Donald Trump:lol:

Isn't he in a relationship now?

will you care about your relationship , if Masha knocks your door in nightie?;)

MM_1257
Oct 1st, 2012, 06:30 PM
JCF was/is a handsome, well-off and young men. I don't care is Masha had an affair with him. It's not like having sex with Donald Trump:lol:

Hahaha. Well.. I do not think having a relationship with JCF was a bad thing, he is a hottie. :hearts:
I said I do not like man stealers.
And I bet you don't either. :lol:

will you care about your relationship , if Masha knocks your door in nightie?
Eeem... You ask me? I am a straight female, I would want JCF to knock on my door.

Trih
Oct 2nd, 2012, 02:00 PM
http://www.mariasharapova.com/news/q's-and-a's.aspx

https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/398325_10151044495992680_1309147377_n.jpg

Hi everyone, it's been a while since I did one of my own Q's and A's. I got a great response from the last one, so since I'm sitting in my Beijing hotel room with not much on my plate, I thought of some very random questions for myself.

Question: What I'm craving right now?
- A cappuccino from New York's Eately. Has anyone been there? I only recently discovered it and besides the amazing coffee, it has to be one of the best Italian markets there is. From home made pastas, to real Italian grana cheese, it is a culinary dream. I usually drink tea while on the road with my usual raspberry jam ( that's the Russian in me) but I'm ready for a good cup of coffee!

Q: What have I been up to besides my day job?
- Umm most importantly planning my vacation! There are only a few weeks a year which I can plan in advance and I take it very seriously! Day trips, weekends, vacations, events, anything! With every year my friends think I'm getting slightly worse which is....ya its true. I am the travel agent/ hotel scooper/spa organizer/waterfall guide/itinerary updater, all wrapped into one and I absolutely love it. If I ever had a previous life, I must have worked for Conde Nast Traveler and interned for Martha Stewart, only to find out I wasn't interested in scraping the pan after cooking Persian rice.
My other project in the works is Sugarpovas official launch in Australia before the Australian Open. It's really fascinating to learn about each countries regulations in terms of bringing a new product in. Well actually its not that fascinating. Its a fascinating amount of work! The labels, ingredients, bar codes, all have their certain rules so we have to produce different films for different markets.

Q: With fashion week wrapping up in Paris soon, what has been my favorite collection?
- From what I have seen so far, I absolutely loved Antonio Berardi's collection. I would feel super chic in any one of those dresses.
I also loved the full length skirts at Dior with the simple black tops. Very elegant.
Wait, I just saw Stellas collection. She is so good at what she does!! Its pretty remarkable. Its too bad I have to wait 6 giant fashion months to get my hands on look 19.

Q: Trend I'm liking now?
Silk pants. A little baggy around the butt area. And skinny on the ankle. Sometimes I look at my closet and wonder if I have a pregnant sister!

Q: Trend I would like to see disappear?
The platform sneaker. Who's idea was this? Maybe it is because I am tall and would have a very different opinion if I was on the shorter side but it feels AND looks like cheating! You either want to look sporty, or you don't. No in between.

Q: My favorite tv show in the last 6 months?
- I have been on a show marathon while traveling. I finished all the seasons of Parenthood, Good Wife, and just saw the first season of Scandal.

Q: Music?
-Hot Chip has been on repeat. And a bit of Madonna. I love her Hard Candy album.

Q: My favorite new game?
- I don't know what it's called or if it has a name because it really is stupid but it's two miniature pigs...which you roll like dice and you get a certain amount of points depending on how they land. My coach brought it from Sweden but says its not originally from Sweden. Hmmm....I will have to triple check that. Anyways it's a lot of brainless fun which is sometimes exactly what everyone needs in this serious life of ours. And I have won the most games so far. Thank you very much!
Alright I'm going to get some sleep! Actually I ran out of questions. Do you have any??

JamieOwen3
Oct 2nd, 2012, 02:41 PM
She probably loves "She's Not Me" from Hard Candy ;)

Mistress of Evil
Oct 2nd, 2012, 05:14 PM
Well, that was cool to read through. :D

jameshazza
Oct 2nd, 2012, 06:09 PM
I wonder what made her listen to Hard Candy. It's been out a while. :lol:

nelsondan
Oct 2nd, 2012, 08:25 PM
Reminds me of her old doodles.....this fills a need for her, and I think it has to do with sharing some honesty on her own terms. I believe it is something very good for her and for us.

WowWow
Oct 3rd, 2012, 08:35 AM
Reminds me of her old doodles.....this fills a need for her, and I think it has to do with sharing some honesty on her own terms. I believe it is something very good for her and for us.

Yes, so much better than pimping all sorts of products :lol:
As a fan, I enjoyed reading those Q&A:D

Advantage Me
Oct 3rd, 2012, 09:17 AM
Yes, so much better than pimping all sorts of products :lol:
As a fan, I enjoyed reading those Q&A:D

I agree. Maria writes well. Enjoyable read. Her facebook entries these days are just an excuse to plug her endorsements.

JoPova
Oct 3rd, 2012, 09:19 AM
Loved this Q&A! It's nice to have these kinds of information about her!

LoveMasha2008
Oct 3rd, 2012, 11:04 AM
Pre-tournament interview:


CHINA OPEN

September 29, 2012

Maria Sharapova

BEIJING, CHINA

THE MODERATOR: Questions in Chinese, please.

Q. How do you try to make comments on the fitness of the Asian players or on Asian tour, that a lot of players don't have very good performance, their performances. What is your comments on the phenomena?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: You mean towards the end of the year? For Asian players or everybody?

Q. Each player.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I think it's ‑‑this is the end of the year for us, and, you know, it's a pretty long season of 10 months of playing tournaments back to back.
You know, I have a pretty normal schedule. I don't play too many events. I try to focus on the ones I feel are important and work my schedule around that.
I love coming to these two tournaments in Asia, Tokyo and Beijing. They are very big tournaments for us. Then obviously, if I have the opportunity to finish in Istanbul, it's a perfect schedule.
There is no doubt towards the end of the season you are not as fit as you are in the beginning, maybe don't have as much energy because the last Grand Slam of the year was only a couple of weeks ago. You know, you try to give everything for that. And then also we had the addition of the Olympics this year. So it was an incredibly busy summer for everybody.

Q. For yourself, how do you try to handle this phenomena? How are you going to try to keep very good fitness?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I have been on the tour for many years, so I'm quite experienced in knowing how to recover from tournaments and how my body feels and what I need to do in order to prepare.
You know, I took a couple of weeks after the US Open to get ready for this Asian swing and also for the last tournament of the year in Turkey.
But you also need to know that you can go out on the practice court, but maybe you won't be able to be out there for so many hours because it is towards the end of the year. You're a little bit physically not at a high of pace as you were maybe at the start of it.
So it's really important to know how you feel and adjust. I think adjusting is the biggest priority right now.

Q. (In English.) You missed the China Open last year because of the injury. This year you will be playing in this stadium for the first time. Do you ever practice before in the stadium?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, I haven't. As you said, I missed last year, so I didn't have a chance to play there at all.
Yeah, I think this year everything, you know, after the US Open is kind of a bit of a bonus for me because last year I sprained my ankle in Tokyo. I pretty much missed the rest of the season, missing this tournament, and not being really fit for Istanbul.
So coming in here this is just‑‑ you know, every match I play, whether I win or lose, I'm really happy to be in the spot to be healthy, to be No. 2 in the world, you know, to have the year that I have had.
But I haven't had the chance to practice or play in the stadium yet.
THE MODERATOR: Questions in English.

Q. I caught a little bit of your practice this morning, and it looked like you were working a lot on your serve. Does that have anything to do with, I guess, how you served in Tokyo against Stosur?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No. I think, you know, I was out there for quite a bit this morning. I'm working on a little bit of everything. It's my first practice here, so, you know, you don't want to do too much running, and the first one is really just about getting used to the court and the conditions, and, you know, a little bit of the atmosphere and the tension of the racquet. It's kind of the little things that you work on in the first practice.
So we did a lot of baskets and returns and serves and things like that.

Q. Is regaining the world No. 1 spot a priority for you at the moment?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it's tough to say because, you know, I have been in that position a few times in my career. You know, my priorities from maybe when I was 16 years old to now have changed a little bit.
You know, of course getting to the No. 1, you know, and winning the French Open in two weeks' time was an incredible achievement, but I think if I would have won the French Open and not been No. 1, I don't think I would have been very disappointed. It was just great that the two kind of came together for me.
And the way I look at things, the more matches you win, the better opportunity you have towards getting to No. 1. You know, you don't really have to look at other opponents or what the ranking is. You know, if you focus on, you know, your own results and trying to win matches and you do, then, you know, you're going to have a good ranking either way.

Q. Talk a little bit about your first‑round draw. Obviously you have only played her once and you won in straight sets, but anything in particular you're focused on going into that one?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Nothing so much against her. I think it's just, you know, maybe trying to change last week around and coming into this tournament with a fresh new perspective.
You know, she can play really good. I think she was injured a little bit in the summer. You know, it doesn't really matter who it is. I think if I follow through and focus on what I have to do, that's pretty much my priority right now.

Q. Any thoughts on Serena Williams' withdrawal?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: It's a long year. You're not really surprised to see a few more withdrawals now than with the beginning of the season.

Q. You just created your candy brand. How is it different from playing tennis, and do you have the schedule to bring the brand to China?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it's much easier than playing tennis, that's for sure. (Smiling.)
I laugh a lot more. Not as stressful, I guess.
Yeah, you know, I started it a couple of years ago. It started with, well, first with my love of candy in general and food, and then the name Sugarpova came about and I put the two together. I have been part of so many great partnerships and collaborations and collections in my career, but at the end of the day I was always a very small part of that. I really wanted to own something that was 100%, you know, me making all the final decisions, whether it was financial or creative decisions. I really wanted to be in the process the whole way.
I worked on it for the last two years. I feel like it's been my lucky charm in a way, because it was during the time when I've gotten myself back from injury, got back to No. 1, and won the French Open.
We just launched it at the US Open. I hope to bring it to China soon. I actually saw a few fans today that had some of it, so I think they had friends in the U.S. that shipped it over to them. The response has been really incredible.
I'm working on the launch in Australia now before the Australian Open. It's a lot of fun. It's so different to what I do. The greatest thing is seeing how excited people have been over it, you know, when you work on something, to see it come to life.

Q. Do you expect to see more Grand Slam winners from China and from Asia?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I think Li Na set an incredible example last year what she was able to accomplish coming from a point where maybe not so many believed it would happen so soon. You know, she is certainly one that set the example for so many young girls and boys in this country and also all of Asia.
You know, someone that maybe didn't necessarily have the height or everyone thought that would win a Grand Slam, it was just really a great accomplishment for China.

Q. A few years ago it seemed like you were talking a little bit about retiring fairly early around the age that you are now. Have your recent successes kind of changed your mind to that course of thinking?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I wouldn't necessarily say it was the successes. I think when I was 17 or 18 years old, if you would say I would be sitting in a press conference chair in seven or eight years, you'd look at seven, eight years, it would be like, Oh, I don't know. Well, with the injury I missed a year; I didn't compete at all.
I'm sitting in this position and thinking I still have so much passion for what I do. I love going out and competing and learning and trying to get better. This career only goes on for so many years. I think, I mean, it would stupid not to take advantage of the fact that you really enjoy doing something and you like waking up in the morning and getting better at it.
You know, I have done it from a very young age, and right now I don't see my life without it. So there is no real reason to even think of retirement.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=83457

LoveMasha2008
Oct 3rd, 2012, 11:06 AM
Press conference after R1:


CHINA OPEN

October 1, 2012

Maria Sharapova

BEIJING, CHINA

M. SHARAPOVA/S. Halep
7‑5, 7‑5

THE MODERATOR: Questions in Chinese, please.

Q. Based on your current ranking, it should be very much easy for you to defeat a opponent, but the whole procedure is not that relaxed as we expected. How are you going to make an adjustment into your fitness?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I think that's one of the reasons why there is a draw and we go out and play matches is because you still have to go out there no matter what your ranking is or your opponent's and you have to try and win the match.
Certainly the scoreline was quite, you know, difficult, you know, but I was up in those two sets and I let her get back into it, you know. But at the end of the day I won the match in two sets. I'm happy to be through.

Q. Actually for the two sets today you eventually made the win possible. The second question is: Actually the audience and the court are going to cheer for you. Would you bother to make an evaluation to those fans?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I was certainly‑‑ you know, I put myself in a good position in both of those sets being up a break, and I let her back in the match a couple of times.
That's certainly, you know, not the best thing, not exactly I'm proud of it, but the good thing was I was able to regain my focus and win that match no matter how good she was coming back and playing.
But I certainly ‑‑it's been a couple of years since I played here. The support today was incredible, you know, even from the practice courts to the match. It's been really, really nice to see how many fans I have here.
You know, you travel around the world, but, you know, you play so many tournaments, but really the appreciation of tennis here has been really nice to see. They are so enthusiastic, and everyone wants autographs and pictures. It's just nice to see.

Q. Actually, for one game you should have the break point. At that point audience said, Maria, I love you, so would that influence you at that moment?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, not really.

Q. After you got French Open title, you got the Grand Slam, so I want to understand what might be your next goal.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I have a lot of goals. I don't usually like to talk about my goals. I just like to work for them, and when I achieve them, then I like to talk about them, that it's a goal that I really wanted to achieve and accomplish.
But the reason I play this sport is because I believe that I could be better, that I could win more Grand Slams. I'm still very young, I have the passion and energy for it. That's what keeps me going. I have a lot of things in my life that tennis has brought me, but I still feel like there is a lot more that I can accomplish in the sport.

Q. I think in the WTA ranking, actually a lot of young juniors is catching up. Do you feel a lot of pressure from those junior players? How are you going to still keep very good fitness faced with those pressures?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I have been on the tour for many years. I started as a young teenager, and I'm 25 years old now. I feel like I have seen a lot of different generations.
The reality of it is it's not like your generation is going to be the only one playing tennis. You're always going to see new up‑and‑comers and talent, you know, great players that are juniors and that are making the transition from the juniors to the pros, you know, and it's part of it.
When you retire, there's always going to be somebody that takes your place in the rankings and the draws. That's just the reality of it. I feel like I'm somewhere in the middle. When I came up, you know, you had Justine and Kim and the Williamses, and I felt I was kind of the younger of the bunch. Now I'm somewhere in the middle.
You see a couple of retirements, some are still playing, and then you see a younger generation. I'm really kind of smack in the middle.
THE MODERATOR: English questions, please.

Q. There was a point in the first set where you dropped a few games and you called your coach over. After that you were able to come back and win the first set. What did your coach say to you, and how did you get the mental toughness to overcome that and win the set?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think in moments like that, you know, especially in situations when you find yourself up and then losing a few games, it's more of a motivation thing and just for him to come out and give you a little bit of positive words and motivation and energy.
Really, it's not like they're going to say something that's going to change things around so much, because when you're in the third set and it's 5‑All, 6‑All, you know, you're not really going to pay attention to anything around you. You really go out and play with instinct.
In a moment like that, he just said to keep going for it. You lost your concentration a little bit. You started the match really well. There's no reason why you can't get that momentum back.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=83533

T496
Oct 3rd, 2012, 12:25 PM
She probably loves "She's Not Me" from Hard Candy ;)

That song was on one of her playlists when she used to post them along with her doodles on her old website I remember.

MM_1257
Oct 3rd, 2012, 06:30 PM
Who wanted to have another Q and A by Maria?? I smiled when I saw it, I remember someone here or on twitter wrote that wanted a Q and A few weeks ago; now his/her wish came true. ;)
I liked it. I like her style of writing/humour. I am sure that not a lot of people understand her, but I really find some humour and a tiny bit of sarcasm in her writings... I really hope she writes an autobiography one day.

LoveMasha2008
Oct 5th, 2012, 05:47 AM
Press conference after R2:


CHINA OPEN

October 3, 2012

Maria Sharapova

BEIJING, CHINA

M. SHARAPOVA/S. Cirstea
6‑2, 6‑2

THE MODERATOR: Questions in Chinese, please.

Q. Compared with the first‑round match, it's very much easy for you to win today. What kind of adjustment did you make after first round? It's the first time for you to play with this opponent. What's your comments on her performance today?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I have never faced this opponent before. She has had good results, has beaten top players before, and she's one of the players that can come out and have a great day.
You know, she hits the ball really flat and hard. You know, I tried to, you know, play aggressive and play my game and maybe try and figure out her rhythm a little bit from the beginning, especially not playing with her before.
But, yeah, I was happy I played a shorter match than the first round.
THE MODERATOR: Questions in English.

Q. Which parts of your game pleased you the most today?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I was just happy I took her time away today. I think she's someone that really likes to be aggressive and get the first shot, and, you know, hit it really hard, as she can. I think it was really important to try to take that away from her.
You know, I thought I served really well today, much better than the first round. Yeah, I got some free points off of that.

Q. You're playing Hercog next. Have you played her before?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No.

Q. What do you know about her? What are you expecting?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I have never played against her. You know, I think she has a big game but also a different game, you know, hits a lot of slice off the backhand, you know, has a big forehand.
So, you know, it's also like coming into today's match, try to figure your opponent out from the beginning and maybe concentrate what you have to do and not so much about her, because you can get a little bit carried away thinking you've never faced her before, what it's going to be like.
I think it's just a matter of keeping that goal ahead of you and not thinking about it too much.

Q. Can you talk about how fun it is to be in business with your agent Max, which is actually sitting over there?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: How fun it is?

Q. Yeah.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, goodness. It's fun. It's also stressful sometimes. I get mad at him a lot of times. He gets mad at me. It's a good thing we don't see each other too often, just the right amount of time. It's like the perfect relationship. (Laughter.)
But, yeah, we have worked together for many years, and, you know, we kind of know what to expect from each other. We both work really hard at what we do. You know, it's been a fun partnership.

Q. If you want to give a brief introduction about Sugarpova to the Chinese fans, which flavor you will want them to know? Which flavor you like most?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, my flavors have changed because I had a favorite, and now it's called Quirky. But I think I ate so much of it that I needed to change and I needed a new favorite.
So right now I would say my favorite is Spooky because it's Halloween soon. They're like spiders.
I told my agent yesterday, I said, I'm craving, you know‑ no offense to the Chinese food‑ but I'm really craving some Sugarpova yesterday. He told me if I had a good match he'd give me one, so he gave me my favorite after the match.

Q. (In Chinese) A lot of fans were waiting for you outside. Will those fans produce some influence to your practice? And you are the hot spot with Djokovic in China Open, so do you have a very good close watch on the performance of Djokovic because you are close friends privately?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: To be honest, I didn't even know he was in the tournament. (Laughter.)
It's funny. It's a women's and men's event, but I haven't actually seen ‑‑I don't spend too much time at the court, so I don't know what's going on half the time, who's playing and who's not. I just need to know when my match is.
The first question, it's been great to see that support. I mean, you're in the match, you're at practice, the fans are so enthusiastic. I think it's such a unique experience because they really appreciate what you do, and they're rooting for you and making these collages that probably take hours to make, and they're singing songs.
It's just‑‑ you know, I wasn't here last year, so it's nice to see that coming into this year.

Q. Recently you came out against grunting. That's a pretty big part of your game. How would you make...
MARIA SHARAPOVA: What have I done?

Q. You recently came out against grunting.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh. I thought you said I did karate. (Laughter.)
Q.Well, do you do karate?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, that's why I was really surprised.

Q. So if the WTA does start enforcing a grunt limit, how would you make that change in your game?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, they're not enforcing a grunt limit to the active players. They're enforcing it towards the younger generation that is starting tennis and educating the academies and coaches around the world, you know, to teach them certain breathing methods and techniques that will eventually become their habits and not something that you take away or change in a player that's been playing a certain way for many years.

Q. You just took part in a few games, but you won lots of games and you won the second place in WTA. Do you think this is a better way than took part in lots of games?
THE MODERATOR: Tournaments. You haven't played as many tournaments but you're still No. 2.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I have had pretty much the same schedule over however many years. I think I'm one of the few players that don't play so many tournaments. Just physically and mentally I'm, you know, I'm not a player that can go out and play 26, 25 tournaments a year.
You know, I try to get ready for the bigger ones, and, you know, I think it's important to gear up for the ones that are meaningful to you and understand, you know, how ‑‑understand what your body responds to in terms of being healthy for those tournaments and giving yourself a break at the right times, having training blocks in between because that's really important to get your body ready.
Also, I'm not 16, 17 years old anymore. I'm in the middle of my career. You know, I don't see myself traveling for the amount of many weeks that some of the players do.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=83580

LoveMasha2008
Oct 6th, 2012, 03:00 AM
Press conference after R3:


CHINA OPEN

October 4, 2012

Maria Sharapova

BEIJING, CHINA

M. SHARAPOVA/P. Hercog
6‑0, 6‑2

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English.

Q. You have played three matches in three days. You have yet to lose a set. Is everything going to plan? Are you happy with your performance here so far?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I had a long first round, even though it was two sets, but, you know, today and yesterday was definitely a little bit quicker. I was happy with the way I came out.
You know, I played really well in the beginning and got a little tense in the second set, but I felt like I really needed that challenge. It's nice to be in the quarterfinal stage of this tournament.

Q. Do you feel tired at all, having played three matches in three days?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No. Well, actually I had a day in between the first and the second, but, I mean, I have played so many events where you had to play back to back. I mean, the Olympics was six days in a row, so that was quite an experience.
You know, it's just really‑‑ you know, I'm experienced enough to know how I recover and what I have to do in order to get ready. That's something maybe that bothered me six, seven years ago. It would be tough for me to recover. But I do a much better job of it now.

Q. In the last few years you suffered several injuries. This year you seem pretty well. Do you have some new plan for your recovery?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I did. I had a tough injury, and it kept me away from the sport for almost a year.
But apart from the shoulder, knock on wood, you know, overall my body has been really healthy. I was able to recover from that. You know, and that doesn't mean that I don't have to do anything in order to prevent it from happening again. You know, every day I have to do, you know, little exercises to keep my shoulder strong.
You know, the older you get‑‑ I know I'm only 25, but when you're playing tennis from a young age, it's so important to warm up your body and to recover. The little stretches that you do, they sometimes don't seem so meaningful at that particular time, but they're so important.
Yeah, it's just about maintenance. You know, when your body is healthy, it helps you so much when you're on the court.

Q. Can you talk about the fun side of combined events? Do you actually watch some men's matches, or do you have lunch together in players' restaurant, or do you socialize a little bit in the players' lounge?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I'm not the social type in the players' lounge. It hasn't really been my repertoire. I do my job and I come here, and I honestly sometimes don't know who's playing and who's not.
You know, the tournament for me is when I come here and I have an opponent that I have to face and I get ready for and I play that match. I mean, once this press conference is over and I'll eat something, I'll be back in my hotel and not knowing what's going on later today. You know, I'll probably maybe see the result of who my next opponent is.
But as far as focusing what's going on around and who's talking with who, I don't know, it's just none of my business.

Q. Just like this one, you had three very easy wins to push you into Round 4 of this year's tournament. What's the key to your well‑rounded performance?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Very good English. I think that's the best English spoken by a Chinese on my trip here.
Yeah, you can say it's been two sets and it's been easy, but in any particular situation and any match you go into‑‑ you know, look at the match today. I was up a set and I was up a break and played a couple loose points, and then all of a sudden your opponent, you know, starts feeling better, gets a little bit of confidence and makes the match difficult.
So there's no such thing as a really easy match. You know, there can be so many swings from the hour, three hours that you can be on the court, so it's really about maintaining that focus and concentration from the start to the end.
Even if you have a few moments where you feel like you have a little bit of a letdown, I try to recover from it as fast as I can.

Q. In the past few days you have answered a few questions about Sugarpova. My question is: Among all the business opportunities you had, why you choose candy to start your own business?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Because I eat way too much of it, and, well, I love food and I love candy. And the reason it was gummies is because when I came from Russia to the United States and I first tried a Gummy Bear worm, nobody has ever seen that in Russia. It really fascinated me and I loved it.
I mean, when the name came out, I thought it was just so fun and young. Then I put two together. Then I did a lot of research on brands that make this type of candy.
When I would ask my friends, like, what's their favorite gummy, they would tell me a particular shape that they liked. They would never tell me a brand.
Then it just clicked in my head that that is something I want to change, you know, that in the future when people ask what their favorite gummies are, they say Sugarpova. They don't say it's worms or something like that.
That kind of clicked. It's kind of where it all started.

Q. Have you ever been to Russian District in Beijing? If you have been there, what's your opinion about it?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I haven't been. No, I haven't been there. I visited the Great Wall a few years ago, but, you know, the unfortunate life of a tennis player, sometimes you don't get to visit as much as you hope.
We do get to go to some really nice cities, but there really isn't a lot of time to visit‑‑ you know, I have traveled to so many great cities this year, and, I mean, I can't even ‑‑I don't even remember seeing something spectacular and new and being a tourist.
Maybe once or twice I think in Rome. Then in Paris I went to see Moulin Rouge because I had the evening off. That's really as good as it gets for a tennis player, because you get to the tournament, you're trying to prepare for it, and then you finish and then you're on to the next one or you've been on the road for so long you just want to sleep in your own bed.
I think I'll have so much time to travel when I'm done with the sport.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=83606

Charlatan
Oct 6th, 2012, 04:27 AM
Q. Just like this one, you had three very easy wins to push you into Round 4 of this year's tournament. What's the key to your well‑rounded performance?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Very good English. I think that's the best English spoken by a Chinese on my trip here.

What the? :spit: So random :hysteric:

LoveMasha2008
Oct 7th, 2012, 04:42 AM
Press conference after QF:


CHINA OPEN

October 5, 2012

Maria Sharapova

BEIJING, CHINA

M. SHARAPOVA/A. Kerber
6‑0, 3‑0 [Ret.]

THE MODERATOR: Questions in Chinese, please.

Q. Congratulations. Next match you might fight against either Li Na or Radwanska. What's your comments on the next opponent? And also, today Kerber was injured. You also suffer from injury before. So as a player, how are you going to try to avoid injury either on the court or off the court? What are you supposed to do to avoid injury?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I thought we played a high level of tennis the first set and a half, and even though the scoreline was 6‑0, 3‑0, there were many games that went to deuce. She had a few break points and long games on her serve.
I actually didn't see much of her injury. I was surprised she called the trainer and even more so when she retired quickly after that.
But, you know, it's no secret to everyone that we are towards the end of the season, and there are just little things whether it's serious or just a little thing that, you know, maybe will go in a few days hopefully.
You know, the body‑‑ the schedule takes its toll on everyone. It's a normal process. You know, if you feel like it's too bad, you've got to take care of it and be on the court when you're close to 100%.
My next round will be tough no matter what, either facing Li Na or Radwanska. I have had difficult matches against both of them in the past. You know, I lost to Radwanska last time in Miami, and against Li Na we had a really long match on clay in Rome.
So either way it will be difficult.
THE MODERATOR: Questions in English, please.

Q. So you didn't really have any sense during the match that something might be a little bit off with her? I mean, I know that she beat you earlier this year in Paris, and I think she played you pretty close last time, as well. For you to come out and dominate this time...
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Not really, because we had really long rallies, and, I mean, I would say 50% of the games I felt like were really long and went to deuce and back and forth.
It wasn't like she was just making easy errors or not going to the ball. So maybe it got worse as the match went on. I'm not sure.
But like I said, health is the most important thing, and she's got to take care of it. Yeah.

Q. Is there anything that you noticed in particular that was different playing against her today than maybe like in Paris when she got you?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I beat her after Paris. I don't know. You keep referring to the time I lost. (Smiling.)
Yeah, I mean, look, she's sixth in the world. There is a reason why she's at that spot and why she's been so consistent in the last year.
Her results have shown that, you know, she's beaten some really great players. I mean, she's so consistent on the court and makes you hit so many balls that sometimes you almost go a little too much for it and end up making a few more errors than usual.
But I really tried to stay aggressive today, really did a good job of moving the ball around and being solid and moving in when I could.

Q. Can you tell us a little about your candy line, Sugarpova? Are you carrying any bags of candy with you?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I wish I could say yes, but I ate it all. There's none left.
When my manager was in town, I asked him for a few, but otherwise I don't carry it with me because then it just becomes too dangerous. I've got vacation in a month or so, and I need to‑‑ you know, I'm going to be wearing bikinis, so I can't be eating candy before. I need to be bikini‑ready.

Q. All this talk about prize money and stuff like that, I'm just wondering, from a personal point of view, do you feel like players are really underpaid? I mean, they seem like "poor little me," like they make a lot of money.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: We do. We make a really good amount of money. We're very lucky.
You mean about the Australian Open issue?

Q. Yeah.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I mean, look, I think every athlete should be compensated for what they do and their achievements and their result. There's no doubt about it.
I'm certainly not sitting in this chair and complaining about my prize money. I'm very lucky with what I have been able to achieve and the compensation I have received, but it certainly is nice to see that the revenue that these Grand Slams are receiving, which is a pretty big number compared to maybe what the athletes get in return, you know, they're all getting together, and the Australian Open is really the first one that took the stand on it and said, Since we are making really good money and getting so many people, so much interest, why not give a little more percentage to the players, for sure?

Q. We know that next round you have a big possibility to meet Li Na. Could you just talk about Li Na, maybe what is your advantage and her advantage, especially when this tournament was held in China?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, of course, if I do happen to play against her, there's no doubt that she's playing in her home country and she will have the support behind her, which is absolutely normal and to be expected.
You know, she's a very tough matchup against me, because we have always had really difficult matches. And before the one ‑‑well, I won the last two, I think, but before that she got me a couple of times. We have been back and forth with our results.
But every match is always really high‑quality tennis, and that's what I hope to expect in the next match. I mean, she's proven why she's a Grand Slam champion with her results, and she's, you know, been top 10 in the world for a long time. There's no reason why it shouldn't be a good match tomorrow.

Q. Are there times as a tennis player where the scoreline can kind of dictate your decision of whether to stay in a match or retire from a match if you kind of have a nagging injury?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it all depends how serious your injury is. I think if it's a nagging injury that's ‑‑I mean, I think if you go on the court, you need to have a mindset that you're going to be able to finish the match.
You know, nagging injuries are ones that just kind of are there and are floating around, and usually you can get by them but maybe they're not improving, but I don't think they really get you out of retiring in a match.
I think it's the injuries that get worse within a situation within a match that you really need to look out for.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=83665

nelsondan
Oct 7th, 2012, 03:39 PM
This....sounds like excellent news......

Q. Can you tell us a little about your candy line, Sugarpova? Are you carrying any bags of candy with you?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I wish I could say yes, but I ate it all. There's none left.
When my manager was in town, I asked him for a few, but otherwise I don't carry it with me because then it just becomes too dangerous. I've got vacation in a month or so, and I need to‑‑ you know, I'm going to be wearing bikinis, so I can't be eating candy before. I need to be bikini‑ready.


Maria needs to be bikini ready......for who? Those of us who would not mind seeing some new Maria in bikini photos. It is pretty hard to be very worried about the candy.....when it comes to food, maria's pattern is to eat, worry about how much it was, and appear picture perfect.

LoveMasha2008
Oct 8th, 2012, 11:37 AM
Press conference after SF:


CHINA OPEN

October 6, 2012

Maria Sharapova

BEIJING, CHINA

M. SHARAPOVA/N. Li
6‑4, 6‑0

THE MODERATOR: Questions in Chinese, please.

Q. First of all, congratulations for your victory. This is first time for you to enter final of China Open. Can you share with us, how did you make adjustment in second set? Because first set you did not take lead but after which you start to take the lead and eventually win.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I came into this tournament not playing extremely well in Tokyo, and I had a couple of days of practice here. I really wanted to do well and get to the final stage of this tournament because I haven't been, like you said, to the finals here. I have played a few times, and I skipped last year.
So I was hoping that from the first round on I'd really step it up and get better. I feel with the tournament I have been playing and moving better.
Yeah, as far as today, it was a really high‑quality first set and a few ups and downs, and obviously she had the lead in the first set.
You know, I came back and then I broke her in that last game of the second [sic] set. You know, there are a few key moments to that set, and it was important for me to take that momentum going into the second.

Q. First of all, congratulations for entering the final. So who do you expect to be your final opponent?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't know. That's why they're playing the match out there to see who my opponent will be.

Q. My question is not related to the tournament. We all believe that you are a pretty girl no matter on the court or off the court. You are representative of fashion. You carry this bag to the court and to this press conference. Can you tell me what might be the secret inside your bag?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Inside my bag?
My credential, my two phones, and a water. That's it. I don't even know why I'm carrying it with me. That's it. (Laughter.)

Q. Can you tell me what kind of strategy does your coach give to you? When Thomas started to coach you, I think your performance is very much good. What kind of help does Thomas bring to you? Did Thomas give you specific guidance about playing against Li Na because he knows her game really well?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Thomas is a very experienced coach before he started working with Li Na. I have played Li Na many times before, so I think it's just about kind of knowing what has worked against her in the past and trying to use that.
I have beaten her the last couple of times. Before that I had a few losses. It's not so much important to focus on what your opponent is doing; more so trying to be confident in your game and enforcing that during the match.
Li Na has so much experience. She's a Grand Slam champion. You know going into the match that this is going to be a difficult match. She can come back. She certainly is capable of playing high‑level tennis.
So it's important to try to keep that level as long as you can during the match.

Q. Two years ago you have very much suffered from injury. Did you recover to what you were pre‑injury?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I don't like to compare from where I was to where I am now. It's always different stages in your life and in your career. You grow as a person, as a tennis player.
I actually have never looked back and said I wonder how I am compared to those moments, because you're always playing new tournaments, you're playing different opponents, and it's a new day.
You know, I'm not the one to compare things, not just in tennis but in other aspects of my life, so I try not to worry about that. I just try to keep improving. As long as I have that attitude, you know, it's better than trying to look back.
THE MODERATOR: English questions, please.

Q. Did you make any subtle changes to your serve following those runs of double faults early on in the first set?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No. I think, you know, in those first few games I thought my percentage of first serve was low. Against someone like Li Na who likes to step in and take the ball early, I think I put a lot of pressure on myself to have to hit too many second serves.
I think, you know, my goal after that was just to get my first‑serve percentage much higher than it was in the first three or four games.

Q. Four of your eleven previous meetings were on hard courts, and your won all four of them and never lost one set. You did it again today. So do you think you have a thing to work it out every time facing Li Na on hard court?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: You know, every match is different. When I go into a match against anyone, not just Li Na, I don't look at the ‑‑I mean, you take things from the matches. Maybe if you have a good record against them, you obviously are smart enough to know what has helped you win those matches.
But to go into a match feeling so confident that you have a good record or good statistic against a player is, I mean, I think it wouldn't be too smart, because every situation is new, every match is different, it's a new day, and there is a reason why we have to go out and play again.
You know, I just try to maybe focus on the things that have helped me in the past and that's pretty much it.

Q. You have drawn a lot of big crowds to your matches all throughout the tournament, and they've mainly been cheering for you. Today the crowd was decidedly against you and for Li Na. Do you think you felt that in the first set? Do you think you were feeling jitters early and that's why you weren't performing quite as well as you were later in the match where you got more used to it?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I have been part of many matches where I have played against someone that's playing in a home crowd. Of course you feel the energy change a little bit, but as far as it affecting me and letting it bother me, not so much.
I think maybe my first time in that type of atmosphere, let's say, I needed to take it in and really learn from it. But I have been part of so many of those situations that it's so understandable going into a match that you know she's playing in her home country. She's going to have the support.
But I really thought that they were more for her than against me, which is ‑‑ I thought all in all, they were pretty respectful of both of us.

Q. It seems you can always turn tough matches around. We all remember what happened in Rome and same today. My question is where does a player get that mental toughness? You are you born with it or it's trainable or you get it from your growing‑up experience?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it's a combination. I think a lot of it is when you're young. I think your upbringing and maybe the people that are around you help you. I have been in the sport for so many years, since I was young, and I moved to a new country when I was seven years old. So there are a lot of things I had to kind of battle through and be on my own and kind of mature by myself.
In that time, I mean, I learned a lot about being competitive and not just in the sport but in life, as well. But I feel like I have been like that in other aspects of things, whether it's, you know, trying to eat faster than others or if there is a competition, win a board game. I have always had a really competitive spirit.
As far as tennis, it's just where I really‑‑ I feel like the court is where I belong and where I really want to, you know, compete and fight no matter what the score is or situation is. Whether I'm down, and it can be match point, I still always believe I can turn it around.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=83727

Crux Squall
Oct 8th, 2012, 11:38 PM
CHINA OPEN

October 7, 2012

Maria Sharapova

BEIJING, CHINA

V. AZARENKA/M. Sharapova
6‑3, 6‑1


THE MODERATOR: Questions in Chinese, please.

Q. Can you make comments on your performance today? Compared with your performance with Li Na yesterday, it seems that Li Na has similar mistakes as you did today. Is that correct?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, Victoria played a really good match. You know, she just did many things much better than I did.
I felt like when I had the chance, I was just making errors in situations where I had opportunities to get back in the set or in the match. Little windows, but as small as they were, I thought that I just didn't take them.
Even in the second set on a couple of her games, it was Love‑30, I would, you know, miss second‑serve errors, which against somebody who is No. 1 in the world you can't really do.
So, yeah, I just really need to cut back on those errors that I made today.

Q. Some spectators believe that you have more unforced errors than the previous matches. What might be the reasons for that? The second question is how are you going to make comments on your overall performance in China Open this year?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I definitely made more errors than the previous round, but I think it also had to do with, you know, with the way she played. I think she played really smart.
Her ball was very deep today. I just didn't have a lot of time to, you know, really play the way I wanted to.
But overall, I mean, I came here not playing at a high level in Tokyo, and, you know, with every match I played better. Obviously it's unfortunate to lose in the final, but I felt for the results I have had here in the past, I felt this was definitely a step in the right direction.
THE MODERATOR: Questions in English.

Q. One thing I noticed tonight was that she had these wrist bands that were the exact same color, same bright, you know, neon color as a tennis ball. Did that cross your mind at all, and if so, did it bother you?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, not at all.

Q. So looking ahead, how are you going to prepare for the Championships?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it will be in a couple of weeks. Yeah, it's the last one of the year. Obviously a great achievement to get in that spot. It's always kind of the goal in the beginning of the year. You really want to make it and be one of the girls to make it to the last 8.
So I'm excited to have that opportunity. I have been part of that tournament for many years. You know, I was a bit injured last year there, so, I mean, like I said, everything that I have played after Tokyo this year I feel is a bonus for me since I was injured in that part of the year.
I'm really looking forward to it. Everyone that's in that draw has had a tremendous year and is a really good player. It will be tough, but, you know, I have a couple of weeks to get ready and practice. Yeah.

Q. You looked really tired today. Your physical condition actually looks like you're not as good as yesterday. Is it because of the tough game with Li Na yesterday?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, I didn't feel it. I just thought I was making a lot of mistakes, really.

Q. I'm just wondering, I know it's kind of a fact of this kind of lifestyle, but obviously there is some political unrest going on between Turkey and Syria. Do you ever think of those things when you go to places like that, or do you just put it out of your mind and say, Hopefully everything is going to be okay?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, of course you hope everything is going to be okay. But I think the tour will do a good job of monitoring whether we go there and if it's safe for us.
That was one of the things that, you know, we discussed a lot about Japan and going there after what happened. You know, some people were not sure if they wanted, you know, with the health hazards‑wise, and in a particular situation like this, I'm sure we're not just going there without any information and without any knowledge of what's happening.
We have a lot of security and safety there. Maybe it will just be a little bit more extreme than normal, but it's okay. I'm not worried about it.

Q. In the beginning of this season you lost in Melbourne, the final. Did you try to make a difference in preparation before today's game and why it didn't work?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: That was eight months ago, so I don't really think about the preparations. I'm more focused on the new game. You know, obviously I lost more times to her this year than I have beaten her, so I really certainly wanted to try to change that around, but it just didn't happen today.

Q. If you can list one particular moment as your best memory in China Open this year, what will it be?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: My best memory? Well, I mean, like I said, I haven't done well in this tournament for so many years. You know, I came here a couple days before and prepared, and then I really wanted to play good tennis.
Today was not the best showing of that, but overall, I had really good five matches. You know, I have a lot to look forward to going forward.

Q. We know that Sugarpova will be in Australia next year, so when can we buy Sugarpova in China?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't know. The sooner the markets buy it, the better. Maybe you can help me out with that. (Smiling.)
Yeah, the next launch is going to be in Australia. We had a pretty good meeting here, and hopefully it will be coming here soon.

Q. After the competition, will you stay more in Beijing? If you will, where will you go, Great Wall or other place of interest?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I would love to, but, you know, when you're on the road for so long and you're playing tournaments, you really miss home. We don't get to spend so much time at home during the year, so I will be flying home tomorrow.
But if I had the choice, I would definitely visit the Great Wall again, because I went six years ago, and it was a lot of climbing up, not too much down. I took the slide down. The slide was fun, really fun. Maybe someone can help me get up, and then I'll take the slide down next time.

Q. Going back to the match tonight, you mentioned you had a lot of errors. What is it about Azarenka's return and her serve that makes it difficult for you to finish those rallies?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I mean, she plays really well inside the baseline, and she likes to be the aggressive player. We play kind of similar. I mean, there are no secrets between each other. She likes to step in early and take the first ball and control it and not be on the defense. She did a really good job of that today.

Q. When would you launch Sugarpova in the Middle East? Maybe in Dubai.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Step by step, baby steps. You have no idea how much it takes to actually produce all the different labels for each market. It's a lot of work, and I'm learning a lot more about that than I probably should.
But it's a lot of work. I hope soon, sooner than later. I mean, to get it launched in the United States, I mean, the customs, like three days before it got to Henri Bendel's, it was stuck in customs and it might have not gotten out, and that would have been a disaster. I would have had to put like fake candy in the bags.
But I hope soon. I mean, I think next year will be a really big step in us going into different markets.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

http://www.asapsports.com/show_interview.php?id=83779

Advantage Me
Oct 9th, 2012, 10:36 AM
Great interview. Great answers. I enjoy reading these conferences more than the ones in Europe. Thanks for posting.

Cosmic Voices
Oct 9th, 2012, 06:54 PM
So happy to announce I will be coming back to Moscow at the end of this month. I will be at the Samsung Mobile Gallery on Tverskaya, 22, on October 30th to meet all of you. Everyone is welcome to come but the lucky 50 guests who enter the contest below have a chance to win my autographed racket and picture together. Can't wait to see all of you there!
http://www.samsung.com/ru/promo/sharapova/
Start of the event: 30th October 19:00, Autograph session begins at 19:30.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc7/553644_10151053612252680_1116218536_n.jpg

MM_1257
Oct 11th, 2012, 10:48 AM
What the? :spit: So random :hysteric:

Aham.. That was my reaction, too. I was wondering why did she say that.. When she isn't exactly a native speaker herself... She is great at the language, yes... But.. Usually native speakers say that. :shrug:

Angelpova
Oct 17th, 2012, 05:43 PM
Sharapova: "I'm still hungry for success My dream? To be a spy!"

Maria: "I’ve still got a lot of hunger for success. I want children and I want them to not be afraid to take on tough tasks. Serena the best tennis player of all time? It’s impossible to say! Tuscany is beautiful. It’s so relaxing there” On December 1 she'll be in Milan, taking part in the "Grande Sfida" exhibition match.
Starting next Tuesday, the top 8 women’s tennis players in the world will take part in the Maters is Istanbul. Maria Sharapova will even be able to pit her skills with those of Sara Errani. A prelude to La Grande Sfida on December 1, at the Forum di Assago, along with their doubles partners, Roberta Vinci and Ana Ivanovic.

Maria, what's the secret behind the success of these diminutive Italia women tennis players?
“Italian tennis is very ‘physical’ but at the same time ‘technical’, as players learn to play on clay. You learn to adapt to everything. That’s why Errani and Vinci have found their way to the top even playing against opponents who are a lot taller: they compensate for their stature with their skill and ability. There’s room for everyone in tennis. When I was younger, I used to think I’d stay short. Instead, I grew taller. However, I quickly learn that strength comes from within, from your mind. A match can last up to 3 hours. There are lots of ups and downs. It’s impossible to maintain a high level for so long. Therefore, the way you react when you are ‘down’ is fundamental. How concentrated and focussed you remain, and for how long.”

Does talking about Sara Errani always make you remember the Final and your win at Roland Garros.
“It was a surreal experience. The most unique moment of my career. Even more so than Wimbledon when I was 17-years-old and even the US Open, the tournament that, as a junior, I’d never have imagined to win one day. It has a special atmosphere. Finally winning Roland Garros, the only major I hadn’t won, on a surface that is difficult for me to play on, was very special indeed. Who knows, also because I always wanted to play against Steffi Graf there, but was never able to. That’s why when people start to talk about ‘the best tennis player in the world’, I always say it’s impossible to say, even if Serena Williams is an extremely strong player. I only ever played once against Monica Seles...”

Rich and famous. Do you still have a dream?
“Sure. Lots! My motto is: 'If you aim at the moon, even if you miss, you’ll still reach the stars.” It’s important to have dreams – to have big dreams, to keep yourself motivated. Without dreams it’s difficult to get up in the morning: you’re better off just staying in bed!”

Errani and Vinci are strong and technical as they learnt to play tennis on clay. Sara always reminds me of the Final at Roland Garros. It was surreal
If it were possible, would you prefer to be able to fly or to be invisible?
“To be invisible! Because I love Sherlock Holmes and my secret ambition is to become a spy!"

Do you believe more in willpower or destiny?
“Willpower counts for a lot. You can control things with willpower. But destiny is fundamental: things always happen for the right reason and at the right time. Things aren't merely ‘casual’ or all of equal importance, be it in a negative or a positive way. It’s always useful.”

Can you sum up Maria Sharapova in just 2 words?
“No, that’s impossible in just 2 words! I’d need at least 20! Let’s see... stubborn. And open. Better still, honest. Very honest.”

If you hadn’t become a tennis player, what other type of athlete would you have become?
“I used to dream about becoming a successful rhythmic gymnast."

At the age of 9 you moved from Russia to Florida and were coached by Nick Bollettieri: did you find that difficult? A nightmare?
“No, on the contrary. It was a fundamental experience for me. While there I matured. I developed as a person: I learnt all there is to know about life and relationships. I improved as I learnt to do things on my own. I learnt things that I still remember today, things that have made me stronger. Had I not learnt those things, I wouldn't have been able to get back to playing tennis following surgery on my shoulder. I wouldn’t have been so successful. I wouldn’t have had the will to fight so much.”

But would you allow your child to go through the same experience?
“Let’s just say that, sooner or later, I’d like to have children, but I don’t know exactly how many more years I’ll continue playing tennis for. Perhaps 3-4 more years? Perhaps I wouldn’t allow them to go through what I went through! But, if I could turn back time, I’d go through it all again, as I know how much of a formative experience it was. If everything is nice and easy, and you just stay at home, it’s tough to find challenges in life. I’d like my children to also be encouraged to take on the toughest challenges that life presents. That way, even if they do take a lot of knocks, they’ll bounce back up again. But, to do that, as I did, they'll need a lot of ‘get up and go’, self-esteem and pride.”

Not thinking a lot does, after all, help in tennis.
“I think a lot. But I think that’s in my nature. When you are on court, at 5-5 in the 3rd set, you tend to rely on instinct. Even if you do have a lot of thoughts going through your mind.”

I'd have liked to have played against Steffi Graf at Roland Garros, but, instead, I just managed to take on Monica Seles, once
What does money mean to you, and do you know how much you have in the bank?
“I do follow my financial interest and yes, I do know how much money I have in the bank. When I can buy things for my parents, or my grandparents, perhaps buy them a car and I see the joy in their eyes, or take friends on holiday and I see them happy, I don’t feel guilty about spending my own money. But when I’m home and I drink tea the way the Russians do, then there is no amount of money in the world that can make me feel happier. My parents taught me to be happy irrespective of what I’ve got, but also to be very ambitious and therefore always try to earn more. And to respect money.”

Do you feel more American or more Russian?
“From a lifestyle point of view I’m very American: I live in Florida and California. I have a very simple way of life. I spend time on the beach, relaxing. But my culture and diet is more Russian. At home, I feel very Russian. But, when I open the door, I’m surrounded by Americans, so I’m American! But my heart and my true home is in Russia, in Sochi.”

What does the future hold for Maria Sharapova?
“Another game. Another tournament. And more and more. At this moment in time, there is nothing more important to me than trying to win: I’m full of energy, ability, desire, motivation to wake up in the morning and train so I can improve ready for my next game.”

Which compliment that people pay makes you really feel happiest?
“When people say that I’m real and honest. That's very important to me. I wouldn’t want to give the impression that I’m not real. That I’m false, as I’m totally opposite to that. My mouth does sometimes get me into trouble, but I’m used to making my point when it comes to things I feel strongly about.”

Is it tough being Maria Sharapova?
“No. Why? I do what I have to do. Play sport, do things connected to my job. As a professional."

What is it that you can't do?
“I don’t lead a ‘normal’ life. I love Tuscany: it’s so peaceful, relaxing, beautiful. It’s so tranquil… But, after a week, I need more action in my life!”

http://english.gazzetta.it/More_sports/16-10-2012/sharapova-m-still-hungry-for-success-my-dream-to-be-spy-912937649911.shtml

Advantage Me
Oct 18th, 2012, 11:21 AM
Thanks for posting, Angelpova. Great interview.

MM_1257
Oct 18th, 2012, 04:21 PM
“I do follow my financial interest and yes, I do know how much money I have in the bank."

:sobbing:
I was wrong... :sobbing: ----> :lol::help::tape::lol::lol::lol::lol: she checks the bank account notes trying to read the number out loud... but loses concentration half-way... :oh:

MS17
Oct 19th, 2012, 12:25 PM
Maria Sharapova: grit, guts and glory




Wednesday, October 17, 2012

"No matter how tough it was, no matter how many people didn’t believe in me, I didn’t care and I didn’t listen.

“I could have said: ’I don’t need this.’ I have money, fame, victories. I have Grand Slams.

“But when your love for something is bigger than all those things, you continue to get up in the morning when it’s freezing outside, when you know that it can be the most difficult day.

"You can achieve great things when you don’t listen to all those things.”

So went Maria Sharapova’s victory speech after she lifted the French Open trophy in June, having overwhelmed the Italian Sara Errani to triumph in straight sets.

That victory gave her the illustrious career slam of having won all four Grand Slam titles – a feat only nine other women had previously achieved. Being in the final also took her back to world number one for the first time in nearly four years. But, perhaps most significantly, the Roland Garros crown came after Sharapova’s four-year struggle with injury, when many questioned whether the Russian would ever return to the top.

It was a career-threatening torn rotator cuff in 2008 that kept her out for 10 months and sent her ranking plummeting to 126th in the world. She was not to be beaten, though, returning to the sport in the summer of 2009 to begin the long climb back towards the top.

She finally reached the summit this summer – and now, with the TEB BNP Paribas WTA Championships in Istanbul getting under way on Tuesday, Sharapova has the chance to finish the year with what would be another milestone in her comeback. You have to go all the way back to 2004 for the last time she won the prestigious end-of-season tournament – the same year she first became a Grand Slam champion, becoming the 17-year-old darling of Wimbledon with a comprehensive 6-1, 6-4 defeat of Serena Williams.

She is 25 now, and one of the biggest names in women’s tennis – and indeed women’s sport. But the joys of winning never get old – especially when you’ve had to face the possibility they might be out of reach forever.

You said winning the French Open this year was the “most unique moment of your career”. What did you mean by that?
“Winning that Grand Slam as my first one after my injury – on a surface not many people expected me to do well on – was really meaningful. You put so much work in on the practice court and in the gym, but you never quite know when that will pay off. And when you have experienced those incredible moments of winning Grand Slams before, you really want to feel that emotion – that moment of winning a matchpoint – again. I was really happy it happened in Paris. I couldn’t have asked for a better moment for it.”

Did spending all that time away from the sport change your attitude towards it?“After the injury I felt like I was starting over again in my career. In a way, I was appreciating what I’d been given and was just grateful to have the opportunity to play tennis again on a daily basis. But I enjoyed the hard work to get back – I never looked at it as a negative, no matter how tough it was. You appreciate it so much more when something’s taken away from you a bit.”


There’s just the TEB BNP Paribas WTA Championships in Istanbul left this season. At the end of a long year, would you really rather be on a beach?“When you start the year, you have the four majors and you think: ’Oh, the champs are all the way at the end of the season.’ But the goal is always to be one of those eight girls who qualify, because it means you’ve had a really consistent year. I remember qualifying for it for the first time in 2004, and it felt like a bonus because usually the season had finished so early. I still feel like this tournament is a bonus for your accomplishments during the year.”

It’s the sixth time you’ve qualified. Does your experience give you an advantage?“I think it’s the experience that I have of not playing so many tournaments during the year. A lot of girls usually play a few tournaments in the lead-up to a big one like that, but a lot of my success has come when I’ve had a limited schedule. It gives me a chance to let my body rest and to practise well and be healthy – so that when I go out and compete, even though I might feel rusty for a few games, in the longer stretch of the tournament I feel better.”

The tournament has been held all over the world, from Madrid to Doha and now Istanbul. Where would you like to see it?
“I would actually love to see it go to Brazil. I was there once, and it’s somewhere we haven’t seen too much tennis, but I know there’s so much passion for sport there. Obviously football’s their number one thing, but as far as tennis is concerned I get so much fan mail from there, and I’m sure other players do too. It seems like the sport is really followed in Brazil, so I really hope it goes there.”

The next Olympics will be there. Are you planning to be in Rio, to upgrade the silver medal you won in London this summer?“It’s tough to say – it’s so far down the line. I usually don’t try to plan too much ahead. I was so looking forward to the Beijing Olympics in 2008, but just a few months before that is when I got my shoulder injury. So that was a real bummer. I try not to look at things that far in advance, but my experience this year was so special that of course I would love to get there – and experience having that chance again.”

You became the first female Russian athlete to have the honour of carrying the flag during the opening ceremony in London. When did you find out you’d been chosen?“It was crazy; I received a text message from the Russian Olympic Committee in the middle of the French Open, asking me if it was something I’d be interested in doing. [Laughs] I was half asleep and just honestly I couldn’t believe that was even being asked in question form. The Olympics was such a big part of our culture in Russia, so I grew up hoping that one day I could represent the sport of tennis – because it wasn’t very big when I was watching it in the Olympics when I was young. But the visibility of tennis in Russia and the amount of facilities and coaches we have has grown so much - it’s a solid sport there now. So for me to have that honour was incredible.”

Were you nervous?“It was such a long walk from the athletes’ village to the stadium, with the whole team and all the other countries, that once you got there it felt like the walk around the track was so much shorter than it actually was. I was just trying to focus on making sure the flag was waving the right way and holding it right...”

Tennis aside, food is another passion…
“I know, it’s really pathetic. Every time I do an entry on my website or write a little blog, I always mention food. I think my fans must think I have a problem… I kind of do [laughs]:lol:. But one of the greatest things about travelling is experiencing the different flavours and cultures. And, in Russia, sitting down at the table to eat as a family was such a big part of our lives – eating your grandma’s cooking and baking with the family. I’ve missed it since I moved to the US. I’m always talking about food and I try to cook, but I don’t do it as much as I would like to because from start to finish it’s such a big process. So on training days it’s pretty tough to cook, but on my off days I always do.”

If someone was to put together the perfect menu for you, what would be on it?“I love the Russian soup, borscht, and then we have this salad which is originally French, called Olivier – but I think the Russians took over it and now they call it the Russian salad. And we have these little dumplings called pelmenis, which are really good – my grandmother makes them really well. Then for dessert I’d want Russian honey cake called medovnik, which is really yummy.”

And now you've even gone and launched your own range of sweets...“When I came to the US as a kid and I saw these gummy bears and gummy type candy, it was so different to anything I’d ever tried or seen in Russia. I just fell in love with it. A couple of years ago, the name Sugarpova came about, and I put the two together. I really wanted to start my own business, and I thought this would be fun, young and fresh. And everybody loves candy, right?”

Sarah Shephard @sarahsportmag

British Eurosport HD will broadcast the WTA Championships exclusively live, October 23-28. Coverage is also available online and on mobile via the Eurosport Player: eurosportplayer.co.uk

Read more at http://www.sport-magazine.co.uk/278/maria-sharapova-grit-guts-and-glory-2472#DUjhIwhHBRwTAPf7.99

Cosmic Voices
Oct 19th, 2012, 12:40 PM
"A lot of girls usually play a few tournaments in the lead-up to a big one like that, but a lot of my success has come when I’ve had a limited schedule. It gives me a chance to let my body rest and to practise well and be healthy – so that when I go out and compete, even though I might feel rusty for a few games, in the longer stretch of the tournament I feel better.”


i think it confirms that her schedule will never grow from now on, i wish she would play some smaller events but her health comes first!

Cosmic Voices
Oct 19th, 2012, 12:40 PM
also, thanks Masha Fierce :oh:

nelsondan
Oct 19th, 2012, 07:46 PM
If someone was to put together the perfect menu for you, what would be on it?“I love the Russian soup, borscht, and then we have this salad which is originally French, called Olivier – but I think the Russians took over it and now they call it the Russian salad. And we have these little dumplings called pelmenis, which are really good – my grandmother makes them really well. Then for dessert I’d want Russian honey cake called medovnik, which is really yummy.”

Maria should help explain these concepts....the soup is often mentioned in articles....to Americans...and according to this chart...to the beautiful women of Russia, who have been abandoning traditional Russian diet in favor of eating like Americans.
Percentage of obese men in Russia.. 10.8........Russian women..27.9



Country Percentage of Obese Men Percentage of Obese Women
Finland 19. 19
Russia 10.8. 27.9
England 17 20
Germany 17.2 19.3
Czech 16.3 20.2
Scotland 15.9 17.3
Belgium 12.1 18.4
Spain 11.5 15.2
Sweden 10 11.9
France 9.6 10.5
Denmark 10 9
Holland 8.4 8.3
Italy 6.5 6.3
Australia 18 18

ziros
Oct 19th, 2012, 08:55 PM
Percentage of obese men in Russia.. 10.8........Russian women..27.9

That blows my theory that almost all Russian women are hot

nelsondan
Oct 20th, 2012, 12:06 AM
There are a lot of studies...I saw 2000-2012 at the bottom, and the Russian numbers were surprising. http://www.annecollins.com/obesity/worldwide-obesity.htm

That was contradicted in some older studies, but supported by newer ones.

One thing was definite.....Italy has good food, and it must be healthier than most other countries. The quotes I have seen from Maria usually praise the traditional fare of the country. She goes for quality, and enthusiasm about that is better than just eating the ordinary American style fast food without thinking much about it.

Advantage Me
Oct 20th, 2012, 10:32 AM
Thanks for posting the interesting article, Masha Fierce. Now we know why Maria takes her mother along on tournaments. Russian home cooking!!

MM_1257
Oct 21st, 2012, 02:26 PM
Tennis aside, food is another passion…
“I know, it’s really pathetic. Every time I do an entry on my website or write a little blog, I always mention food. I think my fans must think I have a problem… I kind of do [laughs]

:haha: #dead

in Russia, sitting down at the table to eat as a family was such a big part of our lives – eating your grandma’s cooking and baking with the family. I’ve missed it since I moved to the US.

:awww: :hug: Khm, Mash, I assume you guys didn't have many family lunches together in USA?

Trih
Oct 21st, 2012, 06:05 PM
:haha: #dead

The first quote ROTFL :happy: love her :sobbing:

jameshazza
Oct 21st, 2012, 06:08 PM
Is she lurking on here? :lol:

WowWow
Oct 21st, 2012, 06:55 PM
Is she lurking on here? :lol:

Of course she is. :cool:

MS17
Oct 24th, 2012, 08:24 AM
October 22, 2012


Maria Sharapova

ISTANBUL, TURKEY

THE MODERATOR: Questions for Maria.

Q. You are I think the most popular tennis player in Turkey. What do you think the reason is?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I'm very excited to be back. Unfortunately last year I was a bit injured and wasn't able to play 100%, so it's nice coming into this event knowing that I'm ready.
I've been here for a little bit getting ready for the tournament. I've spent about five days getting ready and practicing. I love this city. I've been here many times already. The energy from the crowd last year I thought was spectacular.
I'm really looking forward to experiencing that again.

Q. Why do you think you're the most popular tennis player in Turkey?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I'm not really aware that I am and there is no statistic on it, so...
I think that's just your personal opinion.

Q. After what happened this time last year to you ‑ you were very unlucky ‑ do you feel being here this time is a bit of a bonus?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Absolutely, yeah. I feel like after Tokyo everything was a little bit of a bonus. I was trying to recover last year and probably came back a little bit too soon. Obviously it's special to make it to the last eight, and I wanted to give it a chance and give it a go.
I had the same type of goal this year at the beginning of the year. Obviously you've done something in order to achieve this spot in the top eight.
Yeah, it's the last push of the year. I'm looking forward to it.

Q. Do you feel after all these years you're still learning about the rehabbing and scheduling issues?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, the scheduling has been pretty similar for me for the last eight years, no matter how the tournaments or the graphic has changed. I've always pretty much had the same schedule. It hasn't really been a secret for anyone.
You know I'm not going to play more than 20 tournaments a year, that's for sure. I don't exactly remember when I played 20.
But from experience I've learned that it's important for my body to be healthy and ready to go for the tournament instead of having to play so many smaller tournaments in order to get ready for the big ones.
It's just not really my priority.

Q. How conscious are you of the fact that you can still get to year‑end No. 1 if things go your way this week?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it also has to do with how some of the other players do. I don't like to think about what's not in control in my destiny and not in my hands.
It would be a great achievement, no doubt, but I've been No. 1 before. The more matches I win here the better the chance I have of accomplishing that, I guess.
But it's not the biggest priority this week.

Q. You and Serena seemed very chatty and giggly during the draw ceremony yesterday.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: You do not want to know what we talked about.

Q. I do.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: It's not PG13.

Q. Talk about what that relationship is like. Tennis is an isolated sport, but you two do have a lot in common being multi‑slam winners in this sort of lone journey.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: We didn't talk about tennis. (Laughter.)
Yeah, obviously you're sitting there for 45 minutes and you're listening to a lot of Turkish speeches. At some point you're going to start some conversations in English. It may be a little inappropriate and rude maybe, but we couldn't‑‑ we were just joking about a few things.

Q. I think sometimes people perhaps underestimate the importance of this event. They look at the season as a Grand Slam season. For a player like yourself, how important is it to be here with the seven other best players in the world?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, it's a big accomplishment. It's such a different format as well. You know, obviously when you start a tournament usually if you're a seed you're not playing a seeded player.
So many different scenarios go into this type of event. From the first round on you're playing a pretty tough opponent, so it's unique in that way.
Also the format, knowing that maybe if you have a slow start you can get yourself back into it. I enjoy it. I've always liked that. It's just a great goal set in the beginning of the year. Every one of the players here obviously have done something great to be in this position.

Q. You have a big rivalry with Victoria Azarenka. You beat her on clay, but on hard court she has the upper hand. Do you think about new strategies for the next matches? Do you think there is something you should have done different?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, you know, right now we're in opposite groups. Right now I'm facing different opponents, and I have to focus on the opponents that are in my group.
If it comes to a point where I play her this tournament, there is no doubt I will want to change a few things going into this match.

Q. Talk about your year overall. On court and off you've had a lot going on. Have you been able to put things in perspective yet? How are you looking at 2012?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Definitely not looking at ‑‑ Oh, at 2012? I thought you said 2013. I was going to say I really haven't thought about that yet.
It's certainly been a great year. I mean, thinking back to my off‑season it wasn't the best off‑season I had. I was still sort of recovering from the ankle and I had to skip up a warmup tournament in Australia.
So actually my mood going into this year was like, Oh, okay. Great. What do I expect from this?
Getting to the finals of the Australian Open and starting out on that note and going into Roland Garros, a Grand Slam that not many expected me to win in my career, going out there and achieving something that I had dreamed of for a really long time was obviously very special.
Regaining the No. 1 ranking after my injury. There are a lot of things I can look at and say were really meaningful.
Yeah, I'm not complaining, that's for sure.

Q. You carried your country's flag for your time in London. Congratulations for the silver medal.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Thank you.

Q. Can you share your Olympic experiences with us with top athletes from all around the world?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: It was a surreal week. From the day that the opening ceremony happened to the last match of the tournament, it was such a quick ‑‑ I think I played six matches within six days. Then the ceremony was just a surreal experience.
I didn't stay in the Village because it was quite far from Wimbledon, but I went there extra early that day to have an afternoon experience of what it's like to walk around in this ant Village with only athletes.
It was so unique, because no matter what sport they're in, the fact that you can relate to them and what they do so much, you know, you have so much respect for everyone that you see. You might not even know what sport they're in.
I was walking around and there are fields and boxers out there doing their things, and even gymnasts stretching. It was so mind blowing to me. They weren't even at their facilities and they were still practicing and so determined in the lead‑up to the Olympics.
The ceremony, when I got the honor and the message of carrying the flag for my country, I knew that I would be the first female to do that from Russia. I think it put a little extra pressure on me holding the flag and making sure it was right and really trying to concentrate that it was waving the right direction.
But it was a really, really fun week.

Q. You just told us that you've been in Istanbul a lot of times. What are your favorite places to go and what are your favorite things to do in Istanbul?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, there are endless things to do here from the cultural experience. I went to the Hagia Sophia, the Bazaar a few times. The first time I went to the bazaar I was so overwhelmed I think everyone could have cheated me on everything that I wanted to buy. Next time I came there a lot tougher. I was like, I'm really going to bargain with them.
I mean, what's there not to like? We were at the ceremony yesterday and the view of the bridge looking on to the Asian part of the city is just one of the best views there is in the world.
So there's just a lot to do. Unfortunately we're a little bit far from the city while we're playing the tournament, so there's not a lot we can do.

Q. Last year there were some rumors that the dogs of the city annoyed you so much. In the second year of your visit...
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I didn't understand your first question.

Q. Last year there was some rumors that the dogs of the city annoyed you so much. Is there any problem like this?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I never had a problem in the first place. Like you said, they were just rumors.

Q. What determines the player of the year for you?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: That's a good question. Obviously results. I don't know. I guess results are really important, yeah.

Q. Is it size of tournament? Rankings points? Consistency?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: To be honest, I think it's a combination of everything. Yeah, definitely is.
You can't just base it on ranking or one big tournament or consistency. I think all those things have to go into play.

Q. Obviously you're a candidate for that. Outside of yourself, who has had the best year, Serena or Victoria?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, definitely winning two major and the Olympics, for sure.

JamieOwen3
Oct 24th, 2012, 08:51 AM
Q. "Last year there were some rumors that the dogs of the city annoyed you so much. In the second year of your visit..."

Random :lol:

Advantage Me
Oct 24th, 2012, 09:49 AM
Thanks for posting the article, Masha Fierce. The interviews get more interesting these days.

nelsondan
Oct 24th, 2012, 03:05 PM
Is Maria as articulate speaking Russian as she is speaking English?

How many people are able to even know the answer to that?

Craig.
Oct 24th, 2012, 03:17 PM
[SIZE="4"]
Q. Obviously you're a candidate for that. Outside of yourself, who has had the best year, Serena or Victoria?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, definitely winning two major and the Olympics, for sure.

MARENA :inlove:

Qetusi
Oct 24th, 2012, 03:21 PM
Is Maria as articulate speaking Russian as she is speaking English?

How many people are able to even know the answer to that?

No

She speaks in Russian well/fluent but way better in English, of course

Cosmic Voices
Oct 24th, 2012, 04:42 PM
From Masha's FB page:

Hello from Sugarpova headquarters! So happy to announce that www.sugarpova.com will start shipping all products internationally on November 1st. Looking forward to hearing everyone's feedback from all around the world!

Mexicola
Oct 24th, 2012, 06:42 PM
Is Maria as articulate speaking Russian as she is speaking English?

How many people are able to even know the answer to that?

I think Maria is excellent in both languages. But I don't think it's going out on a limb saying her command of English is superior. She lived in Russia for 7 years and America for 18 years. I know she speaks Russian with her dad and whenever she goes home or talks to family members on the phone. But she has all of her American friends and has immersed herself in American culture for so long, it's only natural her English is better. A day doesn't go by where she doesn't speak English, but I'm guessing there are days when Russian isn't spoken.

I admire anyone who speaks multiple languages. And it was cool how Maria took some French lessons during her downtime.

NashaMasha
Oct 25th, 2012, 01:55 AM
Is Maria as articulate speaking Russian as she is speaking English?

Russian is much more complicated language with much bigger vocabulary used by common people. Maria speaks pretty decent Russian , but it takes time for her to recall some words which are not used in her family.

MS17
Oct 25th, 2012, 11:05 AM
October 23, 2012


Maria Sharapova

ISTANBUL, TURKEY


M. SHARAPOVA/S. Errani
6‑3, 6‑2

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You arrived here I think earlier than a lot of the other players and you looked quite comfortable out there on court.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uh‑huh.

Q. How is the court playing? What's your sense of it?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I arrived earlier because I think I was one of the few that was traveling quite far. So it felt good. I think the same as last year. Maybe a little bit slower, but I don't know. I had a short memory last year. Didn't go too well.
Yeah, I was happy about the way I started. Certainly the first few games went quite long. When you give her a lot of time, she uses it quite well. That's what has brought her success this year. I really tried to be more aggressive as the match went on.

Q. We've talked about your slow hard court or slow court play a lot this year, but it seems like you've adjusted well. You don't mind dealing with her high balls, you seemed to be getting on top of pretty much everything she was giving you?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I tried. She's a player that likes time and likes to hit the high balls and use the dropshots and the angles. Again, that is when you have time.
I think if I'm playing my game well that she doesn't have that time to create all those things she likes to and maybe goes for a little bit more than she would want to maybe on the serve or in the groundstrokes.
That's pretty much my goal.

Q. Did you have any time after the US Open to work on your game practice‑wise and try some new things, or do you pretty much day, Okay we're still in the season; can't try anything radical; I'm just going to get to the end and maybe work on some things after the Championships?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: To be fair, I had a little bit of trouble getting going after the US Open. Just making my way to Asia and knowing that I have to play so soon after the Open, just after such a long summer I think that was why I was just not really there in Tokyo.
Really changed it around when I went to Beijing. I knew I needed to do step up. It was an event I wanted to do William at of.
But, no, overall of course you always want to work on things that you feel need to improve, because there is never really time, if you think about it. Our off‑season isn't that long, so...

Q. I believe you hit 22 winners with your forehand today. Is that about as good as you've felt on any one stroke ever?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, I wasn't counting them, but I guess it's a good number to have. (Smiling.)
Yeah, I mean, like I said, I don't think I did that in the first maybe four, five games. As the match went on, I certainly felt like I needed to in order‑‑ I mean, you don't want points going way too long against her.
If that occurs, then, okay, you've got to be a little bit more patient. I did want to be the more aggressive one today.

Q. What would you like to say about the atmosphere? Seems like you have a great fan base here in Turkey.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I do. I mean, I felt the energy last year. It was so nice to see the success of the tournament, especially for a first year. You never quite know what to expect and how the fans will react and how much attendance and how many people will come and support you.
I mean, last year was one of the most successful Championships the tour has had. I was looking forward to experiencing that feeling and the atmosphere and the crowd again this year.

Q. You obviously broke through first at Wimbledon winning there on a pretty fast surface ;more recently in your career big results have come for you on slower courts, especially on clay. Do you think you've sort of evolved into a different sort of player over the years where this is now a better environment for you maybe than the reverse, younger?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I hope not. (Laughter.) No, because my favorite tournaments are on the faster court, and I really want to do well there.
It's tough to say. I was in the finals of the Olympics and semis of the US Open. Those are probably two of the fastest courts we play on during the year. I mean, it's all relatively speaking obviously. You want to adjust to wherever you're playing, whether it's slow or fast.
Maybe do a few more drills if you're a little late late or slow getting up to the ball when the court is slower.

Q. Did you follow the Lance Armstrong stuff?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: A little bit.

Q. Were you shocked? Big cultural icon like that.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I'm not a big cycling fan. I don't think I've ever made a point to turn it on TV and watch it. I've known his success and what he's achieved obviously. He was a great athlete in what he accomplished and went through being sick and coming back.
It's unfortunate, but I guess it happens.

Q. Sort of brings up the question as to whether or not doping is stringent enough in all sports. Do you think the controls are enough in tennis?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Are they enough?

Q. Are they enough, yeah.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Considering I landed from New York and my first day back at home I got a wake‑up call at 6:00 a.m., I think that's enough. (Laughing.)
Yep, knocking on my door. I was like, Thank you. Welcome home.

Q. But you're okay with the whereabouts rule in general?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I am. I know it seems difficult to have to give one hour every single day, but I usually have my hour somewhere in the middle of the night because I'm not going to be anywhere but in my bed.
If they come get m,e up they can wait and I can wait until I have to go to the bathroom. It's the most awkward thing when they knock on your door at 6:00 in the morning in you're walking around in your robe and your dog is going, What is going on? Who are these strangers? It's just a really bizarre situation.

Q. Is there any chance in the future we might see the Sugarpova candies in Turkey?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I would love to see the candy here. I had an attempt of bringing two bags with me, but between me and my team they were gone on the plane. Turkish Airlines swallowed them up.
I would love to see the candy come here. It's going to be actually available internationally in a couple weeks, so people if want to order online at sugarpova.com it will be able to come to Turkey.
Great news. I've been getting a lot of mail that people are upset they can't get it around the world. So, you know...

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

PimpMePova
Oct 25th, 2012, 11:42 AM
Beyond The Baseline ‏@SI_BTBaseline
Sharapova to press: "Riiiise and shine, everybody." Carrying food. Asked what it was. "I don't know. Could be kangaroo food for all I know.":haha:

SI_BTBaseline
Sharapova sums it up: "But I fought. And I won. So I'm happy.... Just wondering when I'm going to go sleep. Aren't we all?" #wtachamps

Marga.
Oct 25th, 2012, 12:14 PM
^ :lol: So funny, I love her even more. :D

MS17
Oct 25th, 2012, 09:24 PM
Maria Sharapova

ISTANBUL, TURKEY


M. SHARAPOVA/A. Radwanska
5‑7, 7‑5, 7‑5

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Obviously this was a late finish for you. What was it like fighting out there? Talk about the match.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it was a very physical match. Just came down just to a few points in the end. I think today was an example of not playing my best tennis at all, fighting through it, hanging in there, and getting it done.
I mean, obviously I didn't play the way I wanted to from the beginning. I didn't break her once in the first set. Just wasn't doing a lot on my returns; wasn't playing aggressive enough.
But I fought and I won, so I'm happy.

Q. You seemed to be disagreeing with your coach at points during the match. Was that tactics from before the match or when he visited you?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I was just aggravated because I was making errors and wasn't doing the right things.
In the heat of the moment got to blame it on someone, right? It's never on yourself. (Laughter.)

Q. Did you feel like at any time you were playing the match on your terms, or was that not until the very end of the match?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, I feel like I was doing the right things. Obviously there's a reason why she's No. 4 in the world. She showed that today. Her capability of anticipating where the ball goes and getting it back. No matter if it's, you know, a hard shot or a lower slice that has no pace, she makes you work for it.
She did until the end. I found a way to get through those points against her which is not always easy, especially on a slower court like this. But I managed.

Q. So do you feel only happiness or is it more just relief that you got through it and a little bit of frustration trying to move on to get the level you want?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, not frustrated. Just wondering when I'm going to go sleep. Aren't we all?

Q. Absolutely. In the middle of the third set, I heard an impression that you shouted to Radwanska, Run run. Was I mistaken, or it was your plan to force her to run?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I was doing all the running, so, I mean, I wish I could watch the tape of this match. I mean, there is not one time in the first set where I felt like I was controlling and moving forward.
In that point, I finally like moved in and hit an approach shot winner for the first time, so I was just happy about that.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports


maybe one of the shortest interviews ever from her :lol:

rucolo
Oct 26th, 2012, 02:11 PM
http://www.wtatennis.com/news/20121024/sharapova-hangs-on-two-players-into-sfs_2256076_2959219


Sharapova Hangs On, Two Players Into SFs

October 24, 2012
ISTANBUL, Turkey - Maria Sharapova battled past Agnieszka Radwanska and into the semis of the TEB BNP Paribas WTA Championships - Istanbul 2012 on Wednesday, rallying from 75 42 down and outlasting the Pole in a three-hour, 12-minute marathon that finished at 2:12am, 57 75 75.

The match put forth a clear contrast of styles: Sharapova constantly on the offense, Radwanska keeping her on the run with clever use of variety and redirection of pace. And for the first half of the match Radwanska's game plan was working better, as she snuck out of a 40-15 hole and broke Sharapova in the very last game of the first set, then broke again for 4-2 in the second set.

"I was a little bit frustrated early on," Sharapova said. "I wasn't doing the right things and she was doing all the right things, and making me make mistakes.

"I was just trying to hang in there."

And hang in there she did - a true workaholic, Sharapova never gave up on a winning strategy, always looking to take charge with big serves, big returns, ferocious groundstrokes - she would eventually outlast Radwanska 7-5 in the third set, finishing the match with a big ace out wide on the deuce side.

The numbers said it all - Sharapova was the clear aggressor with 66 winners to 64 errors, while Radwanska compiled a safer 18 winners to 19 errors.

"It was a very physical match with so many ups and downs - I wasn't playing my best tennis, but I kept fighting," Sharapova said. "And when you win when you're not at your best, it gives you extra motivation to do better in the next one."

Radwanska gave praise. "It was a great match, and all the sets were very tight," she said. "I had my chance in the second set, but when you don't use your chances against a top player, a great player, it's hard to come back and win."

And Sharapova gave praise back. "There's a reason why she's No.4 in the world. Her capability of anticipating where the ball goes and getting it back - and no matter if it's a hard shot or a low slice with no pace, she makes you work for it. She did until the end. I found a way to get through the points, which isn't easy."

Sharapova's victory also meant she has qualified for the semifinals.

"I'm happy to get to that stage - the goal is always to get out of your group," she said. "I was injured last year and didn't play very well, so to be in the semifinals this year makes me very proud, and especially given the way I fought tonight."

MM_1257
Oct 27th, 2012, 12:12 AM
I love this city. I've been here many times already.
:oh:

PimpMePova
Oct 27th, 2012, 10:19 AM
Sharapova embarrassed by her Gangnam style


ISTANBUL: Maria Sharapova admitted on Friday that she felt embarrassed by her contribution to a tennis-style Gangnam video and revealed the Asian dance craze had completely passed her by.

Teenage players, Britain's Laura Robson and Genie Bouchard of Canada, decided the women players should not to be outdone by Novak Djokovic's Gangnam performance in Beijing, and created a video of their own.

They persuaded Sharapova to introduce it, which she duly did with a saucy wink, something she might not have done had she actually known what she was introducing.

"Yeah, it was really fun until - well, when I found out what Gangnam was and what Gangnam Style was," Sharapova admitted.

"So I did it and I sound ridiculous. I sound like I don't know what I'm talking about. Obviously and I'm very embarrassed about it.

"I was driving my car and I hear this ridiculous song and I'm like, what is this? And I look at my radio and it says Gangnam Style."

Gangnam is the music and dance pioneered by rapper Psy, who has become the first South Korean pop star to become a global phenomenon.

His video featuring a manic horse-riding dance is said to have become YouTube's most liked of all time.

Sharapova didn't know that but she did, however, know that the best course was to gently satirise herself.

She did that after explaining that Robson approached her after one of her matches in Beijing, asking if she would do a quick introduction to her video, Gangnam Style.

"I'm like, what?" is how Sharapova characterised her response.

"She's like, Gangnam Style. I'm like, I'll do it if you tell me how to pronounce it right," Sharapova went on.

"She's like, What do you mean you don't know how to pronounce it? I'm like, I've never heard of this. What is it?"

"I didn't even know what it was. Now maybe I can, you know, attempt it (to dance). But before I needed to know how to pronounce it!"

Sharapova concluded: "Oh, my goodness. I'm 25. I'm not that old. I'm still into it. So I didn't know what I was doing, but it came out great. It was funny." - AFP



:haha::rolls:

Cosmic Voices
Oct 27th, 2012, 11:45 AM
i love how masha's the high priestess over these girl and they have to ask permission before she'll accept :haha:

MS17
Oct 27th, 2012, 10:06 PM
October 26, 2012


Maria Sharapova

ISTANBUL, TURKEY


M. SHARAPOVA/S. Stosur
6‑0, 6‑3

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. When you seen an opponent struggling like that in the first set, what do you think?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think I got to keep them struggling. (Laughter.)
You know, obviously there is a reason why they're in that position. You know, could be a combination of them not having a good day and also you forcing the issue a bit.
You know, I certainly didn't want to play as long of a match as I did in the previous round. I wanted to do a better job of a few things, and I think I did.

Q. Kind of funky playing those dead rubber matches, no?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, they're not so dead. You're going out and playing in front of thousands of people.

Q. You know what I mean. You're getting through anyway and she can't.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't know. I think there are still some things that you play for, because, especially in my mind, I don't want to go and just play to play tennis. I go to play to win.
So it's not like a practice match or anything.

Q. But is it just a little bit of an upgrade on a practice match? Are you kind of thinking ahead? You knew going into today that you'd reached the semifinals and she couldn't get there, so it's not really same type of pressure or intensity.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I didn't want to feel that way, to be honest. I wanted to go and try to replicate a match that matters. To me, in my mind, it does.
I never want to go into a match when I'm in a competitive tournament atmosphere and feel like there is nothing on the line. That would never really get me going, so...

Q. Next you get the winner of the match coming up later tonight between Li Na and Azarenka. Can you talk about each them, especially I guess Li Na, because you've played Azarenka a lot recently.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I played both of them in Beijing. I mean, there are no secrets out there. We've played maybe a little less against Li Na this year than Azarenka. Either one are a big challenge and I've had trouble against, especially with Azarenka this year.
So, you know, I'm putting myself back in the position to try to change things around and do things a bit differently. So I'm happy that I'm giving myself more opportunities against these players, whether it's Li Na or Azarenka.

Q. When you lose several times to the same player, like Azarenka, do you ever go back and watch those matches?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, of course I do.

Q. Any main things you see when you watch them?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Certainly. (Smiling.)

Q. You said about the Australian Open prize money that you didn't think it would be a good idea to increase the first round loser's prize money. What do you think about the case of injured players who come back after and they're struggling at first because they have no support from federation or maybe don't have sponsors as well? So the first round loser's paycheck is very important to these kind of players, don't you think?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I do. I think it's obviously an incredible position to be in a Grand Slam main draw. I mean, don't get me wrong. I just think that when you're in a position to be in a Grand Slam first round, you want to have the motivation to go further, to win the match, to get prize money, to get more prize money, to get more points.
I always feel like there has to be something on the line. You don't just feel like just because you're in the draw you're going to be paid more. There is no doubt ‑‑ I mean, I think that it's obviously very difficult for somebody that's maybe ranked 190, a 100‑something, to make really good money, because this is one of the most expensive sports.
I mean, the expenses are incredibly big and challenging. In order for you to get to the next level, you have to have a really good team of knowledge and people, and that takes a lot of money. That's no secret.
But yet when you just arrive to a place, you want to have a motivation to get yourself through to the next round. So I don't think that there is anything that I said that I'm trying to take away from losing or somebody that's just there.
It's a really incredible position to get there. It takes a lot. You obviously have to win tournaments, go far in tournaments, and be consistent, so...

Q. Just talk a little bit more about playing Victoria if you play her. You've played her a lot this year. You beat her in Stuttgart; very close at the US Open; other ones, not so close. What do you need to do to get over the hump on hard courts?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I think just stay with her a little bit more and be a little bit more consistent, but aggressively consistent. We have very similar game styles. We like to hit the ball and be the first one to really go for it in the rallies.
I think that's just something that maybe I was a little bit tentative and not doing so well in the previous‑‑ in some of the matches where I haven't had success.
You know, also taking my opportunities. I mean, US Open I'm up a set and a break and having chances in certain games and not taking them. You really can't do that against someone that's No. 1 in the world.

Q. Is there a mental part of it confidence‑wise against her, because she seems to return you very well also?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, there are many great things she does, but you have to expect that against someone that's one of the best in the world. No doubt.

Q. Just one more on Stosur. Since she won the US Open she sort of struggled to replicate that fantastic match she played against Serena. Have you noticed a change in her game or herself since then?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, it took me a couple years after I won my first major to get to that type of position again. It's certainly not an easy one, especially after you experience that type of success, almost floating on clouds and you feel like you're the greatest ever.
That takes a while to get back. Everyone is different, and you can't compare anyone. I can't compare myself to her or anyone else, like she can't.
But from my experience, I'm not sitting here and saying I won Wimbledon, the next day I won the US Open. I was far from it.
So everything is a learning experience, and I'm sure it is for her as well.

Q. You were the first top player Li Na was trying to challenge when she came back from her retirement back in 2005.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Who?

Q. Li Na.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I didn't know she was retired.

Q. She has for two years.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, yeah? I had no idea.

Q. You played her in 2005 Australian Open that year.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Which round was that?

Q. Third round. You beat her pretty bad.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't remember that either.

Q. You don't remember?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I won?

Q. Yeah.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Okay, good.

Q. After so many meetings in seven years, do you think in a way that she's still fresh as she was back then considering she's almost 31 years old right now? Can you talk about that?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't think age is something that you can really say is affecting someone, especially when they're ‑‑ I mean, look, last year she won the French Open. What is she, 31 now? She was 30 then, so you could have had the same type of conversation and said she is a Grand Slam champion at 30 years old.
Now, what, she's 31 and all of a sudden you're asking if she's good enough at 31. That's kind of tough. From the position where she was in 2005, even though I don't remember that match, obviously she's been very consistent in the last few years. To be a Grand Slam champion is not an easy task, no matter if you're 16, 17 or 30 or 35.

Q. I remember when you beat Victoria this year in the Stuttgart final and afterwards you got a car and you drove the car onto the court. Have you had a chance to drive that car much yet?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I haven't received that car yet.

Q. No?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it's at the dealership now. Maybe when I get back I'll get to drive it.

Q. Did you see the video you were in with Robson and Bouchard?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I did.

Q. Reaction? Looked kind of fun there, huh?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it was really fununtil ‑‑ well, when I found out what Gangnam was and what Gangnam Style was.
She actually approached me after one of my matches in Beijing and she was like, Can you just do this quick intro for me? We did this video, Gangnam Style. I'm like, What?
She's like, Gangnam Style. I'm like, I'll do it if you tell me how to pronounce it right. She's like, What do you mean you don't know how to pronounce it? I'm like, I've never heard of this. What is it?
So I did it and I sound ridiculous and I sound like I don't know what I'm talking about obviously and I'm very embarrassed about it. But then driving in my car and I hear this ridiculous song and I'm like, What is this? And I look at my radio and it says Gangnam Style.
I'm like, Oh, my goodness. I'm 25. I'm not that old. I'm still into it. So I didn't know what I was doing, but it came out great. It was funny.

Q. Did they ask you to dance?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Ask me to dance? I didn't even know what it was. Now maybe I can, you know, attempt, but before I needed to know how to pronounce it.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

PimpMePova
Oct 27th, 2012, 10:17 PM
Q. You were the first top player Li Na was trying to challenge when she came back from her retirement back in 2005.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Who?

Q. Li Na.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I didn't know she was retired.

Q. She has for two years.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, yeah? I had no idea.

Q. You played her in 2005 Australian Open that year.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Which round was that?

Q. Third round. You beat her pretty bad.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't remember that either.

Q. You don't remember?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I won?

Q. Yeah.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Okay, good.

Q. Did they ask you to dance?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Ask me to dance? I didn't even know what it was. Now maybe I can, you know, attempt, but before I needed to know how to pronounce it.
:rolls: :happy::haha:

Charlatan
Oct 27th, 2012, 11:21 PM
Q. Kind of funky playing those dead rubber matches, no?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Um, they're not so dead. You're going out and playing in front of thousands of people.

Q. You know what I mean.

TrollPova :rolls:

domon17th
Oct 28th, 2012, 06:09 AM
I'm so in love with her these days. She's so real, sometimes shady, very witty, yet always point-on in her interviews. She's really residing comfortably in her HBIC role. I can never understand those people who complain that she's boring and unfriendly. She did an video intro for something she's never heard of for a fellow player for god's sake!

JadeFox
Oct 28th, 2012, 06:37 AM
I'm so in love with her these days. She's so real, sometimes shady, very witty, yet always point-on in her interviews. She's really residing comfortably in her HBIC role. I can never understand those people who complain that she's boring and unfriendly. She did an video intro for something she's never heard of for a fellow player for god's sake!

Shut your whore mouth! She only did it to throw the peasants a bone! :rolleyes: ;) :p

domon17th
Oct 28th, 2012, 06:57 AM
Shut your whore mouth! She only did it to throw the peasants a bone! :rolleyes: ;) :p

To be fair they did ask the highness for permission :sobbing:

PimpMePova
Oct 28th, 2012, 06:32 PM
Beyond The Baseline ‏@SI_BTBaseline
Sharapova forgot she still has the Prague exo tomorrow vs Kvitova/Safarova. "Whoopsie. Why did I sign up for that one." #wtachamps

JoPova
Oct 28th, 2012, 06:34 PM
Beyond The Baseline ‏@SI_BTBaseline
Sharapova forgot she still has the Prague exo tomorrow vs Kvitova/Safarova. "Whoopsie. Why did I sign up for that one." #wtachamps

Just withdraw and relax Maria! ;)

MS17
Oct 28th, 2012, 07:57 PM
^ you just beat me to it :D

wht an amazing champion we support , very well done Maria .

larimoreira
Oct 28th, 2012, 08:17 PM
October 27, 2012

Maria Sharapova

ISTANBUL, TURKEY

M. SHARAPOVA/V. Azarenka
6‑4, 6‑2


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Obviously that looked like that win felt pretty good. As the second set is going your way and obviously after the match, it was clear that this win meant a lot to you.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, of course. Of course victories mean a lot to you. That's what you play for and practice for. And especially when you find yourself in a losing position a few times during this year you want to try to figure out how to change those things around.
Again, you're giving yourself opportunities to go out there and try to do that. I did today, so obviously it means a lot to me.

Q. Yesterday you were saying you needed to be aggressively consistent. Seemed like you pretty much executed, what 90%, 95% of the time what you wanted to do?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think so. Yeah, certainly didn't make as many mistakes as I did in some of the previous times, but also returned a little bit better. Although I still feel like I could have returned better than I did today.
But overall I'm happy with the way I came in and didn't let anything bother me, even losing to her the last couple times just trying to figure it out.

Q. Just talk a little bit about fitness overall. Clearly you look more fresh than she did today; wasn't moving that well. I guess fitness really matters in those kind of tournaments when it's condensed, six days, and being in shape enough to play day after day means something.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Everybody is hurting at this time. Some show it more than others.

Q. Do you think it'll be a PG13 final?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: (Laughter.) That's a good question. (Smiling.) Look at you. You've been thinking about that one, right? I see, I see. You get a bag of candy for that. (Laughter.)
I'm not sure. Let's see how it turns out. Obviously tennis will do the talking hopefully. Look, it's also a match that I'm looking forward to. I haven't beaten her in a long time. She's certainly the one to beat this year, especially the second part of the year with the way she's played.
Again, to be in the final of this event, I mean, I'm extremely proud. No reason why I can't go out there and give it my all.

Q. The tour pretty much stops for two months after this tournament before Australia. This is the tournament you look back to as having been your most recent match for a while. How important that was in terms of ending on the right note against Azarenka after all the matches you played this year?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: It is, but I'm going to be on vacation in four days, and not one part of my mind will be thinking about the matches that I played with her or anyone else during this year. I can guarantee you that.

Q. What will be on your mind then?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't know what's going to be on my mind, but I'm going to have a Strawberry Daquiri in one hand and a magazine in the other and my eyes are going to be looking at the ocean. I'm going to be very satisfied.

Q. You seem to do a good job of convincing yourself, even after taking a series of defeats like you did to Victoria that you can actually go out and do it ‑ which you managed to do today. So against Serena you said you haven't beaten her in a long time. You still believe if you execute you can win the match?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Absolutely. I've done it before. I know against her it's been a really long time, but there are many players that I've faced against, especially coming up where there were things that just weren't working at that time. Whether I wasn't strong enough yet ‑‑ Justine was a really good, example. I always had difficulties against her and never quite recovered well in the rallies. You know, she was moving me around with all the different shot‑making.
But, I mean, obviously against Serena there is a lot more power involved. You know, her serve, she served extremely well against me in the last few matches that we played.
But, yeah, obviously you got to hold your own court as well, so...

Q. Do you think about choosing less tournaments next year?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: What?

Q. Do you think about playing less tournaments next year?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Less than I do?

Q. Yeah.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't really play that many so I don't want to really worry about that. I think people want me to play more and I shake my head, so...

Q. Is there a greater sense of satisfaction as the years go by that you are still capable of playing the level of tennis that you're playing and being in a final of this merit tomorrow?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: So much. I mean, I have to think about it every day because I‑‑ well, first I was doing the interview on the court and the journalist said, you know, It was eight years ago that you won. Eight? Yeah. You won Wimbledon and came to the Championships and faced Serena in the finals, and here you are eight years later in the Championships with the career Grand Slam and you've been No. 1 in the world a few times.
I was like, Wow. You stop and think about those things. You know, it's incredible. I wish I could have those moments more often, those moments where you sit down and reflect on what you've achieved. There is no better feeling than coming back from what I had to go through and not knowing if I was able to hit a serve again and to be in that position of being in the finals and being the world No. 1. I'm very, very happy.

Q. Putting aside tomorrow's match, after this entire year up to today, is it fair to say that you are better now than you were in 2008?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I never compare and I don't like to. I think every year and every situation is different. We grow and we learn, whether it's tennis or other things in life. I never like to compare myself to where I was tennis‑wise or life‑wise.
Everything is a learning curve and you go through it. There is not one situation in life that's the same.

FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports

larimoreira
Oct 28th, 2012, 08:18 PM
^ you just beat me to it :D

wht an amazing champion we support , very well done Maria .

I'm sorry, I deleted my post after I saw yours :lol:

Mexicola
Oct 29th, 2012, 02:33 AM
October 28, 2012

Maria Sharapova

S. Williams d. M. Sharapova

6-4, 6-3Q. You played pretty well overall but just couldn't get a sniff on her serve seemed like. She had a big serving day once again.MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, she did serve consistently well. I don't think I even had a break point today. Yeah, I mean, partly because maybe I wasn't doing enough on the returns and she was serving well. Even a few moments whether it was 30-All or 15-All, I didn't really get a good return.
Yeah, it was one or two breaks, so 6-4, 6-3.

Q. Do you expect with the amount of times you played her now that when she needs to she's going to serve well in the clutch or come up with a big groundstroke at 30-All or at deuce?MARIA SHARAPOVA: That's one of the reasons she's such a great champion and has had a tremendous amount of success in her career. There is a reason for that.
It's obviously tougher to play when you're behind, even if it's just a break. But, yeah, I mean, got to keep moving forward. (Smiling.)

Q. You don't have to keep moving at this moment. Now you get some time off to reflect and rest. What do you look back on the 2012 season most having now wrapped it up?MARIA SHARAPOVA: I'm proud of it. I'm proud of my consistency, I'm proud that I'm moving in the right direction in terms of improving my game and where I see it.
You know, I've accomplished a lot of things this year that I really wanted and wanted to get back in my career. Yeah, lots of great memories. Some difficult ones, but a lot of really positive thoughts moving into next year.

Q. When you talk about moving in the right direction, does that count for this match? Your last two matches against her were not as close as this in the Olympics final and Madrid. MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I mean, maybe you could say it was just one or two breaks in the first, second set, but, I mean, I probably had more -- I broke her a few more times in the other matches or maybe had more looks to break.
Today she had another great serving day against me.

Q. Can you read her serve? Is her toss that hard to read, or do you feel like you have to kind of guess on her first serve?MARIA SHARAPOVA: Maybe she can serve some for you. I don't know.

Q. You're the one that's returning though.MARIA SHARAPOVA: Maybe you can win a raffle. :haha:

Q. $1 million. But seriously, can he see where her toss is going, or are you saying, She might go T this time, she might go out wide, but I'm just going to have to guess.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, I think her toss is pretty consistent, definitely.

Q. So it's hard to?MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, if I didn't have a break point, there is your answer. (Laughing.)

Q. After a couple of years when you look back and when you remember this tournament, what's the biggest thing you will remember about this tournament? MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, I've it said throughout the whole tournament. I feel like this has been the best Championships that I've been a part of. I only got to play a couple of matches last year, but this year the energy from the first round on...
Maybe wasn't completely sold out in the first round, but as the week went on, I mean, just the excitement from the people from the second they call your name onto the court and you're walking out, it's pretty incredible as an athlete to have that sort of positive energy without even hitting a ball.
The appreciation you have from people's understanding and respect of what you do I think is really unique. I think we were really all unsure of how was it going to go in Istanbul because we never really had such a big tennis event. Only a smaller tennis tournament here.
But I think we're all really happy. We're here another year, so.

Q. With the finals going to another place in 2014, there is a lot of discussion about what the priorities should be for the WTA. With how good the crowd is here, do you think finding somewhere where they can get sell-out stadiums and this much enthusiasm for women's tennis should be a priority?MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think obviously as players we want that excitement from the crowd. I mean, like I said, there is no better feeling than having that energy from people that want to watch you play. It's a little bit different when the stadium is a bit more empty, there is no doubt.
But it's not just the tickets that make an event happen. It's also the involvement of the government, the sponsors, so there is a lot involved. Where will it be, we're not sure yet. I personally would love to see it in Brazil.

Q. Just on that point, do you like the idea of moving the Championships every two or three years to places that don't have big-time tennis events?MARIA SHARAPOVA: For sure.

Q. You were mentioning Brazil and Rio, which I guess isn't a candidate. Would you like to see it put someplace like Paris or London, putting L.A. aside?MARIA SHARAPOVA: Just as a staple, let it be there?

Q. Well rather than just saying, Okay, we'll have all these cities bid for it.MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh.

Q. And maybe we should move it to a part of Asia that hasn't had a lot of exposure to tennis or...MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, I like the idea, because I think it's almost like a competition of who really wants it more. I think that's also really important, because we don't just want to give it to somebody just to give it to someone.
I think it's a very unique event and opportunity for the people, the city, for the government. I think it's worked so far for us, that concept of bidding, and I hope that it moves on going forward.

Q. So when is the next time you plan on hitting a ball?MARIA SHARAPOVA: Not sure right now. I don't know. Tomorrow actually. I'm going to Prague. Oh, no. Oopsies. How did I sign up for that one?

Q. They announced finalist cities for the next years and one is in Russia. What would that mean to you to have it in Kazan? MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, that was an interesting one. I was actually pleasantly surprised to hear that. I mean, I just heard it a few days ago as well. I don't know. I mean, it will depend, like I said, on who wants it more.
It would mean a lot if it was there, absolutely. To have such a big event in that region is pretty unique.

Shivank17
Oct 30th, 2012, 05:43 AM
Anastasia Myskina lauds Maria Sharapova's wonderful year.

Moscow: Former French Open champion Anastasia Myskina has hailed Maria Sharapova's season, saying her countrywoman should forget about trivial failures and bask in the glory of a career Grand Slam.

Despite losing the WTA Championships final Sunday and the Olympic final in August - both to Serena Williams - Sharapova became only the sixth woman in the open era to claim all four slam titles when she won at Roland Garros earlier this year.

"She's had a great season," said Myskina, who beat Elena Dementieva to win the French Open in 2004.

"Maybe here and there Maria didn't get the results she wanted but on the whole, the year has turned out wonderfully."

Sharapova ends the year at World No.2, a feat she last achieved in 2006, and spent a short time in June in the No.1 slot, a position she had last held in June 2008.

Good to hear, surprised it came from her :lol:

Stonerpova
Oct 30th, 2012, 05:51 AM
It took like a decade, but Myskina finally said something nice about her :inlove:

jameshazza
Oct 30th, 2012, 05:54 AM
I'd love to know what beef went down with them. I was reading some articles from 2005 earlier and apparently Myskina was very protective of her on tour a couple of years before she made it big. By the time she won Wimbledon they hardly spoke.

Stonerpova
Oct 30th, 2012, 05:57 AM
I'd love to know what beef went down with them. I was reading some articles from 2005 earlier and apparently Myskina was very protective of her on tour a couple of years before she made it big. By the time she won Wimbledon they hardly spoke.

From what I've read Myskina had problems with Yuri and how he was constantly yelling during matches. She also criticized Maria for not being committed enough to the FC team IIRC.

Shivank17
Oct 30th, 2012, 05:58 AM
From Wikipedia:

After Sharapova had beaten fellow Russian Anastasia Myskina at the 2004 WTA Tour Championships, Myskina criticized Sharapova's father, saying: "He was just yelling and screaming instructions to her and I thought he just might jump right on the court at one point in the match." At the Fed Cup semi-finals two weeks later, Myskina stated she would stop playing for Russia if Sharapova joined the Russian team the following season: "If she joins our team next season you won't see me there for sure. His behaviour is totally incorrect, simply rude. I don't want to be around people like him."

MM_1257
Oct 30th, 2012, 12:16 PM
It took like a decade, but Myskina finally said something nice about her :inlove:
-Myskina has said some great words about Maria on her Game Set and Match commentaries for Eurosport Russia in the last couple of years...

I'd love to know what beef went down with them. I was reading some articles from 2005 earlier and apparently Myskina was very protective of her on tour a couple of years before she made it big. By the time she won Wimbledon they hardly spoke.

-Myskina was angry at Yuri, she considered him disrespectful towards her and said that he even yelled insults sometimes on court.. in that YEC match in 2004... But I think the digs at Maria started after Wimbledon... Imagine it, Myskina was the 1st ("real") Russian to win a Slam, and in a few weeks Maria stole the show; not only in Russia but worldwide... Pretty much that is what bothered all of them IMO; the Russians and the Americans... But yeah, Anastasia's main problem was Yuri.

Lura
Oct 30th, 2012, 12:56 PM
It took like a decade, but Myskina finally said something nice about her :inlove:

Sorry to interrupt, but i think Myskina is now fond of the Masha. After Olympics some people were angry that Masha lost to Serena so badly, and Nastya said that she even had to defend her (like c'mon, silver isn't so bad!) and continued doing it on TV. Plus on videos from FedCup they seemed okay with each other- smiles and everything... So i think feud is in the past.:)

Angelpova
Oct 30th, 2012, 07:20 PM
Winning Wimbledon priority for 2013, Sharapova says

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian Maria Sharapova will focus on trying to win Wimbledon next year rather than attempting to regain the world number one ranking.

"Wimbledon will be my priority next season," Sharapova, who finished the year as world number two behind Belarussian Victoria Azarenka, told Reuters on Tuesday after signing a sponsorship deal with electronics manufacturer Samsung in Moscow.

"This year it was different because of the Olympics but if you ask me about my main goal for 2013, it definitely will be Wimbledon."

Sharapova made her breakthrough to the tennis elite by winning the 2004 Wimbledon title as a 17-year-old newcomer.

This year she won the French Open to complete a career grand slam and claimed the Olympic silver medal in London.

The 25-year-old also said she was hoping to finally end her winless streak against Serena Williams in 2013 after losing to the American in all three of their matches this year, including two finals, in the Olympics and at the WTA Championships on Sunday.

"She plays a very physical tennis and when she is in top form it's very difficult to beat her but I will try to take my revenge next year," said the Florida-based Russian.

http://news.yahoo.com/winning-wimbledon-priority-2013-sharapova-says-183136973--ten.html

:hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

Cherry.
Oct 30th, 2012, 08:34 PM
Vladas Lasitskas ‏@VladasLasitskas
FC: Sharapova won't play vs Japan. Team: Petrova, @mkirilenko, @verazvonareva, @SvetlanaK27, Makarova & @akleybanova.

http://t.co/hRONzSlJ

Mexicola
Oct 30th, 2012, 08:42 PM
Winning Wimbledon priority for 2013, Sharapova says

MOSCOW (Reuters) - Russian Maria Sharapova will focus on trying to win Wimbledon next year rather than attempting to regain the world number one ranking.

"Wimbledon will be my priority next season," Sharapova, who finished the year as world number two behind Belarussian Victoria Azarenka, told Reuters on Tuesday after signing a sponsorship deal with electronics manufacturer Samsung in Moscow.

"This year it was different because of the Olympics but if you ask me about my main goal for 2013, it definitely will be Wimbledon."

Sharapova made her breakthrough to the tennis elite by winning the 2004 Wimbledon title as a 17-year-old newcomer.

This year she won the French Open to complete a career grand slam and claimed the Olympic silver medal in London.

The 25-year-old also said she was hoping to finally end her winless streak against Serena Williams in 2013 after losing to the American in all three of their matches this year, including two finals, in the Olympics and at the WTA Championships on Sunday.

"She plays a very physical tennis and when she is in top form it's very difficult to beat her but I will try to take my revenge next year," said the Florida-based Russian.

http://news.yahoo.com/winning-wimbledon-priority-2013-sharapova-says-183136973--ten.html

:hearts: :hearts: :hearts:

Maria sure is stubborn. :lol: Even with Serena around and her success on clay this year, Wimbledon is still her top priority. I give her credit for aiming high, but I think Wimbledon is the major she's least likely to contend in, especially with a healthy Serena. She's flat out unbeatable on grass. And because of the speed of the surface, Maria seems to struggle more with other power hitters who excel on grass more than other surfaces. See Lisicki. So, IMO, there are many more obstacles to get by on grass for Maria, compared to clay and hard.

And Maria sure loves to throw around the word "revenge" a lot. But she should save the bravado for players like Vika or Agi. I like it when she publicly pokes Vika and calls her out on her drama. :cool: And she's shown she can back it up with some wins. But, in the case of Serena, better to be silent and quietly try to come up with a winning game plan. :tape: No need to provoke someone you haven't beaten since you were below the legal voting age.

NashaMasha
Oct 30th, 2012, 08:57 PM
Maria sure is stubborn. :lol: Even with Serena around and her success on clay this year, Wimbledon is still her top priority. I give her credit for aiming high, but I think Wimbledon is the major she's least likely to contend in, especially with a healthy Serena. She's flat out unbeatable on grass. And because of the speed of the surface, Maria seems to struggle more with other power hitters who excel on grass more than other surfaces. See Lisicki. So, IMO, there are many more obstacles to get by on grass for Maria, compared to clay and hard.

And Maria sure loves to throw around the word "revenge" a lot. But she should save the bravado for players like Vika or Agi. I like it when she publicly pokes Vika and calls her out on her drama. :cool: And she's shown she can back it up with some wins. But, in the case of Serena, better to be silent and quietly try to come up with a winning game plan. :tape: No need to provoke someone you haven't beaten since you were below the legal voting age.

It's not like Serena is winning 3 next Wimbledons in a row..... She was close to lose Zheng and Shvedova this year , really very-very close. Such players like Pironkova or Lisicki on grass can upset anyone including Williams

Charlatan
Oct 30th, 2012, 09:04 PM
Maria sure is stubborn. :lol: Even with Serena around and her success on clay this year, Wimbledon is still her top priority. I give her credit for aiming high, but I think Wimbledon is the major she's least likely to contend in, especially with a healthy Serena. She's flat out unbeatable on grass. And because of the speed of the surface, Maria seems to struggle more with other power hitters who excel on grass more than other surfaces. See Lisicki. So, IMO, there are many more obstacles to get by on grass for Maria, compared to clay and hard.

And Maria sure loves to throw around the word "revenge" a lot. But she should save the bravado for players like Vika or Agi. I like it when she publicly pokes Vika and calls her out on her drama. :cool: And she's shown she can back it up with some wins. But, in the case of Serena, better to be silent and quietly try to come up with a winning game plan. :tape: No need to provoke someone you haven't beaten since you were below the legal voting age.

Just when I thought you seem to be a pretty reasonable poster, you throw that negativity around :facepalm: another carbon copy of Fighterpova :help:

There is nothing wrong with what she said. She is a champion. She knows what it takes to 'try' to beat Serena. Did you forget that she is the one who gave serena the toughest match in 2010 Wimbledon?

Olympics is just a different story. And it's not like she is guaranteed to meet Serena at Wimbledon. There are certain players who have given Serena trouble on the surface.

And when maria set something as her goal, I am pretty sure she will be working her ass off and trying to improve her grass game more than ever

gc-spurs
Oct 30th, 2012, 09:26 PM
Maria sure is stubborn. :lol: Even with Serena around and her success on clay this year, Wimbledon is still her top priority. I give her credit for aiming high, but I think Wimbledon is the major she's least likely to contend in, especially with a healthy Serena. She's flat out unbeatable on grass. And because of the speed of the surface, Maria seems to struggle more with other power hitters who excel on grass more than other surfaces. See Lisicki. So, IMO, there are many more obstacles to get by on grass for Maria, compared to clay and hard.

And Maria sure loves to throw around the word "revenge" a lot. But she should save the bravado for players like Vika or Agi. I like it when she publicly pokes Vika and calls her out on her drama. :cool: And she's shown she can back it up with some wins. But, in the case of Serena, better to be silent and quietly try to come up with a winning game plan. :tape: No need to provoke someone you haven't beaten since you were below the legal voting age.

That revenge speak is hardly bravado, rather its her run of the mill answer. A more interesting way of saying, "I hope I can turn it around" but she always says it.

Mexicola
Oct 30th, 2012, 11:03 PM
Just when I thought you seem to be a pretty reasonable poster, you throw that negativity around :facepalm: another carbon copy of Fighterpova :help:

There is nothing wrong with what she said. She is a champion. She knows what it takes to 'try' to beat Serena. Did you forget that she is the one who gave serena the toughest match in 2010 Wimbledon?

Olympics is just a different story. And it's not like she is guaranteed to meet Serena at Wimbledon. There are certain players who have given Serena trouble on the surface.

And when maria set something as her goal, I am pretty sure she will be working her ass off and trying to improve her grass game more than ever

There's no such thing as being too negative when it comes to playing Serena. I call it being a realist. Her results against her speak for themselves.

I love Maria's unwavering belief and confidence in herself. It's one of her great strengths and why she's so easy to root for. It's a big reason why she got over the shoulder surgery and why she rose above the serving problems and how she got to the top of tennis again. And it may be the biggest reason why she could beat Serena again someday. She never accepts failure. And, in the end, that's all that matters. I'll be thrilled to say how stupid and wrong I was if and when she beats her again.

ziros
Oct 31st, 2012, 12:15 AM
And of course,Serena is 31. Decline is coming. As much as it looks like she will continue to dominate for another 3-4 years,I'm telling you,it just won't happen

MM_1257
Oct 31st, 2012, 12:27 AM
Hmmm... I do not know if speculations about any player right now are right... Anything can happen. Serena proved over the years that she is capable of stepping up when something important for her is happening... And is capable of blowing out the tour despite of months of absence...
But why do I say anything can happen? Look at numerous exaples; look at the latest - Petra Kvitova! Strong in 2011, disappointing 2012...Same goes for Caro... Some players improve drastically like Vika did, others fall in form... It is a cycle... Maria has to focus on staying strong and healthy and work on the weakness of her game - *cough* serve placement *cough* and movement back and front... - because she has a fair share of points to defent through whole year!

NashaMasha
Oct 31st, 2012, 12:37 AM
Hmmm... I do not know if speculations about any player right now are right... Anything can happen. Serena proved over the years that she is capable of stepping up when something important for her is happening... And is capable of blowing out the tour despite of months of absence...
But why do I say anything can happen? Look at numerous exaples; look at the latest - Petra Kvitova! Strong in 2011, disappointing 2012...Same goes for Caro... Some players improve drastically like Vika did, others fall in form... It is a cycle... Maria has to focus on staying strong and healthy and work on the weakness of her game - *cough* serve placement *cough* and movement back and front... - because she has a fair share of points to defent through whole year!

There are a number of speculations about how Serena at 31 is running faster than Azarenka :lol:

I've seen enough biathlon, cross skiing , cycling etc and don't have any illusions about cleanliness of sports, especially when it turns to the experienced sportsmen

And it's not like i speak about doping, because there are a plenty of legal pharmaceuticals and substances

effedcamel
Oct 31st, 2012, 12:52 AM
Perhaps her goal this year was to win the FO which is why her game looks tailored to clay right now and became much more ineffectual off it (although she still had boat loads of success)?

lylux
Oct 31st, 2012, 12:21 PM
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Kg7z0cWrirA/UJEQN0QZ7OI/AAAAAAAAKVk/SItcmHg-awI/s400/394989_275047295932149_283218767_n.jpg

Maria Sharapova has received the Russian Cup prize as the country’s best tennis player of 2012. She received the prize before the official ceremony which will be held only on November 16.

Maria is in Moscow for a quick visit as part of an advertising campaign, and at the end of the evening Maria receives award the "Russian Cup" of Shamil Tarpischev Captain of Russian Tennis Federation.

JoPova
Oct 31st, 2012, 02:12 PM
Wimbledon? :spit: She's basically aiming to win the WS Slam! Until Serena stops playing, I think she'll win Wimbledon every single year. I mean, she doesn't even need to play well to win it. She just needs to serve and hit a couple of good ROS per set to break the opponent! :hysteric: If she plays well, it'll be like the Olympics! :help: I'd love to see Maria win the FO again instead! :hearts:

domon17th
Oct 31st, 2012, 03:32 PM
^ 2011 Wimbledon. Shit Maria would have won if not against an inspired Petra. And Serena was in the draw, granted she wasn't at top form.

While Maria has surely improved leaps and bounds on clay, I still don't buy the notion that her game has regressed greatly on grass. The foundation of her game is still power play, with big serve and groundies. If she's made Wimbledon her priority now, it won't surprise me if she tweak her training to facilitate that goal.

MM_1257
Oct 31st, 2012, 04:46 PM
And I would love to see Maria win AO. (Even though that Slam is also Serena's.)

Mistress of Evil
Oct 31st, 2012, 08:48 PM
http://t.co/hRONzSlJ

Such great news. For once she will not get sick doing the Melbourne-Moscow trip. :banana: This might even mean that she possibly plays Doha/Dubai. Not that I am so fond of the idea but anyways.

jameshazza
Oct 31st, 2012, 08:56 PM
Doha is the P5 next year so she likely will play there.

ziros
Oct 31st, 2012, 09:16 PM
Wimbledon? :spit: She's basically aiming to win the WS Slam! Until Serena stops playing, I think she'll win Wimbledon every single year. I mean, she doesn't even need to play well to win it. She just needs to serve and hit a couple of good ROS per set to break the opponent! :hysteric: If she plays well, it'll be like the Olympics! :help: I'd love to see Maria win the FO again instead! :hearts:
I take it you didn't watch Wimbledon this year then,she came very,very close to losing to Zheng and Shvedova. As she gets older,more and more of those sort of matches will turn into losses

dsanders06
Oct 31st, 2012, 09:17 PM
I hope she doesn't play the Middle East tournaments :lol: If we think her serve goes haywire at the US Open, I don't want to imagine what it would be like in the heavy winds in Doha.

dsanders06
Oct 31st, 2012, 09:18 PM
Also, while I agree that Wimbledon is probably the Slam Maria's least likely to win again, I wouldn't say she has NO chance of winning it. Who apart from Serena or Petra really has a better chance of winning it than Maria?

MM_1257
Oct 31st, 2012, 10:06 PM
I'd rather see her do the Fed Cup than play in Doha TBH...

JoPova
Oct 31st, 2012, 10:15 PM
I take it you didn't watch Wimbledon this year then,she came very,very close to losing to Zheng and Shvedova. As she gets older,more and more of those sort of matches will turn into losses

Serena wasn't playing well in that first week of Wimbledon. Her best tennis wasn't there and she was mentally fragile after that shock loss at RG. The only thing that was working was her serve!.When she plays really well on grass, like she did at the Olympics, she's unplayable! I really don't see her losing Wimbledon in the following years. She's that good! Of course, if an upset of some sort happens, Petra and Maria are the safest bets for the title then.

C. Drone
Nov 1st, 2012, 09:30 AM
I hope she doesn't play the Middle East tournaments :lol: If we think her serve goes haywire at the US Open, I don't want to imagine what it would be like in the heavy winds in Doha.

she wont play FED Cup and apparently Errani & Bartoli are top10 players who signed up for the Paris indoor.
Also there is a rule top10 players have to commit for a Premier-5 tournament if they misssed in previous year (and she missed Dubai this year).

Or she'll just take a 5 week break after AO.

Pova fan
Nov 1st, 2012, 11:24 AM
Maria spotted in Singapore last night

https://mobile.twitter.com/BrettDeledio03/status/263770222689914881

JoPova
Nov 1st, 2012, 11:33 AM
Singapore?! OMG.. Maria never leaves airports and planes! She's always travelling! :lol: Istanbul>Prague>Moscow>Singapore :hysteric:

Shivank17
Nov 1st, 2012, 11:41 AM
perhaps vacation in singapore this time?

domon17th
Nov 1st, 2012, 12:51 PM
WHAT!? WHAT!? :sobbing:

Cosmic Voices
Nov 1st, 2012, 01:18 PM
It's because she's a jetsetting Queen
http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_ldp08esGNp1qzj9d0o1_500.gif

ziros
Nov 1st, 2012, 10:05 PM
I'd stay it would have just been a stopover point

jameshazza
Nov 1st, 2012, 10:45 PM
Nobody realised we need a new volume? :lol: