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View Full Version : ** Masha News and Articles! ** Vol. 2


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perseus2006
Jun 6th, 2012, 05:31 PM
"Poland, which seemed like the pit of the world"!

It's definitely not a good idea to piss this woman off!

I can feel the heat of ARad's flush from here, like 8,000 miles away!

pokey camp
Jun 6th, 2012, 05:57 PM
I'm shocked there isn't already a thread on GM about that one. :lol:

BOOMSHELL! Ostrich sayz to Vulture: Poland is the pit of the world!

MM_1257
Jun 6th, 2012, 06:04 PM
Well a torunament in Poland, Slovenia or anywhere else, those small tournaments are "the pit of the world" for the tennis players. At least for the top ones.

gc-spurs
Jun 6th, 2012, 07:38 PM
Q. Obviously you're known for your groundies, but what of all the shots in your arsenal or the different exchanges you have, what gives you the most pleasure, the most joy yourself?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: The shot? Probably the swing volley because I don't have to bend my knees. I can just kind of jump up and hit it. (Smiling.)

Yeah, no, I've always liked hitting swing volleys. I can practice them all day long.


Lol I liked that part.

Kon.
Jun 6th, 2012, 08:35 PM
I'm shocked there isn't already a thread on GM about that one. :lol:

BOOMSHELL! Ostrich sayz to Vulture: Poland is the pit of the world!

But now of course there is one.
It did take them longer than I expected though. :lol:

Advantage Me
Jun 6th, 2012, 09:38 PM
The questions are getting more interesting as the tournament progresses. At least they refrained from using 'cow on ice' and 'you are the favourite'.

cowsonice
Jun 7th, 2012, 12:37 AM
Is Masha still bitter that motherland Russia lost Poland? :awww:

Maria had a gameplan today, and it worked. ;)

MashaFan01
Jun 7th, 2012, 11:08 AM
At least Masha isn't in back Poland :lol: - like some others :lol:

masha122
Jun 7th, 2012, 07:10 PM
this is the interview after the SF for french speakers :) the english version is not out yet :

http://www.rolandgarros.com/fr_FR/news/interviews/2012-06-07/201206071339095747702.html

joão.
Jun 7th, 2012, 07:17 PM
M. SHARAPOVA/P. Kvitova 6‑3, 6‑3

MARIA SHARAPOVA





Q. You can call it a perfect day. Your first final here.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah.



Q. The spot of No. 1 in the world. How do you feel?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah. It’s just amazing to be back in this position of being world No. 1 again. Not yet. On Monday. But nice to know it happened again for me.

I was in a position a few years ago where I didn’t quite know if I would ever be here again on this stage playing professionally. And not just at that, but at a level to get to No. 1 in the world and a first Roland Garros final for me.

So a very special day, no doubt.


Q. Today it seems like nobody could have beaten you out there. You were so determined. Do you feel like maybe it’s the best match you’ve played this year? How were you feeling on the court?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, it was tough to play a great match because of the conditions. I think most importantly it was about playing a solid match. I think patience was very important today, because in conditions like this, no matter how good you’re playing or bad, so many things equal out. If you get frustrated by a few mistakes, it can let you down.

I was also facing a tough opponent who’s given me a lot of trouble in the past. So, yeah, I was really happy that I was able to win in two sets today.



Q. Just talking about the comeback, I know people would assume that a player coming back from injuries straight back to the level that they left at, but if you could talk a bit about how it takes a while to build it up to that same standard.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, those are exactly what you said: assumptions. It’s a long road back; it’s a long process. It’s a lot of days of frustration and uncertainty not knowing if you’ll ever get there, not knowing how much you want it, not knowing whether it would be a moment like that for you again.

So there’s definitely a lot of tough things you have to go through to get to this point, but when you get here and you look back at the things that you did and the work that you put in and the toughest days that you can remember, it’s all really worth it.

Because, I mean, I have played tennis since I was four years old. I committed myself to this sport. I’ve always loved what I did. When it was taken away from me for a while, that’s when I realized how grateful I was and how lucky I was to be playing it.



Q. The personal issues are also important. Is your mother with you? Do you think this has helped, or you are a lonely warrior? How is that?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I’m a what? Lonely warrior? (Smiling.)

I have to look that up in the dictionary. I’m a warrior. I don’t know if I’m lonely.

I have always in my career had a small group of people in my box. Where you can give 14 tickets, you only see four people in my box, and it’s the way I’ve always been. I’m not the person to bring in friends and people that I’ve met for one day.

It’s not a show for me. It’s my career, and I take it very serial. You know, when I’m on the road, it’s the few people that are close to me, my team, my coach, my physio, my hitting partner, whoever it is, and then my family.

Those are the people that matter to me most during, you know, the good and the bad days and when you’re on the road.



Q. The No. 1 position has been changing quite a few times lately. Are you promising that you’ll keep it for a while now? And the second part of the question, the lady from the WTA, she seemed really excited about you being No. 1. For us journalists, it’s always exciting, I guess, maybe because you’re very charismatic ‑‑

MARIA SHARAPOVA: And shy.



Q. ‑‑ and different obviously. Do you think the women’s tennis really needed you or needs you really bad?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don’t know. That’s for you to judge, not me.

I mean, all I know is that I’ve worked hard to get to this place. Whether I’m charismatic or not, it’s really for you to determine, I guess. But I’m happy and I’m proud of where I came from and how I had to get here to this position.

Obviously I really hope that I can stay in this position. You know, it’s a spot that you always go for, but it’s also a spot that many others want and work hard for, as well.

But, you know, when you get there it’s always even tougher to keep it, so it’s certainly a challenge.



Q. During the time off your ranking went down and down and down and a lot of tears and the world is crashing around you. I’m sure those feelings were bad, but can you switch to today and just talk about when you won the match, feelings inside, what was coming out of you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, first, I was thinking that I won the match on the second serve ace.



Q. First one ever, I think.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: All right. Let’s not go crazy here. It wasn’t the first one ever. Maybe second.

Yeah, well, to be in a Roland Garros final for the first time when I know many years ago I’m sure many people in this room never considered me getting to this stage. And personally, I mean, I’ve always believed and I have worked towards it, but I didn’t quite know if I was really ever physically quite ready for that.

So, yeah, to be in this stage for the first time in my career, 25 years old, is just a great personal achievement.



Q. Saturday you’re going to be playing a final in order to get the only missing Grand Slam tournament in your career. So it’s very important. You’re going to encounter kind of an outsider player. Would you have preferred playing somebody you have played much more at those stages, or how is it going to feel to play against an outsider?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, it doesn’t really matter what I prefer. I mean, at the end of the day it’s who gets to the final on the other side. You know, for me it’s going to be Errani, someone who I think has won the most clay‑court matches this year. She’s been so great on this surface. It’s her favorite surface to play on.

The way she’s been competing in the last two weeks, I mean, I’ve seen a lot of her matches. Not all of them, but saw a little bit today, you know, the way she competes and moves and, you know, gets herself back in position, makes you hit a lot of balls.

She’s certainly a very dangerous player. It’s also a first for her to be in the finals here. Yeah, it’s not something that, you know, you prefer or not prefer. It doesn’t really matter. It’s whoever you have to face.



Q. Even if you both are 25 years old, there is a little difference: 24 inches, centimeters, 21 tournaments.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Here we go. Get your pillows out, guys. (Laughter.)



Q. Three slams, 21 tournaments and so on, so many other things.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yes.



Q. What is really the difference? I mean, how do you compare those things? The fact that you have so much more experience than her? Do you think it’s a great advantage, or she has nothing to lose so it’s almost even at the start?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, maybe that’s something we can talk about after the final. But, I mean, I’m certainly grateful for the experience that I have. Experience I think is priceless. It teaches you so many things. Winning, losing, situations, circumstances that you go through.

But, yeah, I can’t speak for obviously how she’s feeling, but I’m just excited to be in this position. Whether I’m playing against someone that hasn’t been there or not it doesn’t matter. At the end of the day it’s another match, and we have to go out there and compete and perform well.

Whoever is going to be better on that day will win the match.



Q. Given the way that the match did end, I just wondered if you know how many serves you may have hit this year in practice, you know, outside courts when you’ve been out there with Thomas going through it over and over and over again? Have you ever hit as many serves perhaps in practice or in matches as you’ve hit this year?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, probably more.



Q. More?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, probably. I don’t really count.



Q. No, but it’s something you have been really working very hard on.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, of course.



Q. To actually reach a final in that manner is quite a reward.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it’s definitely something that I knew. I mean, the day that I got shoulder surgery I knew it was something I’m going to be working on and trying to get back for a very long period of time.

I mean, it was the most painful shot for me before I had to get surgery, and I knew that it could have still been painful after. It certainly was for a period of time.

I always knew that I ‑‑ I mean, that’s why in the beginning I kind of had to start with a different motion because I couldn’t have a long swing when I got back. Just my arm, I would just get pain right away, so I had to, you know, change a few things around.

But, you know, you’ve got to do what you’ve got to do sometimes.



Q. Yesterday you talked about the Japanese trainer you started working with. I’m guessing it’s Yutaka.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uh‑huh.



Q. Could you talk a little bit about when you started working with him again? Where are you training? It’s Florida or Los Angeles?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I’ve worked with Yutaka when I was a young girl because he trained in Florida. He was part of the program there. Then he left for a couple of years to work for Tennis Australia. He ended the job there and I kind of stole him. It was a combination.

Yeah, I mean, he’s still based in Florida, and we work there. He travels a bit. When I’m in California he comes there. When I’m in Florida he’s home, so he’s there.



Q. Comparing this final to the ones you won ‑ US Open, Wimbledon, and the Australian Open ‑ in which year you had the best approach? In which you get in the best condition?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, yeah, I don’t know. Best condition?

I mean, all of them were pretty difficult. I mean, can’t really count Wimbledon because I had absolutely no expectations there.

The US Open I felt like I was ready to win my second Grand Slam there. I don’t know why. It was just a feeling I had. I was playing, you know, extremely good tennis.

I mean, it’s really tough to compare. Every situation is different. Look, there are times when you feel really great and you come out and nothing seems to work.

There are times where before the Wimbledon final I had a fever, I was sick, and I thought I maybe couldn’t even play. I was really worried. I went out, and it was like nothing bothered me.

So I don’t know. Just depends.



Q. Hopefully if you get the win here Saturday…

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Maybe you can ask me after?



Q. Yes. Do you think that your mom, you would say to her, Well, stay throughout Wimbledon; I’m not gonna let you go home? Would she be scared of you not letting her go back home because you’re doing so well with her?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, I don’t feel that bad for her. She’s been in Rome, Madrid, Paris, walking the streets, shopping, going to museums. I don’t think she would mind if I tell her that.

But, yeah, I mean, I’m happy when she travels with me. It makes my life so much easier, and she’s just such a calm influence for me. Yeah, I always enjoy whether it’s on the road or at home. We’re very good friends.



Q. Can you talk a little bit about resiliency? You have had some tough losses in finals this year, but you just keep coming back and back and back. Doesn’t seem like they bother you that much, and now you’re back in another big one. How do you deal with it, and how do you realistically put them behind you and not think about them?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I mean, it’s about understanding that you did something well enough to get to that position, to get into the finals, and about realizing that when you get to the finals, I mean, you’re not done. You know, you have to keep going. You have to keep playing with the same intensity, same level. You’ve got to be even better.

That’s pretty much the way to look at it. But, I mean, resiliency is important, because if you let things get to you and losses and words and negative things, then it can be frustrating.

But, I mean, after I came back from injury I’ve been much better at not allowing those things to bother me. Results, and, you know, little things that can maybe, you know, make your mind go crazy, they don’t bother me so much now.

masha122
Jun 7th, 2012, 07:19 PM
thank you :)

Advantage Me
Jun 7th, 2012, 09:35 PM
Thanks for posting the interview. I wonder if she would invite her mum to her box on Saturday. I am sure if her dad is with her, he would be there. Because she has a calm influence on her, might be an asset.

MM_1257
Jun 8th, 2012, 07:58 AM
The Russian presser - http://news.sport-express.ru/2012-06-07/515338/

Shivank17
Jun 8th, 2012, 09:54 AM
Matt Cronin: Maria's return to No.1 and her final hurdle in the Roland Garros final

By Matt Cronin

PARIS - Comeback stories in tennis are sometimes so over dramatized that the authentic ones lose their sparkle.

But Maria Sharapova's march back to the No. 1 ranking almost four years after a severe shoulder injury that nearly ended her career is not one of the those.

It's a very real one and after a sometimes torturous comeback, Sharapova has retaken the No. 1 ranking and punched her way into her first Roland Garros final with a 6-3, 6-3 dismantling of Petra Kvitova.

"It is satisfying to be in a Roland Garros final for the first time when I know many years ago I'm sure many people never considered me getting to this stage," she said. "And personally I've always believed and I have worked towards it, but I didn't quite know if I was really ever physically quite ready for that. So to be on this stage for the first time in my career, 25 years old, is just a great personal achievement."

In October 2008, the California and Florida resident by way of Russian underwent shoulder surgery and didn’t return to singles competition until May 2009 in Warsaw.

During her rehab, there were days in which her surgically repaired shoulder hurt so much that she couldn’t even take a walk on the beach. Reflecting on that period a couple of years ago, the three-time Grand Slam champion told me that she soothed her mind by thinking back to some of her greatest triumphs, like her shocking upset of Serena Williams in the 2004 Wimbledon final, her beatdown of Justine Henin in the 2006 US Open final, or her complete devastation of the 2008 Australian Open field. But there were some other kinds of triumphs that few noticed, the ones that were won based on grit and guile.

“When you are 17 and winning Wimbledon it’s not so much a freebie, but I never thought I was ready to win it physically or mentally,” she said. “But something in me was so strong and I didn’t let anything bother me. I was almost oblivious to the outside world. When I look back at the matches when I played great, I think about what was going through my mind. Confidence helps and you are on autopilot. I also go back to the tough days when I wasn’t feeling great, or I wasn’t thinking straight, and still managed to pull it together. I think about how I was able to turn it around."

There also were those days when Sharapova saw her ranking drop through the floor week by week and she would call up her team and cry. But she stayed determined and was willing to take the punches, even when during the first two years of her comeback there were times when she was playing at 50% of her prior level. Her shoulder still hurt on many occasions and she had to reconstruct her serve time and time again just to avoid pain shooting up her arm, or the numbness in her right hand.

She heard people make fun of her frequent double faulting, folks who had no idea that due to her surgery there were times that she couldn't even feel the balls coming off her strings on her kick serve.

But she kept grinding, was willing to take all sorts of advice and finally, during this clay court season, her serve has become a consistent weapon, which is one of the reasons why she has won 18 of her last 19 matches on clay. Her return of serve has always been vicious and her groundstrokes are also deadly when she is moving well.

But in taking down Kvitova for the third straight time this year, she did it by hitting her spots with her serves, which allowed her to take control early in rallies so she could stretch the lefthander out and gun for the corners.

Sharapova, whose serve had let her down in previous majors, placed 75% of her first serves in and won 79% percent of those points. She actually won the match on a second serve ace down the tee, which might have been the first time she has done that in her career.

"Let's not go crazy here," after I mentioned that to her. "It wasn't the first one ever. Maybe second," she said with a hearty laugh.

Sharapova broke Kvitova four times in the contest, who made a mini charge in the second set to even it at 3-3, but then imploded after one of her returns of serve was called out on game point to give Sharapova 4-3 lead.

She then went on a mental walkabout and Sharapova quickly closed out the contest.

"She improved a lot, not only on the clay," said Kvitova. "I wasn't playing bad, but she was better. She deserves it, and she's No. 1 now. She has a big serve. It's tough to return her. She plays very fast. It's a different game compared to matches before."

Sharapova will play the feisty Italian Sara Errani in the final, whom she considers a dangerous foe. And why not? Errani is the ultimate thinking woman's player who has belied her lack of height and become a major defense to offense threat, sprinting past a series of fine foes en route to the final. Two former Roland Garros champs in Ana Ivanovic and Svetlana Kuznetsova, the much improved German Angelique Kerber, and on Saturday she chopped the mighty clay court lover Samantha Stosur in three sets, showing steely serves while the US Open champion shook.

Errani, the 21st seed, said that she finally believes she can hang with the top players.

So can Sharapova, but since her May 2009 return to the tour, she has only reached two major finals - 2011 Wimbledon, where she lost to Kvitova, and the 2012 Australian Open, where she went down hard to soon-to-be-No. 2 Victoria Azarenka. But she never stopped believing she would get to this stage again.

The cherry on the cake would be her first Roland Garros title, but even if she doesn't win it, she'll be back for more. She's is the mark of resiliency.

"It's about understanding that you did something well enough to get to that position, to get into the finals, and about realizing that when you get to the finals, you're not done," she said. "You have to keep going. You have to keep playing with the same intensity, same level. You've got to be even better. That's pretty much the way to look at it. Resiliency is important, because if you let things get to you and losses and words and negative things, then it can be frustrating. But after I came back from injury I've been much better at not allowing those things to bother me. Results and little things that can maybe make your mind go crazy. They don't bother me so much now."

TrollPova
Jun 8th, 2012, 01:27 PM
Thanks for posting the interview. I wonder if she would invite her mum to her box on Saturday. I am sure if her dad is with her, he would be there. Because she has a calm influence on her, might be an asset.

Aww, I would love to see her mother in her box for the first time! That would be so sweet, especially if she won =)

lefty24
Jun 8th, 2012, 01:41 PM
Thanks for the article! Matt Cronin can get on my nerves sometimes but that was a good article. What Masha said about the second serve ace is great.

nelsondan
Jun 8th, 2012, 02:22 PM
Thanks for the article! Matt Cronin can get on my nerves sometimes but that was a good article. What Masha said about the second serve ace is great.


Cherry on the cake is a lousy choice of words. A grand slam title, the only one which has eluded her, is more than a cherry on her cake.

graffite
Jun 9th, 2012, 05:35 PM
http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2012-06-09/201206091339262485043.html

"It's not over yet, you know. I'm not sitting here and saying I'm done, because I'm far from it."

Glad to hear it.

My favorite bit: "I had so many outs in my career. I could have said, I don't need this. I have money; I have fame; I have victories; I have Grand Slams. But when your love for something is bigger than all those things, you continue to keep getting up in the morning when it's freezing outside, when you know that it can be the most difficult day, when nothing is working, when you feel like the belief sometimes isn't there from the outside world, and you seem so small."

*tear*

Trih
Jun 9th, 2012, 05:40 PM
http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/interviews/2012-06-09/201206091339262485043.html

"It's not over yet, you know. I'm not sitting here and saying I'm done, because I'm far from it."

Glad to hear it.

Those words... :bowdown: I can never EVER cease to admire how much power and strength she has in herself. :hearts:

Maria Croft
Jun 9th, 2012, 05:45 PM
Final interview:

Q. You've dominated this match as you have dominated the whole tournament. How were you feeling today? How were you feeling just after the match point?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it's surreal. It's the most unique moment I've experienced in my career. I never thought I would have that. I thought that when I won Wimbledon at 17, I thought that would be the most treasured moment of my career.

But when I fell down on my knees today I realized that this was extremely special, and even more so. Yeah.

Q. Achieving the Grand Slam, big four, and when you think that even people like Nastase, Sampras, Rosewall, so many big names even in men's tennis couldn't achieve. When you look back to the start of your career and today, maybe one of your happiest days, how do you envision the trip between the beginning of your career and today, the Grand Slam?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, it's a long journey. It started from a very young age. It's not over yet, you know. I'm not sitting here and saying I'm done, because I'm far from it.

I have a lot more in me to achieve. I believe in my game. I think that's one of the reasons that that's why I'm sitting here with my fourth one and winning Roland Garros, is because I always believed I could be better, I could be a better player, whether it was on clay, whether it was on grass, whether it was on cement, anything, I always strive to be better.

And one percent here, a few here, this is what I've always wanted to achieve. No matter how tough it was, no matter how many people didn't believe in me, didn't think that I could get to this point, I didn't care and I didn't listen.

I always listened to my own voice, and it always told me that for some reason I'm meant to be better. I'm meant to succeed again.

And I did.

Q. What did you prove to yourself today?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don't know. I proved that no matter how many punches I took in my career, I've always gotten back up. I never made excuses for me, not to myself, not to people. I always relied on my own talent, on the help of my team.

At the end of the day, that's really what gets me through and gets me up. I have a tremendous amount of belief and pride in what I do. I love my work. I've always said this: I love playing tennis.

I had so many outs in my career. I could have said, I don't need this. I have money; I have fame; I have victories; I have Grand Slams. But when your love for something is bigger than all those things, you continue to keep getting up in the morning when it's freezing outside, when you know that it can be the most difficult day, when nothing is working, when you feel like the belief sometimes isn't there from the outside world, and you seem so small.

But you can achieve great things when you don't listen to all those things.

Q. Talking about the match, Sara did some very good dropshots. Your athletic skills, where did you get them? Because you are moving really well in clay.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Let me take a sip of water. (Smiling.)

I've said this. I've really improved physically. I've moved a lot better, you know, from the start of my first tournament in Germany. I just felt more comfortable. Not just this year, but starting maybe last year, maybe the year before, I started moving a lot better. I started believing that I could, you know, play longer rallies; I could recovery better.

I mentioned this before. It's something, you know, that I've stuck to.

Q. At the beginning of your career you didn't seem so comfortable on clay.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uh‑huh.

Q. Is there a key moment when you found, I believe in myself, I can win, or is it you improve a little bit during all your career?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I felt like I've improved little by little. There wasn't a certain moment in my career where I thought, Oh, wow, now I can do this.

You know, I had really difficult matches in previous years at Roland Garros, but I feel like maybe the match I ended up losing was against Justine, you know, I was ‑‑ I took her to the third set and I had many opportunities in that third set, and she, at the time, was the best clay‑court player.

During that match I felt like, you know, I retrieved many balls back, I made her play, I felt like I was really in the game, and I didn't feel like she was that much better than me at that time during that match despite all her success on clay. And I didn't have much.

So, yeah, maybe that was a moment where I felt like, you know, I would have a chance one day.

Q. Your French was really decent.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, please. Please. Let's only give compliments where compliments are due. That's not an area where you can compliment me on.

Q. Are you going to be studying now in order to come back next year and be fluent? Maybe was that a start of a love affair? How are you going to experience Paris now maybe tonight by celebrating, going shopping, or what?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It's fun. Actually when I first hurt my shoulder and I knew that I wouldn't probably be playing for about two or three months, for some reason the first thing I did was I found a French school close to my house, and I did private lessons every single day for three months.

But after that I had to start traveling to Phoenix to see a shoulder specialist there. I was going from Monday to Friday, so I pretty much stopped, which was unfortunate.

I don't know why, but everyone thought I was completely crazy because there were so many other things I could have done.

But it was really the first thing on my mind when I heard about my injury was that I was going to learn a language. I chose French. I didn't achieve much in the language department, but, you know...

Q. It's more than obvious that you won this tournament, but what was your reaction when your name was announced as a runner‑up at the ceremony?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It was funny. I actually like saw her reaction better when she lifted her hands. It's nice to see when, you know, when a finalist is in good spirits and, you know, the way she talked and, you know, the speech. It's nice to hear words that are down‑to‑earth, that are real, you know, real people. I think real souls are just ‑‑ it's nice to hear, nice to see.

Q. I'm wondering are you going to watch the match tomorrow or are you going to watch maybe with Sasha and whom you're going to cheer?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Which match are we talking about? His match or?

Q. Finals.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, I don't know, no. Because he's playing tomorrow. I didn't know if you were...

I might be on a plane tomorrow somewhere. I don't know where yet.

I heard the weather is not supposed to be too good tomorrow, I'm not sure, but I will tell you that I'm not going to be planning my schedule around the final.

Q. Who are you going to cheer...

MARIA SHARAPOVA: For who am I going to cheer?

Q. Yeah.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, I don't know. It's the last thing I'm really thinking about right now.

Q. Nadal or Novak?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I mean, I don't know. I would love to see Novak win because it's the one he hasn't won yet, but I mean, I have seen Nadal play here and it's been pretty incredible.

So, yeah, it's going to be a pretty nice match.

Q. What are your plans now? You must be excited to get on the grass given the form that you're in?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I just spoke to my mom and she said ‑‑ Well, first, I'm actually debating with my coach whether I should have three or four days off. I'm going for four, he's going for three, which is very typical. (Smiling.)

I called my mom. We talked for a little bit, and she said, You know, you have those four days off. I said, No, mom, maybe only three. She said, Okay, whatever it is, you enjoy for three or four days, and then it's back to work.

Yeah, this is my philosophy in my family. Then I called my dad and he's on the bike and he's like, Oh, great job. He's like, Talk to you later. I'm like... (Smiling.)

Wonderful, wonderful family support. Like the wind is the back, you know, and he's like ‑‑ no, he was excited. He's like, Yeah. Okay, I'm on the bicycle I'll call you later. (Laughter.)

Oh, my family...

So, yeah, I will be enjoying for the next three, four days, and then I'm back on the grass courts where I love to be. I can't wait to step on it and start working and getting ready for Wimbledon.

Q. You're clearly a serious player in matches, but were there any times during the tournament, on points or after points, where you're really enjoying yourself, feeling happy, or just kind of locking in and saying, Oh, I actually hit a topspin lob winner or a slice forehand, that makes me feel good? Or is it all just deadly serious point by point?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, when I'm hitting a slice forehand there's something wrong. I mean, shouldn't be hitting a slice forehand.

Q. You hit a winner off one, though.

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, well, that was a big mistake.

No, I mean, I'm sure there were points during the tournament where, you know, I was happy about them. But I think I didn't play a great fourth round here. I felt like, you know, I had three good matches and then my level dropped a little bit in that fourth round.

I improved from that. You know, I came out of the match, and I said, You know, I have a chance; I'm in the quarterfinals; I have to step it up.

I think that was really like when I came off the court after that tough match where I didn't feel like I was playing well and I said, you know, I've got to step it up. I can't play like this if I want to win this tournament.

So that was something that I was just happy with.

Q. Since you started working with Thomas Hogstedt, your game seems to have improve a lot and you've reached tremendous success. What has he meant to you?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, he's been a great addition, no doubt about it, to my team. I have a lot of respect for him and his work and his energy that he's brought. I mean, from the first day in practice I thought I was going to suffocate. You know, to his energy in the box, to his words, and, you know, he studies the sport really well. I think he locks himself up in a room and watches tennis 24/7, and I have a tremendous amount of respect for that.

He loves the game, and he was really passionate to start working for me. I really appreciated that from the first day.

Q. Before this ceremony, you looked for a paper. Was there any special message?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: No, no, I was just trying to figure out a few words in French. (Smiling.)

Q. You weren't really prepared?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Oh, no, nothing was prepared. I'm not one that writes a speech before the victory. Trust me. Not me.

dsanders06
Jun 9th, 2012, 07:30 PM
I love how she just doesn't give a damn about the men's final :happy:

jameshazza
Jun 9th, 2012, 07:35 PM
http://www.itv.com/itvplayer/video/?Filter=318702

Not sure what availability will be like in other domains. But that's the match.

Trih
Jun 9th, 2012, 07:39 PM
I love how she just doesn't give a damn about the men's final :happy:

Nonetheless I'd love to see her in the crowd like we saw Vika at AO. :hearts:

swissmr
Jun 9th, 2012, 07:46 PM
http://www.itv.com/itvplayer/video/?Filter=318702

Not sure what availability will be like in other domains. But that's the match.

OMG thank you, I couldn't watch the match today and didn't even think of this :facepalm: I was in the middle of downloading a torrent!

MM_1257
Jun 9th, 2012, 09:04 PM
Graf about Masha http://www.thetennisspace.com/opinion/steffi-graf-sharapova-is-a-complete-tennis-player/
Steffi Graf has told The Tennis Space that Maria Sharapova’s career grand slam has shown that she is “a complete tennis player with great talent, who is capable of winning on all surfaces”. Graf, who was speaking at a Longines event at Roland Garros, said she understood the difficulties and the challenges that Sharapova has been through after her shoulder injury and operation: “I know what that’s like, and I’m sure it’s been a big challenge for her. This is a great achievement for Maria.”

Graf on Sharapova returning to the top of the sport – she will be No 1 again on Monday morning. “I’m not surprised at what Sharapova has done, getting back to No 1 again after the problems with her shoulder, but I sure understand the difficulties of coming back from a serious injury. I’m sure that it’s been a big challenge for her coming back from her shoulder operation, but with the talent she has it’s not so much of a surprise. Her style of tennis is so powerful, and she is so talented, so there was always a chance that she would come back to this level.”

Graf on the significance of Sharapova winning all four grand slams: ”To win all four slams, that’s a great achievement. If you win a few slams, that’s an achievement in itself, but if you win all the slams at least once, that shows that you’re a complete player, and your talent, as you’ve shown that you can win on four different surfaces. Especially nowadays, as three of the four grand slams used to be on grass, with the fourth here on clay in Paris, and now the tournaments are played on four different surfaces. So this is quite an achievement for Maria.”

Graf on what’s it like trying to deal with her, Sharapova, and other tennis players to cope with injuries: “It’s one of the hardest things for a tennis player. Early on in my career, I didn’t struggle with any injuries, and then I had problems with my shoulder and with my back. That was difficult. The knee then made it very difficult. When you know almost every hospital in every city, that’s not good. I have lasting effects now from my playing career and from my injuries. Every retired tennis player will tell you that it becomes harder and harder as the years go on. We just age much quicker than people who didn’t play tennis professionally. That’s definitely one of the most difficult parts of dealing with your body, not just at the end of your career, but after your career.”

**mashafierce**
Jun 9th, 2012, 10:29 PM
Graf saying this is even better

GrandMartha
Jun 10th, 2012, 08:06 AM
Russia's President Putin congratulates Masha:
«Уважаемая Мария Юрьевна!

Поздравляю Вас с блестящим триумфом на Открытом чемпионате Франции по теннису.

Вам покорилась вершина, которой достигали лишь немногие, самые сильные, легендарные теннисистки планеты – победа во всех турнирах серии «Большого шлема». Это – заслуженная награда за Ваш талант, великолепное мастерство и потрясающую работоспособность.

От души желаю новых успехов, удачи и всего самого доброго.

Молодец! Так держать!«

Dear Maria Yurievna!
Congratulations on your brilliant triumph at the French Open.
You have conquered the crown that only few players managed to achieve, only the strongest, the most legendary ones on the planet: winning all the Grand Slam tournaments. This is the deserved award for your talent, your excellent skill and your terrific capability.
Wish you new success, good luck and all the best.
Well done! Keep it up!

Maria Croft
Jun 10th, 2012, 08:09 AM
She's offically a Legend, and she's not even done yet :worship:

Mr.Sharapova
Jun 10th, 2012, 10:03 AM
She's offically a Legend, and she's not even done yet :worship:

IKR :oh:, she's still 25 :eek::oh:.

domon17th
Jun 10th, 2012, 10:05 AM
Wow from the president, I must say I'm quite shocked. Nevertheless fantastic for our girl!

18majors
Jun 10th, 2012, 02:37 PM
Russia's President Putin congratulates Masha:

Dear Maria Yurievna!
Congratulations on your brilliant triumph at the French Open.
You have conquered the crown that only few players managed to achieve, only the strongest, the most legendary ones on the planet: winning all the Grand Slam tournaments. This is the deserved award for your talent, your excellent skill and your terrific capability.
Wish you new success, good luck and all the best.
Well done! Keep it up!

Can President Putin ensure Maria carry the flag for Russian Olympic Team? We know Maria wants to do it.

Crux Squall
Jun 10th, 2012, 02:54 PM
Can President Putin ensure Maria carry the flag for Russian Olympic Team? We know Maria wants to do it.

It's very deserve for Maria If this happen :hearts:

perseus2006
Jun 10th, 2012, 03:38 PM
I will not post in the Wimbledon thread created by abesky.

Someone legitamate please create another one.

Charlatan
Jun 10th, 2012, 03:46 PM
Can President Putin ensure Maria carry the flag for Russian Olympic Team? We know Maria wants to do it.

Yeah, that'd be amazing!

Trih
Jun 10th, 2012, 03:53 PM
Can President Putin ensure Maria carry the flag for Russian Olympic Team? We know Maria wants to do it.

That would be epic! I do not know what other Russian athletes may do it this year, someone who knows better could tell us if this is something possible?

I'm from the same town of Antonio Rossi, the sprint canoer, who carried the flag for Italy in 2008 at Beijing and I remember how beautiful it was to see him at the opening ceremony. :bowdown:

lefty24
Jun 10th, 2012, 04:24 PM
That would be epic! I do not know what other Russian athletes may do it this year, someone who knows better could tell us if this is something possible?

I'm from the same town of Antonio Rossi, the sprint canoer, who carried the flag for Italy in 2008 at Beijing and I remember how beautiful it was to see him at the opening ceremony. :bowdown:

Maybe Irina Shabayeva. She's a Russian pole vaulter.

MM_1257
Jun 11th, 2012, 03:03 PM
You mean Yelena Isinbayeva. ;) Yes, she should do it. Afterall she has broken the world record so many times, she deserves it. Not to mention the "but she lives in USA" factor in Maria's case.
Anyway, about president Putin's congratulation message, it is great, and all presidents congratulate to their athletes (and to all of them who achieve good results/win medals) - it is no different in Serbia or Slovenia etc. ;)

azi
Jun 11th, 2012, 03:16 PM
French Open win beats Wimbledon, says Sharapova
http://sports.yahoo.com/news/french-open-win-beats-wimbledon-says-sharapova-170201210--ten.html

Maria Sharapova said her French Open triumph was a greater achievement than her teenage 2004 Wimbledon breakthrough which launched her on the road to international fame and fortune.
The Russian, one of the few genuine stars in the women's game, completed a career Grand Slam by beating Italy's Sara Errani 6-3, 6-2 on Saturday.
It was the 25-year-old's first Roland Garros title and fourth major of her career, but first since she recovered from a potentially career-ending shoulder injury.
"It's the most unique, surreal moment. I never thought I would have it. When I won Wimbledon at 17, I thought that would be the most cherished moment of my career," she said.
"But when I fell to me knees today on the court I realised that winning here was extremely special, even more so."
Sharapova added the 2006 US Open and 2008 Australian Open titles to her 2004 win at Wimbledon before the shoulder injury sidelined her for 10 months, sending her ranking spiralling to 126 in the world.
She has endured numerous false starts since that time and losses in the 2011 Wimbledon final to Petra Kvitova and this year's Australian Open title match at the hands of Victoria Azarenka led many to ponder whether she had been overtaken by a new generation of big-hitters.
But titles on clay in Stuttgart and Rome in the run-up to Paris transformed her into one of the favourites for the Paris title which she achieved with a 6-3, 6-2 win over the out-gunned Errani in just 90 minutes.
With the Williams sisters on the wane, Kim Clijsters about to retire and the likes of Azarenka and Caroline Wozniacki struggling for consistent levels of success, Sharapova believes there are many more majors coming her way.
"It's been a long journey, I started from such a young age, but I'm not done yet, far from it," she said.
"I have a lot more to achieve, I always believed in my game and that I could get better on grass, clay, cement."
Sharapova said she was increasingly motivated by the people who wrote her off, never doubting her own powers or the influence of those around her.
"No matter how tough it was or if people didn't believe in me, I never listened. I only listened to my own voice which told me that I would succeed again and I did.
"No matter how many punches I took, I didn't care. I always got back up again. There were no excuses. I love this work of playing tennis. I could have said I have had enough when I was injured.
"I could have said I have enough money and fame, but when your love for the sport is bigger than those things, then you still get up to practice when it's freezing or when others have no belief."

azi
Jun 11th, 2012, 03:19 PM
http://sports.yahoo.com/news/parlez-vous-francais-sharapova-says-oui-220720512--ten.html

Parlez-vous Francais? Sharapova says oui

Trih
Jun 11th, 2012, 03:29 PM
You mean Yelena Isinbayeva. ;) Yes, she should do it. Afterall she has broken the world record so many times, she deserves it. Not to mention the "but she lives in USA" factor in Maria's case.
Anyway, about president Putin's congratulation message, it is great, and all presidents congratulate to their athletes (and to all of them who achieve good results/win medals) - it is no different in Serbia or Slovenia etc. ;)

Oh silly me, I forgot Yelena! :hearts:

NashaMasha
Jun 11th, 2012, 04:00 PM
You mean Yelena Isinbayeva. ;) Yes, she should do it. Afterall she has broken the world record so many times, she deserves it. Not to mention the "but she lives in USA" factor in Maria's case.
Anyway, about president Putin's congratulation message, it is great, and all presidents congratulate to their athletes (and to all of them who achieve good results/win medals) - it is no different in Serbia or Slovenia etc. ;)
Yelena will hardly be a flag bearer, it is considered to be a jinx in our Olympic team. Rumor has that flag bearers are not winning Gold. And in sport . in which there are only three attempts everyone is much superstitious

MM_1257
Jun 11th, 2012, 04:17 PM
Yelena will hardly be a flag bearer, it is considered to be a jinx in our Olympic team. Rumor has that flag bearers are not winning Gold. And in sport . in which there are only three attempts everyone is much superstitious

Didn't know about that. :) Then I hope some athlete who doesn't have chances of winning gold will bear it.

NashaMasha
Jun 11th, 2012, 04:48 PM
Didn't know about that. :) Then I hope some athlete who doesn't have chances of winning gold will bear it.

usually team players, because they have less pressure on their shoulders , like Kirilenko (NBA player)

18majors
Jun 11th, 2012, 08:04 PM
daniel kaplan‏@dkaplanSBJ

Maria Sharapova is launching in NY on Aug 20 her new candy line, Sugarpova, at Bendel's. More in SBD International edition later today

lefty24
Jun 11th, 2012, 09:09 PM
Russia's President Putin congratulates Masha:

Dear Maria Yurievna!
Congratulations on your brilliant triumph at the French Open.
You have conquered the crown that only few players managed to achieve, only the strongest, the most legendary ones on the planet: winning all the Grand Slam tournaments. This is the deserved award for your talent, your excellent skill and your terrific capability.
Wish you new success, good luck and all the best.
Well done! Keep it up!

That's nice to hear, but I still don't like him. :p
You mean Yelena Isinbayeva. ;) Yes, she should do it. Afterall she has broken the world record so many times, she deserves it. Not to mention the "but she lives in USA" factor in Maria's case.
Anyway, about president Putin's congratulation message, it is great, and all presidents congratulate to their athletes (and to all of them who achieve good results/win medals) - it is no different in Serbia or Slovenia etc. ;)
haha yes her, sorry! If Maria careers the flag my whole family would go crazy, especially my dad. He was so pissed that she was crying during the national anthem.
Yelena will hardly be a flag bearer, it is considered to be a jinx in our Olympic team. Rumor has that flag bearers are not winning Gold. And in sport . in which there are only three attempts everyone is much superstitious
Interesting, I never knew about that! Thanks for sharing.

gc-spurs
Jun 11th, 2012, 09:18 PM
daniel kaplan‏@dkaplanSBJ

Maria Sharapova is launching in NY on Aug 20 her new candy line, Sugarpova, at Bendel's. More in SBD International edition later today

Oh, so it's classy candy.

18majors
Jun 11th, 2012, 09:24 PM
daniel kaplan‏@dkaplanSBJ

@MariyaKTennis Day after winning French Open, Sharapova was in Spain touring factory sites. She is serious about this as her own business

lefty24
Jun 11th, 2012, 10:40 PM
daniel kaplan‏@dkaplanSBJ

@MariyaKTennis Day after winning French Open, Sharapova was in Spain touring factory sites. She is serious about this as her own business

OMG LEGEND. I'm so upset I forgot to submit my Candypova idea to max. :sad:

Craig.
Jun 12th, 2012, 02:29 AM
daniel kaplan‏@dkaplanSBJ

@MariyaKTennis Day after winning French Open, Sharapova was in Spain touring factory sites. She is serious about this as her own business

:spit:

Fucking legend.

Shafanovic.
Jun 12th, 2012, 02:30 AM
daniel kaplan‏@dkaplanSBJ

Maria Sharapova is launching in NY on Aug 20 her new candy line, Sugarpova, at Bendel's. More in SBD International edition later today

2 days after my birthday :eek: I want some for my birthday please :angel:

ziros
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:04 AM
Wonder how many slaves she will employ

Mrs. Dimitrova
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:26 AM
daniel kaplan‏@dkaplanSBJ

Maria Sharapova is launching in NY on Aug 20 her new candy line, Sugarpova, at Bendel's. More in SBD International edition later today

At Henri Bendel's? :spit: I didn't know it was serious candy. I'm gonna try to be there. :worship:

lefty24
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:28 AM
At Henri Bendel's? :spit: I didn't know it was serious candy. I'm gonna try to be there. :worship:

I'm kind of surprised. The gum didn't look very serious.

nelsondan
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:40 AM
I'm kind of surprised. The gum didn't look very serious.

When it comes to business judgements.....lets just say Maria seldom makes unforced errors. or any other errors, for that matter.

MM_1257
Jun 12th, 2012, 12:18 PM
Found this on twitter:
Tatiana ‏@Tatiana_984
Per http://news.sport-express.ru/2012-06-12/516 Sharapova will be Russia's flag-bearer during the OG opening ceremony

18majors
Jun 12th, 2012, 12:28 PM
Found this on twitter:
Tatiana ‏@Tatiana_984
Per http://news.sport-express.ru/2012-06-12/516 Sharapova will be Russia's flag-bearer during the OG opening ceremony

Great! This will double London Olympic TV rating.

MM_1257
Jun 12th, 2012, 12:29 PM
:scared: of the curse, of the reactions of some Russia based athletes... bah... I am happy for Maria and confused at the same time.
lefty24, you mentioned your dad and Maria's reactions to the anthem... What was going on, I didn't quite understand...

Trih
Jun 12th, 2012, 12:42 PM
Found this on twitter:
Tatiana ‏@Tatiana_984
Per http://news.sport-express.ru/2012-06-12/516 Sharapova will be Russia's flag-bearer during the OG opening ceremony

Eggy tweeted it too

Eggy ‏@TheBoiledEgg
RT @Rus_tennis_news: The Russian Olympic Committee: Maria #Sharapova will carry Russian flag at the opening of the Olympic Games in London

:woohoo:

Shivank17
Jun 12th, 2012, 12:45 PM
OMG! Fuck yessss! :cheer: After being denied by Tarpischev the last time they allowed her this time. :bounce: Can't wait.

joão.
Jun 12th, 2012, 12:46 PM
Yay! :o :cheer:

Shivank17
Jun 12th, 2012, 12:53 PM
Ugh, but now watch all other Russian top athletes bitch about it. :o

nelsondan
Jun 12th, 2012, 02:45 PM
Republicans in the USA will try to use maria's carrying of the russian flag as proof that Obama should not be president. They are definitely that crazy.

Meet the press was canceled in favor of the men's final. Are comparisons available for saturday and Sunday NBC ratings?



What has Obama to do with Maria carrying the russian flag?



Absolutely nothing.

Dieter.
Jun 12th, 2012, 02:47 PM
Republicans in the USA will try to use maria's carrying of the russian flag as proof that Obama should not be president. They are definitely that crazy.

What has Obama to do with Maria carrying the russian flag? :confused:

atominside
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:00 PM
nelsondan again :facepalm:

18majors
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:01 PM
http://www.10sworld.com/tennis/blog/french-impressions-lindsay-gibbs

“For the majority of the match, I was mostly settled. But after Maria got the break to get to 4-1 in the second, my heart rate went sky-high. That's when I knew it was seriously about to happen. It remained that way until Errani hit the last shot of the match into the net. I yelled "YES!!!" in happiness, as I usually do after she wins a title. But then, something different. I didn't run around my room like a chicken with its head cut off. I didn't start fist-pumping or anything like that. I fell to the ground, and unexpectedly, it became very emotional for me. After a few moments of laying there with all this emotion flowing out of me, I sat up to look at the TV with tears in my eyes, and there's Maria jumping up and down with pure joy. I mean, I never cry. Ever. But this was just so special. This meant so much. For Maria, this was the official top of the mountain after being at rock-bottom during all those months out of tennis. By far, the best moment I have ever experienced as a Maria fan. No matter how much longer she plays, I doubt anything will ever top this.”

fanofmaria
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:04 PM
I hope that this news is true! What a great display of a current/well known/beautiful Russian athlete carrying their flag. Prost!!!:bounce:

Charlatan
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:24 PM
Maja, are you sure the tweet is true?

omg :hysteric: yes yes so happy for her :dance:

you go, girl :rocker2:

PS: i've always known putin has a crush on maria, btw. with the RG title and the career slam, he probably leaned towards maria and picked her

Charlatan
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:29 PM
Ugh, but now watch all other Russian top athletes bitch about it. :o

meh,boo..i am pretty sure The Queen won't give a fuck about them peasants being all hot and bothered by it :dance:

they will remain presseT :bigwave: stay mad at the Queen's prioritized position, you russian peasants

jacobruiz
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:42 PM
http://www.10sworld.com/tennis/blog/french-impressions-lindsay-gibbs

“For the majority of the match, I was mostly settled. But after Maria got the break to get to 4-1 in the second, my heart rate went sky-high. That's when I knew it was seriously about to happen. It remained that way until Errani hit the last shot of the match into the net. I yelled "YES!!!" in happiness, as I usually do after she wins a title. But then, something different. I didn't run around my room like a chicken with its head cut off. I didn't start fist-pumping or anything like that. I fell to the ground, and unexpectedly, it became very emotional for me. After a few moments of laying there with all this emotion flowing out of me, I sat up to look at the TV with tears in my eyes, and there's Maria jumping up and down with pure joy. I mean, I never cry. Ever. But this was just so special. This meant so much. For Maria, this was the official top of the mountain after being at rock-bottom during all those months out of tennis. By far, the best moment I have ever experienced as a Maria fan. No matter how much longer she plays, I doubt anything will ever top this.”

This beautiful tribute to Maria is from our own heelsrule1988! :worship:

18majors
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:51 PM
This beautiful tribute to Maria is from our own heelsrule1988! :worship:

Beautiful, indeed.

NewShoulderPlz.
Jun 12th, 2012, 03:57 PM
Sharapova savours her 'sweetest triumph' as reward for comeback
New world No1 could have quit in 2008 but made a painful recovery from shoulder surgery
Paul Newman


For eight years Maria Sharapova's most treasured tennis memory had been her first Grand Slam title, captured as a 17-year-old on the Centre Court at Wimbledon in 2004. That changed here on Saturday. "I never thought that something would be sweeter than the first one I won," Sharapova said after beating Sara Errani 6-3, 6-2 in the French Open final. "But the second I fell to my knees today, I just felt something extremely special."

Sharapova's victory secured her first title at Roland Garros, elevated her to a place in history alongside nine other women who have won all four Grand Slams, and underlined her return to the top of the world rankings. More than that, however, the win completed a long and often painful journey following the shoulder surgery the 25-year-old underwent four years ago.

Sitting in a small room beneath Court Philippe Chatrier just hours after her triumph here, Sharapova explained how that journey had begun after she had struggled to beat Marta Domachowska, a journeywoman Pole, in a tournament in Montreal in the summer of 2008.

"I was having a few problems with the shoulder about four months before the surgery," Sharapova recalled. "Everyone was just telling me: 'You have inflammation, tendonitis.' But nothing was really going away, despite so much treatment and anti-inflammatories. Then I came to a point where I was in Canada and I had so much pain that after the match, I said: 'There's something wrong. I don't know if anybody can find it, but this is not inflammation'."

An initial MRI scan had failed to pick up the problem but a second revealed two tears in her right shoulder. Sharapova was soon undergoing surgery and did not play another singles match for nearly 10 months.

After a failed comeback playing doubles in Indian Wells, a bruised bone was diagnosed. "Bone bruises take a long time to heal and it was a pretty big one," she said. "It was stop and go, stop and go. Everyone had great expectations and they would say: 'OK, in a week or two, you'll be able serve and have no pain.' I would go and serve and be clenching my teeth."

Already the world's highest-earning sportswoman, Sharapova had no need to return to competition but retained her passion for a sport she had been playing since the age of four. "I love competing," she said. "There's nothing in the world that gives you that adrenalin feel, just being in the moment of a match. There's nothing that I've done in my life that has given me that experience, being on the court. It takes a lot to get to that moment, a feeling, whether it's pressure or nerves, or excitement, it's a combination of those things, but that feeling, and getting through it and winning, beating your opponent, as an athlete I think it's different to other careers.

"It's not like you're a great actress and you can be so good but nobody goes and watches your matches, or you can be the greatest model in the world but if somebody doesn't put you on the cover of a magazine, you're never going to be famous. This sport, it's all in your own hands and that's what I love about it. You control your own wins and losses."

It was because she had to go through so much – the rehabilitation, the restructuring of her service action, the difficult losses as she struggled in the early months of her recovery – that Saturday's victory was one to treasure even above her Wimbledon triumph.

"I think the first one I won was the feeling of joy from no expectations and not really understanding how this came so early," Sharapova said. "Whereas I felt like I really deserve this one because I've worked so hard and I went through so many tough days to get here. I never, never put my head down. I was grumpy and I had my tough days and I would yell at people and say: 'You're promising one thing and it's not happening.' I'd certainly have my doubts, but I kept going – and I didn't let anyone tell me otherwise."

Sharapova said she owed her drive to her parents, who decided when their only child was nine that Yuri, her father, would take her from their home on Russia's Black Sea coast to train in Florida. They spent the next two years apart from Yelena, Maria's mother.

"My parents had a normal life in Russia and they could have easily kept living a normal life, working and raising a child in Russia," Sharapova said as she recalled her parents' sacrifices. "I heard endless conversations between my parents when I was going to sleep about how we would survive, how we would continue. All of them were about trying to make me better.

"Of course, my father takes responsibility for my whole career, but he was extremely smart. He knew that he wasn't a tennis expert and he took me to all the different people who could make me better, somebody on movement, somebody on the serve, somebody on the strokes.

"One day – we were in Florida – I went in his room and he said: 'One day we are going to go to California.' I was like: 'No we're not. I was watching the news the other day and the crime rate there is horrible. I do not want to go to California.' And he said: 'We're going.' I didn't even know why we were going and then two weeks later we were on a plane to see Robert Lansdorp."

Lansdorp became the most significant coach in Sharapova's development as a player. Another major influence was Michael Joyce, who emailed her on Saturday in the wake of her triumph. Sharapova read out his message: "I know how tough the last few years have been. It would have been very easy to hang 'em up and enjoy life, but you kept persevering and pushing yourself through all the doubts. There was never a doubt in my mind that you would be on the podium again. You deserve every ounce of happiness this title brings."

Sharapova's slams

Wimbledon 2004

Wins first Grand Slam at 17.



US Open 2006

Defeats Justine Henin-Hardenne in straight sets in the final.



Australian Open 2008

Becomes the first Russian woman to win the tournament.



French Open 2012

Completes full set of Grand Slams.

Break My Rapture
Jun 12th, 2012, 04:14 PM
Beautiful article!

Stonerpova
Jun 12th, 2012, 04:22 PM
Michael Joyce is the shit. I fucking love that guy :lol:

Dieter.
Jun 12th, 2012, 04:55 PM
Great article to read.

jameshazza
Jun 12th, 2012, 05:51 PM
Great article, nice to see how close her and Michael still are.

lefty24
Jun 12th, 2012, 06:29 PM
:scared: of the curse, of the reactions of some Russia based athletes... bah... I am happy for Maria and confused at the same time.
lefty24, you mentioned your dad and Maria's reactions to the anthem... What was going on, I didn't quite understand...

well my parents have a complicated relationship with Russia, well I guess I should say the former Soviet Union. My parents were Soviet jews and back then Jews were oppressed and were not allowed to be, well Jewish. Of course my parents and many other Soviet Jews wanted to leave but the Soviet Union wouldn't let them. I could on in great detail but I won't bore you. After fighting for their freedom they were finally let free. My mom actually speaks all over the world about her story and former US President Reagan mentioned my dad in a couple of his speeches.

So anyways, the US has been amazing to our family, completely different then Russia. My dad just despises that the US has done so much for Maria, yet she plays for the Russia. No matter how many times I tell him, he doesn't realize that so many other players don't live in the country they play for.

My mom and sister have similar feelings that he has, but they adore Maria(especially my mom) so they're not as harsh as him. We're going to Russian in July so hopefully it will give my family some closure.
Sorry for this essay. :p

MM_1257
Jun 12th, 2012, 06:51 PM
I know about the history of Jews in USSR and in Europe in general, have read quite a few stories about it. Could you maybe tell me more about your family in private message? Or if you want, I can send you my e-mail... I'd really like to hear more.
As for Maria... USA has given her a lot, but her situation is different than your dad's, don't you think?

lefty24
Jun 12th, 2012, 07:12 PM
I know about the history of Jews in USSR and in Europe in general, have read quite a few stories about it. Could you maybe tell me more about your family in private message? Or if you want, I can send you my e-mail... I'd really like to hear more.
As for Maria... USA has given her a lot, but her situation is different than your dad's, don't you think?

I'll send you a PM later once I get my laptop back.
and yes I do think that her situation is a lot different than my dads. She would not have gone to the US if it weren't for tennis. She also still clearly loves Russia, the Fed Cup was the happiest I've seen her in awhile.
My sister and dad actually got into a huge fight when she started tearing when they played the anthem during the ceremony.
I might get to meet Svetlana Kuznetsovas dad when I got to Russia, so hopefully he'll convince my dad that Maria should play for Russia.

MM_1257
Jun 12th, 2012, 07:28 PM
Wow! Sveta's dad? Wahoooo! You'll share the details with us, when you'll have a chance, won't you? :) :p Um yes, you are right in what you wrote. Maria's ethnic bacground is Russian or possibly Belarussian, and I imagine that their situation was totally different than of other ethnic groups, but after Chernobyl there was quite some tension between Russia's politic situation and Belarus'/Ukraine's (I recently read a book about it)... But maybe we can talk about it some other time on PM not to make this board boring and not to o off topic. ;)

Shivank17
Jun 12th, 2012, 08:52 PM
Wow! Sveta's dad? Wahoooo! You'll share the details with us, when you'll have a chance, won't you? :) :p Um yes, you are right in what you wrote. Maria's ethnic bacground is Russian or possibly Belarussian, and I imagine that their situation was totally different than of other ethnic groups, but after Chernobyl there was quite some tension between Russia's politic situation and Belarus'/Ukraine's (I recently read a book about it)... But maybe we can talk about it some other time on PM not to make this board boring and not to o off topic. ;)

Tbqh, I actually found your conversation interesting. :angel:

Charlatan
Jun 12th, 2012, 09:12 PM
Yeah, I love Maja's posts :) She is always passionate about talking maria's life and off court activities

perseus2006
Jun 12th, 2012, 11:48 PM
I believe there would be no Tennis star Maria Sharapova today except for Michael Joyce. When the chips were down, he was there to support, encourage and protect Pova until she could stand on her own again. Then, he found her a new coach who could teach her to dance on the baseline once again! I can't even get a grasp of how painful it must of been for Michael to back away from daily contact with Pova. Another facet of an amazing story.

JamieOwen3
Jun 13th, 2012, 12:04 AM
Wasn't she 7 not 9 when she moved to the US? Great article though. I was happy when I heard her thanking Michael Joyce in her speech after winning :)

nelsondan
Jun 13th, 2012, 01:05 AM
Still wondering about nbc tv ratings for the men's and women's finals. Or any other tv ratings about the french finals.

Charlatan
Jun 13th, 2012, 01:17 AM
@nelsondan, there is already a thread about it on GM http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=461617

Cherry.
Jun 13th, 2012, 01:24 AM
I almost died of happiness when I first saw the news of her being the flag-bearer for Russia popped on my Twitter timeline. :hysteric:
Really hope she could do it. It's an honor of a lifetime.

nelsondan
Jun 13th, 2012, 02:06 AM
@nelsondan, there is already a thread about it on GM http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=461617

Thanks....

I never run out of things to worry about....this story makes me wonder if Russian leaders need someone carrying the flag to counteract these "spoiled rich kids".


MOSCOW (AP) — A glamorous Russian TV host is paying an expensive price for becoming an unlikely face of the anti-Putin protest. When investigators raided her Moscow apartment, they confiscated $1.7 million she had stashed in envelopes.

A spokesman for the investigators, Vladimir Markin, said they found more than 1 million euros ($1.25 million) and $480,000 in cash during Monday's raid on Ksenia Sobchak's apartment — one of several raids on protest leaders' homes.

Markin said they will try to determine if Sobchak paid taxes on the money, and also look into what she planned to do with it, which was in more than 100 envelopes.

Sobchak, a socialite, TV presenter and restaurant owner, insists that she had done nothing wrong and was keeping her savings at home because she doesn't trust banks. She said on Twitter that her annual income exceeds $2 million.

"I never thought that we would slide back to such repressions," tweeted Sobchak, who is described by some as Russia's Paris Hilton equivalent.

While it's not uncommon for wealthy Russians to keep large amounts of cash at home, authorities are likely to use her wealth to illustrate their depiction of the opposition as a bunch of spoiled rich kids at odds with the majority of Russia's population.

Reptilia
Jun 13th, 2012, 11:24 AM
:cheer: I am so excited to see her do this!

Qetusi
Jun 13th, 2012, 11:29 AM
Maria Sharapova

Ahh finally I can share some exciting news with you! After the third round of the French Open, I woke up to a pretty memorable message.
The Russian Olympic committee chose me to be the flag bearer at this years Olympic opening ceremony. I am so honored, and especially excited as it will be my first Olympics in my career.
I have had to keep this hush hush for two weeks and keeping secrets is not my best quality!

http://www.facebook.com/Sharapova

Maria Croft
Jun 13th, 2012, 11:32 AM
That's so amazing for her :)

Andy.
Jun 13th, 2012, 11:38 AM
OMG thats such amazing news :hysteric::crying2:

Dieter.
Jun 13th, 2012, 11:39 AM
Great news. :cheer:

DeeHax
Jun 13th, 2012, 11:54 AM
Maria Sharapova

Ahh finally I can share some exciting news with you! After the third round of the French Open, I woke up to a pretty memorable message.
The Russian Olympic committee chose me to be the flag bearer at this years Olympic opening ceremony. I am so honored, and especially excited as it will be my first Olympics in my career.
I have had to keep this hush hush for two weeks and keeping secrets is not my best quality!

http://www.facebook.com/Sharapova

Ohh, that´s so cool!! I´ve read this morning that it was not official yet, but coming from MS, it´s more than confirmed!!!

domon17th
Jun 13th, 2012, 11:58 AM
So i assume it's true then? What sh*t was the sports minister talking about then? *mildly pissed but still happy*

MashaFan01
Jun 13th, 2012, 02:14 PM
BTW - I dunno if this has been posted somewhere already - but I bumped into these hilarious clips on Youtube - Here are 3 out of many others and I hope you'll enjoy them as much as I did:

Link: Hitler is informed about Maria Sharapova's ridiculously easy French Open draw (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKLOXv_sbtQ)

Link: Hitler explains why he hates Maria Sharapova (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PrSqyHBgELA)

Link: After Hitler finds out Maria Sharapova is the 2012 French Open champion (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSeFhQd3IgQ)

Funny!!!

Cherry.
Jun 13th, 2012, 03:00 PM
http://www.tennishead.net/news/on-tour/2012/06/13/sharapova-im-so-proud-to-be-russian

Sharapova: I'm so proud to be Russian

Maria Sharapova may sound like an all-American girl, but the world No.1 insists she is Russian to her roots

Maria Sharapova, who has lived in the United States for the last 18 years, said she felt great pride when the Russian national anthem was played after she had won the French Open title last weekend.

“Everyone knows my story of being born in Russia and moving to the United States at seven,” she said. “People didn’t criticise me but they would say: ‘She’s Russian but she’s living in the United States.’ When the flag [went up at Roland Garros] and I heard the national anthem, I was so proud to be a Russian. I’m so proud to represent my country.

“I never thought for a second that it would be otherwise, no matter how many people told me: ‘You’re not, you just have a passport.’ I couldn’t care less. I love where I’m from. I don’t live there because of the circumstances, but all my family is there, the culture and the feeling. It’s what’s inside, not what’s outside, that determines that.”

Sharapova, who is one of the favourites to carry the Russian flag at the Olympic Games opening ceremony, said she was grateful to her parents for giving her the chance to pursue her tennis education in the United States. Initially it meant she had to spend two years apart from her mother, who was unable to travel to America because of visa problems.

“My parents had a normal life in Russia and they could have easily kept living a normal life, working and raising a child in Russia,” Sharapova said. “I heard endless conversations between my parents when I was going to sleep, about how we would survive, how we would continue. And all of them were about trying to make me better.”

She added: “I was never afraid of not making it because I was OK with what I had and my family were OK with what they had. They were realistic enough to know that any day they would be going back to Russia or Belarus. For them it wasn’t a problem and neither for me.”

Charlatan
Jun 13th, 2012, 04:40 PM
Yep, it's official then :dance:

so proud! such an incredible honor!

Ksenia.
Jun 13th, 2012, 05:00 PM
So it was after 3rd round, I though they chose her after she won the whole thing :lol:
Great honor!

lefty24
Jun 13th, 2012, 05:09 PM
So it was after 3rd round, I though they chose her after she won the whole thing :lol:
Great honor!

I actually really like that they chose her before she won.

Charlatan
Jun 13th, 2012, 05:41 PM
So it was after 3rd round, I though they chose her after she won the whole thing :lol:
Great honor!

I actually really like that they chose her before she won.

Same here :lol:

Sha_ra_po_va
Jun 13th, 2012, 06:12 PM
Maybe that explains the dodgy performance against Zakopalova!:confused:
Anyway - how much better can life get for Maria (and for her fans)? Another Grand Slam title, the career Slam, back to No. 1 in the rankings and now, flag bearer for Russia in the Olympics - all in the space of about 6 days! :worship:

lefty24
Jun 13th, 2012, 06:37 PM
Maybe that explains the dodgy performance against Zakopalova!:confused:
Anyway - how much better can life get for Maria (and for her fans)? Another Grand Slam title, the career Slam, back to No. 1 in the rankings and now, flag bearer for Russia in the Olympics - all in the space of about 6 days! :worship:

+ She just wore converse. Best week ever.

zigga
Jun 13th, 2012, 06:39 PM
That's great news :yeah: I can't wait for the olympics to get started, not only tennis but also other sports :)

gc-spurs
Jun 13th, 2012, 06:58 PM
+ She just wore converse. Best week ever.

:worship:

imema
Jun 13th, 2012, 07:08 PM
The no. 1 in the world, Maria Sharapova, comes back to Spain and Equelite
After the victories in Wimbledon (2004), US Open (2006) and the Australian open (2008), the Russian player had just one Grand Slam left, the French Open. with this victory, she gets her own Career Grand Slam, a collection of tournaments that really few players had got during their tennis life. Moreover, she had become, once more, the top 1 in the WTA ranking.

Maria, since she was very young and also during the last years, had been training at the Academy next to the team leaded by Antonio Martínez Cascales, Juan Carlos Ferrero's coach in Alicante and after her current triumphs, she decided to come back and rest to our Ferrero's Hotel in Bocairente and to her former residence, the Equelite Academy where we organized a dinner for her to celebrate her victory in Roland Garros and no. 1 in the world. We also met Juan Carlos Ferrero and Nicolás Almagro with us in the dinner. Both of them gave her a present to congratulate her because of her career Grand Slam.

Now, she is already flying to London to take part in the next Grand Slam of the season, Wimbledon.
http://www.equelite.com/noticia.asp?idnoticia=125100


http://www.equelite.com/noticia.asp?idnoticia=124993

18majors
Jun 13th, 2012, 07:13 PM
The no. 1 in the world, Maria Sharapova, comes back to Spain and Equelite
After the victories in Wimbledon (2004), US Open (2006) and the Australian open (2008), the Russian player had just one Grand Slam left, the French Open. with this victory, she gets her own Career Grand Slam, a collection of tournaments that really few players had got during their tennis life. Moreover, she had become, once more, the top 1 in the WTA ranking.

Maria, since she was very young and also during the last years, had been training at the Academy next to the team leaded by Antonio Martínez Cascales, Juan Carlos Ferrero's coach in Alicante and after her current triumphs, she decided to come back and rest to our Ferrero's Hotel in Bocairente and to her former residence, the Equelite Academy where we organized a dinner for her to celebrate her victory in Roland Garros and no. 1 in the world. We also met Juan Carlos Ferrero and Nicolás Almagro with us in the dinner. Both of them gave her a present to congratulate her because of her career Grand Slam.

Now, she is already flying to London to take part in the next Grand Slam of the season, Wimbledon.
http://www.equelite.com/noticia.asp?idnoticia=125100


http://www.equelite.com/noticia.asp?idnoticia=124993

Thanks for the news piece.

I guess we learn something new everyday. As much as I follow Maria, I'm not aware of her Spain connections.

Kitten63
Jun 13th, 2012, 09:23 PM
Maria Sharapova

Ahh finally I can share some exciting news with you! After the third round of the French Open, I woke up to a pretty memorable message.
The Russian Olympic committee chose me to be the flag bearer at this years Olympic opening ceremony. I am so honored, and especially excited as it will be my first Olympics in my career.
I have had to keep this hush hush for two weeks and keeping secrets is not my best quality!

http://www.facebook.com/Sharapova

That's really awesome!

Advantage Me
Jun 13th, 2012, 10:25 PM
Anyone going to the Opening Ceremony??

Jtdrum10
Jun 14th, 2012, 12:11 AM
Maria Sharapova

Ahh finally I can share some exciting news with you! After the third round of the French Open, I woke up to a pretty memorable message.
The Russian Olympic committee chose me to be the flag bearer at this years Olympic opening ceremony. I am so honored, and especially excited as it will be my first Olympics in my career.
I have had to keep this hush hush for two weeks and keeping secrets is not my best quality!

http://www.facebook.com/Sharapova

What a wonderful honor!

denny5576
Jun 14th, 2012, 11:29 AM
Maria's RG final is the Eurosport’s best since 1994:


Julien Carrasco ‏@JandCom
RT @Eurosport #RG12 final Sharapova vs Errani watched by av. live audience of 1.9M #Eurosport’s best French Open women's Final since 1994

Dieter.
Jun 14th, 2012, 11:41 AM
From Maria's facebook:

From Paris, to the candy factory that is producing Sugarpova in Murcia, Spain.
That's one of the flavors in the background...yuuummy! I needed to pump my stomach after that visit.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/532797_10150851557722680_1529326577_n.jpg

Mr.Sharapova
Jun 14th, 2012, 11:50 AM
Sugarpova :inlove:.

TrollPova
Jun 14th, 2012, 01:01 PM
Maria's RG final is the Eurosport’s best since 1994:


Julien Carrasco ‏@JandCom
RT @Eurosport #RG12 final Sharapova vs Errani watched by av. live audience of 1.9M #Eurosport’s best French Open women's Final since 1994

And everyone is mocking the final's US low ratings. :help:

nelsondan
Jun 14th, 2012, 03:31 PM
I wonder about sugarpova....has Maria found a way to make candy a healthy thing to eat? Or will she be adding a deluxe variation of junk food to...do the things junk food does to people?

Maybe it will be so fantastically good that people will stop eating so much other junk.

stegall
Jun 16th, 2012, 01:19 AM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/tennis/news/20120615/maria-sharapova-qa/

Dieter.
Jun 16th, 2012, 09:14 AM
From Maria's facebook


I have finally had a chance to settle in and share some fun things my sponsors did for my victory. During the livestream of the final, Nike Tennis started with a blank canvas, 3 artists and hundreds of paint spray bottles and created this amazing image in just a few hours. All done in a warehouse in Amsterdam....many thanks for such a unique picture!

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/255399_10150853526307680_1968793952_n.jpg

Kon.
Jun 16th, 2012, 09:58 AM
^ I love this picture.


Pam Shriver, a former Wimbledon semi-finalist, gives her assessment of the contenders for this year’s women’s title at the All England Club. Shriver's analysis of Maria Sharapova:
I’ve been wrong before with Sharapova, but I think she’s going to have to raise her level to win Wimbledon. Unless you’re a dominant player, it’s exhausting winning grand slams. Winning two slams in a row is always difficult, but it’s never harder when those two are the French Open and Wimbledon. The women’s game is so unpredictable at the moment, with no player dominating. While it’s possible that Sharapova could follow her win in Paris by winning Wimbledon as well, I think she’s going to have to really raise her level to do that. So I think the period of unpredictability is going to carry on. I wouldn’t say that I’m amazed that Sharapova has got back to No 1 in the world, because of her mental and emotional strength. A couple of years ago, people thought that she would never win another grand slam, and she’s gone a lot of problems with her serve, with yips and double-faults.


Not that anybody should really care about what Shriver has to say. :o

Break My Rapture
Jun 16th, 2012, 10:34 AM
Maria's RG final is the Eurosport’s best since 1994:


Julien Carrasco ‏@JandCom
RT @Eurosport #RG12 final Sharapova vs Errani watched by av. live audience of 1.9M #Eurosport’s best French Open women's Final since 1994
:hearts:

stegall
Jun 16th, 2012, 03:34 PM
^ I love this picture.


Pam Shriver, a former Wimbledon semi-finalist, gives her assessment of the contenders for this year’s women’s title at the All England Club. Shriver's analysis of Maria Sharapova:



Not that anybody should really care about what Shriver has to say. :o

Ya...I live in the US so the only network I can get to watch Wimbledon in the early rounds is ESPN2..cant get eurosport etc..I like Mary Jo but for the most part the rest don't know what they're talking about half the time..Besides Shriver's the one that said she'd never win another slam so..

princessmasha
Jun 16th, 2012, 05:19 PM
The tennis Event in olympics starts just a day after the opening ceremony. I doubt whether its a good thing for her shoulder to carry the flag :/

Trih
Jun 16th, 2012, 05:28 PM
I don't think the flag is heavy at all :lol:

Shivank17
Jun 16th, 2012, 05:28 PM
exactly. :lol:

princessmasha
Jun 16th, 2012, 05:32 PM
i was obviously not talking about it being heavy ,Sorry. But the ceremony is quite long tbh.

pokey camp
Jun 16th, 2012, 05:39 PM
I'm only concerned about the ceremony's finish time relative to when she's due on court.

Ya...I live in the US so the only network I can get to watch Wimbledon in the early rounds is ESPN2..cant get eurosport etc..I like Mary Jo but for the most part the rest don't know what they're talking about half the time..Besides Shriver's the one that said she'd never win another slam so..
Pam just seems like a negative and pessimistic person in general so I never took her doomsdaying about Maria seriously. She's a glass half empty now, but it'll be empty soon and then we'll all die of thirst kind of girl. :shrug:

princessmasha
Jun 16th, 2012, 05:44 PM
I'm only concerned about the ceremony's finish time relative to when she's due on court.


Pam just seems like a negative and pessimistic person in general so I never took her doomsdaying about Maria seriously. She's a glass half empty now, but it'll empty soon and then we'll all die of thirst kind of girl. :shrug:

THis.

Shivank17
Jun 16th, 2012, 05:46 PM
Umm, Maria will only have to lift the flag when Team Russia has to march I guess, so shouldn't be a problem.

Dieter.
Jun 17th, 2012, 07:58 AM
From Maria's facebook:

Here is another fun thing my sponsor evian did for my win. Look what the live young baby is doing on the t-shirt!! The morning I woke up after the win...or better said, the moment I realized I can't force myself to sleep anymore...this image was under my front door with a nice message from the evian team.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-prn1/526804_10150856110417680_1344214091_n.jpg

goldlion
Jun 17th, 2012, 09:10 AM
I don't care about Pam Shriver as she was not making any points in that whole passage. Either say yes or no she thinks she can win Wimbledon

jameshazza
Jun 17th, 2012, 09:27 AM
Thank God Pam didn't pick her to win, a R2 shock would have been certain had she. Opening ceremony is on July 27, OG Tennis starts the following day. Although Masha's first match may be on the 29th. Considering the tennis playing flag bearers are all Wimbledon Champions (well the important ones) they could well convince the AELTC to give them the 29th. Either way I'm sure the ceremony won't be that harmful, she'll practice just as hard as she always does and make the ceremony in the evening. I don't think the ceremony will last to the small hours of the morning either so all should be well.

18majors
Jun 17th, 2012, 10:56 AM
Thank God Pam didn't pick her to win, a R2 shock would have been certain had she. Opening ceremony is on July 27, OG Tennis starts the following day. Although Masha's first match may be on the 29th. Considering the tennis playing flag bearers are all Wimbledon Champions (well the important ones) they could well convince the AELTC to give them the 29th. Either way I'm sure the ceremony won't be that harmful, she'll practice just as hard as she always does and make the ceremony in the evening. I don't think the ceremony will last to the small hours of the morning either so all should be well.

We know this is a big deal for Maria because to be part of Olympic Games has always been her goal since she was a little girl in Russia, and to be a Russian flagbearer no less.

There is little that Maria hasn't already accomplished in her young life, there is nothing more fulfilling for her than to live out her dreams.

Dieter.
Jun 18th, 2012, 09:44 AM
Can anyone out-slam Sharapova at Wimbledon?

by Ron Atkin - Sunday 17 June 2012
http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/news/articles/2012-06-17/201206171339953204897.html

Can it really have been eight years since a blonde teenager from Russia knelt on the baseline of Centre Court, arms thrust aloft in a heady mix of joy and disbelief, having just won the 2004 Wimbledon title? In those eight years Maria Sharapova has known fame by winning the Australian and US Opens, fortune beyond her wildest dreams and come through a career-threating shoulder operation in 2008 with such typical determination that she completed the set of Grand Slam titles by capturing the French Open earlier this month.

Now the 25-year-old American-based Sharapova is aiming for a second triumph at The Championships. She is the form favourite, too, having regained the world No.1 spot for the first time in four years. The French Open marked the culmination of a year-long push for the top as Maria and her repaired shoulder gradually grew stronger physically and mentally. In that 12 months she has reached - and lost - two other Grand Slam finals.

At Wimbledon last summer Maria's slam-bang style propelled her into the final, only to be out-slammed by the tall Czech lefthander Petra Kvitova. There was an even worse drubbing at the Australian Open final in January, where she collected just three games against Victoria Azarenka of Belarus. But her remarkable self-belief remained undimmed.

"No matter how many punches I took in my career I have always gotten back up," she says. "That's what really gets me through. I have a tremendous amount of belief and pride in what I do. I've always said this, I love playing tennis.

"I could have said 'I don't need this'. I have money, I have fame, I have victories, I have Grand Slams. But when your love for something is bigger than all those things you continue getting up in the morning when it's freezing outside."

Sharapova acknowledges there were times when she doubted her ability to come back from shoulder surgery in October 2008. By the following May, when she returned to singles action, her ranking had slumped to 126. "But I never actually said I was not going to be back. I had that certain belief in me. I love competing. There is nothing in the world that gives you that adrenalin feeling. It's different, I think, to other careers. In this sport it's all in your own hands and that's what I love about it. You control your own wins and losses."

Those wins started to mount up this year as Sharapova hit form in the spring, defeating Azarenka in the Stuttgart final in April and then outlasting the dogged Chinese Li Na in the Rome final last month. Now, after that heady success at Roland Garros and a few days' deserved rest, the woman who wowed Wimbledon in 2004 is back to tilt once more at the tournament she loves most - and she has a word of warning for the opposition.

"I have a lot more in me to achieve. I believe in my game, I always strive to be better." All of which could add up to another Grand Slam success on Centre Court. She will certainly be hammering her way in pursuit of that. And anybody who wants to stop Maria Sharapova will need to be prepared to out-slam her.

gc-spurs
Jun 18th, 2012, 09:54 AM
^^I just read the first line and thought- am I that old?

Valkyre
Jun 18th, 2012, 10:48 AM
I consider an INSULT , the part of the article that says "American-based Sharapova"... the fact that it comes straight from Wimbledon website, makes it even more appaling...

Maria Sharapova has chosen to be a Russian, even when she was offered other "options". The fact that she lives in the States means jack s**t... Most tennis players dont live in their home country, that doesnt make them any less Russians or what not... Besides Masha went to the US because of tennis.

So that "amercian based Sharapova" comment is rather disgusting, especially now that Maria is going to carry the flag of her country with pride. Maria is Russian, and she is proud of it as she always says so, everyone should respect that, especially Wimbledon officials.

nelsondan
Jun 18th, 2012, 02:10 PM
I wonder how complicated the job is to get all maria's tax forms sorted out and sent to the proper places.

denny5576
Jun 18th, 2012, 02:46 PM
I consider an INSULT , the part of the article that says "American-based Sharapova"... the fact that it comes straight from Wimbledon website, makes it even more appaling...

Maria Sharapova has chosen to be a Russian, even when she was offered other "options". The fact that she lives in the States means jack s**t... Most tennis players dont live in their home country, that doesnt make them any less Russians or what not... Besides Masha went to the US because of tennis.

So that "amercian based Sharapova" comment is rather disgusting, especially now that Maria is going to carry the flag of her country with pride. Maria is Russian, and she is proud of it as she always says so, everyone should respect that, especially Wimbledon officials.

Do not try, please, creating a problem from nothing.

denny5576
Jun 18th, 2012, 02:46 PM
I wonder how complicated the job is to get all maria's tax forms sorted out and sent to the proper places.

Not so easy...

nelsondan
Jun 18th, 2012, 03:06 PM
As most of us gear up for some of the most exciting, entertaining tennis from Maria over the next few years, I believe there are many possibilities for her over several decades. She has shown the ability to keep business matters separate from concentrating on her game. She is observant and very intelligent, so I can't believe she is not forming some opinions about the turmoil in the world. Her excitement about carrying the russian flag is something I think is a good thing. This world will have a need for the best and brightest to step up, one way or another. I am not sure if or what in maria's case, but think it will be something.

pov
Jun 18th, 2012, 06:30 PM
I consider an INSULT , the part of the article that says "American-based Sharapova"... the fact that it comes straight from Wimbledon website, makes it even more appaling...

Maria Sharapova has chosen to be a Russian, even when she was offered other "options". The fact that she lives in the States means jack s**t... Most tennis players dont live in their home country, that doesnt make them any less Russians or what not... Besides Masha went to the US because of tennis.

So that "amercian based Sharapova" comment is rather disgusting, especially now that Maria is going to carry the flag of her country with pride. Maria is Russian, and she is proud of it as she always says so, everyone should respect that, especially Wimbledon officials.
:haha: over-reactive any? First, it's a fact - Sharapova is American-based. She's lived here since she was 7 yo. Second, it points out to the casual reader that she's not American. Third, all her fans can be thankful that her father didn't think of American-based as an outrageous insult. ;)

DeeHax
Jun 18th, 2012, 06:47 PM
:haha: over-reactive any? First, it's a fact - Sharapova is American-based. She's lived here since she was 7 yo. Second, it points out to the casual reader that she's not American. Third, all her fans can be thankful that her father didn't think of American-based as an outrageous insult. ;)

I completely agree with you!!

Valkyre
Jun 18th, 2012, 06:50 PM
:haha: over-reactive any? First, it's a fact - Sharapova is American-based. She's lived here since she was 7 yo. Second, it points out to the casual reader that she's not American. Third, all her fans can be thankful that her father didn't think of American-based as an outrageous insult. ;)

Maria went to the states because she had no other option in order to have a future in tennis. Maybe I over reacted I admit, but it is because i did not expect to read something like that on an official website, not when a few days back Maria announced she is going to carry the Russian flag.

Maria lives in America but still stays true to her heritage and she has proven that many times in the past. My comments was not towards US, not in any way at all (referring to your last sentence which makes it sound as if my comment was racist which was not).

I would have said the same thing if a US athlete lived in China and the article wrote "the China based XXX athlete". I hope I make that clear now. In any case, I apologize if it sounded a bit too much. Carry on! :)

Kon.
Jun 18th, 2012, 06:51 PM
I consider an INSULT , the part of the article that says "American-based Sharapova"... .

It's not as if it said she's American. It said American-based, which she is. ;)
Nothing wrong with that.

Trih
Jun 18th, 2012, 06:52 PM
Anyway it didn't sound in an offensive way to me, it was just an "additional info" which the writer added in the article, I don't think it meant in any bad way. It's just the fact that Maria is "american-based" like, for example, Vika or Caro or Nole are "Monte Carlo-based" ;)

azi
Jun 19th, 2012, 06:52 AM
Maria is the Highest Paid Female Athlete

http://ph.sports.yahoo.com/news/mayweather-tops-list-worlds-100-highest-paid-athletes-164158726--spt.html

gc-spurs
Jun 19th, 2012, 08:18 AM
^This is news to me.

ziros
Jun 19th, 2012, 09:30 AM
Wonder how much longer she can stay the #1 paid female athlete,what is it 7 years,8 years in a row?

18majors
Jun 19th, 2012, 11:59 AM
Wonder how much longer she can stay the #1 paid female athlete,what is it 7 years,8 years in a row?

I guess Maria won't be the highest paid female athlete when she retires from tennis, but she may compete for the the best paid female with her endorsements and business ventures.

Kon.
Jun 19th, 2012, 12:46 PM
Maria is the Highest Paid Female Athlete

http://ph.sports.yahoo.com/news/mayweather-tops-list-worlds-100-highest-paid-athletes-164158726--spt.html

Maria the highest paid female athlete? :cool:

http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m32f7fPQ5s1qm5849.gif

Mrs. Dimitrova
Jun 19th, 2012, 03:22 PM
Her earnings went up again. :lol:

lylux
Jun 19th, 2012, 09:01 PM
Varvara Lepchenko (https://twitter.com/Varunchik1)

Played an exhibition match with number one Maria S.Was a lot of fun!!!

https://twitter.com/Varunchik1/status/215165245948313601

lefty24
Jun 19th, 2012, 10:16 PM
Varvara Lepchenko (https://twitter.com/Varunchik1)

Played an exhibition match with number one Maria S.Was a lot of fun!!!

https://twitter.com/Varunchik1/status/215165245948313601

weird, she lives in such a random place 30-45 min away from me.

and that list is depressing. Almost all guys for the first 30 spots.

18majors
Jun 19th, 2012, 10:21 PM
weird, she lives in such a random place 30-45 min away from me.

and that list is depressing. Almost all guys for the first 30 spots.

It has been bad but slowly it's getting better, no women was in top 100 before Maria.

It's up to your generation to change that.

lylux
Jun 20th, 2012, 08:28 PM
Tarpishchev of mixed doubles: "we have an idea to put #Sharapova along with Tursunov or Youzhny. I do not know whether she would agree, but I'll try to make her an offer." ->

via @Rus_tennis_news (https://twitter.com/Rus_tennis_news/status/215511825574400000)

Advantage Me
Jun 20th, 2012, 11:33 PM
Tarpishchev of mixed doubles: "we have an idea to put #Sharapova along with Tursunov or Youzhny. I do not know whether she would agree, but I'll try to make her an offer." ->

via @Rus_tennis_news (https://twitter.com/Rus_tennis_news/status/215511825574400000)

Go for it, Maria!!:hearts:

lefty24
Jun 20th, 2012, 11:38 PM
Tarpishchev of mixed doubles: "we have an idea to put #Sharapova along with Tursunov or Youzhny. I do not know whether she would agree, but I'll try to make her an offer." ->

via @Rus_tennis_news (https://twitter.com/Rus_tennis_news/status/215511825574400000)

That would be amazing. I've always found Youzhny to be attractive so that combo would be amazing. :hearts:
Plus he has the same name as my grandfather.
I just wish she would start playing doubles regularly.

stegall
Jun 21st, 2012, 02:58 AM
COMMENTARY
Sharapova back where it all began
Updated: June 20, 2012, 10:16 PM ET
By Greg Garber | ESPN.com

Early in the second set of the 2004 Wimbledon final, an extraordinary thing happened:

Maria Sharapova, standing inside the service line, unleashed a violent, swinging forehand volley, which hit Serena Williams -- square on the nose.

This was when Williams was close to her peak, having won five majors in the previous two years and pretty much cornered the market on muscular intimidation. Sharapova? She was a slender 17-year-old playing a limited schedule mandated by the WTA.

Sharapova stunned Williams 6-1, 6-4.

"I never, never in my life expected this to happen so fast," said the second-youngest Wimbledon champion ever. "To tell you the truth, I don't know what happened in the match. I don't know how I won. I was in my own little world -- I don't know what world that was, really."

[+] Enlarge
Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images
It's hard to believe, but eight years have passed since Maria Sharapova's first Grand Slam win.
At the time, that low screamer felt like a warning shot.

Sharapova went on to win the U.S. Open two years later and, two years after that, the Australian Open. But then, after winning three Grand Slam singles titles in a span of 15 majors, she dropped off the grid. Sharapova went 0-for-the-next-15.

And now, after triumphantly completing her career Grand Slam with the title at Roland Garros, she returns to the All England Club, where it all began. After career-threatening shoulder surgery and an agonizingly prolonged comeback, Sharapova is again back on top of tennis.

"She basically said, 'I am not going away. No, no, no,'" said Tennis Channel analyst Mary Carillo. "You've got to give it to Maria in that she has never taken her eye off the ball, literally or figuratively. She always had it in her head she was going to get back to this place; she never dropped the ball.

"I certainly think she can win Wimbledon," Carillo said. "Absolutely. The U.S. Open a second time? Sure. Does that answer your question? "

Well, yes.

Carillo likens Sharapova's journey to that of Andre Agassi's, who after winning three majors from 1992-95, went through a difficult three-year period.

"Andre and Maria didn't mind the process [of the comeback]," Carillo said. "Andre said, 'All right, I still have tennis in me; I can win majors. I can take that ride being [ranked No.] 141 in the world. I will play Challengers.'

"He didn't need to do it, and neither did Maria. It had to be hard to be hitting all those double faults and wondering if her serve would ever get better."

It's hard to believe she turned 25 in April and that this is her 10th season as a professional. There are three older women in the top 10: Williams, Samantha Stosur and Marion Bartoli and a fourth, Sara Errani, is only 10 days younger.

Four years after the fact, Sharapova's back to the No. 1 ranking and the question begs itself: Can she, will she be a dominant, full-year No. 1 that the WTA has lacked since Justine Henin's run of 61 straight weeks in 2007-08?

"[Victoria] Azarenka had a great run at the beginning, but then what happened?" Carillo said. "[Petra] Kvitova wins Wimbledon and basically goes away. Li Na same thing. Stosur, too. You think they'd like it more up there.

"Maria and Serena are the only ones who have shown a taste for longevity. Can she sustain herself at the No. 1 spot? There are a lot of interesting questions coming into Wimbledon. I picked Serena to win in the French. Hey, I was off by a mere seven rounds. Someone is going to have to prove to me that Serena can't win anything she sets her sights on."

That someone at Roland Garros was Virginie Razzano, who stunned Serena in the first round. At Wimbledon, her power will be rewarded on the living grass. Azarenka (a semifinalist a year ago) and defending champion Kvitova, too, will find a surface more conducive to their games.

Sharapova is coming off the best clay season of her life; she won 19 of 20 matches and won three titles. Her eight victories over top-10 players are already her most in a season since 2006. Another sign of her growing dominance: She is trying to become the first woman to reach the finals at the season's first three majors since Henin in 2006.

Sharapova was undeniably emotional after winning at Roland Garros, something we haven't seen since that breakthrough eight years ago at Wimbledon. But when she met the press after that final triumph, Sharapova had recovered her cool command.

"I believe in my game," she said. "I think that's one of the reasons why I'm sitting here with my fourth one and winning Roland Garros, is because I always believed I could."

Another warning shot, perhaps?

"It's not over yet," Sharapova advised. "I'm not sitting here and saying I'm done, because I'm far from it. I have a lot more in me to achieve."

denny5576
Jun 21st, 2012, 03:46 AM
Tarpishchev of mixed doubles: "we have an idea to put #Sharapova along with Tursunov or Youzhny. I do not know whether she would agree, but I'll try to make her an offer." ->

via @Rus_tennis_news (https://twitter.com/Rus_tennis_news/status/215511825574400000)

The most stupid idea ever! Go for it, Maria, and forget the medal in singles!

Mrs. Dimitrova
Jun 21st, 2012, 03:52 AM
Youzhny is a solid player but he's crazy. :scared:

Craig.
Jun 21st, 2012, 03:55 AM
I'm not a fan of this idea at all. I'd much rather she focus solely on singles.

denny5576
Jun 21st, 2012, 03:57 AM
That would be amazing.
I just wish she would start playing doubles regularly.

and of course the OG are the best place to start playing doubles... after many years not playing doubles at all...
:)

stegall
Jun 21st, 2012, 04:02 AM
eta:nevermind

Mrs. Dimitrova
Jun 21st, 2012, 04:02 AM
and of course the OG are the best place to start playing doubles... after many years not playing doubles at all...
:)

:lol:

I'm certain that she's not going to play doubles at the Olympics.

lefty24
Jun 21st, 2012, 04:03 AM
and of course the OG are the best place to start playing doubles... after many years not playing doubles at all...
:)

I dont mean mixed doubles, just regular doubles. At small tournaments to start. I think it's too late this year but maybe next year.

lefty24
Jun 21st, 2012, 04:05 AM
:lol:

I'm certain that she's not going to play doubles at the Olympics.

As long as Russia wants to place in mixed doubles, they're not going to want Maria to play. Russia has so many good doubles players.

stegall
Jun 21st, 2012, 04:10 AM
Has she played doubles since 2007? http://youtu.be/dK8OQZCLwUY

Mrs. Dimitrova
Jun 21st, 2012, 04:15 AM
Has she played doubles since 2007? http://youtu.be/dK8OQZCLwUY

2009 Indian Wells.

denny5576
Jun 21st, 2012, 04:50 AM
I dont mean mixed doubles, just regular doubles. At small tournaments to start. I think it's too late this year but maybe next year.
Please understand: one of the reasons for the success of Maria is the fact she does not play doubles.
See how many matches she already played this year:
http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/1886/winlossytdtop100jun1120.gif
Maria in 2012 already played:
- 1 match more than in entire 2009 season;
- 5 matches more than in entire 2008 season;
- only 3 matches less than in entire 2010 season;
- only 10 matches less than in entire 2007 season;
- only 16 matches less than in entire 2011 season;

Most matches Maria played in 2004 - 70 matches.
In 2005 65, in 2006 68.
In any other season not more than 57 matches.
And now, in 2012, before even the half of the season is completed, she already has 41 matches!
Winning titles automatically means obligation to play more matches.
Do you think the doubles are necessary for the success?
I do not think so.
Maria's physical resources are not limitless.

perseus2006
Jun 21st, 2012, 06:25 AM
That's a torrid pace of play for Pova! The result of making so many Finals but it only represents eight tournaments! She has at least six more tournaments to play, possibly eight!

W
Olympics
Canada
Cincinatti
USO
Japan
Beijing
YEC

Maybe she will skip Canada and Japan?

Whatever, keep it together. Pova!

Crux Squall
Jun 21st, 2012, 08:20 AM
Has she played doubles since 2007? http://youtu.be/dK8OQZCLwUY

Maria played double when her career was started. She has 3 WTA double title (2 with Tanasugarn in 2003 and 1 with Kirilenko in 2004)
but i dont think She will play double anymore :)

cowsonice
Jun 21st, 2012, 08:25 AM
Sharapova + Schnyder is such a random coupling.

Mistress of Evil
Jun 21st, 2012, 08:44 AM
There is no way in hell Martha playing doubles again ever.
Is she to play mixed during the Olympics, she must enter Wimbledon as a tryout, though.

Kon.
Jun 21st, 2012, 10:17 AM
I seriously doubt Maria would play mixed if she thought there were any chance it would harm her chances at singles.
So if she decides to play, we shouldn't worry.
I think it would be nice if she played with Youzhny, I like him. :p
But don't other Russians want to play mixed and are also more experienced and actually better than Maria at it? :confused:

Also, hadn't she said something about it at a press conference at RG? Something like "nobody asked me to play mixed"?
So I guess it's a possibility.

JoPova
Jun 21st, 2012, 10:38 AM
No way! I really don't think she'll play mixed doubles! :lol: I'll be so surprised if she decides to play it! She hasn't played doubles for ages too!

denny5576
Jun 21st, 2012, 10:50 AM
I seriously doubt Maria would play mixed if she thought there were any chance it would harm her chances at singles.
So if she decides to play, we shouldn't worry.

Are you sure Maria always makes the right decision? Many times she did the opposite. And paid a heavy price for that. You want her to pay again?

gc-spurs
Jun 21st, 2012, 11:13 AM
Wow that is a great pace. Sharapova and Azarenka's winning percentages are insane. I reckon she will take a break during that Asia swing, I don't expect her to do both.

stegall
Jun 21st, 2012, 06:20 PM
This was posted in the videos thread,but I'll post it here too,Billie Jean King talking about Sharapova at 3:30 mark
http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/video/king-jean-billie-mentor-queen-court-sports-hollywood-entertainment-16614980

imema
Jun 21st, 2012, 06:34 PM
http://www.modmods.com/fashion/it%E2%80%99s-love-love-sharapova

**mashafierce**
Jun 21st, 2012, 08:52 PM
This was posted in the videos thread,but I'll post it here too,Billie Jean King talking about Sharapova at 3:30 mark
http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/video/king-jean-billie-mentor-queen-court-sports-hollywood-entertainment-16614980

She said some really moving things

**mashafierce**
Jun 22nd, 2012, 06:26 AM
Any interviews from last night??

jameshazza
Jun 22nd, 2012, 07:09 AM
Nice words from BJK.

Not sure when we'll get the interviews.

MM_1257
Jun 22nd, 2012, 03:19 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturenews/9342497/Maria-Sharapova-backs-Emilys-Big-Walk-fund-raiser.html
Maria Sharapova backs Emily's Big Walk fund-raiser
Wimbledon star Maria Sharapova lends her support to charity project Emily's Big Walk, which will raise funds for children with cancer. The charity is in honour of Emily Bailes, the girl who tossed the coin when Sharapova won Wimbledon in 2004.Former Wimbledon champion Maria Sharapova has given her support to a charity raising money in memory of Emily Bailes, a girl who died of cancer at the age of eight in March 2008.
In 2004, aged five, Emily tossed the coin at the Wimbledon championships final in the year that Sharapova won the women's singles title. In August and September this year, there will be 15 fund-raising walking events throughout the UK, called Emily's Big Walk, which will raise funds for children with cancer.
Emily’s Big Walk, organised by the Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Group (CCLG) at the University of Leicester, will feature an Olympic-style ‘torch’ being passed along various routes around the United Kingdom.
Sharapova said of the project: "I am delighted that Emily's Big walk is taking place and such a fantastic fund-raising event is being held in Emily's name. I have very fond memories of Emily and the time we spent together, especially at Wimbledon in 2004. I know she fought her illness very bravely and the walk will be a testament to all children who have done the same and continue to do so every day. I wish all the walkers and fund-raisers lots of luck."
The 2012 French Open champion has personally donated two of her own Centre Court tickets for Wimbledon 2013 and also offered the auction prize of being able to meet Sharapova.
For full details of events and how to donate see emilysbigwalk.org.uk
The final destination of the “torch” will be the Barbican Centre in London for the start of the prestigious International Paediatric Oncology Society Meeting, being hosted by CCLG in London in early October 2012. Emily’s Big Walk will earlier have gone through 14 destinations, and among those joining in the walk will be Bill Bryson, the author of Notes From A Small Island and A Short History of Nearly Everything. Bryson said: "Emily's Big Walk is a tribute to all children diagnosed with cancer in this country. I'm delighted to be able to take part in the Newcastle leg."
Amanda Bailes, 44, said: "As Emily's mother, I'm hugely proud at what is being done in her name. I'm so grateful to everyone who has worked so hard to make the vision of Emily's Big Walk a reality."
CONTACT DETAILS
Emily's Big Walk (CCLG),
3rd Floor, Hearts of Oak House,
9 Princess Road West, Leicester, LE1 6TH.
Tel: 0116 249 4460
E-mail: info@cclg.org.uk

GrandMartha
Jun 22nd, 2012, 09:13 PM
Tarpischev tries to persuades Masha to play mixed with either Tursunov or Youzhny.
Other possibilites are Youzhny/Lena V or Youzhny/Nadia

http://www.championat.com/tennis/news-1221988-tarpishhev-est-shalnaja-ideja-zajavit-na-mikst-olimpiady-sharapovu-i-tursunova.html

Тарпищев: есть шальная идея заявить на микст Олимпиады Шарапову и Турсунова

Президент Федерации тенниса России Шамиль Тарпищев рассказал о том, что состав российской пары для выступления на Олимпиаде в Лондоне в миксте пока не определён.

"Окончательное решение надо принять до 1 июля. У нас есть шальная идея включить в микст Шарапову — например, с Турсуновым или Южным. Трудность в том, что Мария всегда концентрируется на одиночном разряде, поэтому микст для неё не слишком желателен. Но может быть, на первой неделе Уимблдона удастся поговорить и решить этот вопрос.

Есть и другие варианты: Южный / Веснина или Южный / Петрова", — заявил Тарпищев в эфире "НТВ-Плюс".

graffite
Jun 23rd, 2012, 05:59 PM
http://www.thetennisspace.com/off-court/sharapova-exclusive-ive-been-watching-trashy-british-tv/

Maria Sharapova has told The Tennis Space that she has been relaxing before Wimbledon by watching “some trashy show called Benidorm” and by chatting to fans as she strolls around Wimbledon Village: “People come up to me to tell me that they’re so happy for me that I’ve been through bad times and got myself back up.”

Have you been watching any British television while you’ve been in London?
“I was watching some trashy show the other day. What was it called again? The Only Way Is Essex? No, it wasn’t that. Maybe I shouldn’t use the word trashy. It was about English people taking a vacation in Spain. Beni-something? Benidorm, that’s what it was called. Oh my gosh, it was good entertainment, but I don’t think I’m going to be buying the season.”

Do people come up to talk to you in the Village?
“People come up to talk to me and tell me how happy they are for me that I’ve been through bad times and got myself back up. You hope that people who come to talk to you have nice things to say, ha ha. If you don’t have anything nice to say, then it’s probably best not to say anything at all, ha, ha!”

Is this the happiest you’ve been during your career?
“The French Open was the most memorable moment in my career so far and it couldn’t have come at a better time in my life, career-wise. Life-wise, there are gifts you can have, such as being a mother. My career, at the end of the day, it’s been incredible.”

lefty24
Jun 23rd, 2012, 06:28 PM
You can tell even from the transcripts that she's super happy.

MashaFan01
Jun 23rd, 2012, 06:30 PM
ESPN's editors picks (http://espn.go.com/sports/tennis/picks)

gc-spurs
Jun 23rd, 2012, 09:14 PM
Haha i watched an episode of the only way is Essex. Horrible stuff.

And lies. No way Queen Masha has been speaking to plebs.

slamchamp
Jun 23rd, 2012, 10:51 PM
So RG is more treasured now than the Wimbledon moment?:eek: :hearts:

MM_1257
Jun 23rd, 2012, 10:57 PM
Some Masha quotes; in Russian. also about the bus, she said she was with friends, looking for a taxi, but that they got into the bus and she simply followed them and that it was fun, lots of laughs... And some other quotes, but I am too sleepy to translate... http://rsport.ru/tennis/20120623/602336914.html

dsanders06
Jun 23rd, 2012, 11:55 PM
Maria watching The Only Way Is Essex :hysteric: :hysteric: :bigcry:

18majors
Jun 24th, 2012, 12:05 AM
A good article

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/jun/23/wimbledon-2012-maria-sharapova?newsfeed=true

If anyone can light up Wimbledon on a grey day, it is Maria Sharapova, yet there will always be a hint of Russian melancholy about her, as if life some times is too good to be true and therefore should be treated with suspicion.

Certainly, it was as good as it can get in Paris earlier this month, from the morning midway through the French Open when she was asked if she would carry the flag for Russia in the Olympics, to that sun-blessed finish to the tournament, when she danced on the clay of Court Philippe Chatrier in celebration of her first title there, a win that returned her to No1 in the world for the fifth time and completed her set of four majors.

Sharapova, surely, is as well placed to win Wimbledon as anyone in this field of flickering failures and uncertain prodigies, yet, looking forward to her opening match against the 133rd-ranked Australian, Anastasia Rodionova, she says, "I always say if you think everything is great and you're feeling good, then you should be extremely worried."

With rain spitting lightly on the lawns, she spoke of the "many incredible messages" she received after beating the Italian outsider Sara Errani in two quick sets to win her first French Open in her first final at Roland Garros. "They were much more open, actually, than the ones I had previously, which was really nice. But I think I'll keep it to myself on who those are from.

"I was much more content with the way I felt [than after her previous slam wins], just more pleased. Before you're kind of like, 'Wow, this is amazing'.

"But I was really happily easy-going. I didn't feel like I needed a huge celebration. I was walking around for three days with the biggest smile. Then I got here and thought, I better get back to reality."

So, no champagne on the Champs-Elysées. She had already been thrilled, after all, by an unexpected request from her homeland. "I had to read the text message five times and read it to other people to make sure I got it correct. I got it in the morning after my third-round match, asking if I would [carry the Russian flag in London]. I didn't even know if that was a question but I was very happy to accept."

Her loyalty to Russia has never faltered, even though she left 18 years ago and lives an ultra-American life in Bradenton, Florida, a star graduate of the Nick Bollettieri tennis academy and grateful recipient of the state's sunshine and tax breaks. Nobody in the women's game earns remotely as much; Time magazine last year named her one of the "30 legends of women's tennis". On the Forbes world rich list of athletes released this week, Sharapova ranks 26th, the only woman, with total earnings over the previous 12 months of $27.9m ($22m of it in endorsements), just behind Lewis Hamilton and Wladimir Klitschko and ahead of Mahendra Singh Dhoni, Wayne Rooney and Luke Donald inside the top 50.

Yet, through experience or inclination, Sharapova remains wary of life's gifts. Her parents fled the killing clouds of Chernobyl and, when they arrived in the US, her father washed dishes to support them until IMG anointed the precocious Russian starlet with their financial largesse. While the riches that followed were hard won, they arrived with the unwelcome whispers that, were it not for her blinding beauty, the numbers would be significantly smaller.

All she can do about that – as she has pointed out many times – is play her best tennis. What leavened the sniping was the shoulder injury that required serious surgery nearly four years ago and which threatened to bring all that glitter crashing around her.

"You go for a period of time where you feel good," she said, "and then there's a change, a change of weather, the ball is a little bit heavier, and then you feel it at times. It's [like that] to this day.

"But I'm much more aware of it and I know what to do. I am much more disciplined with the physical rehabilitation aspect of it. I just know it's something I'll have to do for the rest of my career. Sometimes when it feels better you're like, 'OK, I'm done.' It doesn't work that way, unfortunately."

She has managed her shoulder like an unwanted friend, a haunting relic that will not go away. Like leaving Russia, the operation was something over which she had no control. She hints that it was not altogether a success.

"I never had surgery before so I didn't really know [what it would be like]. I hoped for the best. The doctors and everybody were pretty optimistic. I guess that's what you pay them for, or part of it. But I don't know if they were always right."

It is losing control, then, that makes her sad. Maybe it is why she fights her emotions, on court and off. For someone who has everything, often she gives the appearance of having very little. Perhaps the sun will shine for her again over the next fortnight.

If Sharapova wins Wimbledon again – which is a distinct possibility rather than the mere hope it has been since her teenage victory, in 2007 – she is well-placed to take her tennis to a new level. For once, all around her in the women's game is uncertainty; for once, she is an island of calm.

jameshazza
Jun 24th, 2012, 12:11 AM
Great articel but normally she does an interview in the house she rents with the Guardian/Telegraph every year. Guess they didn't get an invite this year :sad:

Charlatan
Jun 24th, 2012, 03:56 AM
SHARAPOVA MEANS BUSINESS http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/news/articles/2012-06-23/201206231340471453095.html
by Helen Gibert
06/23/2012
When Maria Sharapova bowed out to Petra Kvitova in the 2011 Wimbledon finals she had no idea what the future had in store. Twelve months on the Russian is in possession of a career Grand Slam having won the French Open in Paris just a few weeks ago and a world No.1 ranking. And should Sharapova’s sparkling form continue, she will become the first female player since Serena Williams in 2002 to win Roland Garros and Wimbledon back to back.

However, the top seed is under no illusion about the difficulty of that particular feat. “I think it’s the toughest back to back Grand Slam-wise, no doubt,” said Sharapova this afternoon. “Especially if you’re coming off a French Open win or a final it’s the toughest turnaround. As much as you want to celebrate and enjoy, you come here and it’s like a whole new ballgame.”

Whilst it is never easy wearing the runner’s up hat –especially in a Grand Slam final – Sharapova describes last year’s Wimbledon adventure as a “big step in the right direction,” for her career.
“It was the first time in a few years where I had reached the end of Wimbledon, it had been a while,” she recalled. “It was just really good to be at that stage of a Grand Slam again. I was really happy that I was here. You come off that loss and as tough as it is to lose Grand Slam finals, probably one of the toughest things for a tennis player, it’s really about getting yourself back out there and improving and hoping for another chance.”

Of course the All England Club provides many happy memories for Sharapova, who claimed the scalp of Serena Williams in 2004 to lift her maiden Grand Slam title in 2004 at the tender age of 17. Since then the 25-year-old has been prone to injury - a troublesome shoulder saw her undergo traumatic reconstruction in October 2008. But her sheer hard work and determination has paid off – her Roland Garros victory proved to be her first Grand Slam title in more than four years.

Now Sharapova is back on SW19 soil and means business. Like last year, she refrained from playing in a warm up even ahead of The Championships. The reason? “I don’t think I was physically ready,” she said. But the Russian has been practising here for more than a week and “feels good”.

“I think everybody knows the meaning of this tournament for me, ever since I was a young girl, how special it was,"she adds. To be part of its history for the rest of my career and life means a lot. I certainly hope I can achieve the success I had many years ago here."

Stonerpova
Jun 24th, 2012, 04:04 AM
^Nice quotes. I know we haven't seen her play yet, but she's handling the #1 ranking with class and confidence. Nice to finally see that on the women's tour.

MM_1257
Jun 24th, 2012, 12:10 PM
:lol: http://blogs.montrealgazette.com/2012/06/22/miss-maria-sharapova/

jameshazza
Jun 24th, 2012, 01:17 PM
Maria is second on CC in case it hasn't already been posted.

EDIT: Just realising I'm in the wrong thread.

MashaFan01
Jun 24th, 2012, 05:00 PM
Link: Wimbledon Betting: Why there will be a new winner in the women's draw (http://betting.*******.com/tennis/wimbledon-betting/wimbledon-betting-why-there-will-be-a-new-winner-in-the-womens-draw-240612-158.html)


Sharapova is an unreliable favourite

The Russian tops the winner market at 3.95 after the victory at Roland Garros that completed her Career Grand Slam and launched her to the top of the world rankings, but her record at sustaining success doesn't inspire confidence. Unlike most players talented enough to lift all four Grand Slams, she has won each just once and dragged that out over eight years, with five slams the shortest gap between any two. Serena is the only female in the last 16 years to have prevailed at Roland Garros and Wimbledon consecutively and that was way back in 2002. Sharapova meanwhile failed to get beyond the fourth round at the major following two of her three prior Grand Slam wins, and has been out before the quarters in four of her last five Wimbledon entries.

Hopefully she'll proof him wrong!

Link: Wimbledon 2012: Maria Sharapova Will Win Her First Wimbledon Title Since 2004 (http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1233920-wimbledon-2012-maria-sharapova-will-win-her-first-wimbledon-title-since-2004)

stegall
Jun 24th, 2012, 05:04 PM
She's been to the final of 3 of the last 4 slams..I don't see how she's unreliable at this point..

lefty24
Jun 24th, 2012, 06:32 PM
Link: Wimbledon Betting: Why there will be a new winner in the women's draw (http://betting.*******.com/tennis/wimbledon-betting/wimbledon-betting-why-there-will-be-a-new-winner-in-the-womens-draw-240612-158.html)



Hopefully she'll proof him wrong!

Link: Wimbledon 2012: Maria Sharapova Will Win Her First Wimbledon Title Since 2004 (http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1233920-wimbledon-2012-maria-sharapova-will-win-her-first-wimbledon-title-since-2004)

Wow that's one of the most idiotic things ive read in a while. So much wrong with that article.

MM_1257
Jun 24th, 2012, 06:43 PM
:facepalm: I guess he skipped the shoulder injury?

nectar69
Jun 24th, 2012, 06:56 PM
Most writers know nothing. You can't take stock in anything they say. I should know I am one. haha.

Charlatan
Jun 24th, 2012, 08:09 PM
“I first met Maria Sharapova when she was 12, and even then she was a fighter – she was a little blonde girl, but she was a real fighter. She was hungry then, and she’s still just as hungry now at the age of 25. And there’s nothing more important in women’s tennis than desire.” - Legend Martina Hingis

don't know when martina was preaching this, but found it from tumblr :hearts:

MM_1257
Jun 24th, 2012, 08:21 PM
Martina wrot that in her column...

Kon.
Jun 24th, 2012, 09:41 PM
don't know when martina was preaching this, but found it from tumblr :hearts:

Here's the whole thing:

Martina Hingis column: Maria's still just as hungry.
Martina Hingis, a former world No 1 and Wimbledon champion, writes for The Tennis Space:
I first met Maria Sharapova when she was 12, and even then she was a fighter – she was a little blonde girl, but she was a real fighter. She was hungry then, and she’s still just as hungry now at the age of 25. And there’s nothing more important in women’s tennis than desire.

When she was out for all those months – after the operation to her shoulder in 2008 – she would have realised how much more she wanted to achieve in tennis. That happens when you’re out of the sport for a while, you get the desire back. Without that desire, Maria would never have returned to No 1 in the rankings, and she would not be one of the favourites for this summer’s Wimbledon.

I think you could say that Maria is not the most talented player of her generation, but she has always got the most out of herself. Yes, she is tall and has great reach, and is a good ball-striker, but her greatest attribute has always been that she has dedicated herself to her tennis, and done everything she can to be the best player she can be.

The first time I saw Maria was when I was practising at the Nick Bollettieri Academy in Florida, and I was impressed by her attitude, and how aggressive she was on the court. It was certainly no accident that she was a Wimbledon champion at 17. She had no fear back then, just as I didn’t have any fear when I won Wimbledon at 16; you don’t think too much and you’re not scared of losing. Without a doubt, Maria has improved in the eight years since she won the Wimbledon title. There was a lot of hype around then, but she’s a better player now. Maria has matured and gained experience and her forehand – which used to be a little fragile – is a much stronger shot.

It’s great to see her back at the top of the sport. I noticed that, in her speech after winning the French Open, which gave her a career grand slam, she made a point of thanking her physical trainer, as she knows how important it is to be healthy again.


http://www.thetennisspace.com/opinion/martina-hingis-column-marias-still-just-as-hungry/

JamieOwen3
Jun 24th, 2012, 09:43 PM
I was going to say that about the shoulder injury. What a stupid ass hole! Just made it out like it never happened.

Charlatan
Jun 24th, 2012, 10:34 PM
Here's the whole thing:

Martina Hingis column: Maria's still just as hungry.
Martina Hingis, a former world No 1 and Wimbledon champion, writes for The Tennis Space:

LMAO there was already a thread about this on GM, quoting only 'I think you could say maria is not the most talented player' of course :lol:

JamieOwen3
Jun 25th, 2012, 01:48 AM
Ahh Martina :hearts: , didn't look at that earlier because I was little pissed with the other one.

Kon.
Jun 25th, 2012, 10:29 AM
60 seconds with Maria Sharapova
The actress I would like to play me in a film about my life: Gwyneth Paltrow.
If I wasn’t a tennis player, I would be: An architect.
I never travel to a tournament without: My phone.
My favourite city on the tour: Probably Tokyo.
The last place I went to on holiday: Thailand.
My favourite restaurant on the tour: A Russian restaurant in New York.
My favourite shop on the tour: Rick Owens in Paris.
The last film I watched: That’s a good question. I’m watching a show right now called ‘The Good Wife’. I haven’t seen a movie in a while.
The last album I listened to: Florence and the Machine.
The last meal I cooked: I made a salad the other day. Does that count as a meal, ha ha? I can’t say whether it was good or not. Everyone ate it, so I imagine it was good.
The last joke I laughed at: Erm, I laugh at the most stupid things.
The last time I was recognised in public: Just the other day, in Wimbledon Village.
The last time I broke a racket: I usually break rackets during the first few practices of the clay-court season.
Grass, hard or clay? Oh, grass.
Sand or snow? Sand.
Which super-power would you choose – to be invisible or fly? Invisibility, always.
If I was in a karaoke bar, the song I would choose: Cher’s ‘Do You Believe in Love’. I sing that all the time. That’s my go-to song.
If I won the lottery I would spend it on. Oh my god, I feel as though I already won the lottery, ha, ha. I don’t know, I think I would give it away to charity.
http://www.thetennisspace.com/off-court/exclusive-60-seconds-with-maria-sharapova/

Lachy
Jun 25th, 2012, 10:32 AM
60 seconds with Maria Sharapova


The last film I watched: That’s a good question. I’m watching a show right now called ‘The Good Wife’. I haven’t seen a movie in a while.

http://www.thetennisspace.com/off-court/exclusive-60-seconds-with-maria-sharapova/

OMG. :hearts: :hearts:

MM_1257
Jun 25th, 2012, 10:58 AM
Mashenka still likes Gwyneth? :hearts: I remember she once said how "she used to say that Gwyneth should play her but now she doesn't know anymore who to pick"...

Crux Squall
Jun 25th, 2012, 11:00 AM
My favourite city on the tour: Probably Tokyo.:)
I remember watch Maria's video play with kid in Tokyo, so funny

Sebastian222
Jun 25th, 2012, 11:03 AM
CBS This Morning‏@CBSThisMorning
You'll hear from the world's highest-paid female athlete #ThisMorning. Maria Sharapova talks abt life, love, and how long she'll play tennis

Well maybe some of us get's the answers they want to here...:singer:

DeeHax
Jun 25th, 2012, 11:29 AM
When does this air?

DeeHax
Jun 25th, 2012, 11:30 AM
CBS This Morning‏@CBSThisMorning
You'll hear from the world's highest-paid female athlete #ThisMorning. Maria Sharapova talks abt life, love, and how long she'll play tennis

Well maybe some of us get's the answers they want to here...:singer:

When does this air?

Marilyn Monheaux
Jun 25th, 2012, 11:47 AM
^^Sometime between 13:00 and 15:00 CET :)

DeeHax
Jun 25th, 2012, 12:00 PM
CBS This Morning‏@CBSThisMorning
You'll hear from the world's highest-paid female athlete #ThisMorning. Maria Sharapova talks abt life, love, and how long she'll play tennis

Well maybe some of us get's the answers they want to here...:singer:

^^Sometime between 13:00 and 15:00 CET :)

Ohh! How cool! Can someone post the news then?

Sebastian222
Jun 25th, 2012, 12:16 PM
(CBS News) LONDON - Maria Sharapova is more than a tennis champion.

She's practically an industry, earning more money in prizes and endorsements than any other female athlete.
After a long comeback from injury, Sharapova is number one again on the women's tennis tour.
The women's' tennis circuit likes to market its top players like movie stars. It's just as well some of them look the part. None more so than Sharapova - six-feet-two-inches of statuesque glamor off the court, and the same measure of screeching power and determination on it.
After her victory in the French Open two weeks ago, which followed wins earlier in her career at the U.S. Open, the Australian Open and at Wimbledon, Sharapova is one of only eight women to achieve the career grand slam.
Now, she's back in London, about to begin another try for the Wimbledon title.
She says she was particularly pleased with herself after the French Open victory because, "I feel like I -- I worked so hard to get to that moment. You go through so many good days and bad days, and there are days where you think, 'Well, are the good days gonna be that worth it? Are they gonna feel so good?' And the moment I won match point, I got down on my knees. It's kinda that moment when everything comes together."
Sharapova says tennis players don't practice their victory dances, as some football or soccer players do, but she's, "seen photographs of me winning the four Grand Slams," she said with a laugh. "And my reactions are pretty much the same. I go on my knees and I do something and I'm quite -- quite shocked.
"But, I certainly don't practice it. I don't wanna jinx anything!" she laughed again.
Practicing, not victory celebrations, but hitting the ball, is what tennis players do. Even those ranked number one in their sport, which is what Maria Sharapova is, again, at the age of 25.
Just four years ago, it looked like she'd never return to top-level tennis, never mind win another championship.
She needed surgery on a recurring shoulder problem. It's the kind of injury that ends careers.
"I got injured at a pretty, you know, young age of 21," she reflected. "And that's usually not the age where you have to get shoulder surgery. And also not exactly an injury that I've known other players to come back from, especially in tennis."
Did she ever think she wouldn't make it back?
"No - yeah - the comeback wasn't continuous, that's for sure. Yeah, anyone, I think, in my team would tell you that. And not just with the event, but emotionally as well, because as a tennis player, you come - I mean, six days a week, you wake up and you try to go and practice and improve and get better, and that's taken away from you. And you start waking up in the morning. And I was like, 'Well, I'm so sick of putting casual clothes on. I wanna put my Nike stuff on.'
"So, at the end of the day, I was really missing that."
The clothing reference is not an accident. Sharapova's endorsement contracts contribute to her $25 million-a-year income.
Not just clothes, but bags, watches.
Being a top tennis player is one thing. Having super-model looks to go along with the talent makes her the hottest property on the market, in so many ways.
But the world's top-earning woman athlete says it's still all about the tennis.
"It's not my job to judge," she chuckled. "It's somebody else's. So you know, first and foremost, I just - I have a tennis racket and a ball, and that's what I'm good at."
It's all a long way from the seven-year-old little girl tennis prodigy who was brought to the U.S. from Russia by her father and who, as she grew older, showed the two qualities that would make her - skill, and a killer instinct.
"They saw how much I loved going out and competing against somebody. And I was never the one that liked to practice and hit millions of balls, even though I knew it was good for me. But when I saw somebody across the net, I just wanted to win. And I think that they -- they saw that, they saw the desire, they saw that I wanted, you know, that the passion I had for the sport, and they did everything they could to make me better."
How big a role did having a "tennis stage parent" have in making Sharapova as successful as she is?
"Well, at the end of the day, where are you gonna be without that driving force?" she responded.
Her father, Yuri, doesn't travel with her anymore.
There's a new man in her life - her fiance, basketball player Sasha Vujacic.
But Sharapova says she'll "probably wait a little bit" - perhaps until she's finished playing tennis - to get married.
So, at 25, she's done it all - and has more money than she can ever spend. Why go on? Does she love the game, or hate it?
"That's a tough question," Sharapova conceded with a laugh."There are so many things I love about it. I really do. But there are days where ... like I said, (I think), 'How many years are you gonna do this for?' But I don't think that you will see me so much around it in the daily life of the sport when I'm done."
And it's fun as long as you're winning?
"Well, that helps!" Sharapova replied, "but it's not always about the winning. It's sport, so... "

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505270_162-57459613/one-on-one-with-maria-sharapova-on-eve-of-wimbledon/?tag=contentMain;contentBody

Marilyn Monheaux
Jun 25th, 2012, 12:22 PM
There's a new man in her life - her fiance, basketball player Sasha Vujacic.
But Sharapova says she'll "probably wait a little bit" - perhaps until she's finished playing tennis - to get married.


That wedding is getting pushed further and further back... not a bad thing, though - at least in my opinion - considering they'll be together for merely three years in October and have spent significant time apart. :)

So, he's still her fiance. Y'all calmed down, yet? :p

MM_1257
Jun 25th, 2012, 12:28 PM
Now the doubters will say; when was this interview made AND she says what she wants us to believe, she can invent/hide/act... :lol: :p

Sebastian222
Jun 25th, 2012, 12:30 PM
Now the doubters will say; when was this interview made AND she says what she wants us to believe, she can invent/hide/act... :lol: :p

:tape::ignore::tape::ignore:

MM_1257
Jun 25th, 2012, 12:35 PM
:tape::ignore::tape::ignore:

:lol: :awww::hug:

Sebastian222
Jun 25th, 2012, 12:44 PM
Don't laugh but... Sasha and I are Pisces - Hopelessly Romantic Fools... And I have been "eaten" by a Taurus :devil: before... maybe is a shear projection of my fears...:crying2:

I am very happy now with a Libra...:inlove:

Ksenia.
Jun 25th, 2012, 01:00 PM
Don't tell me there are people who actually believe in astrology :sobbing:

Sebastian222
Jun 25th, 2012, 01:07 PM
Well, there must be an explanation of this strange :nerner: obsesion of mine...:silly:

But...:help: I am :help: still not :help: convinced :haha:

Sebastian222
Jun 25th, 2012, 05:14 PM
by Kate Battersby
Monday 25 June 2012

Should anyone have been under the mistaken impression that completing her career Grand Slam at Roland Garros earlier this month would instil in Maria Sharapova a comfy air of laidback contentment, the Russian put them right at the first opportunity. If anything the No.1 seed appeared hungrier than ever, more fiercely focused than ever as she dismantled the world No.133 Anastasia Rodionova 6-2, 6-3 in 70 minutes.

Sharapova opened up in statement fashion, taking her first service game to love in one minute. Seventeen of the first 18 points in the match belonged to her, and it seemed Rodionova – Russian-born but a naturalised Australian since December 2009 – could do nothing to stem the Sharapova onslaught of winners. Even a Rodionova challenge on a Sharapova ace was shown to be clearly erroneous, and Sharapova was 5-0 up in a scant 14 minutes. A “bagel” set beckoned, and Sharapova was up for it – but Rodionova was not. At 30, she might be a journeywoman of the tour, but her experience means she did not obligingly fold in the manner that a younger, more shell-shocked opponent might have. This was her seventh main draw appearance at Wimbledon, her 12th overall, and all that knowledge counts for something. Moreover, she does actually like playing on grass.

There followed a nine-minute game of nip and tuck, in which the Australian saved three set points, but also required five separate game points of her own before she was able to get her name on the scoreboard. She did it by lobbing Sharapova at the net and the Russian could not get enough of her racket to it. Rodionova smiled in acknowledgement of the crowd’s sympathetic applause. Next game she saved a fourth set point before unexpectedly forcing break point with a sizzling return. Moreover, she actually took it courtesy of a short rally on Sharapova’s second serve. At 2-5 the set had acquired an air of respectability, although that was as much as Sharapova would allow. As if tired of the game, she broke again to take the set via an unanswerable backhand return.

By then Sharapova was in no mood to allow Rodionova any ideas about gaining much of a foothold in the second set. It was not quite the decimation job seen in the early part of the first set, but this time Sharapova was in far more consistent control. Rodionova hung in there, but Sharapova’s relentless attack permitted her to serve out an ideal first-round workout. She took it on the first match point with a roaring ace – but after the match, she was typically not all that impressed with herself.

“The first one’s always tricky, the transition from clay to grass,” Sharapova said. “I had a couple of let downs at the end of both those sets but overall I’m happy. It’s always a very nice feeling to be back on Centre Court. It’s such a special place for me.

“The career Slam is the best gift I could have received at this time in my career. It wasn’t a Cinderella story – I worked really hard, a lot of tough days. I couldn’t compete at a high level without a lot of pain. Now it’s great to say I’m French Open champion but you have to start from scratch again with the practice and the work to get yourself through round one, and maybe to the final again. I still believe I can achieve a lot more. That’s what drives me and gets me up in the mornings still. I always think I can be better.”

http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/news/articles/2012-06-25/201206251340634633327.html

kasia1992
Jun 25th, 2012, 05:48 PM
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505270_162-57459613/one-on-one-with-maria-sharapova-on-eve-of-wimbledon/

Video interview.

MashaFan01
Jun 25th, 2012, 05:55 PM
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505270_162-57459613/one-on-one-with-maria-sharapova-on-eve-of-wimbledon/

Video interview.

Wow - she looks like a business woman in that interview - Never seen her dressed that strictly before - Very kewl!!

kasia1992
Jun 25th, 2012, 06:01 PM
Wow - she looks like a business woman in that interview - Never seen her dressed that strictly before - Very kewl!!

hope we will get whole video interview.

imema
Jun 25th, 2012, 06:29 PM
M. SHARAPOVA/A. Rodionova 6‑2, 6‑3



MARIA SHARAPOVA





Q. How was that for you today?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, the first one’s always tricky. To go out there after not competing for a couple weeks, the transition from clay to grass, I thought I started off the match really well. Had a few letdowns towards the end of both of those sets.

Overall I’m pretty happy with the way I performed, especially for a first match, not having matches coming in.

Q. How do you find the surface and the atmosphere?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, it’s always a very nice feeling for me to be back on Centre Court. It’s been a year. It’s such a special place for me. You know, it’s quiet, but it’s a very understated, nice feeling to be out there.



Q. How is it to be back this year?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: It’s certainly the best gift I could have received at this time in my career. I certainly worked hard for it. My comeback wasn’t the easiest. Wasn’t a Cinderella story, that’s for sure. Took a lot of tough days and losses and some wins to get to that moment. But you realize when you actually do get there that it’s worth it.

All of those situations you’re put in and put through, if you come out of them, it’s a nice prize on the other side.



Q. Do you consider your comeback complete now, and this is a new stage now that you got the Grand Slam title you were looking for?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think maybe in terms of comeback, yes, because it’s a Grand Slam win and to get back to No. 1. But in terms of my career, definitely not. I’m still very humble and very appreciative of what I have. I still believe that I can achieve a lot more.

That’s what drives me and gets me up in the morning still, no matter how much success I’ve had, no matter how many downfalls, I still believe I can be better. I think until the day comes that I wake up and I think my game is not good enough, that’s the time where you say, Well…



Q. So after Paris, you smiled a lot, and now you’re thinking about Wimbledon and you’re thinking, Okay, next stage now. This is sort of behind me and now I have to plan for something new?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, it’s really something that I’ll have for the rest of my life and something that I can think back on and know that I was part of the Roland Garros history.

But this sport puts you back to reality so fast. Within days you’re back practicing, getting ready, and it starts from scratch, starts from the first round. It just happens to be Wimbledon.

So when you’re a Grand Slam champion, you’re No. 1 in the world, everybody is more hungry across the net to beat you.



Q. What do you think about the plans to extend the time from the end of the Roland Garros to the beginning of Wimbledon, maybe an extra week to adjust to the grass?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, maybe. It just depends on how that transitions towards the end of the year and if we have to sacrifice an extra week at the end of the calendar year, which it’s tough already. We don’t have that much time. I mean, especially the men. They’re a couple weeks after us.

So as difficult of a transition as it is, I think it’s maybe better like that than seeing the schedule go over the weeks that it is. Which I don’t think it will, because we’re always pushing for a little bit of a longer off‑season.



Q. What was the one or two toughest moments in the stretch of your comeback?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I think it was just the general idea of not competing and not competing at a level that I wanted to and that I knew that I could. I mean, during the time that I was away from the sport, it was me wanting to be out there so much and I really couldn’t.

You know, sometimes you have goals for yourself and people say, You can’t achieve that. But it was like a stop sign. I couldn’t really go out and compete professionally at a high level without a lot of pain, so I knew that was not possible.

And then when I would come back in the beginning, and even the losses that I went through, I knew that I was capable of so much better out on the court. I knew that had to come out sometime because I put a lot of work in and I know I have it in me.

You’re never going to lose that. It’s about finding and putting the right pieces together in order for it to come out.



Q. This is the first time here coming off having won the French. What’s different about that, if anything, as you conduct yourself and progress at Wimbledon?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, what’s different is I can say I’m the French Open champion. I guess that’s the difference (laughter).

Yeah, I mean, look, as much as you want to celebrate, be so excited and happy, I really think that memory, you enjoy it for just that amount of time, which is a few days you get to relax and think about the victory.

Like I mentioned, you come to a tournament and it’s not like that it never happened, but you’ve got to start back again from scratch in the practices and the work and get yourself through round one and through to the final again.

It all starts from the beginning.



Q. When you come here every year, do you still think about 2004?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I think of what I’ve achieved. When I walk past the boards with the champions, I definitely look at it and I see my name, and it makes me really happy to be part of such history at this tournament. Of course I do. How can you not?



Q. When you see your picture, do you say, That was just a young girl then; she didn’t know what she was doing?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: I don’t know if I didn’t know what I was doing, but I was a young girl. I was like, My ponytail was too low (smiling).



Q. What has been the most surprising thing since you won Roland Garros?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Most surprising thing? I don’t know. Nothing. I wish I could tell you something crazy happened or I was wild.

No, I’m pretty relaxed about things. I think that’s something that’s helped me in the last few years. As much as you want to be down after losing or as much as you want to celebrate a victory, I’ve been pretty levelheaded since my injury about the really good days and the bad days. I handle situations much better than I did maybe when I was younger.

The next day after I won, I was in Row 20 in a European Southwest Airlines going to Spain to see my candy being produced with little babies next to me. It was like reality check.



Q. How does that airline compare with Southwest?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Not enough leg room. I had bruises on my knees. That was the only direct option, so I didn’t have many options. I didn’t want to connect anywhere.



Q. Did people recognize you or ask you to hold their babies?

MARIA SHARAPOVA: Well, I was traveling with a family. It was my physio’s family that had a baby which I love carrying, so I was slightly responsible.


http://freedomtennis.wordpress.com/

jameshazza
Jun 25th, 2012, 06:34 PM
Very nice interview, she does seem to be a lot more open and chatty.

MashaFan01
Jun 25th, 2012, 07:36 PM
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505270_162-57459613/one-on-one-with-maria-sharapova-on-eve-of-wimbledon/

Video interview.

I wonder about that huge ring on her finger - That isn't her engagement ring is it?

JamieOwen3
Jun 25th, 2012, 07:41 PM
LOVE how the video ended :) many more years to come bitchez

JoPova
Jun 25th, 2012, 07:43 PM
Loved the interview! She's so much more willing to talk and answer questions these days! :hearts:

Sebastian222
Jun 25th, 2012, 07:43 PM
I wonder about that huge ring on her finger - That isn't her engagement ring is it?

No... she was already "dressed up" without the dress for the Wimbledon Pre-Party... so the interview was taken right before or right after the party... I guess before...

Sebastian222
Jun 25th, 2012, 07:46 PM
Very nice interview, she does seem to be a lot more open and chatty.

But still she doesn't tell us new stuff... it's what we know in different ways...

MashaFan01
Jun 25th, 2012, 07:53 PM
No... she was already "dressed up" without the dress for the Wimbledon Pre-Party... so the interview was taken right before or right after the party... I guess before...

That sounds like a plausible explanation - I thought that ring and bracelet looked familiar from her party dress up - :) - Thanks

BTW - Arantxa reached R2 - not bad

stegall
Jun 25th, 2012, 07:54 PM
http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=8094159

MM_1257
Jun 25th, 2012, 08:00 PM
I am tired of all these rings... Let her wear whatever she wants... :lol: :unsure:

Sebastian222
Jun 25th, 2012, 08:02 PM
http://espn.go.com/video/clip?id=8094159

Has been posted in the video thread but not for us to see in parts of Europ(a)...

By the way... nice ring...:devil:

MM_1257
Jun 25th, 2012, 08:11 PM
I had bruises on my knees. :lol: QueenPova not used to airplanes for peasants... But yeah, I agree, a torture for tall people.

I cannot see the ESPN video. :bigcry::ras:

MM_1257
Jun 25th, 2012, 09:04 PM
Maria's Russian presser
http://news.sport-express.ru/2012-06-25/518818/

gc-spurs
Jun 25th, 2012, 09:14 PM
:lol: QueenPova not used to airplanes for peasants... But yeah, I agree, a torture for tall people.

I cannot see the ESPN video. :bigcry::ras:

Yeah well not a bad price to pay for being tall. Stupid tall people.

Crux Squall
Jun 29th, 2012, 07:33 AM
Q. A not particularly convincing start in your early‑round matches. Is that because you're adjusting to the grass or is it something else?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: My first match was okay (laughter). Second one we should talk about, but the first one...
Well, a lot of things went on in the last one. Obviously felt like two matches in a way. You know, yesterday she came out firing, started so well, and had so many opportunities to win that set. I really hung on. I was just extremely tough.
Finally got the momentum. I knew we would be stopping. Everybody knew at some point we wouldn't finish the match. That was difficult, because I felt I had the advantage.
Today I wanted to start off really well because I knew I was up a break. Didn't go according to plan. Really served sloppy.
In the third I changed it around.

Q. Looking at the draw, you knew it would be difficult because she did so well here last year.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I think if she played on grass 365 days a year she'd be top 5 probably. Unfortunately, doesn't work that way. She has the perfect game for it. She always does really well against top players. She really rises for the occasion.
But, yeah, I haven't seen too many of her other matches, but every time I play against her and every time I see her face a tough opponent, especially here, she plays extremely well. You saw some of that yesterday definitely.

Q. How do you turn it on and off so fast going from the second set breaker, which clearly wasn't your best tennis. What were you thinking when you were down?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, well, I started with no motor whatsoever. I was just on pause, everything. I felt like my feet, I mean, so many things, just making errors. The return, I mean, she hit a 95 miles per hour ace in the body, I think. I didn't think that was possible (laughter).
So there were just a lot of things I felt I could have done better. I felt like I put myself in a position to be up and I didn't take advantage of it.
I mean, look, it kind of starts from scratch. It's always a difficult situation because, you know, I really felt like I turned things around yesterday.
But she's someone that just comes out and just fires, and things go well, they go well; if not, the bad day.

Q. You have a pretty impressive record in third sets. Do you think it's an advantage to be starting first going into that set? And if so, why?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Did I serve first today? No, I don't. Then maybe not (smiling).
Yeah, I think I started with a break. Yeah, I don't know. I actually don't know. I mean, it depends. Of course, it's nice to be up in those games. But I always think the first games are always really important in terms of, you know, when you're in that situation, those are really key moments in the third set.

Q. What did you specifically change in the third set?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Specifically? Nothing specific. We were playing with the same balls. I played with the same racquet. I think it was just, I mean, tell myself to ‑‑ well, I mean, I started doing things a little bit better.
Like I said, I felt like everything was a little bit slow. I wasn't moving up to the ball. She hit a few short balls. I made errors. I let her play. I didn't feel like there was enough pace on my ball. I guess those things that I usually do.

Q. I'm from Sweden and curious about your journey together with Thomas Hogstedt. Could you describe that a little bit, please?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Let's not make it sound so dramatic. It's not like curing cancer here (laughter).
Well, yeah, I've said it many times. He's been a really great addition to my team. Certainly not an easy change for me, because I had the same people on my team for many, many years.
But, you know, he brought a whole new perspective to my career in a way, a lot of energy in my practices which ultimately gets you to the match with that same sort of feel and desire.
He came in believing in me, that he could see me back at No. 1 in the world, which was a plus now. He coached against me, as well.
So, yeah, I mean, many good things I could say about him.

Q. Unlike the women's side of things where there have been so many champions in the Grand Slams the last several years, on the men's side it's been three guys winning 28 of the last 29. What sense of appreciation do you have for what Djokovic, Nadal, and Federer have done?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Tremendous amount. You know, you ask the question of when are you going to see something like this again. You know, we're pretty fortunate to be part of a generation in which you see such incredible rivalries between the three, and also putting Murray in the mix, someone who is out to be 'em and get his first Grand Slam.
It's special to watch. The tennis they've produced against each other has been so nice. Obviously it was Roger and Rafa against each other. And then the way you kind of saw Novak come in, especially last year, and just dominate I think mentally was just so impressive how he could go from one event to another. That was the thing that was really amazing.
Of course you're bound to have a few letdowns, but he was just so mentally strong.

Q. There's been a report recently about adopting a system to measure the noise when players hit the ball. Is there something you can do to your technique to reduce the noise that you make?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Uhm, certainly not now, not since I've been doing it since I was four years old. It's definitely tough and impossible to do when you've played this sport for over 20 years.
But it's something, I mean, I certainly spoke to Stacy about it. We've had numerous conversations. It's the first person actually that's sat down with many people and coaches and sports psychologists and analysts and really reviewed what could be done.
I'm really happy with the system that she put forth. Going to the juniors, going to the academies that are producing the young players, and putting a system in place, I think it's extremely smart.

Q. You played a shot yesterday with your left hand.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: I'm actually naturally a lefty. I played left‑handed for a year in my junior year, and then I played two hands on both sides.
I actually kick and throw left‑handed all the time. There are many things, yeah, that I like to do left handed.
But I do things both.

Q. Gilles Simon has made a comment about the equal pay issue. Wondering what your feelings are on those comments.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Yeah, I mean, look, we women have fought so long to get equal prize money. It was a big challenge and nobody really supported us. It's been a few years since we've gotten that. We're all really proud of it, and we continue to build the sport and make it bigger.
No matter what anyone says, or the criticisms that we get, despite everything else, I mean, I'm sure there are a few more people that watch my matches than his, so...

Q. You're an American‑based, Russian coached by a Swede. Do you know anything about cricket?
MARIA SHARAPOVA: No.

Q. One of the world's best cricketers has declared a crush on you.
MARIA SHARAPOVA: Don't know too much about that sport. I'm not very athletic and don't watch too much. Sorry.

Valkyre
Jun 29th, 2012, 07:56 AM
^^I also declare a crush for Maria lololol

Good luck today Maria, hope you have a comfortable win!

**mashafierce**
Jun 29th, 2012, 08:49 AM
I just read what Gilles Simon said and in some arguments he was right but overall he was wrong.Before reading what he said I thought Maria shouldn't be so hostile and arrogant but now I realise her comments were absolutely justified

Andy.
Jun 29th, 2012, 08:54 AM
WOW that has got to be the most openly bitchy thing Maria has said in a presser. LOVE IT!!!

Mrs. Dimitrova
Jun 29th, 2012, 09:10 AM
And which cricketer is this? :lol:

Reptilia
Jun 29th, 2012, 09:24 AM
Whoever he is... He just became my favourite Cricketer. :p

MM_1257
Jun 29th, 2012, 10:34 AM
I actually LOVE Maria's presser. She wasn't bitchy, just being herself. The statement about Simon is nowhere as bitchy as I thought it would be.
About Masha being left-handed. I can just say WOW. She is pretty good with her right hand... I was watching clips from that Open Court (or how was it called) show that she filmed when she was a teenager, she holds the camera in her right hand, I, for example, am not very confident in filming left-handed...

Advantage Me
Jun 29th, 2012, 11:01 AM
Serena's response to Maria's comment about Simon was even better. 'Maria is way hotter than Simon'!! Way to go Serena. Told you they are best mates.

Cosmic Voices
Jun 29th, 2012, 11:34 AM
"There are many things, yeah, that I like to do left handed"

I read this so wrong :oh:

nectar69
Jun 29th, 2012, 03:08 PM
Love the part about the cricket player. Maria was probably thinking 'who doesn't have a crush on me'? I know I do. And I even think Serena does.