PDA

View Full Version : WTA wants to change whereabouts regulation after Wickmayer flap


belzebub
Jan 29th, 2010, 11:25 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20100129/sp_wl_afp/tennisopenauswtawickmayerdoping

Hopefully this will be read by Radwanska too.:p

belzebub
Jan 29th, 2010, 11:57 AM
"Allaster said the WTA was committed to supporting the young Belgian, who made the fourth round in Melbourne, and said her case had highlighted problems with WADA's procedures."

About time did they have to wait 3 months to come up with that...

Rik.
Jan 29th, 2010, 11:59 AM
:yeah:

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 05:06 PM
WTA calls for changes to ‘whereabouts’ rule

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP)—The head of the WTA wants changes to certain anti-doping rules, notably the stringent “whereabouts” rule that initially led to a one-year ban for Yanina Wickmayer.

Wickmayer has appealed the ban and was allowed to play at the Australian Open and other tournaments while the appeal is pending in the Court of Arbitration for Sport and the European Commission.

“There are rules in place and professional athletes have to follow the rules. Do the rules need to be changed? Yes, we are advocating for changes as it relates to (the) whereabouts program,” Stacey Allaster, the chairman and CEO of the women’s tennis tour, said Friday.

Wickmayer was banned in November for breaking World Anti-Doping Agency regulations by failing three times to report her whereabouts for drug testing.

She never failed a doping test, and claimed that she was not properly informed of the online reporting requirements for drug-testing that led to her ban. She said that letters notifying her of her breach of the rule were sent to her home in Belgium while she was in Australia.

Wickmayer appealed to a Belgian court and the controversial suspension was lifted last month. But the cutoff for main draw entries at the season’s first Grand Slam had already passed, so she had to go the qualifying route. Wickmayer would have been seeded No. 16 for the Australian Open based on her ranking. She lost in the fourth round to Justine Henin.

“Everyone in the sport has zero tolerance for doping,” Allaster said. “I think the whereabouts program is good. Some of the procedures in the whereabouts program need to be modified for our sport.”

WADA’s “whereabouts” rule requires elite athletes to make themselves available—at times they can specify—for out-of-competition testing on any given day. They must give three months’ notice of where they will be so they can be tested at random.

Three missed tests results in an automatic ban.

Many athletes have spoken out against the system since it was imposed at the beginning of last year, saying it violates their right to privacy, and 65 athletes in Belgium started court proceedings against the whereabouts system, citing the European Convention on Human Rights.

The women’s tennis circuit includes 53 tournaments for 10 months of the year.

“During competition, we know where they are, they’re here. They don’t know if they’re going to win a match or not. They don’t know when they’re going to get their practice court. It’s very difficult to keep that system updated,” Allaster said. “If WADA wants to come in, or a national doping association wants to come in and test them, all they have to do is look at the schedule".

“That’s where we’ve been saying, what works for all sports doesn’t work for our sport procedurally when they are in competition. And they are in competition 10 months of the year,” she said.

http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/news;_ylt=Ag.zA6DHO9TVrfzCkBhWKOQ4v7YF?slug=ap-wta-wickmayer&prov=ap&type=lgns

DutchieGirl
Jan 29th, 2010, 05:18 PM
Hmm well I like this chick for now... :lol:

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 05:54 PM
yanina or stacey? :lol:

DutchieGirl
Jan 29th, 2010, 05:56 PM
Stacey....at least she's thinking about the whereabouts rules, and she makes some good points (I'll wait to see what else she does in the next few months to decide if I really like her :lol: )... Yanina's Ok...not a big fan, but what happened to her sucks obviously.

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 06:03 PM
I have a good rule :speakles:

Test all players at the start of each tournament, Q R1 or MD R1/R2 :speakles:

DutchieGirl
Jan 29th, 2010, 06:12 PM
The problem is it still doesn't cover out of comp testing. But it'd be a good start I guess. :lol:

hablo
Jan 29th, 2010, 06:23 PM
They need to be tested in the off-season too ...

Shvedbarilescu
Jan 29th, 2010, 06:24 PM
“During competition, we know where they are, they’re here. They don’t know if they’re going to win a match or not. They don’t know when they’re going to get their practice court. It’s very difficult to keep that system updated,” Allaster said. “If WADA wants to come in, or a national doping association wants to come in and test them, all they have to do is look at the schedule".

“That’s where we’ve been saying, what works for all sports doesn’t work for our sport procedurally when they are in competition. And they are in competition 10 months of the year,” she said.


This here is good common sense. Wouldn't it be nice if just once in the crazy world good common sense prevailed?

DutchieGirl
Jan 29th, 2010, 06:28 PM
This here is good common sense. Wouldn't it be nice if just once in the crazy world good common sense prevailed?
:lol: Yeah - but good luck with that ever happening. ;)

scoobz
Jan 29th, 2010, 06:29 PM
I blame the ATP, the ITF and the WTA for signing up to the WADA whereabouts code WITHOUT IRONING OUT ALL THESE PROBLEMS BEFOREHAND.

They were just as obvious then as they are now.

Sure, everyone wants a clean sport and I support the moves to get doping testing done under the auspices of WADA. But this should have been thought through first!

Now the tours leave themselves in the silly position of trying to change a procedure that they seemed happy to go along with when WADA introduced this whereabouts requirement.

scottd
Jan 29th, 2010, 06:33 PM
They seem like entirely sensible suggestions from Stacey Allaster to me. Whilst the whereabouts programme seems to place overly restrictive demands on players, I'd rather have it in-place than see tennis dragged through the mud the same way that cycling and athletics have been in the past. Some procedural changes are needed, though.

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 06:48 PM
So what they could do

* Test players every player at the start of a tournament.

* Test players during the off-season on each Monday.

* If a player misses her first whereabouts, the person should be contacted via WTA/ITF via telephone.

* Deliberately missing a doping test should result in a 2 month suspension.

Any other things to be added?

WhoAmI?
Jan 29th, 2010, 07:06 PM
^^ if they test them every Monday in the off-season, then there's no point because the players know they'll be tested. The problem is to get the players off-guard, so they don't expect it. I think the whereabouts system works well in the off-season, they probably don't travel to a different place each week.

I think they shouldn't force the whereabouts system when they know anyway where the player is at that week. But when a player has a week off of the tournaments, then she should fill in her location.

^bibi^
Jan 29th, 2010, 07:08 PM
They could implant a GPS device under the skin of professional players, that way they'd always know where they are :haha:

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 07:09 PM
In the future that will happen bibi. The American government is already in testing fase with gps emitters in the blood stream. They plan to do that with criminals and such :lol:

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 07:11 PM
^^ if they test them every Monday in the off-season, then there's no point because the players know they'll be tested. The problem is to get the players off-guard, so they don't expect it. I think the whereabouts system works well in the off-season, they probably don't travel to a different place each week.

I think they shouldn't force the whereabouts system when they know anyway where the player is at that week. But when a player has a week off of the tournaments, then she should fill in her location.

Each drug averagely stays 2-4 weeks in your bloodstream. There's no way you can get a drug out of your system in 7 days.

^bibi^
Jan 29th, 2010, 07:12 PM
:hearts: :hearts: awesome.. George Orwell was just a few decades ahead placing his novel in 1983 :lol:

DutchieGirl
Jan 29th, 2010, 07:17 PM
:hearts: :hearts: awesome.. George Orwell was just a few decades ahead placing his novel in 1983 :lol:
:lol: Scary, isn't it? ;)

gentenaire
Jan 29th, 2010, 09:15 PM
So what they could do

* Test players every player at the start of a tournament.

* Test players during the off-season on each Monday.

* If a player misses her first whereabouts, the person should be contacted via WTA/ITF via telephone.

* Deliberately missing a doping test should result in a 2 month suspension.

Any other things to be added?

Deliberately missing a doping test should be punished far more severely than that. To me that counts as evidence of doping.

I do think players should be tested at random too.

But I agree with Tracey that the rules should be different for different sports.

TheBoiledEgg
Jan 29th, 2010, 09:20 PM
as WADA got to know where players are 3 months before hand, where they'll be for that hour....
i can just see WADA come onto court during a match

can we have your sample now please ??

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 09:27 PM
as WADA got to know where players are 3 months before hand, where they'll be for that hour....
i can just see WADA come onto court during a match

can we have your sample now please ??

You missed the point. She meant, we know they will be at the facilities or in the city, where they are playing, we know which hotel they are staying at, we know where they'll be at the gym. We know when they have media tasks. etc...

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 09:31 PM
Deliberately missing a doping test should be punished far more severely than that. To me that counts as evidence of doping.

I do think players should be tested at random too.

But I agree with Tracey that the rules should be different for different sports.

I don't think it should be punished more than 2 months, unless repeated, it should be doubled or tripled. You can't put the same penalty on a missed (deliberate or not) test and a positive test. Otherwise it gives them the feeling if we miss a test or take drugs, the sanction stays the same.

Random testing, It's not really that random, you have an idea when they'll come, because of the whereabouts schedule.

WhoAmI?
Jan 29th, 2010, 11:11 PM
I don't think it should be punished more than 2 months, unless repeated, it should be doubled or tripled. You can't put the same penalty on a missed (deliberate or not) test and a positive test. Otherwise it gives them the feeling if we miss a test or take drugs, the sanction stays the same.

Random testing, It's not really that random, you have an idea when they'll come, because of the whereabouts schedule.

Not really they don't, they fill in each day, so they could come each day thus it's impossible to know really.

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 11:13 PM
Not really they don't, they fill in each day, so they could come each day thus it's impossible to know really.

Still not random, they have an idea around what time they will come.

WhoAmI?
Jan 29th, 2010, 11:17 PM
Yes, they know the hour when they could show up, but never a day (it's not possible to know where you are each hour of the day I think :lol:).

DutchieGirl
Jan 29th, 2010, 11:22 PM
Still not random, they have an idea around what time they will come.
:rolls: Just because they know what hours of the day someone may turn up does not mean it's not random. They have no idea what day they could be tested, therefore it IS random. The time of day that they get tested really has no bearing.

youizahoe
Jan 29th, 2010, 11:30 PM
:rolls: Just because they know what hours of the day someone may turn up does not mean it's not random. They have no idea what day they could be tested, therefore it IS random. The time of day that they get tested really has no bearing.

Perhaps, but they know which hour they could come, if they remember what they entered, still not completely random :p

DutchieGirl
Jan 30th, 2010, 08:08 AM
Perhaps, but they know which hour they could come, if they remember what they entered, still not completely random :p
I know that, but what difference does it make what TIME they come? None. It is still random because they never know which day they may be tested. I would assume most athletes just pick the same hour for a week or a month or something so that it's not so hard to remember anyway. I mean if an athlete started picking like 6-7am one day, then 10-11pm the next and so on maybe that would be more weird because they could possibly be trying to hide something anyway. But really, the time of day they may be tested has no bearing on making the test random as they have to give a time for EVERY day, and they still never know what day they might get tested. If they just knew that they would be tested between say 8am and 10am every Monday, that is sure as hell not random.

Lindsayfan32
Jan 30th, 2010, 11:22 AM
WADA are carrying on like Wickmayer returned a positive test. when all her test are negative. when this rule was introduced a lot of the top players at the time said it was going to cause trouble and confusion. The rules don't need to be changed they need to be got rid of. A player can report their where abouts and still do banned drugs so what the point in making them report their where abouts in the first place it just a dumb rule.

Szavay #1
Jan 30th, 2010, 11:43 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20100129/sp_wl_afp/tennisopenauswtawickmayerdoping

Hopefully this will be read by Radwanska too.:p

:haha:

anthonyqld
Jan 30th, 2010, 11:46 AM
So what they could do

* Test players every player at the start of a tournament.

* Test players during the off-season on each Monday.

* If a player misses her first whereabouts, the person should be contacted via WTA/ITF via telephone.

* Deliberately missing a doping test should result in a 2 month suspension.

Any other things to be added?

Just testing on Monday can pose a problem, it might not be able to be detected then. HGH can only be detected for 2 hours, then your free without a chance of being caught. Plenty of other drugs can only be detected in the first 24 hours. In 2008 there were quite a few NRL players having a whinge that they were being woken at 2:00-3:00am for random tests (sometimes 2-3 nights in a row).

If the players knew when they were going to get tested then they'll be stupid if they're caught, as they'll wait until just after the test to do their drugs then they'll turn up clean the next week while reaping the benefits.

anthonyqld
Jan 30th, 2010, 11:51 AM
Each drug averagely stays 2-4 weeks in your bloodstream. There's no way you can get a drug out of your system in 7 days.

HGH only last for 2 hours. Many others last only 24-48 hours. Very few(that are still used) last 2-4 weeks.

Patrick345
Jan 30th, 2010, 11:56 AM
Because one player screwed up (or their national doping agency) the WTA demands to soften the system. If rules are broken, we just change the rules, so they fit again. Sounds like she´ll be a good WTA politican. :worship: :rolleyes:

TheAllan
Jan 30th, 2010, 04:09 PM
She won't have any luck with this proposal. It doesn't look like she has thought it through, and the problem she seems to want to address has nothing to do with the Wickmayer case. The only distinction that exists within the system is between individual sports and team sports. To think that tennis will have their own set of rules is slightly optimistic when every move so far has been in the reverse direction - namely to harmonize the rules and punishments across sports.

Top players only average around 20 tournaments a year - that leaves a lot of time in their schedule when they can't be located through a tournament. They would still need to fill in their whereabouts on an individual basis. I take her proposal to mean that they wouldn't need to fill in their whereabouts when they are participating in a tournament. I think this would just be more confusing for the players. Some players withdraw, others lose early. And whenever that happens they would need to be conscious of the whereabouts. Some might stay for an extra day or two to practice, in which case they still need to update whereabouts as they are no longer covered by tournament participation. It's easy so see players forgetting this when there is no consistent rule to have them updated at all times.

And who will be responsible for constantly updating the player schedules to both the ITF and the national anti-doping organizations? I suppose the WTA will take on this responsibility, but it's the players who will be punished individually for any mistakes they make. This could create some very messy disputes.

youizahoe
Jan 30th, 2010, 04:34 PM
Just testing on Monday can pose a problem, it might not be able to be detected then. HGH can only be detected for 2 hours, then your free without a chance of being caught. Plenty of other drugs can only be detected in the first 24 hours. In 2008 there were quite a few NRL players having a whinge that they were being woken at 2:00-3:00am for random tests (sometimes 2-3 nights in a row).

If the players knew when they were going to get tested then they'll be stupid if they're caught, as they'll wait until just after the test to do their drugs then they'll turn up clean the next week while reaping the benefits.

Those problems will be solved with the new doping trace methods, which is in a testingfase :)

But yeah, I have to agree :)