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View Full Version : Monica is officially in the HOF! [Pics inside]


hingis-seles
Jul 9th, 2009, 12:02 AM
With Monica Seles' HOF induction ceremony this weekend, I was wondering why she never got that proper farewell tribute from the WTA that all the great champions receive? Can we expect one following her HOF induction or has that ship sailed?

Thoughts?

RenaSlam.
Jul 9th, 2009, 12:08 AM
:worship:

Monica.

Dave.
Jul 9th, 2009, 02:13 AM
Monica :hearts: :yeah: I look forward to seeing the pics and hearing her speech. Goes without saying she fully deserves her place in there.


What WTA send-off tribute do you mean? They made her a tribute video when she announced her retirement if that's the sort of thing you mean.

EvertNavratilova
Jul 9th, 2009, 03:09 AM
http://74.125.113.132/search?q=cache:Dyqsf4HlkVUJ:www.turnto10.com/jar/sports/local/article/tennis_hall_of_fame_honors_monica_seles/16772/+monica+seles+hall+of+fame&cd=5&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us
Video

Tennis Hall of Fame honors Monica Seles

By Joe Kayata
Sports Reporter, Anchor
Published: June 19, 2009

NEWPORT, R.I.—A Newport summer tradition is just weeks away.

The Campbell’s Hall of Fame Tennis Championships and induction ceremony take place in early July. This year, Monica Seles will take her place in the pantheon of tennis.

NBC 10’s Joe Kayata reports.

HRHoliviasmith
Jul 9th, 2009, 04:38 AM
i am so happy for her.

spiritedenergy
Jul 9th, 2009, 04:38 AM
:worship:

misael
Jul 9th, 2009, 04:57 AM
She truly deserves to be there, see her also on the cover of Tennis magazine.I love Monica!!

OsloErik
Jul 9th, 2009, 05:09 AM
With Monica Seles' HOF induction ceremony this weekend, I was wondering why she never got that proper farewell tribute from the WTA that all the great champions receive? Can we expect one following her HOF induction or has that ship sailed?

Thoughts?

Well, she kept on saying for around 5 years that she wasn't retired and that she was going to try to come back. It's hard to have a big send off ceremony 5 years after the fact. She'll probably get some ceremony at the HOF induction.

Mike_T
Jul 9th, 2009, 08:20 AM
Another billionaire! I just trust The Hof realises she’s no more than a lesbian gold-digger.

galadriel
Jul 9th, 2009, 08:54 AM
Monica :worship::worship:

hingis-seles
Jul 9th, 2009, 11:41 AM
Monica :hearts: :yeah: I look forward to seeing the pics and hearing her speech. Goes without saying she fully deserves her place in there.


What WTA send-off tribute do you mean? They made her a tribute video when she announced her retirement if that's the sort of thing you mean.

I meant that Steffi and Martina both got proper farewells at MSG as tributes when they retired. Monica got the tribute video...and yeah. Could I get a link to that video, please? I'd really like to watch it.

She truly deserves to be there, see her also on the cover of Tennis magazine.I love Monica!!

She's on the cover of Tennis magazine? Cool. I'll check it out.

Well, she kept on saying for around 5 years that she wasn't retired and that she was going to try to come back. It's hard to have a big send off ceremony 5 years after the fact. She'll probably get some ceremony at the HOF induction.

I supposed the lengthy layoff before the retirement did take the zing out of that, although Sampras did get a big send off at the US Open after taking a year to decide. But 5 > 1, and he was defending champion, so I suppose that's moot. I can't wait to watch the HOF induction. Hopefully, someone manages to upload it.

Dave.
Jul 9th, 2009, 12:35 PM
It's not much, but http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/VideoFeatures/FeaturesDetail/0,,12781~1645511,00.html

Kart
Jul 9th, 2009, 01:29 PM
Hopefully she'll get a good send off. She's a very popular champion.

I agree about the 5 year gap issue. If she'd retired in 2004 she'd have had a huge send off.

spiritedenergy
Jul 9th, 2009, 02:51 PM
Another billionaire! I just trust The Hof realises she’s no more than a lesbian gold-digger.

:weirdo:

hingis-seles
Jul 9th, 2009, 06:09 PM
It's not much, but http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/VideoFeatures/FeaturesDetail/0,,12781~1645511,00.html

Thanks!

I remember watching this clip when it was first put up on the WTA website.

I wonder who will speak for Monica at her induction. A former player or someone else?

Kart
Jul 9th, 2009, 06:11 PM
Maybe they'll get Steffi :D.

hingis-seles
Jul 9th, 2009, 06:13 PM
Maybe they'll get Steffi :D.

That would be amazing. :worship:

I think this board would probably crash with the poster reactions. :devil:

Kart
Jul 9th, 2009, 06:14 PM
It would be amazing I agree.

It would be a good day to steer clear of this forum I think !

CrossCourt~Rally
Jul 9th, 2009, 06:16 PM
Does anyone know if the Tennis Channel or ESPN will air the HOF ceremony this weekend ?? Monica :hearts:

Thanks :wavey:

samn
Jul 9th, 2009, 06:29 PM
I wonder who will speak for Monica at her induction. A former player or someone else?

Maybe Betsy Nagelsen? Or would that be too obvious considering that Seles spoke at Mark McCormack's induction.

EvertNavratilova
Jul 10th, 2009, 03:20 AM
Maybe they'll get Steffi :D.

Nobody likes a cold boring monster like Graf.;) Seriously, I think Seles fans would prefer Evert or Navratilova to grace Monica's induction to the HOF. :)

EvertNavratilova
Jul 10th, 2009, 03:27 AM
Seles exhibit showcases passion for game

09:32 PM EDT on Thursday, July 9, 2009

BY MIKE SZOSTAK
Journal Sports Writer

http://www.projo.com/sports/mikeszostak/projo_20090709_tennis_hall_of_fame_1.257f9a79.html

NEWPORT — Savvy fans took advantage of the four-hour delay in the start of play Thursday to stroll through the International Tennis Hall of Fame and Museum and linger at the stunning exhibits honoring the four luminaries who will be inducted Saturday.

"Monica Seles: Pride and Passion for the Love of the Game" is a spectacular multimedia display covering the nine-time Grand Slam champion's career. Five display cases feature the spoils of her victories, and one case holds the hardware from her triumphs at the Australian Open, French Open and U.S. Open. Another displays memorabilia, among them a tennis ball with the drawing of a mouse done by her cartoonist father, Karolj, when she was a child. He encouraged her to think of herself as a cat and to whack the mouse.

The Seles exhibit takes up the entire room in the center of the museum. She offered 80 items from her personal collection and about 50 are on display. Nicole Markham, the museum curator, went to the Seles' home in Sarasota, Fla., and helped pack the items for shipment. Seles reviewed the text for the exhibit and will see it for the first time Friday or Saturday.

Posters on the wall take us through her career from her childhood hitting balls in her hometown of Novi Sad, Yugoslavia, to her run to the Orange Bowl final when she was 13, to her family's move to Sarasota, Fla., to enroll her in Nick Bollettieri's Tennis Academy and to her professional career.

Seles turned pro in 1989, when she was 15, and defeated Chris Evert in the finals at Houston. She also reached the semifinals at the French Open. In 1990 she won the first of her three French Open titles, and in 1991 was ranked No.1 in the world. By the spring of 1993 she had won three Australian, three French and two U.S. Opens.

Her career and life changed forever on April 30, 1993, when a deranged fan of Steffi Graf stabbed her in the back during a changeover at a tournament in Hamburg. Seles recovered from the wound that summer but remained off the tour for two years to recover emotionally. She came back in 1995 and reached the U.S. Open final; in 1996, she won the Australian Open again.

Karolj Seles died of stomach cancer in 1998, and Seles dedicated her French Open to him and reached the finals. She played her last French Open in 2003.

Video highlights of her career roll on a screen, and laminated cards explain the items in the display cases. One of them is her first trophy for finishing third in the Yugoslavia Juniors in 1983. She was 9 years old.

Dr. Robert W. Johnson, a hero in the black tennis community from 1940 to 1970, will be inducted posthumously. "Whirlwind: A Tennis Pioneer" offers a glimpse at a college football player (Lincoln University, 1924-25), physician, coach, teacher and role model to young players of all races. He conducted camps on his backyard court in Lyncburg, Va., championed the American Tennis Association, the umbrella organization for black tennis during segregation, and promoted the careers of racial-barrier breakers such as Althea Gibson and Arthur Ashe. Among the items on display is a telegram from Gibson to Johnson from London after her 1957 Wimbledon victory.

Johnson's followers referred to him as "Dr. J" long before the basketball star turned the moniker into a household name.

Andres Gimeno of Spain was one of the best players in the world in 1968, after Australians Ken Rosewall and Rod Laver. He lost to Laver in the Australian Open final in 1969, the first victory of Laver's second Grand Slam. In 1972, he won the French Open at 34, the oldest champion in tournament history.

Donald Dell was a force in tennis as a player (ranked No. 4 in the United States), as a Davis Cup captain (1968 and 1969 champion), agent (founder of ProServ), administrator (legal counsel for the fledgling Association of Tennis Professionals), promoter (founder of the Legg Mason Classic in Washington) and commentator (broadcast booth partner with Bud Collins).

Hall of Fame induction ceremonies will start Saturday at 12:30. Catch the exhibit first, if you can.

All first-round matches were finished by early evening Thursday, and eight Americans advanced to the second round, the most since 2002. They are No. 7 Kevin Kim, Rajeev Ram, Brendan Evans, Robby Ginepri, Taylor Dent, Alex Bogolomov, No. 3 Sam Querrey and Jesse Levine.

One of the most interesting second-round matches will pit Fabrice Santoro, the two-time defending champion, and Dent, the 2002 champion. Santoro is trying to become the second three-time champion in tournament history. Greg Rusedski won in 1993, 2004 and 2005. Santoro can become the first to win three in a row.

tonybotz
Jul 10th, 2009, 04:35 AM
thanks for posting. monica will always remain the most aloof, mysterious, enigmatic and graceful figure ever in sports. thanks for the memories, Ms. Seles.

spiritedenergy
Jul 10th, 2009, 04:42 AM
would love to visit the exhibit:hearts::worship:

Kart
Jul 10th, 2009, 09:30 AM
This Seles fan would rather see Steffi than Evert or Navratilova.

hingis-seles
Jul 10th, 2009, 10:15 AM
Maybe Betsy Nagelsen? Or would that be too obvious considering that Seles spoke at Mark McCormack's induction.

This is much more likely, although I really hope not. I'd prefer a former WTA player rather than Betsy.

This Seles fan would rather see Steffi than Evert or Navratilova.

This Seles fan would prefer Steffi as well!

And me = 1000 Monica fans. :p

Kart
Jul 10th, 2009, 01:07 PM
And me = 1000 Monica fans. :p
Only 1000 ?

What's happened - have you lost interest ? :p

hingis-seles
Jul 10th, 2009, 02:03 PM
This is much more likely, although I really hope not. I'd prefer a former WTA player rather than Betsy.

Yes, I know Betsy is a former player. I meant one of the elite from the early 90s!

Only 1000 ?

What's happened - have you lost interest ? :p

Chalk it up to old age! Memory decay. :p

CrossCourt~Rally
Jul 10th, 2009, 02:19 PM
This Seles fan would rather see Steffi than Evert or Navratilova.


How about all 3 there at once :angel:;)

Kart
Jul 10th, 2009, 03:49 PM
That would be a sight to behold !

misael
Jul 10th, 2009, 06:32 PM
Steffi would never do it, besides I want it to be Monica's day, Steffi had hers.

samn
Jul 10th, 2009, 07:58 PM
Yes, I know Betsy is a former player. I meant one of the elite from the early 90s!



Well, maybe it'll be MJF. Since her husband was Seles's agent in the second half of her career, I'm assuming that she and Seles must have been fairly close.

How about Nathalie Tauziat? :devil: Ouch! Don't hit me, Hingis-Seles

hingis-seles
Jul 10th, 2009, 08:26 PM
Well, maybe it'll be MJF. Since her husband was Seles's agent in the second half of her career, I'm assuming that she and Seles must have been fairly close.

How about Nathalie Tauziat? :devil: Ouch! Don't hit me, Hingis-Seles

Ofcourse! Monica was a bridesmaid at MJF's wedding.

Nathalie Tauziat. :devil: She could read a passage on the grunting from the book she wrote! :D :p

EvertNavratilova
Jul 10th, 2009, 11:59 PM
Williams jokes about grunting

Updated: July 6, 2009, 7:30 PM ET


NEW YORK -- Serena Williams believes grunting may give players an edge -- not that she's apologizing for the advantage.

Williams appeared on the "Late Show with David Letterman" on CBS on Monday night, two days after beating her sister in the Wimbledon final and then teaming with Venus to win the doubles title. Williams joked with Letterman about the cacophony some players make, which was the target of media criticism during Wimbledon.

Asked if the noise can be distracting to quieter opponents, Williams said, "I often wonder that."

"I'm thinking like we were playing just recently in the finals and Venus and I were grunting really loud in the doubles and the other girls weren't doing anything," she added. "And after the point, I was thinking, 'Wow, that was pretty loud. Was that distracting for them?'"

Williams said she was inspired by Monica Seles growing up.

"She's like the first person that I know that really used to grunt really loud and really hard, so that's kind of how I modeled my grunt after," Williams said. "Yeah, because you have to have role models when it comes to grunting."

She added that grunting "advanced in everything."

"Like if I play golf, I grunt," she said. "If I'm playing soccer and I kick the ball, I grunt."


Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press

EvertNavratilova
Jul 11th, 2009, 12:14 AM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/tennis/

Monica Seles will be inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame on July 11 in Newport, R.I. Here is a look back her career, which Seles described as having ''a lot of highs and a lot of lows. One of things that always kept me going was my love of the game.''

Kart
Jul 11th, 2009, 12:20 AM
Nathalie Tauziat. :devil: She could read a passage on the grunting from the book she wrote! :D :p

:lol:

nat75
Jul 11th, 2009, 02:14 AM
It would be really awesome if Steffi did the speech. That would end up YEARS of stupid HATING. :rolleyes: If it's not Steffi, Gaby could give a good speech too. :p

OsloErik
Jul 11th, 2009, 08:32 AM
I supposed the lengthy layoff before the retirement did take the zing out of that, although Sampras did get a big send off at the US Open after taking a year to decide. But 5 > 1, and he was defending champion, so I suppose that's moot.

Yeah, I also think he didn't say he planned on playing again. He didn't announce his retirement into the US Open in '03, I believe, but he didn't ever hint that he would come back. Monica really kept people going. Plus, she didn't end her career the same way. Frankly, I think at this point she's entitled to do whatever she wants regarding tennis, but it does make it hard to have such a post-career celebration. Eh, you're right, it is all moot.

Sam L
Jul 11th, 2009, 08:35 AM
I prefer Gaby to be honest.

Monica said that when she was stabbed and they took a vote to see whether to preserve her ranking, Gaby was the only player who voted to preserve her ranking.

Nobody else. Not Graf, not Mary Joe etc.. :rolleyes:

morbidangle
Jul 11th, 2009, 10:18 AM
Or maybe one of the Williamses... Afterall Monica was Serena's idol..

morbidangle
Jul 11th, 2009, 10:18 AM
I think it will be Navratilova or Sabatini.. It would be just too emotional to have Steffi there.

S_Fahad
Jul 11th, 2009, 11:02 AM
I hope its Gaby, but then again, Gaby is too shy, I dont think she'll be able to do a great speech. It was awesome to see Steffi at Gaby's ceremony, but she was a little too shy and the speech wasnt fantastic! Martina would probably do something to steal Monica's thunder. Maybe Arantxa? or Lindsay?

hingis-seles
Jul 11th, 2009, 04:20 PM
Can you guys let me know what ends up happening? I had a surgery done today and am going to be out for the night very soon.

Can't wait to see all the videos and speeches. Monica. :hearts:

Mike_T
Jul 11th, 2009, 04:43 PM
Pam Anderson, or another BayWatch babe.

Juju Nostalgique
Jul 11th, 2009, 08:12 PM
From Yahoo! Sports:



NEWPORT, R.I. (AP)—Monica Seles (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/91/;_ylt=AmCOtoQDT9ZeJc_lGrye0aIgv7YF) is comfortable talking about her on-court stabbing 16 years ago—even on a day of celebration.
The 35-year-old Seles was enshrined in the International Tennis Hall of Fame during a ceremony on Newport’s grass courts Saturday. She was the world’s No. 1 women’s player for 178 weeks overall and a winner of nine Grand Slam singles titles.
“I talk about it openly,” she said during a news conference before being inducted. “As you can see, there’s an exhibit here (about me) at the museum. When we were talking about me going into the Hall of Fame it was, ‘Should we include the stabbing or not?’ Unfortunately it’s part of my career. I wish it wasn’t. It’s a long, long time ago.”
It was April 30, 1993. Seles was on top of tennis, the No. 1 player, three-time defending champion of the French Open and back-to-back winner at both the U.S. and Australian Opens.

The attack shocked the sports world. Seated during a changeover at a match in Hamburg, Germany, Seles was stabbed between the shoulder blades by a crazed fan. It would be 2 1/2 years before she returned to the sport.
“Coming back in Toronto after my stabbing, I viewed my career in two phases — before stabbing and after stabbing,” she said. “The reception that I got just reinforced my decision to return.”
Seles went on to win that tournament—the Canadian Open—one of 53 in her career, including the 1996 Australian Open.
“She won eight grand slams before she was stabbed,” said Donald Dell, also inducted Saturday. “Believe me, she would have won another nine.”
Seles was enshrined in nearly a 90-minute ceremony along with master’s player Andres Gimeno, the oldest player ever to win the French at 34 years, 10 months. Dr. Robert Johnson was inducted posthumously.
“I would like to thank all my tennis fans who were there from Day One when I was No. 1, through my stabbing, and my comeback,” Seles, dressed in white slacks with a lavender blouse, told the crowd.
Johnson, introduced by Jeanne Ashe, wife of the late Hall of Famer Arthur Ashe, helped desegregate the sport. Dell, a U.S. Davis Cup member, later helped promote and market the sport.
Seles, playfully, gave one more grunt. “For old, good time sakes,” she said.
Gimeno brought the biggest laughter from the crowd when he recalled his only major title at Roland Garros. He was introduced by 1987 Hall of Famer Stan Smith.
“I was going to leave the game without winning a big one,” he said. “I think God said, ‘Let the poor guy win one.”’

Knizzle
Jul 11th, 2009, 08:14 PM
:worship:

HRHoliviasmith
Jul 11th, 2009, 08:35 PM
:bowdown: :worship: :hearts: Congratulations!

what could have been???? :sobbing:

EvertNavratilova
Jul 11th, 2009, 09:20 PM
Monica Seles, Hall-of-Famer

Saturday, July 11, 2009
Herald Tribune

Monica Seles has been shopping for just the right dress to wear and looking for the perfect accessories for the occasion. After all, a date with the Hall of Fame requires planning.

“I am excited for the weekend,” Seles said, her familiar giggle finishing her sentence. “As a little girl, you could never imagine all this could have happened.”

The weekend is finally here for one of the best players to ever pick up a tennis racket.

Today, the Sarasota resident who ran her way to the top of the women’s tennis world will be inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame at Newport, R.I, as its newest member.

The skinny little girl who looked all arms and legs when she arrived at the Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy as a 13-year-old prodigy is now 35 years old and is being honored for what she accomplished in a career that included nine Grand Slam singles titles.

Bursting onto the professional tennis scene at the age of 14, Seles won her first tournament a year later by beating legendary Chris Evert. She won her first French Open at 16.

Seles finished her career by earning nearly $15 million and capturing the hearts of tennis fans around the world.

Along the way she revolutionized the women’s game with her two-handed forehands from both sides that created penetrating shots and sharp angles.

Seles is known throughout the world, not only for what she accomplished on the tennis court but for being the victim of a stabbing in 1993 that shook the tennis community and interrupted her career at its zenith.

She is also known as one of the most gracious champions to play the game, an athlete who inspired legions of players to take up the game of tennis.

Today, she receives the ultimate reward in her profession.

MistyGrey
Jul 11th, 2009, 09:23 PM
:worship:
Cant wait to see videos!
So who did Monica's introductory speech?

Scotso
Jul 11th, 2009, 09:28 PM
Congrats Monica!

Mary Joe introduced her.

hingis-seles
Jul 11th, 2009, 10:10 PM
http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.f066a758a8fd4993ae84638d5e06ea06.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea109.jpg

International Tennis Hall of Fame inductee Monica Seles (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/91/), center, poses with presenters and former tennis players, Betsy McCormack, left, and Mary Joe Fernandez, right, as she holds her plaque during ceremonies in Newport, R.I. Saturday, July 11, 2009.
Previous (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/gallery/im:urn:newsml:sports.yahoo,ap:20050301:ten,photo,f 16bb953ac624f27b4624e1a09a2e0e4.hall_of_fame_champ ionships_tennis_riea110:1) 5 of 200 Next (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/gallery/im:urn:newsml:sports.yahoo,ap:20050301:ten,photo,d c362fded3b441d7b0c6259401bd20b9.peru_canada_davis_ cup_lim104:1)

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.3ed0ac20d5844d0b8cd43fb394a17333.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea108.jpg


http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.fd3e6d333167446382bde5af4fd4be4c.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea103.jpg

CrossCourt~Rally
Jul 11th, 2009, 10:12 PM
Thanks for the pic:bounce:. She's looking as beautiful as ever :hearts:

hingis-seles
Jul 11th, 2009, 10:20 PM
Thanks for the pic:bounce:. She's looking as beautiful as ever :hearts:

Pics. I edited. ;):p

She does look great, doesn't she? :hearts:

CrossCourt~Rally
Jul 11th, 2009, 10:21 PM
Pics. I edited. ;):p

She does look great, doesn't she? :hearts:

Indeed she does...Thanks ;)

hingis-seles
Jul 11th, 2009, 10:21 PM
Well, maybe it'll be MJF. Since her husband was Seles's agent in the second half of her career, I'm assuming that she and Seles must have been fairly close.

Between this and the earlier Betsy Nagelsen post, you called it far better than any of us! :worship:

Scotso
Jul 11th, 2009, 10:56 PM
She's looking as beautiful as ever :hearts:
She does look great, doesn't she? :hearts:

She really looks amazing these days.

LightWarrior
Jul 11th, 2009, 11:09 PM
Sorry for my ignorance but what does it really mean to be a member of HOF ? Who gets to decide ? I personally don't need to know she's a HOFer, she was already a legend.

LightWarrior
Jul 11th, 2009, 11:15 PM
I think it will be Navratilova or Sabatini.. It would be just too emotional to have Steffi there.

It would be really awkward. Like "I have all these slams because of your stabbing". And why would she do it anyway ? She didn't have the dignity, class, heart to mention Monica when she won RG in 1993.

Kart
Jul 11th, 2009, 11:28 PM
Thanks for the pics - she looks good.

spiritedenergy
Jul 11th, 2009, 11:40 PM
http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.f066a758a8fd4993ae84638d5e06ea06.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea109.jpg

International Tennis Hall of Fame inductee Monica Seles (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/91/), center, poses with presenters and former tennis players, Betsy McCormack, left, and Mary Joe Fernandez, right, as she holds her plaque during ceremonies in Newport, R.I. Saturday, July 11, 2009.
Previous (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/gallery/im:urn:newsml:sports.yahoo,ap:20050301:ten,photo,f 16bb953ac624f27b4624e1a09a2e0e4.hall_of_fame_champ ionships_tennis_riea110:1) 5 of 200 Next (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/gallery/im:urn:newsml:sports.yahoo,ap:20050301:ten,photo,d c362fded3b441d7b0c6259401bd20b9.peru_canada_davis_ cup_lim104:1)

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.3ed0ac20d5844d0b8cd43fb394a17333.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea108.jpg


http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.fd3e6d333167446382bde5af4fd4be4c.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea103.jpg

The last one:lol:

Monica you'll always be my GOAT:sobbing::kiss::awww:

LightWarrior
Jul 11th, 2009, 11:44 PM
http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.f066a758a8fd4993ae84638d5e06ea06.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea109.jpg

International Tennis Hall of Fame inductee Monica Seles (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/players/91/), center, poses with presenters and former tennis players, Betsy McCormack, left, and Mary Joe Fernandez, right, as she holds her plaque during ceremonies in Newport, R.I. Saturday, July 11, 2009.
Previous (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/gallery/im:urn:newsml:sports.yahoo,ap:20050301:ten,photo,f 16bb953ac624f27b4624e1a09a2e0e4.hall_of_fame_champ ionships_tennis_riea110:1) 5 of 200 Next (http://sports.yahoo.com/ten/gallery/im:urn:newsml:sports.yahoo,ap:20050301:ten,photo,d c362fded3b441d7b0c6259401bd20b9.peru_canada_davis_ cup_lim104:1)

http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.3ed0ac20d5844d0b8cd43fb394a17333.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea108.jpg


http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.fd3e6d333167446382bde5af4fd4be4c.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea103.jpg

She looks good but it always feels bittersweet to me. Couldn't she look like this when she was a tennis player and win many more GS ? I guess that's life, it's unfair. She's probably very happy now and has connected at last with her real self, that's what counts.

EvertNavratilova
Jul 12th, 2009, 12:39 AM
At 28th annual "Legends Ball" to benefit the International Tennis Hall of Fame in September 5, 2008 at Cipriani 42nd Street in New York City.

http://www.panacheprivee.com/Web/BeSeen/IntlTennisHallofFame/B1.jpg


Barbara Walters, honoree Billie Jean King, Monica Seles, USTA president, Jane Brown Grimes.

Sam L
Jul 12th, 2009, 12:44 AM
She looks good but it always feels bittersweet to me. Couldn't she look like this when she was a tennis player and win many more GS ? I guess that's life, it's unfair. She's probably very happy now and has connected at last with her real self, that's what counts.
Same. I love it that she looks great and she feels great now but I always think I just wish you had done this a decade earlier. But in the end, it's important that she's happy now. That's important.

Dave.
Jul 12th, 2009, 12:55 AM
Monica :worship: :hearts: As everyone has been saying she looks amazing! So good to now see her in the HOF and seeming so happy in life. Those pics of her just make me smile. :D

serenafann
Jul 12th, 2009, 01:00 AM
I love you Monica! So well deserved. Think about it, this woman had 8 Majors by the time she was 19 :worship: what she was on pace to accomplish,[if not for the attack :sad:] is truly stunning.

Side note... I always wondered what became of Monica's brother with the memorable name,who used to go to her tournaments,well He grew up to be really Cute. :D

Gumbycat
Jul 12th, 2009, 01:05 AM
ESPN Video
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/news/story?id=4321077

Congratulations Monica

Buitenzorg
Jul 12th, 2009, 01:06 AM
Congrats Monica :kiss: :hug:

coudy.guo
Jul 12th, 2009, 02:03 AM
Monica ! we miss you!

Sally Struthers
Jul 12th, 2009, 02:13 AM
Another billionaire! I just trust The Hof realises she’s no more than a lesbian gold-digger.

Monica has high standards and exquisite tastes in men :lol:

Zojirushi
Jul 12th, 2009, 02:36 AM
Congrats Monica:bounce: miss you so much:hearts::hearts:

DOUBLEFIST
Jul 12th, 2009, 02:38 AM
Congrats to Monica!

There's not a retired player out there who deserves it more!

EvertNavratilova
Jul 12th, 2009, 04:47 AM
Seles at head of class
She’s among 4 to enter Hall of Fame
By Bud Collins Globe Correspondent / July 11, 2009
Email| Print| Reprints| Yahoo! Buzz| ShareThisText size – + NEWPORT, R.I. -

Grown to nearly 6 feet, no longer the aggressive - yet ever gracious - adversary, Monica Seles appears at the International Tennis Hall of Fame this afternoon to take her rightful place alongside the game’s immortals.

Rounding out the Hall’s Class of 2009 are the smooth Spanish shotmaker Andres Gimeno and contributors Donald Dell and the late Dr. Robert “Whirlwind’’ Johnson. Their induction precedes semifinals clashes of the Campbell’s Hall of Fame Championships at The Casino, the lone grass-court stopover on the US pro circuit.

That tiny face in the Seles exhibit is a mouse sketched on a yellow tennis ball by Monica’s father, Karolj, a cartoonist. “He started me in tennis, at 7, and he made it fun for me. If I didn’t have fun there was no sense in playing. The faces on the balls were part of it, like Tom and Jerry. I was the cat giving them whacks.’’

And such whacks they were. Battering, double-barreled, powerhouse smacks. Two hands were better than one for Monica, a lefty who slugged like a switch-hitter - both hands going both ways. Few have done it, and none as productively as she, rising to No. 1 as a teenager. By the time she was 18, Monica held seven major singles titles. Nobody else has gone so far so fast.

It took a while to reach the ninth, her last. Shortly after beating Steffi Graf in the 1993 Australian Open final, Monica was felled by the infamous knifing in Hamburg. We didn’t see her again for two years, when she reappeared spectacularly to win the Canadian Open, then lost a tight US Open final to Graf.

She was never quite the same, but an all-time great nonetheless. I thought she would have been the greatest.

Thoughts of the stabbing come and go, she said. “It unfortunately changed my career. When I decided to come back, I had to realize it was out of my control. It was up to me to take control. That’s when I decided to play again and return to the sport I loved. I didn’t want it to be taken away.’’

A marvelous memory for me was her first French final, 1990. Graf led, 6-2, in the first set tiebreaker only to be overwhelmed in a 6-point rush as 16-year-old Monica became the greenest champ in Paris, 7-6 (8-6), 6-4. Her majors collection was underway. Though seemingly off balance and out of position, she was perfectly coordinated, moaning and murdering tennis balls just as she had as an elementary schooler. By then, papa’s cartooned faces were retired, out of her destructive reach.

While Monica is the youngest French Open champ, good-humored Gimeno, a lanky Barcelonan, is the oldest. It was the highlight of his exceptional three-stage career, during most of which he and colleagues were largely out of sight. First there was amateurism, playing handsomely as a Spanish Davis Cupper, then signing on as a pro tourist in 1960. The pros, gypsies on one-night stands, attracted little attention. But when opens dawned in 1968, Andres was still formidable, returned to Davis Cup, and at age 34 ruled France in 1972.

He’s no stranger to the Casino court. Gimeno, along with such Hall of Famers-to-be as Rod Laver, Ken Rosewall, and Pancho Gonzalez, were guinea pigs for the resident honcho, Jimmy Van Alen, who brought the outlaws to Newport in 1965-67 to test his revolutionary scoring methods. They were the tiebreaker pioneers. “Strange but it worked,’’ Andres said with a smile.

Dell, who played the Casino, but as an amateur with a No. 4 US ranking, and Johnson, who would never have been allowed to because he was black, were also revolutionaries.

Dell, the winning US Davis Cup captain in 1968-69, was a strong factor in founding the ATP, the male players union, becoming the first player-agent. Among his clients: Arthur Ashe, Stan Smith, Bob Lutz, Charlie Pasarell. Dell arranged a tour of war-time Vietnam for them to play exhibitions for US troops. He was a commentator for PBS when that network launched regular coverage of tennis.

Known as “Whirlwind’’ for his football-carrying prowess in college, Dr. Johnson, a Lynchburg, Va., physician who died in 1971, founded the ATA (American Tennis Association) to nurture tournament play for blacks, unwelcome in US Tennis Association circles. He tutored promising players on his backyard court, among them Althea Gibson and Ashe. With his backing, and lobbying for a fair opportunity for blacks, Althea hurdled the color bar in 1950, eventually scoring the first majors for blacks (French in 1956, Wimbledon and US in 1957-58 ). Arthur followed with the US in 1968, Wimbledon in 1975.

Who knows? Without Johnson’s distinguished leadership, those two and the Sisters Williams might never have made it. He was a welcome whirlwind indeed.

new-york
Jul 12th, 2009, 04:54 AM
Moni's aged beautifully.

faboozadoo15
Jul 12th, 2009, 06:12 AM
Love Monica! Hope she's doing well and living life happily. No one deserves the HOF more.

Every time her name pops up I'm still always hoping for a goodbye tour or something. I wish she'd do something like that. What fun!

And yes, I realize that's really improbable and pathetic. :lol:

Vyacheslavovna
Jul 12th, 2009, 07:53 AM
Here's a link to a pictorial history on Seles' tennis career.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/mul...content.1.html


In this interview,

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2009/jul/05/monica-seles-interview


... she says that her Dad was a big part of her life, and she still misses him. This is a nice pic from the SI pictorial.


http://i.cdn.turner.com/si/multimedia/photo_gallery/0907/monica.seles.career/images/seles10.jpg

galadriel
Jul 12th, 2009, 08:22 AM
Monica :worship::bowdown::yeah:

samn
Jul 12th, 2009, 10:55 AM
Between this and the earlier Betsy Nagelsen post, you called it far better than any of us! :worship:

Call me Mistah Cleo! ;) A question for the American posters on the forum: Does Miss Cleo still appear in her (what I thought were) hilarious informercials?

On a more serious note, congratulations to Monica Seles and the other Hall of Fame inductees. Very well deserved, indeed! The part about Seles grunting for old times' sake made me giggle like a 10-year-old schoolboy.

Mike_T
Jul 12th, 2009, 11:47 AM
Monica has high standards and exquisite tastes in men :lol: She could of chosen more wisely, TBH. The Hof has a booze problem, but I think Monica has a bit of a wait before he pops his clogs/flippers.


http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.3ed0ac20d5844d0b8cd43fb394a17333.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea108.jpghttp://img34.imageshack.us/img34/6952/davidhasselhoff788059.jpg (http://img34.imageshack.us/i/davidhasselhoff788059.jpg/)

sonnys
Jul 12th, 2009, 11:55 AM
Monica forever my hero;), i will never forget all these years as a fan watching her matches and the slam victories, and i cherish every moment though time flys by quickly!!!:worship: Forever the best nr 1 that the world has ever seen!!!!:drool::worship::worship::worship::worship ::worship::worship::worship::worship::worship::wor ship::worship::worship::worship:

hingis-seles
Jul 12th, 2009, 01:53 PM
Seles' journey ends fittingly -- in HOF

Tennis had never seen anyone quite like Monica Seles when she charged onto the scene 20 years ago. Part beguiling kitten, part snarling she-lynx, Seles was sweet-tempered off the court and fiercely businesslike on it. With eight Grand Slam titles to her name at age 19, there was little doubt she would wind up in the International Tennis Hall of Fame someday.



Then came the 1993 stabbing incident during a changeover in Hamburg, Germany, that literally cleaved her career into two acts, and the terrible aftershock of watching her father and original coach waste away with stomach cancer. Seles walked onto center court for the 1998 French Open championship match a few weeks after his death wearing black, his ring on a chain around her neck, looking resolute but humbled, her once cherubic expression shaded with grown-up sorrow. "I don't think you are the one who deserved to lose today," opponent Arantxa Sanchez Vicario said afterward.



But Seles did not win that day. Her odyssey from the country then known as Yugoslavia, via Nick Bollettieri's Florida tennis academy, to the top of the game -- at a time when teen phenoms were still allowed to take that rocket ride -- is a storybook tale. The flip side of her journey is a very human and imperfect one.



Seles played for nine seasons after returning from the stabbing, but she absorbed other, more subtle losses out of public view, losses of control and identity. She battled depression that manifested itself in an eating disorder, painfully documented in a recent book, and said last spring that she had lived, traveled, loved and competed for years in a persistent "fog." She faded from the scene after a foot injury forced her offstage and never came back for an encore, shunning closure for almost five full years. Seles had long self-medicated with food, but as she slowly shed physical and psychological weight, she had little appetite to be feted.



Now Seles, 35, has re-emerged, looking and sounding more like the sunny girl with the lilting voice we fell for all those years ago. With her formal retirement announcement in February 2008, someday has finally arrived and Seles is set to be inducted in Newport, R.I., on Saturday. Hall of Famer and close friend Betsy Nagelsen McCormack will introduce her. It completes a circle: Seles helped induct Nagelsen McCormack's late husband, IMG founder Mark McCormack, last year.



No one -- including Seles herself -- can take measure of her accomplishments without wondering what might have been. Yet while this celebration of her career might have a wistful undertone, it's also an affirmation of survival, self-knowledge and personal growth -- qualities that can come hard to the most driven athletes.



"I have a lot of respect for Monica," said Chris Evert, whom Seles beat to win her first professional title at age 15. "What a great competitor. I marveled at how happy she seemed on and off the court, I marveled at the great relationship she had with her dad. And then with the stabbing and her father's death, her life turned upside-down.

"She's come out of it with a lot of dignity, learned some hard lessons, but has had a lot of grace throughout all these episodes. She could have won 10 more Grand Slam events. I think she got robbed, she got shortchanged in the tennis department, but it helped her personally. She grew up and found herself and became a better person because of it."



Billie Jean King knew Seles as an enthusiastic Fed Cup participant who was part of three championship teams, a naturalized American citizen (in 1994) who took enormous pleasure in competing for her adopted country when King captained the team, and later as a World Team Tennis player.





"The power," King said almost reverently of her first impression of Seles, whose two-fisted shots off both sides were effective but not easily emulated. "She used to do this thing where she'd stand close to a wall, and start hitting the ball really hard, switching sides between shots. Whap! Whap! Whap! Whap! Whap! Whap! It was amazing. I've never seen anything like it. Ask her to do it for you sometime."



In a recent conference call with reporters, Andre Agassi -- whose wife, Steffi Graf, was Seles' most formidable peer before the stabbing cruelly aborted what figured to be a top-shelf rivalry -- reflected on Seles' dual legacy.


"I grew up with Monica," Agassi said. "I've known her since she was probably 10 years old at the [Bollettieri] academy. I always marveled at her game. I marveled more at her discipline and fighting spirit. Watching her grow up and becoming one of the best ever is a great journey to go on, from my perspective.



"Really, I think we would have seen much greater things had she not had to endure what she went through in Hamburg on the court. As a result of that, I think all players are left with that aftermath. We are all aware of the exposures out there. I think security across the world tending to those possibilities more, and in a sense she's made us better and she's added to all of us in our own little way.

"I know the game pretty darned well, and I would argue that she would be one of the best of all time had she continued on the path she was. She was disciplined enough and she was focused enough and she certainly had enough shots to leave that kind of mark."



The violent act that altered Seles' trajectory had many unforeseen consequences. One of the more positive ripples was the seemingly unlikely friendship she forged with an African-American man nearly 50 years her senior, who will be beaming from the audience in Newport.



Former New York City mayor David Dinkins, a tennis devotee who still plays several times a week at age 81, wrote Seles a letter following the stabbing, and later sought her out at a charity event. He became a familiar, vocal presence at Seles' U.S. Open matches. The two continue to keep in touch and dine together when schedules allow. "Monica is one of the nicest people I've ever met," said Dinkins, who teaches part-time at Columbia University. "If you're a tennis fan, you have to love Monica."



Yet Seles didn't win election to the Hall of Fame on a sympathy vote. Although she won just one more Grand Slam event after her comeback -- the 1996 Australian Open -- her credentials speak for themselves: nine Slam titles, 44 other tournament wins, twice ranked No. 1 at year's end. It's absolutely fine to feel compassion for her, as long as that never slides into pity. Seles recognizes the privileges that came with her talent and fame. She considers herself fortunate, not cursed.



"It's a great way to cap a fantastic career," Seles said of the upcoming ceremony. "More importantly, I'm just lucky I got to do something I love to do, and I'm hoping in my second life, as I call it, I can find something that I'm as passionate about as I was about tennis. It's really that simple for me."


This familiar American ritual of enshrining athletes in a brick-and-mortar pantheon is usually grounded in stats first and character second. It's true that Seles' induction has a deeper context, but that's not simply because she was wounded. It's because she showed the world how lengthy, difficult and ultimately gratifying the process of healing can be.



[I]Bonnie D. Ford covers tennis and Olympic sports for ESPN.com. She can be reached at bonniedford@aol.com. (bonniedford@aol.com)

HRHoliviasmith
Jul 12th, 2009, 02:22 PM
what of her mom? is she still alive?

samn
Jul 12th, 2009, 02:38 PM
what of her mom? is she still alive?

Who, Ester Seles? Yes, I believe she's alive and well.

spiritedenergy
Jul 12th, 2009, 08:39 PM
Seles' journey ends fittingly -- in HOF

Tennis had never seen anyone quite like Monica Seles when she charged onto the scene 20 years ago. Part beguiling kitten, part snarling she-lynx, Seles was sweet-tempered off the court and fiercely businesslike on it. With eight Grand Slam titles to her name at age 19, there was little doubt she would wind up in the International Tennis Hall of Fame someday.



Then came the 1993 stabbing incident during a changeover in Hamburg, Germany, that literally cleaved her career into two acts, and the terrible aftershock of watching her father and original coach waste away with stomach cancer. Seles walked onto center court for the 1998 French Open championship match a few weeks after his death wearing black, his ring on a chain around her neck, looking resolute but humbled, her once cherubic expression shaded with grown-up sorrow. "I don't think you are the one who deserved to lose today," opponent Arantxa Sanchez Vicario said afterward.



But Seles did not win that day. Her odyssey from the country then known as Yugoslavia, via Nick Bollettieri's Florida tennis academy, to the top of the game -- at a time when teen phenoms were still allowed to take that rocket ride -- is a storybook tale. The flip side of her journey is a very human and imperfect one.



Seles played for nine seasons after returning from the stabbing, but she absorbed other, more subtle losses out of public view, losses of control and identity. She battled depression that manifested itself in an eating disorder, painfully documented in a recent book, and said last spring that she had lived, traveled, loved and competed for years in a persistent "fog." She faded from the scene after a foot injury forced her offstage and never came back for an encore, shunning closure for almost five full years. Seles had long self-medicated with food, but as she slowly shed physical and psychological weight, she had little appetite to be feted.



Now Seles, 35, has re-emerged, looking and sounding more like the sunny girl with the lilting voice we fell for all those years ago. With her formal retirement announcement in February 2008, someday has finally arrived and Seles is set to be inducted in Newport, R.I., on Saturday. Hall of Famer and close friend Betsy Nagelsen McCormack will introduce her. It completes a circle: Seles helped induct Nagelsen McCormack's late husband, IMG founder Mark McCormack, last year.



No one -- including Seles herself -- can take measure of her accomplishments without wondering what might have been. Yet while this celebration of her career might have a wistful undertone, it's also an affirmation of survival, self-knowledge and personal growth -- qualities that can come hard to the most driven athletes.



"I have a lot of respect for Monica," said Chris Evert, whom Seles beat to win her first professional title at age 15. "What a great competitor. I marveled at how happy she seemed on and off the court, I marveled at the great relationship she had with her dad. And then with the stabbing and her father's death, her life turned upside-down.

"She's come out of it with a lot of dignity, learned some hard lessons, but has had a lot of grace throughout all these episodes. She could have won 10 more Grand Slam events. I think she got robbed, she got shortchanged in the tennis department, but it helped her personally. She grew up and found herself and became a better person because of it."



Billie Jean King knew Seles as an enthusiastic Fed Cup participant who was part of three championship teams, a naturalized American citizen (in 1994) who took enormous pleasure in competing for her adopted country when King captained the team, and later as a World Team Tennis player.





"The power," King said almost reverently of her first impression of Seles, whose two-fisted shots off both sides were effective but not easily emulated. "She used to do this thing where she'd stand close to a wall, and start hitting the ball really hard, switching sides between shots. Whap! Whap! Whap! Whap! Whap! Whap! It was amazing. I've never seen anything like it. Ask her to do it for you sometime."



In a recent conference call with reporters, Andre Agassi -- whose wife, Steffi Graf, was Seles' most formidable peer before the stabbing cruelly aborted what figured to be a top-shelf rivalry -- reflected on Seles' dual legacy.


"I grew up with Monica," Agassi said. "I've known her since she was probably 10 years old at the [Bollettieri] academy. I always marveled at her game. I marveled more at her discipline and fighting spirit. Watching her grow up and becoming one of the best ever is a great journey to go on, from my perspective.



"Really, I think we would have seen much greater things had she not had to endure what she went through in Hamburg on the court. As a result of that, I think all players are left with that aftermath. We are all aware of the exposures out there. I think security across the world tending to those possibilities more, and in a sense she's made us better and she's added to all of us in our own little way.

"I know the game pretty darned well, and I would argue that she would be one of the best of all time had she continued on the path she was. She was disciplined enough and she was focused enough and she certainly had enough shots to leave that kind of mark."



The violent act that altered Seles' trajectory had many unforeseen consequences. One of the more positive ripples was the seemingly unlikely friendship she forged with an African-American man nearly 50 years her senior, who will be beaming from the audience in Newport.



Former New York City mayor David Dinkins, a tennis devotee who still plays several times a week at age 81, wrote Seles a letter following the stabbing, and later sought her out at a charity event. He became a familiar, vocal presence at Seles' U.S. Open matches. The two continue to keep in touch and dine together when schedules allow. "Monica is one of the nicest people I've ever met," said Dinkins, who teaches part-time at Columbia University. "If you're a tennis fan, you have to love Monica."



Yet Seles didn't win election to the Hall of Fame on a sympathy vote. Although she won just one more Grand Slam event after her comeback -- the 1996 Australian Open -- her credentials speak for themselves: nine Slam titles, 44 other tournament wins, twice ranked No. 1 at year's end. It's absolutely fine to feel compassion for her, as long as that never slides into pity. Seles recognizes the privileges that came with her talent and fame. She considers herself fortunate, not cursed.



"It's a great way to cap a fantastic career," Seles said of the upcoming ceremony. "More importantly, I'm just lucky I got to do something I love to do, and I'm hoping in my second life, as I call it, I can find something that I'm as passionate about as I was about tennis. It's really that simple for me."


This familiar American ritual of enshrining athletes in a brick-and-mortar pantheon is usually grounded in stats first and character second. It's true that Seles' induction has a deeper context, but that's not simply because she was wounded. It's because she showed the world how lengthy, difficult and ultimately gratifying the process of healing can be.



[I]Bonnie D. Ford covers tennis and Olympic sports for ESPN.com. She can be reached at bonniedford@aol.com. (bonniedford@aol.com)

Nice article:worship: Monica doesn't need pity, life challenged her and she won, that's what counts. Also nice to read what Agassi thinks, I think everybody knows what she would have become if not for the stabbing, but she had a great career anyways.:kiss:

HRHoliviasmith
Jul 12th, 2009, 08:52 PM
Nice article:worship: Monica doesn't need pity, life challenged her and she won, that's what counts. Also nice to read what Agassi thinks, I think everybody knows what she would have become if not for the stabbing, but she had a great career anyways.:kiss:

:worship:

Patrick345
Jul 12th, 2009, 11:12 PM
She is so skinny, her legs are so thin, I was seriously worried she´d break down just hitting balls. There is no muscle definition anywhere on her body. She probaly weighs less today than she did at 15. That can´t be healthy. Please eat a whole cake to celebrate your induction. I know everybody loves Monica, she was my all-time favourite player too, but I can´t believe nobody is seeing this or saying anything. :sad:

LeRoy.
Jul 12th, 2009, 11:21 PM
Monica :worship: :hearts: :bowdown:

A legend is now in the HoF !! :D

laurie
Jul 12th, 2009, 11:27 PM
Nice photos.

I will order her autobiography from Amazon, I have her first one from 1997 "From Fear to Victory".

raquel
Jul 13th, 2009, 05:45 PM
Monica :worship: Where she belongs, of course.

She's look beautiful :)

EvertNavratilova
Jul 14th, 2009, 02:01 AM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/LatestNews/Read/0,,12781~1720885,00.html

WTATour: Seles Honored by Hall of Fame
JUly 13, 2009

NEWPORT, RI, USA - During her career she charmed fans with her rambling, giggly speeches and on Saturday, July 10 Monica Seles showed she had lost none of her capacity to entertain. The occasion might have been the nine-time Grand Slam champion's induction into the august International Tennis Hall of Fame, but that didn't stop the 35-year-old from treating the assembled audience to a cheeky blast from the past.

"For old time's sake, here it is," the former world No.1 grinned as she prepared to unleash one of her trademark grunts. "Eeeunnh!

"I just had to do it," she smiled, having reminded all present that, as still-controversial grunts go, hers' was the original and best.

Admission to the Hall of Fame is, nonetheless, a serious business and Seles is certainly a worthy addition. The winner of 53 Tour titles sat atop the rankings for a total of 178 non-consecutive weeks (fifth all-time) and won the 1991 and 1992 US Opens, the 1990-92 French Opens and the 1991-93 and 1996 Australian Opens. She also captured the Tour Championships three years running, from 1990-92.

"Growing up as a little girl, I could never dream I would be inducted into the Hall of Fame," said the winner of nearly $15 million in prize money. "I have a hard time believing it now.

"I grew up on the WTA Tour. That was my home," added the Yugoslav-born American, who famously copied Madonna's platinum-blonde look in the early 1990s. "I grew up in the media spotlight. It can be challenging at times."

Indeed, Seles knows perhaps better than any other player in history the downsides that come with fame and fortune.

Her career was interrupted in the most terrible of circumstances when she was stabbed in the back by a fanatical supporter of Steffi Graf during a match at Hamburg in 1993. It took 27 months, but eventually Seles returned to competitive tennis, winning her comeback event at the Canadian Open, reaching the US Open final and then capturing what would prove to be her last major at the 1996 Australian Open.

And yet, things were never really the same. Since her retirement, Seles has spoken and written movingly of her struggle to come to terms with the stabbing, the loss of her beloved father Karolj in 1998, depression and body image issues. But through it all she carried herself with tremendous dignity, only adding to the regard with which she is held in tennis circles. Rather than dwell on what might have been, she has burnished her reputation by giving her time to a range of charities, including the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation and the UN's program for sports as a way to counter malnutrition.

Seles was one of four Hall of Fame inductees this year. Joining her were 1960s Spanish player Andres Gimeno, pioneering sports marketer Donald Dell and the late Robert Johnson, a junior player developer who helped launch the careers of Althea Gibson and Arthur Ashe.

Whereas Seles became the youngest French Open winner when she won at Roland Garros aged 16-and-a-half, Gimeno became the oldest French Open men's winner by taking the 1972 title at age 34.

"What an amazing group," observed Seles. "It's such a great honor. Standing here, I'm just a bundle of nerves."

Seles, who played her last Tour match at Roland Garros in 2003 but officially retired only in February 2008, has donated many of her trophies to the Hall of Fame's 'honor shine'.

"I hope it will inspire young children to pick up a racket, hit a few balls and fall in love with the sport the way I did," she said. "I look forward to watching the sport and seeing how much faster it can get."

WhatTheDeuce
Jul 14th, 2009, 02:54 AM
http://d.yimg.com/a/p/ap/20090711/capt.3ed0ac20d5844d0b8cd43fb394a17333.hall_of_fame _tennis_riea108.jpg
LMFAO :haha: Love you, Mon.

hingis-seles
Jul 14th, 2009, 10:30 AM
Hehe. I love that pose too! :D

Did anyone in the US manage to get any coverage of Monica's HOF induction on tv? I've been searching online but found nothing so far.

vwfan
Jul 14th, 2009, 12:05 PM
yeah, MONICA.

congrats. love her. she was my fav, before Venus.

Libertango
Jul 14th, 2009, 01:18 PM
Love all the pics! Monica looks unbelievably good!

One thing I always randomly wondered; what is/was Monica's first language? She's from the former Yugoslavia, in the area which is now Serbia, so is it Serbian; or Serbo-Croat? Or is it Hungarian, because aren't her parents of Hungarian birth? :confused: And whatever it is, do we know if she can still speak it now?

samn
Jul 14th, 2009, 07:47 PM
Hehe. I love that pose too! :D

Did anyone in the US manage to get any coverage of Monica's HOF induction on tv? I've been searching online but found nothing so far.

I saw them on YouTube two days ago. Do a search on "Seles" and "HOF".

silesia
Jul 14th, 2009, 10:20 PM
Monica Seles HOF Induction 2009

part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCx5y5JDnXc

part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybNd4yHG4dE&feature=related

part 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdYTj6pJwtU&feature=related

azinna
Jul 18th, 2009, 08:50 PM
Just great to watch. Really great. Hope there's continued peace beyond the baseline for Monica.

CrossCourt~Rally
Jul 18th, 2009, 08:54 PM
Just great to watch. Really great. Hope there's continued peace beyond the baseline for Monica.


Yeah, i hope so aswell :). I'm holding out some small hope that Monica will play Team Tennis at some point in the near future. I think that it would be a nice way to do one more tour to say goodbye to her fans. We know she won't return to the WTA and i think Team Tennis would be a more exciting way for her fans to see her play other than just expos:D:bounce:

Libertango
Jul 18th, 2009, 10:01 PM
Thanks for the vid links; Monica looks great! But what is up with her leg?! :(