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View Full Version : How responsible is it to play in extreme temperatures like 40Celcius/103F ?


Elwin.
Jul 8th, 2009, 06:33 PM
Marino just defeated Krajicek in Grapevine. The conditions were extreme! Temperatures rose to 40 degrees Celcius and 103 Fahrenheit.
The match went on for 3h20!

Matches played under these circumstanses are just extreme. You could hear Krajicek and Marino breathing heavily!
They didn't got extra time in the break. The commentator on the radio said Krajicek barely could drink something because the umpire already called time really fast :o

For both ladies this was just incredible extreme and for the other players in Grapevine!
Should there be no matches played when the temperatures are so high?

I say yes they shouldn't! It's dangerous :o
I remember Krajicek once fainted during a match because of the extreme heat:sad:
i followed this on the radio that is broadcasting Grapevine all week

FORZA SARITA
Jul 8th, 2009, 07:58 PM
that's really strange :shrug: in Palermo also there are these temperatures but they start at 4 pm at least :o
same with a spanish challenger played 1/2 weeks ago where some matches started at 8 pm :lol:

Elwin.
Jul 8th, 2009, 08:11 PM
that's really strange :shrug: in Palermo also there are these temperatures but they start at 4 pm at least :o
same with a spanish challenger played 1/2 weeks ago where some matches started at 8 pm :lol:

exactly! I think that's the best solution ;)
The match started at 10AM but was played untill 1PM. You know, temperatures are the hottest then.
Anyway it's really strange yeah :lol:

Freakan
Jul 8th, 2009, 08:36 PM
It's responsible when player from your avatar wins. If she loses, it's extremely irresponsible:p

Andreas
Jul 8th, 2009, 08:40 PM
Excuses.

drake3781
Jul 8th, 2009, 08:42 PM
That's ITF so I don;t know about it, but WTA matches in heat - they do an actual temperature check right on the player's body, at each changeover. And record the results in a paper on a clipboard. Don't know what the parameters are, but at least there is some attention and monitoring for problems. :shrug:

Craig.
Jul 8th, 2009, 08:42 PM
Sour grapes.

Kart
Jul 8th, 2009, 08:50 PM
3 hours 20 minutes in 40 degrees is really quite impressive.

Maybe the women could play five sets in the slams after all.

Elwin.
Jul 8th, 2009, 08:51 PM
Trolls :spit:
This is not an excuse for Misa's loss. Rebecca deserved it, she was the better player today :shrug:
Only thing that i'm stating is that it's not responsible to play in such extreme temperatures.
Obviously some people don't have a brain and can't discuss about that :lol:

Mynarco
Jul 8th, 2009, 08:56 PM
If I am either player, I would simply give it to another player.
OH GAWD. 40 degrees for 3 hours?

Craig.
Jul 8th, 2009, 09:13 PM
Trolls :spit:
This is not an excuse for Misa's loss. Rebecca deserved it, she was the better player today :shrug:
Only thing that i'm stating is that it's not responsible to play in such extreme temperatures.
Obviously some people don't have a brain and can't discuss about that :lol:

Thanks for the bad rep :wavey:

Elwin.
Jul 8th, 2009, 09:14 PM
Thanks for the bad rep :wavey:

You are welcome:wavey: You can bad-rep me back if that makes you feel better :hug:

miffedmax
Jul 8th, 2009, 09:20 PM
Grapevine is a suburb of Dallas, where I live. Those temps are only slightly hotter than usual for this time of year. (I wish I was watching tennis instead of in the office, but I gotta work). My younger son is at tennis camp right now, drilling about 5 hours a day in those conditions and has a tournament this weekend. Pro baseball and soccer going on right now. I myself will be out officiating for 12 hours in a couple weeks.

Sunscreen, hydrate, light colored clothes, a hat--you actually want clothes that provide a little coverage to cut down on the sun hitting your skin, especially if you're fairskinned, but even if you're quite dark. If they've been on the USTA circuit, they've had some time to acclimate. US summers tend to be hotter than in Europe, even at similar latitudes--I don't know why.

It's kind of what we're stuck with in Texas, which is notoriously hot. If they head west from here toward Arizona, Nevada or Utah, 102 will be a fond memory.

HRHoliviasmith
Jul 8th, 2009, 09:57 PM
Grapevine is a suburb of Dallas, where I live. Those temps are only slightly hotter than usual for this time of year. (I wish I was watching tennis instead of in the office, but I gotta work). My younger son is at tennis camp right now, drilling about 5 hours a day in those conditions and has a tournament this weekend. Pro baseball and soccer going on right now. I myself will be out officiating for 12 hours in a couple weeks.

Sunscreen, hydrate, light colored clothes, a hat--you actually want clothes that provide a little coverage to cut down on the sun hitting your skin, especially if you're fairskinned, but even if you're quite dark. If they've been on the USTA circuit, they've had some time to acclimate. US summers tend to be hotter than in Europe, even at similar latitudes--I don't know why.

It's kind of what we're stuck with in Texas, which is notoriously hot. If they head west from here toward Arizona, Nevada or Utah, 102 will be a fond memory.

you live in grapevine????? i practically LIVED at the California Pizza Kitchen over there. i miss it so much. :sad:

Volcana
Jul 8th, 2009, 10:10 PM
There's no irresponsibility there.

I played tennis at that temperature. Never for more than two hours though. But I'm not a professional athlete either. They're supposed to be able to do things I can't. And they did both finish the match.

Heat's an oddment. I've done 60 miles of cycling at that temperature. I tried icing my thighs mid-ride and my legs cramped into knots so tight I could barely walk, much less ride. Similar problems at the end of a beach volleyball tournament, on really hot days. It's NOT inherently dangerous to play sports in ultra-hot conditions. Providing you have access to sufficient hydration. Also the right nutrient balance. But it is an issue that players who aren't from hot climates probably don't know how to manage. You average changeover is more than enough time to maintain hydration, if you make it your first priority.

But especially if the chair ump is trying to move things along, you gotta grab that water bottle first, not sit down to catch your breathe, then find the bottle. An issue might be if the players brought enough with them in the first place.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jul 8th, 2009, 11:39 PM
That's ITF so I don;t know about it, but WTA matches in heat - they do an actual temperature check right on the player's body, at each changeover. And record the results in a paper on a clipboard. Don't know what the parameters are, but at least there is some attention and monitoring for problems. :shrug:
I wont that job. :devil:

xan
Jul 9th, 2009, 12:40 AM
It's totally irresponsible to make people play professional tennis for hours in 100 degree heat. The AO has stopped it after Maria's 3 hour marathon in 2007. That sort of heat can kill, and that is not what any sporting event should be risking.

Bennguin1491
Jul 9th, 2009, 01:24 AM
trust me, it's not too much cooler here now at 8:30PM :p

drake3781
Jul 9th, 2009, 01:35 AM
I wont that job. :devil:


It's funny cuz the player is just sitting there resting, drinking, or whatever, and the official goes behind her with a skin thermometer and puts it right on her back and takes the reading, writes it down. :p The player never says anything or looks back, lol.


This must kick in when the temperature is at a certain number of degrees, but I don't know how high it must be. Cincinnati can be super-hot in mid summer (August) so expect to see it there on some days.

Sharapower
Jul 9th, 2009, 02:14 AM
These are typical temperatures in the AO, nobody has died yet (Only Martina Hingis lost a final to Jen-Cap despite a substantial lead...).
But the umpires and tournament officials should allow some flexibility about the breaks duration and systematically apply the extended break at 1 set all.
Maybe it would be good as well to train the players on the hydration best-practices.

miffedmax
Jul 9th, 2009, 03:12 AM
you live in grapevine????? i practically LIVED at the California Pizza Kitchen over there. i miss it so much. :sad:

Nah, I'm in Dallas proper. I was just in Grapevine about a month ago with the lad for a tennis tournament.

That's so funny you lived there.

HRHoliviasmith
Jul 9th, 2009, 04:34 AM
Nah, I'm in Dallas proper. I was just in Grapevine about a month ago with the lad for a tennis tournament.

That's so funny you lived there.

i actually lived in las colinas (irving) but was addicted to the food at the pizza kitchen. :lol: that was the closest one to me.

MyskinaManiac
Jul 9th, 2009, 09:47 AM
02 AO final was one of the worst tennis conditions for any player, male or female period. I saw that match, and you could just tell things weren't right... and Melbourne is one of the cooler cities in Aus. From what I've heard, Hingis collapsed on in the tunnel after the second from heat exhaustion and wanted to get off the court ASAP in the third set, win or lose.

I live in Australia, and 40 degree tempts are ok, it's when they get over 45 plus do you worry and stay inside. It's when you get the hot wind do you start to feel it. When the courts get too hot and you feel it through your shoes. Playing under a hot sun should not be the issues so long as you're hydrating and wearing sunscreen.

Professional athletes... they should deal with it.

adner
Jul 9th, 2009, 11:03 AM
It aint their fault that its too hot out there in Australia. I am an European and for me 30+ is way too much to live normally and I simply keep sitting in home dying from heat, not even speaking about playing sports.

Sharapower
Jul 9th, 2009, 11:24 AM
It aint their fault that its too hot out there in Australia. I am an European and for me 30+ is way too much to live normally and I simply keep sitting in home dying from heat, not even speaking about playing sports.
Actually, you're likely to less feel the heat if you're playing tennis or some other sport you like, than sitting doing nothing. It's the case for me, I've played at over 35C, I was definitely sweating a lot, but surprisingly it was totally bearable. You just have to wear a cap, hydrate yourself sufficiently and eat stuff and go in the shade whenever possible: in changeovers, between points...
The action makes you forget the heat and that's what may be dangerous because then you forget to take those precautions as well.

miffedmax
Jul 9th, 2009, 11:29 AM
In the days of my youth, I used to play in soccer tournaments (as did my older son) in Texas in the summer. Playing two soccer games in one day is, IHMO, more of a drain than one tennis match (and I played both). We dealt with it.

Emiel Goelen
Jul 9th, 2009, 11:44 AM
If she can't stand the heat, why is she playing that tournament? :confused:

Volcana
Jul 10th, 2009, 04:30 PM
Considering that the players always have a choice, is it even POSSIBLE for the tournament organizers to be truly 'irresponsible'?

Stupid? yes. No one is going to playing a the bottom of the ocean without breating equipment. But, as Lindsay Davenport famously pointed out, the players are independent contractors.

If they choose to play, it their probem, not the tournament's.

Boreas
Jul 10th, 2009, 08:39 PM
Krajicek lost to Marino, who's not even Duque Marino?:lol: she seems to be in terrible form