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only_one_maria
Jun 29th, 2009, 07:43 PM
Seems like a reaction to the religious camps that you get. Not sure how many kids would fancy spending their summers learning about critical thinking, evolutionary biology and so on but that's what they'll be doing.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/faith/article6591236.ece

It's backed by God Delusion author Richard Dawkins.

Solitaire
Jun 29th, 2009, 08:17 PM
Sounds like fun where do I sign up?

miffedmax
Jun 29th, 2009, 09:42 PM
Meh. I find it just as annoying when someone parades their lack of belief as when someone flaunts their faith. All of you, off of my porch.

The Dawntreader
Jun 29th, 2009, 11:14 PM
At least more original than fat camp!:lol:

I agree with you though Max. People shouldn't use their beliefs/or lack of belief as a focal point. Beliefs should always be private. For the most part anyway.

antonella
Jun 30th, 2009, 12:46 AM
Hope they don't get hit by lightning.

Scotso
Jun 30th, 2009, 01:06 AM
Meh. I find it just as annoying when someone parades their lack of belief as when someone flaunts their faith. All of you, off of my porch.

Agreed.

Why don't they just send their kids to a normal summer camp? The only reason to emphasize that this is an "atheist camp" is to purposefully slap religious people in the face. It's childish.

NeeemZ
Jun 30th, 2009, 01:26 AM
Agreed.

Why don't they just send their kids to a normal summer camp? The only reason to emphasize that this is an "atheist camp" is to purposefully slap religious people in the face. It's childish.

I agree.

Warrior
Jun 30th, 2009, 02:55 AM
Looks like atheism is starting to mimic organized religion.

Solitaire
Jun 30th, 2009, 03:52 AM
Agreed.

Why don't they just send their kids to a normal summer camp? The only reason to emphasize that this is an "atheist camp" is to purposefully slap religious people in the face. It's childish.

Just like religious camps are attempts to slap Atheist in the face? I think both form of camps are fine. I see nothing wrong with parents sending their children to a religious summer camp nor do I see it as a slap in the face to Atheist. Heaven forbid you surround yourself with like minded individuals!

tennisbear7
Jun 30th, 2009, 04:17 AM
Agreed.

Why don't they just send their kids to a normal summer camp? The only reason to emphasize that this is an "atheist camp" is to purposefully slap religious people in the face. It's childish.

Agreed.

gentenaire
Jun 30th, 2009, 05:53 AM
I agree with nearly everyone in this thread.
I consider myself an atheist, as i don't believe there's a god and there's no religion in my life. But that's it. It's something that's not present in my life, it's a lack of, it's an inactive thing.
These kind of camps do make it active, make atheism almost like a religion in itself.

Scotso
Jun 30th, 2009, 06:59 AM
Just like religious camps are attempts to slap Atheist in the face? I think both form of camps are fine. I see nothing wrong with parents sending their children to a religious summer camp nor do I see it as a slap in the face to Atheist. Heaven forbid you surround yourself with like minded individuals!

There's a difference between an "I believe!" club and an "I don't believe!" club. The latter is almost always started as a slight to the former.

If you don't believe, swell. There's no need to celebrate it. I seriously doubt there is a "God," and I think religion is bogus, but I still think that this "atheist camp" is nothing more than an attempt to insult a group of people.

moby
Jun 30th, 2009, 07:15 AM
Hmmm... interesting. I have my reservations with a Dawkins-affiliated camp naturally, since his stance on atheism is almost fundamentalist in nature. However, the objectives of the camp strike me as very legitimate. IMO, it's the the loaded words of the article writer - "budding atheists" etc contribute to the dogmatic feel of the camp.

I don't see anything wrong with educating kinds on critical thinking, rational skepticism, moral philosophy and evolutionary biology; in fact, it's applaudable. These are essential tools and knowledge even in the non-religious aspects of our lives - and it just so happens that people equipped with such tools and knowledge, and who use them, almost invariably turn out to be atheists or agnostics. Given the nature of skepticism, if the course were conducted right, none of the kids should end up holding fundamentalist atheistic beliefs. If they become atheists, they'll become working atheists who will readily change their minds should sufficient evidence for the existence of God emerge.

Equip the kids with these tools and let them decide.

Solitaire
Jun 30th, 2009, 07:28 AM
There's a difference between an "I believe!" club and an "I don't believe!" club. The latter is almost always started as a slight to the former.

If you don't believe, swell. There's no need to celebrate it. I seriously doubt there is a "God," and I think religion is bogus, but I still think that this "atheist camp" is nothing more than an attempt to insult a group of people.

I'm a proud atheist and I do celebrate it. In my personal celebration I feel no need to slight people of faith. The religious right is such a strong froce in America and most of the world which leads many Atheist to feel isolated and marginalized. So I see nothing wrong with Atheist getting together and celebrating their shared nonbelief. I was an atheist at the age of 13 and I went to "normal" summer camp. It would have been awesome if I had the chance to go to an Atheist summer camp instead.

Pheobo
Jun 30th, 2009, 03:02 PM
I bet this is the most depressing group of kids a summer camp has ever seen :lol: I can only imagine what kind of stories the counselors hear.

"Well, timmy told me that it took the death of his mother and father in a fiery accident as well as his dog getting cancer for him to realize that there is no God...and I said welcome home. "

Scotso
Jun 30th, 2009, 04:20 PM
I'm a proud atheist and I do celebrate it. In my personal celebration I feel no need to slight people of faith. The religious right is such a strong froce in America and most of the world which leads many Atheist to feel isolated and marginalized. So I see nothing wrong with Atheist getting together and celebrating their shared nonbelief. I was an atheist at the age of 13 and I went to "normal" summer camp. It would have been awesome if I had the chance to go to an Atheist summer camp instead.

:lol:

Sorry, but this is hilarious to me. Just replace "atheist" with "Christian" and it's the same crap they spiel.

Monica_Rules
Jun 30th, 2009, 04:27 PM
Sounds like fun, wish i would have been able to go when i was younger. Doesn't sound so much like an athiest camp asa place to learn about free thinking and stuff.

Solitaire
Jun 30th, 2009, 04:38 PM
:lol:

Sorry, but this is hilarious to me. Just replace "atheist" with "Christian" and it's the same crap they spiel.

They say laughter is good for the soul so it should do you some good.:D Each group has they right to assemble and talk as much crap as they want. I think it's great people can freely get together and share their beliefs with like minded individuals.

Ryan
Jun 30th, 2009, 04:40 PM
If you're an atheist by 13 it just means you're rebelling against a dominant way of life, no 13 year-old is educated/aware of the world enough to make sound decisions about whether there is or is not a God IMO.

Scotso
Jun 30th, 2009, 04:50 PM
If you're an atheist by 13 it just means you're rebelling against a dominant way of life, no 13 year-old is educated/aware of the world enough to make sound decisions about whether there is or is not a God IMO.

Personally, I don't believe anyone is ever intelligent enough to make that decision.

Ryan
Jun 30th, 2009, 04:58 PM
Personally, I don't believe anyone is ever intelligent enough to make that decision.



I think you can reach a point where you know enough about life in general/from your point of view to make a decision about whether you THINK there is a God or not. :shrug: I can't make it, but I'm sure people have. :p

Solitaire
Jun 30th, 2009, 05:03 PM
If you're an atheist by 13 it just means you're rebelling against a dominant way of life, no 13 year-old is educated/aware of the world enough to make sound decisions about whether there is or is not a God IMO.

Then I've been rebelling for a few years now. I made the conscience decision at 13 that I didn't believe in god it was as simple as that. No one preached to me about Atheism nor did I have a bad exeperience with the church. It was a logical conclusion I came to on my own. People don't often give kids enough credit when it comes to critical thinking. If anything I had a leg up on public school kids cause I went to Catholic school. I had gathered enough information from my teachings to conclude there was no god.

Monica_Rules
Jun 30th, 2009, 05:14 PM
I became an athiest at the age of 13 aswell. Just under a year before that i had made the decision to get confirmed. I went through 3 months of confirmation classes.

I don't know how i came to that conclusion but i did and it was through thinking about the world.

Bayo
Jun 30th, 2009, 05:14 PM
Meh. I find it just as annoying when someone parades their lack of belief as when someone flaunts their faith. All of you, off of my porch.

Agreed.

And either way, be it Jesus camp or an atheist camp, I see it as an attempt to indoctrinate children. Why not wait til they're older and let them choose whether they believe or not for themselves? Now there's a novel ideal.

Kart
Jun 30th, 2009, 06:10 PM
It sounds completely ridiculous.

treufreund
Jul 1st, 2009, 06:59 AM
I'm a proud atheist and I do celebrate it. In my personal celebration I feel no need to slight people of faith. The religious right is such a strong froce in America and most of the world which leads many Atheist to feel isolated and marginalized. So I see nothing wrong with Atheist getting together and celebrating their shared nonbelief. I was an atheist at the age of 13 and I went to "normal" summer camp. It would have been awesome if I had the chance to go to an Atheist summer camp instead.

You hit the nail on the head. It's very important for atheists to provide support and networking for our kids and for other atheists in general. By staying isolated or quiet, we are not armed with the critical tools and critical thinking needed to protect us from feeling isolated and to diffuse the propaganda of the religious right.

Edinboro
Jul 1st, 2009, 07:26 AM
I hate when parents practice their beliefs on kids. I was lucky (well not really lol) in the fact I didnt have parents growing up. My dad ran out and my mom is very sick and always has been. Ive been able to research religon on my own and come to my own conclusions without any added influences. Kids should be able to do the same.

Edit, Religon should be about compassion and love and acceptance of ALL people. Most uber religous people I know use their religon as a way to look down on others.

Ryan
Jul 1st, 2009, 12:03 PM
You hit the nail on the head. It's very important for atheists to provide support and networking for our kids and for other atheists in general. By staying isolated or quiet, we are not armed with the critical tools and critical thinking needed to protect us from feeling isolated and to diffuse the propaganda of the religious right.




:weirdo: Support and networking for your kids? WTF dude, do you not let your kids hang out with non-atheists? I hope you realize you're acting exactly like the religious-right you look down upon so much. :o

Ryan
Jul 1st, 2009, 12:06 PM
I hate when parents practice their beliefs on kids. I was lucky (well not really lol) in the fact I didnt have parents growing up. My dad ran out and my mom is very sick and always has been. Ive been able to research religon on my own and come to my own conclusions without any added influences. Kids should be able to do the same.

Edit, Religon should be about compassion and love and acceptance of ALL people. Most uber religous people I know use their religon as a way to look down on others.



:( That's sad Edinboro, but nice view on growing up/learning things for yourself. I agree.

Kworb
Jul 1st, 2009, 12:11 PM
Personally, I don't believe anyone is ever intelligent enough to make that decision.

Indeed, agnosticism is true enlightenment.