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The Tennis Head
Feb 23rd, 2009, 02:22 PM
I would paste it in here but it's impossible in this format! Check it out in the new tennishead ezine...

http://cde.cerosmedia.com/1J499185eee9e7b012.cde

fatty sausage
Feb 23rd, 2009, 06:39 PM
this is very cool...thanks for posting and great job!

Christinawww
Feb 23rd, 2009, 06:49 PM
thank you.
And to whoever is was who wanted to know how many languages Caroline speaks/understand, well the answer is in the article:
Danish, Polish, English all speaking fluently. Understands Russian, Norwegian, Swedish, Czech, Slovak, and is learning Spanish and French.

Spiritof42
Feb 23rd, 2009, 07:39 PM
Impressive. What she says about the three Scandinavian languages is true, but I didn't expect her to know Russian. Being something of a language freak myself, I think Caroline and I could have some interesting conversations. Well, I'm available if she wants to improve her French. :lol:

To the OP: thanks for the link, I was not aware of this "digital magazine". :yeah:

Christinawww
Feb 23rd, 2009, 08:23 PM
nope, Russian came as a surprise for me too. And I've heard before that Polish and Czech and Slovak resemble each other, so why she understands those language shouldn't have come as a surprise, but it did. Though I am a bit surprised that she doesn't speak German.

kman
Feb 23rd, 2009, 08:44 PM
Though I am a bit surprised that she doesn't speak German.


Not everyone has German in Danish schools. And then, even most of those who do can't really speak German.

Christinawww
Feb 23rd, 2009, 09:10 PM
^I would say that you have to search hard for a "folkeskole" (elementary school) that doesn't have German from the 6th or 7th grade. I am pretty sure that according to Danish school law, we must have English by 4th or 5th grade (I'm unsure about the year because a lot have changed since I was that age), and then a second second-language must be offered by 6th or 7th grade, which is normally German. Yes, a student can choose not to follow the German classes, but that doesn't happen very often.

And with all the language knowledge she seems to possess, I find it unlikely that she choose not to have German, or even more unlikely, that she took the classes, but can't speak it.

volta
Feb 23rd, 2009, 09:19 PM
Carol :hearts: i knew i loved her for some reason (other then her tennis that is) :hug: :inlove:

Jorn
Feb 23rd, 2009, 09:29 PM
and then a second second-language must be offered by 6th or 7th grade

Jeg tror de har Tysk i 7. klasse, men jeg lærte aldrig Tysk i skolen, det er først 10 år after jeg lærte at forstå og Læse Tysk, jeg gik 10 år i skole, men fravalgte Tysk de sidste år.
Så ikke sikker hun har haft Tysk i skolen, hvis ikke de har i Gymnasiet.

I don't think she 100% can understand Russian...

kman
Feb 23rd, 2009, 10:12 PM
^I would say that you have to search hard for a "folkeskole" (elementary school) that doesn't have German from the 6th or 7th grade. I am pretty sure that according to Danish school law, we must have English by 4th or 5th grade (I'm unsure about the year because a lot have changed since I was that age), and then a second second-language must be offered by 6th or 7th grade, which is normally German. Yes, a student can choose not to follow the German classes, but that doesn't happen very often.

And with all the language knowledge she seems to possess, I find it unlikely that she choose not to have German, or even more unlikely, that she took the classes, but can't speak it.

There were several students in my elementary school who did not participate in German classes. I had German in both elementary school and high school and I still can't speak it (i.e. lead a conversation in German) . We spent most of our time studying the grammar, constructing sentences (in writing) and reading. Hardly any speaking at all and certainly not enough that I'd be able to lead a proper conversation in German (and my English and Danish is excellent, better than Wozniacki's for sure, so it's not that my lingual skills are poor). And that was the case for most of my peers as well. There was one person in my high school class who could actually speak German pretty well, but his mother was a German teacher so go figure haha.

Christinawww
Feb 23rd, 2009, 10:52 PM
I went to 2 different elementary school, so that is a total of 45 peers for me, 3 of these didn't take German. And what these 3 had in common was the fact that they all had trouble with English and Danish(one of them couldn't even spell his own name), so teaching them German would be a waste of time for all involved. Instead they were given extra Danish lessons. In high school all from my class had German, and since German for the first two years of high school is an oral subject - only if it is chosen on your last year, will you be having a written exam - we all could speak decent German. Of course grammar was taught to some degree, but the main focus was speaking.
Now I don't really have contact with those people anymore, so I can't say if they still speak German, I know I still speak it. Yes you can def. hear I am Danish and I make a lot of grammar mistakes, but when I was in Stuttgart in 2007 and in Berlin in 2008, I didn't have any problems at all in communicating, and it's been 10 years since I left high-school.

But anyway, fact is, Caro didn't list German as one of her languages, and she must know best. All I said is, I was surprised based on my own life.

kman
Feb 23rd, 2009, 11:06 PM
Is German the only foreign language aside from English you had in school? I had Spanish for 3 years too and I can't speak Spanish either lol.

Caroline said she's working on her French and Spanish so that probably means she has French, Spanish and English in her high school (and it's rare that anyone has more than 3 foreign languages in high school I think). What little German she had in elementary she's probably forgotten most of (as is usually the case).