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View Full Version : Gajdosova's brilliant training methods...


Shonami Slam
Jan 10th, 2009, 12:23 PM
Your coach has adopted an interesting training technique...
JG: Yes - if I hit drop shots during a match my coach (Chris Johnston) makes me do sit-ups afterwards as 'punishment'... 50 sit-ups for each one. Since I was a kid it was my favorite shot to hit, but I would do it at inappropriate times like second serve returns on match point down. So when he saw me do it the first time he said, 'Nup, you've gotta do sit-ups for that'. He makes me do it even if I win the point so now my first reaction when I hit a drop shot is to say sorry! But he's actually really nice. At least he doesn't make me do it for double faults.

quoted from the latest "getting to know....Jarmila Gajdosova"

intrested in what you guys think about this - i personally admire the coach's aspiration to create as single-dimensional players as possible.:rolleyes:

i hope she's doing crunches for S&V as well! :tape:

So Disrespectful
Jan 10th, 2009, 12:33 PM
I noticed that and found it bizarre to be honest. It's a smart way of breaking a habit, but I think it would be more appropriate to punish her only if she plays a drop shot from behind the baseline, or down break point.

Hayato
Jan 10th, 2009, 12:48 PM
Lucky Niculescu's coach doesn't do the same, or she'd be the bulkiest woman on the tour!

CooCooCachoo
Jan 10th, 2009, 01:06 PM
OMFG :tape:

Dexter
Jan 10th, 2009, 01:11 PM
Lucky Niculescu's coach doesn't do the same, or she'd be the bulkiest woman on the tour!:haha:

ViennaCalling
Jan 10th, 2009, 03:49 PM
If someone plays a Dropshot too often it´s not a bad idea I guess :shrug:

:lol: If the coach of Jürgen Melzer would use this training method -
of course instead of Sit-Ups something like 24-hours-sex-forbiddance for every dropshot played :haha:

Vincey!
Jan 10th, 2009, 05:32 PM
That's bright, I was doing the same with my cousins, everytime they would fart or cuss when I would be around they would make push-ups or sit-ups :devil:

Shonami Slam
Jan 10th, 2009, 09:56 PM
i just don't understand why fight a natural habit, instead of improve it. oprandi made alot of noise in her short career using it. of course she was a much competer player on clay, but hay - Jarmila would only profit from a djokovic-like drop shot that works on hard courts as well...

Corswandt
Jan 11th, 2009, 12:05 AM
intrested in what you guys think about this - i personally admire the coach's aspiration to create as single-dimensional players as possible.:rolleyes:

He chose the easy way out. Gajdosova tends to hit dropshots at the worst possible times. So instead of teaching her the occasions where that shot might be useful or tactically savvy (which would require some time and effort), he forbids her to use it altogether (which is easy).

He does have a point in that the dropshots tend to be the "weapon" of the terminally lazy - it's no coincidence that Oprandi is the Dropshot Dame.

Back on topic, I suspect most of the coaches of even pro players to be nothing more than hacks with little to no idea about what they're doing.

From the (admittedly little) I've seen of the practice sessions of the pros and their coaches in tournaments, I noticed that I seldom saw the coaches have players work on a particular skill/shot (exception was, rather unsurprisignly, van Harpen) or try out shot combinations. It's mostly unimaginative, run-of-the-mill exchanges of groundstrokes.

Shonami Slam
Jan 11th, 2009, 06:52 AM
He chose the easy way out. Gajdosova tends to hit dropshots at the worst possible times. So instead of teaching her the occasions where that shot might be useful or tactically savvy (which would require some time and effort), he forbids her to use it altogether (which is easy).

He does have a point in that the dropshots tend to be the "weapon" of the terminally lazy - it's no coincidence that Oprandi is the Dropshot Dame.

Back on topic, I suspect most of the coaches of even pro players to be nothing more than hacks with little to no idea about what they're doing.

From the (admittedly little) I've seen of the practice sessions of the pros and their coaches in tournaments, I noticed that I seldom saw the coaches have players work on a particular skill/shot (exception was, rather unsurprisignly, van Harpen) or try out shot combinations. It's mostly unimaginative, run-of-the-mill exchanges of groundstrokes.

well, what came before what? the drop-shot becoming a shot when tired or wanting to finish up the point - or players never mastering it to begin with as a potential and ligitimate mid-rally shot.

I don't know much about coaches really, never seen practice drilling and rarely heard intresting insights from coaches about the game, and not just their current prodigy, but if as you say they don't have much clue - the tour is in better shape than we thought :rolleyes:
If i were a new upcoming player - i'd like Santoro to coach me.

Farina Elia Fan
Jan 11th, 2009, 11:29 AM
When I read it, I thought it was a strange decision. I think there should be some kind of 'punishment' for over using it but to stop her doing it at all is just crazy

Harvs
Jan 11th, 2009, 11:42 AM
lol she has explained that her drop shot is a shot that she has been hitting perfectly since she was a kid... she doesnt need to practice it like the rest of her game so its a way of breaking her habit..

Shvedbarilescu
Jan 11th, 2009, 12:24 PM
...;14746618']lol she has explained that her drop shot is a shot that she has been hitting perfectly since she was a kid... she doesnt need to practice it like the rest of her game so its a way of breaking her habit..

Err....right. So she should avoid hitting a shot that she can hit perfectly and a win points with. I wonder if her coach will now try to systematically one by one remove all the shots she hits well from her game just to make things really challenging for her. :shrug:

Frankly the thing with dropshots is that it isn't just learning how to execute the shot that matters, the key is learning when is the appropiate time to play the shot. And you can really only learn this by the experience of playing the shot. I really don't see what there is to be gained by removing this shot from her repetoire, even temporarily.

wally1
Jan 11th, 2009, 02:36 PM
From the (admittedly little) I've seen of the practice sessions of the pros and their coaches in tournaments, I noticed that I seldom saw the coaches have players work on a particular skill/shot (exception was, rather unsurprisignly, van Harpen) or try out shot combinations. It's mostly unimaginative, run-of-the-mill exchanges of groundstrokes.I've often thought the same, apart from the serve which I've seen players work on for long periods. The only exception that springs to mind is Dementieva, who I once saw at Wimbledon hitting backhand returns of serve for over half an hour, at which point I gave up and moved on. This was just after she'd played a match as she was still in her tennis clothes.

Farina Elia Fan
Jan 11th, 2009, 03:19 PM
Err....right. So she should avoid hitting a shot that she can hit perfectly and a win points with. I wonder if her coach will now try to systematically one by one remove all the shots she hits well from her game just to make things really challenging for her. :shrug:

Frankly the thing with dropshots is that it isn't just learning how to execute the shot that matters, the key is learning when is the appropiate time to play the shot. And you can really only learn this by the experience of playing the shot. I really don't see what there is to be gained by removing this shot from her repetoire, even temporarily.

:worship:

Nederlander RUS
Jan 11th, 2009, 09:33 PM
:lol:

Drake1980
Jan 11th, 2009, 10:19 PM
:lol:
She is so cute.

drake3781
Jan 12th, 2009, 01:03 AM
I love drop shots. :sobbing:

Dawson.
Jan 12th, 2009, 01:30 AM
I could understand it for every inappropriate drop shot (as she mentioned, on 2nd serves for example) but not if she wins the point with it! :o

Corswandt
Jan 13th, 2009, 11:03 PM
well, what came before what? the drop-shot becoming a shot when tired or wanting to finish up the point - or players never mastering it to begin with as a potential and ligitimate mid-rally shot.

An occasionally useful tactical expedient that all players should have in their arsenals - certainly. Often the only way to force a decision in matches between ATP claycourters, given the enhanced athleticism of today's game.

But let's put it this way - what kind of message are you sending to your opponent when, during a lengthy baseline rally, you hit a dropshot? "I can't take this grinding anymore! Please make it stop!" There's a reason why Spanish-trained players always have that fierce look oncourt, and sometimes walk around in circles like caged animals in between points. They don't want to give anything away.