PDA

View Full Version : Will Jill retire if... ?


St.Sebastian
Sep 14th, 2008, 03:25 PM
Will Jill Craybas retire if she loses 4 times in 7days to busty Marta?
Marta is now 5-0 in H2H Singles and 3-0 in H2H Doubles. They are due to play each other in both singles and doubles 1st round in Guangzhou.

Singles:

2006 MEMPHIS CARPET (I) S M. DOMACHOWSKA 6-1 6-0
2006 STRASBOURG CLAY (O) R32 M. DOMACHOWSKA 7-6(0) 6-2
2008 MIAMI HARD (O) R128 M. DOMACHOWSKA 6-4 0-6 7-6(6)
2008 WIMBLEDON GRASS (O) R128 M. DOMACHOWSKA 6-1 3-6 6-4
2008 BALI (O) R16 M.DOMACHOWSKA 6-3 6-7 6-4

Doubles:
2006 STANFORD QF Bartoli/Domachowska d. Crayvas/Tu 5-7 6-4 6-4
2008 MONTREAL R32 Domachowska/Petrova d. Craybas/Spears 6-3 6-2
2008 BALI SF Domachowska/Petrova d. Craybas/Grandin 6-4 5-7 11-9

Guangzhou International Women's Open

Singles (Marta's quarter):
DOMACHOWSKA Marta (POL) vs. CRAYBAS Jill (USA)

Doubles:
DOMACHOWSKA, Marta (POL)/DULKO, Gisela (ARG) vs. 3 CRAYBAS, Jill (USA)/GOVORTSOVA, Olga (BLR)

Mforensic
Sep 14th, 2008, 03:39 PM
ummm no...she's too stubborn!

RJWCapriati
Sep 14th, 2008, 05:47 PM
Jill will never retire

CrossCourt~Rally
Sep 14th, 2008, 06:29 PM
Jill seems to win more games everytime they play :eek::lol:. This will either be a 7/6 - 6/7 7-6 loss or Jilly will win this time! :rocker2:

A'DAM
Sep 14th, 2008, 06:30 PM
Jill is like Pratt she will be looming around for ages :)

hankqq
Sep 14th, 2008, 06:31 PM
Jill seems to win more games everytime they play :eek::lol:. This will either be a 7/6 - 6/7 7-6 loss or Jilly will win this time! :rocker2:

wouldn't surprise me either way :lol:

Shvedbarilescu
Sep 14th, 2008, 07:28 PM
Jill won't retire at least not yet even if she loses both matches.

But if Marta wins both matches it means someday she will be able to tell her grandchildren that once upon a time there was this very good player who in her career had beaten the likes of Serena Williams, Kim Clijsters, Jelena Jankovic, Mary Pierce and Elena Dementieva but she could never beat their own Granmama. Granny owed this very good player, named Jill Craybas, bigtime. Marta's grandchildren will be suitable impressed. :)

TheFifthAvocado
Sep 14th, 2008, 07:41 PM
What an epic rivalry, it nearly eclipses Brie Whitehead and Diamond Jackson. :bowdown:

Drake1980
Sep 14th, 2008, 07:41 PM
:lol:
Jill rocks! Hope she sticks around for a while.

Vincey!
Sep 14th, 2008, 07:44 PM
Jill will stay on the tour untill she can move up to the wheelchair tour :D She's gonna kick ass there too :rocker2:

AndreConrad
Sep 14th, 2008, 07:58 PM
Jill should stay... furthermore, despite of me being Marta's fan I have to say that if she won't take care of the DFs she may actually lose these encounters. Jill is a solid player!

Jakarta
Sep 14th, 2008, 08:00 PM
Jill mentioned in here, says she is still learning, still enjoying it. So staying put!

Tennis players find balance to keep competing
Bruce Emond , The Jakarta Post , Nusa Dua, Bali | Fri, 09/12/2008 10:49 AM | Headlines


Stories of teenage tennis stars who burn out after a flicker of initial promise are nothing new. Injuries, pushy parents, constant travel and pressure all take their toll on young minds and bodies.

There are the high-profile headline-making cases: Jennifer Capriati, who took time off to find herself before making a resurgent comeback, and one-time Wimbledon semifinalist Mirjana Lucic, once tipped as a future Grand Slammer, among others.

But there are many more who exited the tour with little fanfare, like Daja Bedanova, a former U.S. Open quarterfinalist who suffered chronic injuries, or talented Myriam Casanova of Switzerland.

"I learned being on the tour is not just about playing but also about your attitude in doing all it takes to be a professional player," former Indonesian number one Angie Widjaja said Thursday. She was participating in a clinic for up-and-coming juniors alongside the Commonwealth Bank Tennis Classic.

Angie, who won the junior Wimbledon and then the Bali title as a 17-year-old, enjoyed good results on the women's tour, taking home more than US$500,000 in prize money, but injuries and homesickness cut her career short.

At the age of 23, she now works for a sports and athlete management company in Jakarta.

In response to the complaints of players and fans disappointed by big-name players defaulting from tournaments due to injury, the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour has devised a streamlined tournament calendar beginning in 2009. The players also will have more off time at the end of the year to allow their bodies to recover.

Ultimately, however, it is up to the players themselves and their support teams to find what works best for them.

American Jill Craybas, a Tour veteran at the age of 34, says she is glad she went to college before embarking on a full-time tennis career.

"A lot of these girls start so young, at 16 or 17, by the time they're 25 they've been on the tour for eight or nine years," said the 76th-ranked Craybas. "I started a bit later.... By going to school, I learned to be a bit more independent by being away from home. For me, that helped me a lot to stay mentally stronger."

Russian Nadia Petrova, who admitted for a period she was "not very happy", said she has learned to enjoy herself more off court. Daniela Hantuchova, the top seed in Bali, also found an injury layoff earlier this year had an unexpected bright side.

For the first time after turning pro at the age of 16 in 1999, Hantuchova had some time to "be a normal person. It was kind of nice to wake up knowing I didn't have to do anything but rehab during the day."

In tennis terms, Swiss star Patty Schnyder is also a veteran, having turned pro at the age of 15 in 1994. She endured difficult times in her life, but has no plans to retire as her 30th birthday nears in December.

While other players have several people in their entourages, she travels with husband Rainer Hofmann, who helps manage her career. To observers, their relationship -- including arguments on the practice court or imploring looks from Schnyder to the sidelines during matches -- may seem extremely intense.

But the couple said they have learned to keep their private and professional sides separate.

"For sure, we are fighting together (on court), and off court we are living together. When we come off the court she's my wife ... and first of all I am her husband," Hofmann said.

Asked to name what he likes about his wife, he said simply: "She's a very good person, a fighter".

Schnyder said it helped to always have someone nearby for support because it took time to find genuine friends instead of people just interested in getting to know her public persona.

"It's easy to do small talk with people, but making new friends and getting to know a person.... People think they know me, but then they'll say, *You're different'. At the beginning there is a lot of distance."

Hofmann, she said, gave her what she needed to keep playing.

"The way he is fighting for me, he is always there for me, that's the greatest thing you can have."

Asked her secret for continuing to play, Jill Craybas said it was all about her love for the sport.

"I take it day by day. I still love it, I still enjoy playing. When there comes a day when I don't enjoy it, then I'll give it up."

ArturoAce.
Sep 14th, 2008, 08:05 PM
Maybe 4 more years!!!

Go Jilly!!! :bounce:

....i heard that she wants to play london 2012 also!!

___________________

http://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll275/artur0tennis/anim_29e6b310-d107-0c64-2976-a61f68.gif

CrossCourt~Rally
Sep 14th, 2008, 08:14 PM
Thats an informative article Jakarta! Thanks for posting :D:bounce:

Shvedbarilescu
Sep 14th, 2008, 08:30 PM
Jill mentioned in here, says she is still learning, still enjoying it. So staying put!

Tennis players find balance to keep competing
Bruce Emond , The Jakarta Post , Nusa Dua, Bali | Fri, 09/12/2008 10:49 AM | Headlines


Stories of teenage tennis stars who burn out after a flicker of initial promise are nothing new. Injuries, pushy parents, constant travel and pressure all take their toll on young minds and bodies.

There are the high-profile headline-making cases: Jennifer Capriati, who took time off to find herself before making a resurgent comeback, and one-time Wimbledon semifinalist Mirjana Lucic, once tipped as a future Grand Slammer, among others.

But there are many more who exited the tour with little fanfare, like Daja Bedanova, a former U.S. Open quarterfinalist who suffered chronic injuries, or talented Myriam Casanova of Switzerland.

"I learned being on the tour is not just about playing but also about your attitude in doing all it takes to be a professional player," former Indonesian number one Angie Widjaja said Thursday. She was participating in a clinic for up-and-coming juniors alongside the Commonwealth Bank Tennis Classic.

Angie, who won the junior Wimbledon and then the Bali title as a 17-year-old, enjoyed good results on the women's tour, taking home more than US$500,000 in prize money, but injuries and homesickness cut her career short.

At the age of 23, she now works for a sports and athlete management company in Jakarta.

In response to the complaints of players and fans disappointed by big-name players defaulting from tournaments due to injury, the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour has devised a streamlined tournament calendar beginning in 2009. The players also will have more off time at the end of the year to allow their bodies to recover.

Ultimately, however, it is up to the players themselves and their support teams to find what works best for them.

American Jill Craybas, a Tour veteran at the age of 34, says she is glad she went to college before embarking on a full-time tennis career.

"A lot of these girls start so young, at 16 or 17, by the time they're 25 they've been on the tour for eight or nine years," said the 76th-ranked Craybas. "I started a bit later.... By going to school, I learned to be a bit more independent by being away from home. For me, that helped me a lot to stay mentally stronger."

Russian Nadia Petrova, who admitted for a period she was "not very happy", said she has learned to enjoy herself more off court. Daniela Hantuchova, the top seed in Bali, also found an injury layoff earlier this year had an unexpected bright side.

For the first time after turning pro at the age of 16 in 1999, Hantuchova had some time to "be a normal person. It was kind of nice to wake up knowing I didn't have to do anything but rehab during the day."

In tennis terms, Swiss star Patty Schnyder is also a veteran, having turned pro at the age of 15 in 1994. She endured difficult times in her life, but has no plans to retire as her 30th birthday nears in December.

While other players have several people in their entourages, she travels with husband Rainer Hofmann, who helps manage her career. To observers, their relationship -- including arguments on the practice court or imploring looks from Schnyder to the sidelines during matches -- may seem extremely intense.

But the couple said they have learned to keep their private and professional sides separate.

"For sure, we are fighting together (on court), and off court we are living together. When we come off the court she's my wife ... and first of all I am her husband," Hofmann said.

Asked to name what he likes about his wife, he said simply: "She's a very good person, a fighter".

Schnyder said it helped to always have someone nearby for support because it took time to find genuine friends instead of people just interested in getting to know her public persona.

"It's easy to do small talk with people, but making new friends and getting to know a person.... People think they know me, but then they'll say, *You're different'. At the beginning there is a lot of distance."

Hofmann, she said, gave her what she needed to keep playing.

"The way he is fighting for me, he is always there for me, that's the greatest thing you can have."

Asked her secret for continuing to play, Jill Craybas said it was all about her love for the sport.

"I take it day by day. I still love it, I still enjoy playing. When there comes a day when I don't enjoy it, then I'll give it up."

Thanks for that. Great article with a lot of insight into several of the players. It sounds crazy but more and more I get the impression Patty's hubby Rainer ain't such a bad guy after all at least he seems a pretty loving hubby if this article and Patty's current blog are anything to go by.

As for Jill, what can one say? Anyone who is still on the circuit at 34 years old and still playing quality tennis and playing it with real passion and love clearly deserves a hell of a lot of respect. :bowdown: