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View Full Version : Hurricane Gustavo didn't ravage the Gulf Coast afterall


samsung101
Sep 2nd, 2008, 06:26 PM
I almost saw some disappointment in the breathy news-entertainment reporters there
covering it 24/7...........

See, the water is lapping over the levee! Oh no.

The water is falling from the sky!

Oh no!


Thankfully, the hurricanes did not do horrendous damage. The evacuation
went well. Give kudos to the governor there, he did a great job early
on. The city, county, state, and feds did their jobs, in that order.

If the first response teams are on the ground, doing their part well, all
the other pieces of the puzzle fit right, and it works.

Kudos to the citizens too for doing their part, preparing, evacuating, and
waiting it out. Safely.


Texas and Mississippi flooding badly.

Can Geraldo get over there to see it? Nah......it's all N.O. all the time.



It's a city in a bowl, they get hurricanes every year, some much
worse than others, some not so bad, and some every 50 to 100 years
are like Katrina.

The levees are very old. Did you see what they look like? The ocean
is on the other side. Think of that, the Gulf Coast and the ocean are
right there, by a few homes next to a manmade wall.


Man v. nature, who wins in a level 5 hurricane? No contest.

Memo to N.O. and the federal govt., within the next 100 years, build
sea walls, like Galveton did after it was wiped out years ago by a hurricane.
Or do what the Dutch do......

disposablehero
Sep 3rd, 2008, 03:32 AM
A huge engineering success for the US. They proved, unequivocably, that New Orleans can now withstand a near-miss from a Category 2 hurricane.

Williamsser
Sep 3rd, 2008, 10:39 AM
I think that the media was disappointed, too.

Wannabeknowitall
Sep 3rd, 2008, 01:34 PM
A huge engineering success for the US. They proved, unequivocably, that New Orleans can now withstand a near-miss from a Category 2 hurricane.

:lol:

The fact remains that if we would have updated our areas below sea level as the Netherlands do, there wouldn't have been a Katrina in the first place.
Instead we had levees that were by design 40 years old.

Jakeev
Sep 3rd, 2008, 10:11 PM
It's insane to think the media wanted to see widespread devastation.

Either way though, the blessed thing about Gulf hurricanes is that depending on were they enter, they run out of steam because of the temperature of the water. Gustav thankfully followed a path to allow it to lose steam.

canuckfan
Sep 4th, 2008, 05:38 AM
It's "Gustav" by the way. I think you had it mixed with one of the illegal mexican immigrants you like so much.

BigB08822
Sep 4th, 2008, 02:41 PM
I am responding from Baton Rouge, Louisiana and Gustav DID INDEED ravage some places. Just because New Orleans didn't flood, and just because 2000 people didn't die (so so so so so sorry Fox News, MSNBC, etc maybe next time there will be more death and destruction) doesn't mean this wasn't a bad storm. This was the WORST hurricane in modern history for the city of Baton Rouge. Baton Rouge may not boast a population of 2 million people like Houston or other places but it isn't small either. None of us were told to evacuate and now there are hundreds of thousands of people without power, food, gas, water, etc. I wish you people could see what this place looks like, I've never seen anything like it. Could it have been worse? Sure, but it can ALWAYS be worse. Even Katrina could have been worse.

P.S. If anyone is wondering, I am posting from work where we do have power and I am coming in the day just go get some entertainment and A/C.

esquímaux
Sep 4th, 2008, 06:01 PM
Hmmm I'm more concerned about Ike... Provided my forecasting skills are a work in progress, I foresee it thwacking the Mississippi/Alabama border :o

drake3781
Sep 4th, 2008, 09:03 PM
I am responding from Baton Rouge, Louisiana and Gustav DID INDEED ravage some places. Just because New Orleans didn't flood, and just because 2000 people didn't die (so so so so so sorry Fox News, MSNBC, etc maybe next time there will be more death and destruction) doesn't mean this wasn't a bad storm. This was the WORST hurricane in modern history for the city of Baton Rouge. Baton Rouge may not boast a population of 2 million people like Houston or other places but it isn't small either. None of us were told to evacuate and now there are hundreds of thousands of people without power, food, gas, water, etc. I wish you people could see what this place looks like, I've never seen anything like it. Could it have been worse? Sure, but it can ALWAYS be worse. Even Katrina could have been worse.

P.S. If anyone is wondering, I am posting from work where we do have power and I am coming in the day just go get some entertainment and A/C.




I know that three plants of my client's company - these are major manufacturing plants - are closed pending assessment of damage and startup capability.



Hmmm I'm more concerned about Ike... Provided my forecasting skills are a work in progress, I foresee it thwacking the Mississippi/Alabama border :o


This coast has and will continue to be hit by these storms. I remember in the 80s going to the Alabama coast and seeing the remnants of hurricane damage.