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Carofan
Jun 22nd, 2008, 08:06 AM
Caroline Wozniacki: A great Dane
Part of article: http://www.tennishead.net/prozone/hot-stuff/2008-02-19/great-dane/

“I just saw it as an opportunity to show the world who I am, that I can play,” Wozniacki tells Tennishead casually, like taking the women’s tour by storm as a teenager is no big deal. “I had to start from the beginning again, and I really found that fun to just go out and think that every match I win is a big plus. If I lost a match it was fine, and if I won it was great, so step-by-step I came up the rankings.” As well as her refreshingly relaxed approach to playing tennis, she’s proved that she also has the weapons and mental toughness to rely on when the opportunities come along in big matches. “Senior players are more consistent and hit harder, but think a bit better than the juniors,” she explains. “They take the first opportunity that they have, not the second or third; if they have one chance they take it. I think mentally I’m pretty sharp. I don’t give up.”

That winning mentality is probably in her genes. With her dad, Piotr, a Pole who played pro football in Denmark, mum Anna who played volleyball for Poland and an older brother, Patrik, who’s an amateur footballer back home in Denmark she grew up in a pretty competitive environment, something that used to surface when she played soccer herself as a kid. “I’m really competitive so if I’m not better than the others I don’t want to play any more,” she says matter of factly. Her father has had a hand in her tennis since she began playing aged seven and her parents still travel on the tour, accompanied by recent addition to her entourage, Swedish coach Henrik Holm, a former top 20 player himself who is employed by the Danish tennis federation. Internet rumours in February suggested Jimmy Connors was being lined up to help with her game too. “I did all different kinds of sports [when I was younger]… I don’t think there’s a sport that I haven’t tried!” she admits. “And then suddenly I played tennis a little bit, and no one wanted to play with me because I was too bad.

“I just wanted to show the whole world that I wasn’t bad. I was playing against the wall for hours each day and I thought it was fun. And then one day my dad took me on the court and he wanted to practice with me and that’s how it started. And I got better than my parents, better than my brother, and I made some small goals and I achieved them and I wanted to become better and better.”

As well as improving her singles ranking, the teenager says she is determined to make sure she makes her Olympic debut in 2008 when the Games visit Beijing in August. “It’s a main goal for me because the Olympics is only every fourth year, and it’s a great achievement to go there and play and fight for some medals.”Success at the Olympics would guarantee her serious superstar status back home in Denmark. Even before her Australian Open exploits, the Danes were talking about her becoming their biggest sports star of all time – no mean feat in a football-obsessed country that has churned out greats such as Michael and Brian Laudrup, legendary goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel, as well as Tour de France cyclists Bjarne Riis and Michael Rasmussen.

Major sponsors haven’t been slow in recognising her appeal. The logos of Babolat, adidas, Danish financial services group Nordea, JBJ Group, Sony Ericsson and Danish travel insurance company Europæiske Rejseforsikring A/S adorn her personal website, she’s already appeared on talk shows back home and has shot two TV commercials for Sony Ericsson and Europæiske.

Is she bothered by the attention? Not a bit. “Everyone knows me in Denmark now. If I go outside the door everyone wants autographs and are talking, but I like it – it’s fun. It feels good.” Like any authentic sports superstar, she now lives in Monte Carlo, having moved to the, ahem, tax-free principality in January 2007. It’s obvious Denmark is still close to her heart, though, (“It’s beautiful, with nice people,” she says, but “a little bit too rainy”) and confesses that being the only Dane on the WTA tour gets lonely at times. “Sometimes it is, we have some guys that are playing, but no girls, and so it is hard because you want to compete with someone positively and you want to have someone to talk to as well… [I miss] some of my friends that are at home, and my brother who is there and playing soccer, and I miss the atmosphere.”
Maintaining contact with all things Denmark is helped by the fact that Caroline is still a student, dedicated to completing her schoolwork by mixing tennis with long distance learning. “It’s important to get an education in case something happens,” she explains. It’s a mature approach to life for a 17-year-old, but something tells us she won’t be needing her geography, history or algebra any time soon. Someone who knows a thing or two about being a teenage prodigy, Martina Hingis, feels the same – and expects big things. “Caroline is a strong up and coming player with a lot of potential,” she said last year. “She just needs to keep on going with what she’s doing. She’s going in the right direction. I think she is very talented and can go a long way.”

Tennishead says: Watch out for Wozniacki!

Carofan
Jun 22nd, 2008, 08:11 AM
WOZNIACKI OUSTS KUZNETSOVA By Bill Pierce, PA Sport, www.sportinglife.com (http://www.sportinglife.com)

Caroline Wozniacki gave another indication of her promising talent as she blew away Russia's Svetlana Kuznetsova at windy Eastbourne in the £300,000 International Women's Open. The 17-year-old Dane, who has Polish parents but adopted the country of her birth, has burst through this year into the world's top 40. And she will be one to watch next week at Wimbledon where the women's draw has been thrown wide open by the retirement of brilliant Belgians Justine Henin and Kim Clijsters and the annual uncertainty over past champions Venus and Serena Williams.

Wozniacki was born in the same town as Hans Christian Andersen, and after winning both the Wimbledon and Australian junior crowns two years ago she looks set for more fairytale success after demolishing world number five Kuznetsov 6-2 6-2 in just 65 minutes. It added much-needed drama to a dismal day at Devonshire Park where France's Amelie Mauresmo, the 2006 Wimbledon champion, followed American Lindsay Davenport and Ana Ivanovic in dropping out through injury. Mauresmo, now down to number 30 in the rankings after a nightmare year, felt a left thigh injury only three games into her second-round match against Samantha Stosur. Davenport ducked out yesterday with a knee problem.

But despite the absence of several players, Wozniacki was happy to take centre stage and admitted she has her sights set on reaching the top. "Of course, like everybody else, I want to be world number one and win Grand Slams. I'm taking it day by day but who is to say it is impossible," she said. "Svetlana is certainly the best player I've beaten. She's number four or five in the rankings and it is a great result for me.

"I'm really happy. I have been practising very hard this year and my fitness has improved a lot. I think that has come from practicing a lot with guys and learning to combat their physical strength. "It's not difficult to find good tennis facilities in Denmark. Okay, we may be more famous for handball and badminton but there is plenty of opportunity for tennis players, too." Wozniacki, who celebrated her win with an ice-cream on the Eastbourne promenade, now has a quarter-final meeting with Australian Stosur tomorrow.

Carofan
Jun 22nd, 2008, 08:16 AM
Eastbourne's Dane is dynamite, www.theargus.co.uk

The flashlights and furiously clicking cameras in the post-match press conference told their own story. Eastbourne may just have witnessed the birth of a new star of women's tennis. Danish sizzler Caroline Wozniacki did not just defeat top seed Svetlana Kuznetsova - she destroyed her.

http://ads.newsquest.co.uk/RealMedia/ads/Creatives/default/empty.gif (http://ads.newsquest.co.uk/RealMedia/ads/click_lx.ads/www.theargus.co.uk/mostpopular.var.2350829.mostviewed.eastbournes_dan e_is_dynamite.php/2108002700/Frame2/default/empty.gif/35306133336366393438356466363930)
The Russian world No. 4 was blown away 6-2, 6-2 in only 65 minutes on a windswept centre court in the second round of the International Women's Open. It was Kuznetsova's heaviest defeat since losing 6-1, 6-1 to Kim Clijsters in the season-ending championships in 2006. True, she was badly out of sorts in the gusty conditions, serving a hat-trick of double faults in one game (including a foot fault) and eight in total.

It was, nevertheless, a stunning and timely triumph for Wozniacki. The 17-year-old has burst onto the scene like a breath of fresh air to rescue a tournament starved of glamour by the withdrawal last week of new world No. 1 Ana Ivanovic and riddled with injury-induced apathy.

Denmark is not an obvious breeding ground for such a bright prospect. The last player they produced of any note was Tina Scheuer-Larson back in the 1980s and she was hardly the household name which Wozniacki could become if she maintains her progress since winning junior Wimbledon two years ago. Wozniacki said: "We have been Olympic champions in handball three times. In badminton we've had the world No. 1. I think there is more tradition in these kind of games, because we have really accomplished something in them. "Tennis just seemed like the best thing for me. I was the boss on court and I liked that. No-one was telling me what and what not to do. "Tennis is such an individual sport. I think it is up to yourself how good you can be. I always practice with the guys back at home and I think that has helped my game. They play differently and a bit faster than the girls."

Kuznetsova dropped just five games in their only previous meeting at Indian Wells earlier this year. Nobody at Devonshire Park anticipated such a rout in reverse, including Wozniacki. Asked if she was surprised, she admitted: "I was a little bit. I've been close to getting sets against top players before. I am really happy to have closed out the match. "I just enjoy playing on grass, the fast and flat game. It's important to have good serves and return well."

Kuznetsova, the 2004 champion and semi-finalist on her other two Eastbourne appearances in 2005 and 2006, did neither. She held serve only three times as Wozniacki, consistent on both wings and scrambling effectively when she needed to, threatened a second set whitewash when she romped into a 4-0 lead.

Carofan
Jun 29th, 2008, 10:39 PM
Jankovic battles through knee injury to put down great Dane

Serbian No 2 seed looks unconvincing as Wozniacki earns plaudits in defeat

By Tim Glover at Wimbledon www.independent.co.uk (http://www.independent.co.uk)
Sunday, 29 June 2008

Jelena Jankovic, you may or may not be surprised to learn, is ranked No 2 in the world and on the face of it that doesn't say a great deal about the world. Still, the 23-year-old from Belgrade overcame two handicaps yesterday, a suspect left knee and an admirable adversary.

Caroline Wozniacki, experiencing the rarefied heights of the third round at Wimbledon for the first time in her young career, did herself, her country, Denmark, and the women's game proud with a performance that, at times, lit up the Centre Court. Wozniacki, at just 17, is a star in the making. Playing with a maturity and confidence beyond her years, she took the first set 6-2 and another major upset was on the cards until the Serb's weight of shot gradually began to wear her opponent down.

Jankovic, who won the mixed doubles here with Jamie Murray last year, prevailed 2-6 6-4 6-2 in a contest that lasted two hours and five minutes. At least that's what the Rolex said, although the actual playing time was a bit shorter. After levelling the match at a set apiece, Jankovic called for the assistance of the trainer, who trooped on, rucksack on back, looking as if she'd yomped from Land's End.

There has been an inordinate number of withdrawals from these championships and for a while it looked as if Jankovic, who has never been beyond the fourth round, would join them. Before the start of the final set she had her left knee examined and then the joint was strapped up with enough tape to shroud a mummy. "I slid in the first set and my leg went straight and then bent so quickly," Jankovic said. "There was a sharp pain but I continued to play and it was getting worse and worse. On grass you have to stay low and bend a lot. I was struggling a bit but somehow came through. It's very sore now. I'll have a scan. I don't think it's that bad."

As in the second set, Wozniacki lost her serve in the opening game, surprised perhaps by her opponent's mobility in spite of the tourniquet. Between points Jankovic staged a sort of go slow, grimacing behind the baseline and clutching the dodgy knee. However, during the rallies, of which there were plenty, she was running around like a spring, free-range, chicken. With Jankovic leading 3-2, the trainer reappeared, this time to remove the yards of tape that had been so lovingly applied. "The physio wasn't happy about that but with the tape I felt like I couldn't move." It didn't stop her expressions of discomfort, nor in winning her next service game to love. Another break of serve enabled her to open up a 5-2 lead and the teenager from Copenhagen had reached the end of the road. At least in the singles. She barely had time to reflect on her defeat before regrouping for a doubles contest.

With the abrupt departures of Maria Sharapova and Ana Ivanovic, Jankovic is the highest seeded player left in the women's draw. Can she win, à la Tiger Woods, on one leg? She will struggle on two.

She was exposed by the potentially great Dane, a former Wimbledon junior champion, in the first set – how can the land of Legoland, bacon and beer produce a contender here while all the Brits had long gone home? – as Wozniacki, wearing ankle guards, produced serves approaching 110mph. In chasing down shots she was more of a terrier than a Dane and her impressive double-handed backhand was more often than not a winner. Another feature of the match was the number of challenges both players made and calls were often made by margins smaller than the width of a cigarette paper.

"My opponent didn't have anything to lose," Jankovic said. "Her body's quite strong and mature for her age. She's very young. I didn't know she was that young. Of course I'm more experienced and have played many more matches on Centre Court. I'm the No 2 seed, the No 2 in the world." It's still hard to believe.

Carofan
Jul 13th, 2008, 09:30 AM
http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1031453.ece

What you give a girl who reaches the age of 18?

-- A driving licence?

-- No, I have taken. In Florida. It lacks only to be 'translated' to the Monegasque, so I can use it in Europe, says Caroline Wozniacki with a big smile.

Hmmm ...

-- Well, what do you want?

-- I have no idea. I have everything. I wanted me a pair of sunglasses, but these I have just received, so ...

-- One might well wish for something you can get in Beijing and the surrounding area later this summer ...

-- That you can. I do so also. But this project depends of course of much.


-- I have just returned from my grandmothers funeral in Poland. It was hard, because we obviously are very close, even if there is physical distance.

-- She was only 68 but has been ill for a long time and been through so much, so it was better, she died the way she did, than that she should be in a long time and suffer without being able to do something. Some are born, others die. That is, after all, says Caroline Wozniacki.


Now, its time for tennis again.

-- My form has like predicted dropped a bit, and what I should do now is to do a lot of physical training. Running, running, running. That is what it is about in Austria, where the tournament is played in the 2500 meters height. I would use it as a training camp, where I also have some matches.

-- My physical form will be rebuilt in Austria, and I hope that the tennis form will follow.

-- Will you win the gold?

-- I do hope so. Nothing is impossible. We shall see, says the girl with the licence. She is missing 'only' 29 spots to be where there is not something to be desired - on the sporting front.

Carofan
Aug 10th, 2008, 02:07 PM
Wozniacki Wins First Career Title in Stockholm

STOCKHOLM, Sweden - One of the most promising young stars in the women's game won her first Sony Ericsson WTA Tour title close to home on Sunday, as Scandinavian No.1 Caroline Wozniacki absolutely stormed through the draw at the Nordea Nordic Light Open in Stockholm without losing a set.

Wozniacki first began making noise on the Tour in 2006 and 2007, reaching the quarterfinals or better a total of five times and cracking the world's Top 100 last summer; but she has upped the ante in a big way this year, reaching the quarters or better four times (including once at a Tier I event and once at a Tier II), getting into the second week of a Grand Slam for the first time (at the Australian Open) and notching three Top 10 wins (two over Marion Bartoli, one over Svetlana Kuznetsova).

Coming into Stockholm as the world's No.26-ranked player everyone knew she would be tough to beat. Seeded No.4, she rolled through her first three matches of the week losing just 12 games in six sets (including a 61 63 drubbing of No.5 seed Anabel Medina Garrigues in the quarterfinals). The difficulty level shot up as Saturday's semifinals were rained out, meaning whomever would be champion had to win back-to-back matches on the Sunday. And Wozniacki did just that, taking out No.1 seed and defending champion Agnieszka Radwanka handily in the morning, 64 61, then routing Vera Dushevina in the afternoon, 60 62.

"I'm very happy I've won my first title!" Wozniacki said. "It's always tough to play two matches on the same day, but Vera had to do it as well. At the start I had her under pressure and I think that frustrated her. She played better in the second set and began putting pressure on me instead. She had break points at 2-all there and I think getting out of that was the key to the match."

Wozniacki's win over the No.10-ranked Radwanska was her fourth Top 10 win of the year, and with her first Tour title in hand she is sure to continue re-evaluating her goals for the 2008 season, as she approaches the world's Top 20.

"In the beginning of the year my goal was to be in the Top 50," said the Dane, who turned 18 years old in July. "I've kept on moving it up since."

Wozniacki is the highest of two Scandinavian players in the Top 100. The only other one, 68th-ranked Swede Sofia Arvidsson, was forced to withdraw from this year's Nordea Nordic Light Open due to a right knee injury. After Wozniacki and Arvidsson, one has to go down to No.189 on the rankings to find the next-highest-ranked Scandinavian (Sweden's Johanna Larsson).

Wozniacki also became the first Danish player ever to win a Tour singles title. She isn't the first Dane to win a Tour title of any kind, however: Tine Scheuer-Larsen won seven Tour doubles titles in the 1980s and 1990s, partnering the likes of Mercedes Paz and Jana Novotna.

sharapovarulz1
Aug 10th, 2008, 06:09 PM
Thanks Carofan :)

Bitmap
Aug 23rd, 2008, 08:54 PM
http://www.sporten.dk/tennis/wta-turneringer-2008/wozniacki-vandt-i-new-haven

http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1047540.ece

:wavey:

Carofan
Aug 24th, 2008, 12:12 PM
Wozniacki Wins Second Title of Summer in New Haven

NEW HAVEN, CT, USA - Before this year she wasn't even in the Top 50, but after this week she will become the newest addition to the Top 20. Caroline Wozniacki was in strong form all week at the Pilot Pen Tennis and on Saturday afternoon had a fairy tale ending, upsetting No.1 seed Anna Chakvetadze in the final for her her second Sony Ericsson WTA Tour title of the summer.

Despite being unseeded at the Tier II stop, Wozniacki had few problems in reaching the final, not dropping a set in four matches - including a 64 60 win over No.3 seed Marion Bartoli in the quarterfinals and a tougher, 75 64 win over No.7 seed Alizé Cornet in the semifinals, in which she had to rally from 0-3 in the second set to dispatch her fellow 18-year-old in two sets.


Chakvetadze - who had only dropped one set en route to the final, to resurgent former world No.1 Amélie Mauresmo in the semifinals - had all of the numbers on her side as she prepared for the title match. Although she had never played Wozniacki she had far more experience, having been as high as No.5 in the world before and enjoying some of her best career results on summer hardcourts; she was also 7-0 lifetime in finals, a perfect record that included one winning final performance earlier this year, beating Agnes Szavay at Paris [Indoors].


Chakvetadze won the first set of the final, 6-3, in just 39 minutes, then broke for a 1-0 lead in the second set, seemingly on her way to 8-0. But that was when Wozniacki came alive, cutting down on her unforced errors and taking control of more of the points. The Danish upstart fought back to win the second set, 6-4, then cruised through the third set in 25 minutes to complete a 36 64 61 victory.


"Anna was playing really aggressive; I was playing into her game too," Wozniacki said. "I was thinking, if I win this tournament I have to play my own game, and make her do the things I want her to do. I realized I'd lose if I didn't change something anyway, so I just tried to change my tactics. And it worked."


"I just didn't recover from yesterday match well enough," said Chakvetadze, whose semifinal match against Mauresmo was played Friday night. "I just didn't have enough power, especially in the third set. It's quite important that you're able to run and fight on the court. If you can't do that, you're going to lose.


Although she ended up without the title, Chakvetadze still had some positives to take away from New Haven.


"I won quite a few matches and I'm actually pleased with my game, except for today," said Chakvetadze, who hadn't reached a final since Paris [Indoors] in February. "If I compare the way I played to one month ago, it's much better. I'm looking forward to playing the US Open. It's the most important tournament. I'll get a day off in between each match so hopefully I can stay fresh for each one."


Wozniacki had several breakthrough results earlier in the year - reaching the fourth round or quarterfinals in her first five events - but since Wimbledon she has really upped the ante, including becoming the first Danish woman ever to win a Tour singles title at Stockholm and now repeating the feat in New Haven. Before this year she wasn't even in the Top 50, but after this week she will become the newest addition to the Top 20, projected to rise from No.22 to No.18.


"My first title was in Scandinavia, but it was smaller than this," Wozniacki said. "This is a really big tournament before the US Open and I beat some really great players to win it. I'm just happy to have won both tournaments!"


Wozniacki has now won 12 of her last 13 matches, going 5-0 here and 5-0 in Stockholm, and 2-1 at the Olympics last week (she fell to eventual gold medalist Elena Dementieva in the third round).

Dinayer
Aug 24th, 2008, 12:52 PM
thanks :D

OldMan
Aug 24th, 2008, 04:30 PM
Wozniacki Defeats Chakvetadze In Pilot Pen Final
By LORI RILEY | Courant Staff Writer
August 24, 2008

Carolina Wozniacki returns the ball during to top seed Anna Chakvetadze during the third set of the Pilot Pen Women's championship match. (CLOE POISSON / HARTFORD COURANT / August 23, 2008)



NEW HAVEN - — Caroline Wozniacki's father was a professional soccer player. Her older brother plays professionally. Her mother was a member of the Polish national volleyball team.

"I was born into a very competitive family," Wozniacki said. "I'm really competitive. I hate losing."

Friday, she said the first time she beat her brother in tennis was her best experience. But Saturday might have been better.

Wozniacki, who became the first player from Denmark to win a WTA title earlier this month, won her second at the Pilot Pen Saturday afternoon, upsetting top-seeded Anna Chakvetadze of Russia 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 before 5,477 at the Connecticut Tennis Center.

Wozniacki, 18 and unseeded, took advantage of 27 unforced errors by Chakvetadze in the second set. Chakvetadze, who broke Wozniacki in the first game to take a 1-0 lead, slowly fell apart and double-faulted in the final game of the set.

Chakvetadze, 21, had 59 unforced errors; Wozniacki, 25.

"I think I just didn't recover from [Friday's] match," said Chakvetadze, who is ranked 11th and should move into the top 10 when the WTA rankings are released Monday. "It finished quite late. We played three sets, and I didn't really sleep well.

"I just didn't have power, especially in the third set. If you are not able to run and fight on the court, then you are going to lose the match."

Wozniacki, who will move up from 22nd to 18th, hadn't lost a set in New Haven until Saturday. Chakvetadze hadn't lost a final (she was 7-0).

But there were signs Friday that Chakvetadze's game was not quite where it was last year when she advanced to the semifinals of the U.S. Open. She lost the second set to Amelie Mauresmo in the semifinals Friday, largely due to unforced errors. Saturday, her serve was inconsistent and she had seven double-faults

"Caroline is a good player," Chakvetadze said. "She doesn't hit that hard, but she plays consistent. So against her I should play quite aggressive and not do so easy mistakes like I did, especially in the third set."

Wozniacki said she changed her mind-set going into the second set.

"I was just playing her game," she said. "I was thinking, 'If I want to have a chance to win this tournament, I have to play my own game and do the things I want her to do.'"

There are only three players from Denmark ranked in the WTA. Wozniacki is the only player in the top 450. She started playing tennis at age 7, but she was far from a typical tennis prodigy. Instead of playing at a tennis academy, she played against her friends for ice cream. Her father is her coach.

"For me, it was just being with my friends, having a good time," she said. "We'd have like, a grill party or whatever, then went and played a little bit, then went off again. That's the way I liked it to be. We were playing for ice cream every day."

She laughed and said she planned to celebrate before heading to New York for the Open. The Pilot Pen trophy, a large crystal cup, sat next to her on the podium.

It looked like it could hold quite a few scoops of ice cream.

Bitmap
Aug 31st, 2008, 12:35 PM
Theres 4 pages in `BT` today, go grap it danskere!!!:wavey:

Wolfruler
Aug 31st, 2008, 04:22 PM
Quote: "As I see it, there are only THREE who can win the US open: The sister Williams and Caroline Wozniacki" - Ana Ivanovic


Pretty cool ;)

Sharapower8
Aug 31st, 2008, 07:40 PM
If only she was right :rolleyes:

spiceboy
Sep 4th, 2008, 11:40 PM
Great article (plus video) on Caro

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/usopen08/columns/story?columnist=ford_bonnie_d&id=3561438

Carofan
Dec 18th, 2008, 08:08 AM
The Danish Darling Written by Asley Medley | Staff Writer Wednesday, 17 December 2008
Caroline Wozniacki’s tennis and modeling career on the rise

Caroline Wozniacki’s svelte figure, long blond hair and winsome smile make her look more like a model than a professional tennis player. But watch her in action and it’s clear why the 18-year-old is currently ranked 13th in the world.

Wozniacki was in Louisville last week for Rock-n-Racquets, a tennis exhibition at Freedom Hall.

Wozniacki’s love of sports, especially tennis began at an early age. Wozniacki, a native of Denmark, began playing tennis at age 7.

“My brother started playing tennis and other sports and I always did what he did,” she said. “I really fell in love with tennis.”

Wozniacki is hardly the first professional athlete in her family. Her brother, Patrik, is a professional soccer player in Denmark; her father and coach, Pitor, played soccer in Denmark and Poland and her mother, Anna, played volleyball for the Polish National Team.

Wozniacki made her professional debut in 2005 at age 15. Her first professional singles title came in 2004 when she was the singles winner at the Osaka Mayor’s Cup in Japan, and she’s been on a roll ever since.

Wozniacki’s biggest wins include the 2005 Orange Bowl, 2007 Mirage Cup, 2008 Nordic Light Open and 2006 Juniors Championship at Wimbledon. This year she made it to the third rounds at Wimbledon and the French Open and the fourth round at the U.S. Open.

Wozniacki has also made it to the WTA quarter finals and finals of the Australian Open Juniors competition and was also a member of the 2008 Danish Olympic tennis team.

Tennis dominates most of Wozniacki’s time – she practices for four hours a day – but she also has begun modeling.

“I’ve always watched shows like ‘America’s Next Top Model’ and read fashion magazines. I love fashion,” she said.

Wozniacki is represented by Scoop Models, a Danish agency. She has modeled for Adidas, Danish jeweler Reeslev and the Danish versions of Elle and Vogue.

“My personal style is really relaxed. I like to wear jeans and a cute top. But at night I like to wear dresses,” she said. “And I like to look good on the court.”

Wozniacki likes to shop in Los Angeles, New York and Copenhagen. Her favorite designers are Louis Vuitton and Giorgio Armani, but she also likes the casual styles of Abercrombie & Fitch.

Wozniacki’s sense of style off-court also translates to her appearance on the court. She prefers to wear Adidas when playing tennis.

“It’s boring to wear all white,” she said. “Adidas has things that look feminine but that are still comfortable.”

Even though she’s just starting out in the fashion world, Wozniacki said it would be fun to have her own clothing line someday. Several other female tennis stars, like Serena and Venus Williams have their own clothing lines or have made a transition into the fashion world.

“I think tennis is a really big sport for women and they like to look good on the court,” she said. “The response from the crowd and the media (regarding fashion) has been positive.”

Wozniacki and Williams, along with Andy Roddick and John Isner, recently completed the Rock-n-Racquets tour, which combined tennis and rock music to raise money for The Andy Roddick Foundation for disadvantaged kids. In addition to a stop in Louisville, the tour visited Columbia, S.C., and Knoxville, Tenn.

“It has been fun to play these show matches,” she wrote on her blog. “It does not matter that much if I win or lose. We are just having fun on the court and the audience is great.”


http://www.voice-tribune.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=697&Itemid=17

Carofan
Apr 14th, 2009, 09:45 PM
Q&A with Caroline on ESPN.com 14.04.09


Brad (Gadsden,Alabama): Caroline, What players did you look up to when you were a kid?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: I looked up to Steph Graf and Martina Hingis.

Ernest -North Hollywood, CA: Hello Caroline! My question is what kind of changes do you make when switching for hard courts to clay???

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: I actually just changed my strength to get some more top spin with the ball. The rallies are longer, so you hav eto be patient.

Brandon (Detroit, Mi) : What are your expectations for the clay season ?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: I don't konw, I'm just going to take one match at a time. I just take one match and one tournament at a time.

Alex (Cincinnati, Ohio): Hi Caroline, I was just wondering what you do to calm your nerves for the last hour or so before a big match?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: I like to just listen to music. that makes me relaxed. I talk to my dad, who's also my coach, about tactics and then I'm ready.

Jennifer in Jacksonville, FL: Caroline, I was so excited to see you win in Ponte Vedra last week!! Congratulations, you deserved the win. I'm a resident of Jacksonville and wonder, did you enjoy the MPS tournament, and what can we do to get you back here next year?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: Thank you! I enjoyed the tournament. I really liked the area. Hopefully I'm going to come back next year.

Pam W (Australia): What is your favorite tournament? Why?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: I have a lot of favorite tournaments. If I had to choose one, I would probably take Indian Wells. It's a real nice tournament. Everyone is so relaxed. A lot of things are going on. I really like it.

Lisa, San Jose, CA: Hi Caroline, Do you pick out your match outfits or does the sponsor select them for you?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: I get with my sponsor and they have one collection for me that they want me to wear so I can represent that collection. Addidas picks it out, but if there is sometihng that I don't feel comfortable with, then we talk about it.

Ernest(North Hollywood, CA): I think you Caroline are one of the players to watch on clay. What top players do you think are a threat on clay???

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: Let me think. I think some of the Spanish players for sure. Jankovic is good on clay. There are quite a few players. Safina is doing well on clay as well.

Pavel, Zlin, Czech republic: Hi Caroline, congratulations to your current title at Florida. How did you celebrate it ? Do you expect similar conditions and surface in Charleston as well ? I wish you all the best. Pavel

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: Actually, I didn't get to celebreat too much. I celebrated with some good desert, good ice cream, chocolate cake. Yesterday I just relaxed and didn't do anything. I went shopping a little bit. THat's the way I celebrated. I am sure Charleston will be similar.

Kevin (Charleston, SC): I've got good seats for Saturday's semi-finals. Please make it that far, but if you don't I have an extra ticket.

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: I can't promise, but I am going to try.

Amy (Tampa): What is one thing you can't travel without?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: My mobile phone. I always have my Sony Ericsson with me. It helps me get in touch with my family and friends back home. Without it, I would be lost.

patrick (San Diego, CA): Congratulations on winning Ponte Vedra Beach. What part of your game have you improved on or will be improving on?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: I think fitness wise, I have improved. I can stay in there for a longer time than before.

Khalid (Storrs, Conn.): When you travel from tournament to tournament do you have any time to enjoy the city you are in? Or are you too busy playing tennis all the time?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: No, I always try to go out and see what there is to see in the city. If you just go from the courts to the hotel, it can be a pretty boring life. I go and try to experience things.

Brutus: How does playing the US compare to playing in Europe? Are the fans similar or different? Louder or more reserved?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: Every tournament is different. The fans are different every time. In the US, the fans are enthusiastic. People really get the feeling for the matches.

Jesper (Sweden): Which nickname do you prefer? Caro, Wozzy, or something else?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: Caro. Usually my friends are calling me Caro.

Lisa, Las Vegas, NV: Hi Caroline - Did you enjoy your training in Las Vegas? Did you have time to check out the city or was it all business?

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: Yes, I did practice in Vegas for two weeks before Indian Wells. It was an amazing experience. For sure I am going to come back.

Amit, Raleigh,NC: Do you develop any friendships with the women players on tour? How hard is it go from one city to another? Have you gotten used to it

http://a.espncdn.com/i/sn2.gif Caroline Wozniacki: You develop friends when you're on tour. It's always the same people around. You do have friendships with some players on tour. It's hard to be traveling from one city to another. I prefer to traveling the world to being in one place and not have that opportunity.

FormerlyKnownAs
Apr 15th, 2009, 11:17 AM
Moved from Danish Delight - Caroline Wozniacki thread - vol 2 As This Is An Article
Ponta Vedra Beach Champion
6 Comments Published by Caroline April 14th, 2009 in Caroline's blog
Hi everybody,

I’m writing to you from Charleston now. As you all may know I won my first WTA tournament on Clay. It was a great feeling winning my first tournament on clay because clay is not my favorite surface and I had a very tough draw.

I played some good tennis and I’m feeling comfortable with the new strings in my racket. In the semifinal against Vesnina I survived 4 match points. I struggled with the heat and had to take a medical timeout during the match. I felt really bad and I did also threw up during changeovers (went to the bathroom). I don’t know how I won that match but I guess it was my winning mentality which helped me in this situation.

The doctor told me to quit but I said that I wanted to play the game till the end. I’m very happy now that I listened to myself and gave it 100%. After the match I went to the doctors once again and they gave me some minerals and vitamins.

I was able to play the doubles semifinal a few hours after my singles match. We lost 15-13 in the 3rd set (match tiebreak) against Peschke/Raymond number 4 pair in the world. We played some god doubles matches Strycova and I. In the final I meet my good friend Wozniak and I felt much better than the day before. I played a very good match and stayed focused thru the whole match and won 6-1 6-2.

After Ponta Vedra we drove to Charleston about 300 miles. I’m very confident before this tournament and I hope that I can keep my level as high as possible. My health is good and if I can keep my head cool I think I will do well in this tournament.

All the best

Caroline

So that was the 11min break.

FormerlyKnownAs
Apr 19th, 2009, 04:25 PM
Extra Bladet 09:55 - 18. apr. 2009 | Troels Christensen

TOP10 gives cash to Caroline
Her largest Sponsors have assured Caroline Wozniacki considerable bonuses if she plays into the world's 10 best tennis players.

Should Caroline Wozniacki fight her way into TOP10 which she is on track to, her bankers will clap their hands.

- Caroline has some bonus schemes in her sponsorships, which will be payed out if she crosses that line.

- I will not go into the size, but it wouldn't be bad for her, confirms CEO of Nordic Sports Group, Mikkel Nissen.

It is particularly the international sponsors Adidas and Babolat, which have put some performance premiums into the contracts.

Also NSG Director's own job will obviously be a little easier with a TOP10 label on the business card.

- Absolutely. It is a magical border - even commercially, he says.

FormerlyKnownAs
Apr 19th, 2009, 04:45 PM
Extra Bladet 23:11 - 18. apr. 2009 | Troels Christensen


Dads nerves were in tatters

- Such a game must be absolutely fantastic for spectators, but not for me, says happy Piotr Wozniacki

- I was totally relaxed when we went into the match, because I am very happy with what Caroline has done recently.

- However, as opportunities arose and were abused, I was afraid that she would go down. Remember, Dementieva had a very short quarter final, while Caroline has been many hours on the court, says Piotr Wozniacki to ekstrabladet.dk after her daughter's stunning victory over three sets and three hours of intense fight against Elena Dementieva in the Family Circle Cup in Charleston.

- Such a game must be absolutely fantastic for spectators, but it is not for me. As father I have become emotionally involved, but as coach I must always be cool, so I am ready to go down and analyze and motivate. This is not an easy balance, added Papa Wozniacki who rarely have looked so happy after a victory.

Mentally strong
In the tireing semi final of the strongly fielded WTA tournament, Caroline Wozniacki won, after both ups and downs with 7-5, 4-6, 7-5 over world number three, who she has defeated twice in a row.

- It is mentally completely strong of Caroline to get back in the fight that way. And she got again a lot of valuable experience to use in the big tournaments. Now she knows that she can. Even when it looks bad out, "said Piotr Wozniacki to ekstrabladet.dk.

In the finals Sunday evening, Caroline Wozniacki meets the winner of the showdown between Marion Bartoli and the tournament's big surprise, German Sabine Lisicki, who amongst others has knocked Venus Williams out.

Dodoboy.
Apr 19th, 2009, 05:56 PM
Good luck! So many opportunities for her! Denmark is a great country, they've done so well with Caro.

Good thread :yeah:

Carofan
Apr 23rd, 2009, 06:40 AM
Wozniacki's star set to shine

http://www.hotklix.com/link/sports/soccer/Wozniacki-s-star-set-to-shine

Youngster Caroline Wozniacki is fast becoming many people's choice to be the next darling of the tennis world.

In a tennis world littered with tales of pushy parents and childhoods spent at baseline boot camps far from home, the story behind the emergence of Caroline Wozniacki is a refreshingly normal one.

Wozniacki now sits on the cusp of the world's top 10 after reaching the WTA final in Charleston last week, a run which saw the 18-year-old Danish player defeat the top-ranked Elena Dementieva in the last four.

Yet Wozniacki's story did not start in the familiar surroundings of a Floridian coaching academy. She recalls playing games against her brother back home in Odense, with ice cream the only prize. "I really feel I've grown up normally," says Wozniacki, who was nevertheless an outstanding junior player and was marked down as one for the future after winning the girls' singles title at Wimbledon in 2006. "I just used to enjoy playing with my friends. We'd be having a grill party and we'd play for a little bit, then we'd go off again. We played for ice cream every day. It was pretty normal. "I could never imagine myself going away and practising in an academy away from my family and my friends. That's not the way I'd like to do it, but for some people that's the way."

Wozniacki's family boasts a fine sporting pedigree. Her mother played for the Poland volleyball team. Her father played professional football in Poland and Germany, before moving to Denmark. Wozniacki made great strides in 2008, winning her first significant tournament in Stockholm without losing a set, and was rewarded by being named the WTA Tour's newcomer of the year at the end of the season. She said: "Last year I went from 64 at the beginning of the season to 12 in the world, so that was a big jump for me. I know if I just keep improving my game, the results will follow."

However, that newcomer of the year award does not come without its price. Wozniacki admits she will find it much harder to maintain her elite status now that her rivals know all about her style. "Now the others feel more free playing against me," she added. "They don't feel any pressure because I'm usually the higher-ranked player. Until the end of last season, it was the other way round.

"I'm just trying to think really positively, not about last year and defending points. I feel I've improved in everything, especially my serve and return. I'm in there to fight. I just want to keep improving."

FormerlyKnownAs
May 12th, 2009, 10:28 AM
A typical Extra Bladet headline but interesting anyway.

My comment – after reading what Piotr says, I wonder why he doesn’t help matters by helping Caroline not enter so many tournaments.
And why doesn’t the journalist ask why she has entered so many!!!

Caroline in queue at ER

Injury plagued Caroline goes further in Madrid. Dane far from the only one suffering from injuries and needing help. She plays but again today at. 13

When Danish Caroline Wozniacki advanced yesterday to the second round in Madrid, she was only got to play 41 minutes tennis. Then the Israeli Shahar Peer, who at the time was 5-4 behind in the first set, withdrew with a foot injury. And it is sadly symptomatic of this phase, the season is going into, that at present there is a long queue at the physiotherapists who travel with the tour.

- Yes, I have also spent quite some time with the physios in recently. Two hours a day actually says Caroline Wozniacki, who suffers with stiffness in her back and also has picked up an allergic reaction in the south.
- But I felt an improvement during the match, so it should be OK.

Even before the tournament, the top players such as Ana Ivanovic and Vera Zvonareva withdrew with injuries.

- Players never get the chance to restore with this packed program. It gives not least overuse injuries, says Piotr Wozniacki, who in recent weeks have seen his daughter play on three different kinds of clay.
Serena Sour
- Moreover it rained in Rome, so that the balls were very heavy, and it has given even more injuries, he explains, while Caroline supplements.

- It's a good mix of everything and there are many who are getting to be a little tired, one can see.

Serena Williams, who some weeks ago lost her place as #1 in the world rankings because of an injury, withdrew after the first set against Francesca Schiavone, because she has a knee injury and does not want to risk her participation in the French Open.

And she is one of the girls who dares to fire criticism at the WTA, that the new tournament calendar compels Top-Ten players to enter up to ten to twenty top tournaments and four Grand Slams and the four so-called Mandatory Events.

Against An American- One is forced to enter. Even if you are injured or dead. Otherwise they give you huge fines. We have no choice.

Thus Caroline Wozniacki avoids Serena in a possible quarterfinal, but first she must pass her sister Venus, and before that match, she must beat another American, left-handed player Varvara Lepchenko.

- She is best on clay and play with lots of spin on the forehand. Otherwise I do not know so much about her, says Caroline, who as usual will not look beyond the next match.

Direct Eurosport 13 o'clock or here on this site

Jorn
May 12th, 2009, 04:43 PM
http://www.tennistv.com/page/LiveIndex/0,,11444,00.html


A small interview after today R2 match.

Elisse
May 16th, 2009, 10:54 AM
Madrid Open 2009 - Press Conference 14th May

PLAYER: Caroline WOZNIACKI (DEN)


Q: When you walked on the court were you thinking about what might happen to your ranking next week or is that all jus completely to one side?
A: It´s all completely just gone, I just want to win the match, that´s my goal. Actually I never look at the rankings but all the media have told me that if you are in the top ten you can´t really but not know it. I just went in there and I fought for every point.

Q: It was the first time you were meeting Alicia; were you aware about this type of player, very aggressive, were you very prepared for this type of ball?
A: Yes I was. I played here one time in orange ball juniors in 2005, I think.
...What was the result?
I won 6-4, 6-4. I remember because I won there that year and that´s the match that I remember the most from that tournament. I knew how she was going to play and I was really prepared, like yesterday and today I was preparing myself for this kind of style.

Q: Have you had any chance to look around Madrid, find any ice-cream shops, anything like that?
A: Actually I haven´t eaten an ice-cream here yet but I have had a chance to look around Madrid and it´s a great city, it´s very beautiful and actually Verdascos´s family have three restaurants here in Madrid and one of them with the flamenco dancing and it was amazing. It was good food and very very entertaining, so can recommend that

Q: You are going to play another player who is very aggressive on the court, Vera Dushevina; could you tell us something about her game and what you are expecting from this match?
A: Actually, I just looked at the match today and I really didn´t look forward in the draw but Dushevina has had some good results and she has beaten some really good clay court players this week so I just really need to go in there and try to dominate the game.

Q: You have a heavy schedule this year; aren´t you tired, because you have been playing pretty much every week and you have been pretty down the past two weeks after the good green/clay courts? Now are you well adapted to the clay courts in Europe and not too tired?
A: I´m feeling great right now, I don´t feel tired at all and I feel good but of course I´m looking at my schedule and what I´m going to play and what I´m going to skip. It really depends on how you do and I´ve had great results this year and I´ve played many matches but we´ll see. I need to talk to my coaches as well and see how I feel, where it´s better to skip and where it´s better to play and also everything depends. But you never know, maybe at one point I´m not going to be winning so many matches and then I want to play more tournaments. I just take one tournament at a time and one match at a time.

Q: A lot of seeds have gone home; is this good chance to win another title this year?
A: I am in the quarter-finals right now and it´s going to be a tough match so I am just looking at that right now.

Q: What do you think about the tournament, the Magic Box, your impressions?
A: It´s impressive, the stadium. What they have put up here is just great and I´m sure that it´s just going to be better and better for every year that goes by but it´s amazing in here.

Q. The fact that you are in pretty good shape, I feel that you turned a corner after you preparation in Las Vegas because you seem even more consistent because in Australia it was still rusty I feel, isn´t it?
A. Yeah, always in the beginning of the year and I’m sure that Las Vegas helped me so much. Gil Reyes is an amazing person and an amazing fitness coach and it´s thanks to him that I am playing this well and in such good shape. For sure, I am going to go back more times and he has really really helped me, yes.

Q. Your progression has been very impressive and coming up is the French Open; do you feel that this could be a real break-through tournament for you?
A. Yeah, I´ve been playing really good and we´ll see how the next match goes but really I just look at one match at a time and to keep improving is the most important thing for me. I don´t want to stand still or go back in the development of my game, I still have a few things to work on. I´m not giving up, I´m really fighting for every point and I think that´s one of my biggest strengths.

Q. It is a new tournament, a new venue; what would you change for the next year?
A. It´s a tough question. I think it´s really great, I think that they´ve done a really amazing job so I don´t if there are too many things to change. The stadium courts are amazing, I haven´t played on the outside courts so I can´t say anything about that but there are a lot of people coming to watch and I think it´s a great tournament.

Q. Did you see the support of the crowd a little while ago when you were playing? What is it between you and the crowd here?
A. I don´t know, I really like playing here; I really like Spain and I´m really happy that they are coming and supporting me. I´m just doing my best and it helps me every time it’s a tough point I know that they are behind me and that always gives that little bit extra so hopefully the more matches that I play the more popular I will be here.

Q. Have you had the chance to watch some of the matches during tournament?
A. Yeah I have watched a few matches. I watched some of the women´s matches before – some of my friends were playing.

Q. Did you watch today?
A. Today, no because I was really focussed on my own match, so only the days that I am not playing or after my own matches.

Q. You mentioned your friends; there is a new group of you breaking through, Azarenka is already in the top ten, yourself, do you sense that there is a new wave of girl players coming through?
A. Yeah, definitely I think that there is a lot of players coming up and a lot of those that I´ve played in the juniors, well almost everyone is really playing well and they are all in the top 50 I really think that there is a new generation coming up and hopefully we are going to continue our way up there.

Q. Who do you designate as your friends on the tour?
A. I have quite a few friends, I am a very open person, I like to keep in touch with a lot of people. Actually in my age Victoria Azarenka, is one of my good friends, Sorana Cirstea, the Radwanska sisters. I have a lot of really good friends, Sania Mirza as well. I think that a lot of the adidas people stick together.

Q. Because if you look at the top of the game and they don´t really appear to be friendly with one another; is that something that you are going to have to overcome or are you going to be different?
A. I think that it´s really personal and I think that it´s up to each individual. I´m the same person now as I was three years ago. It doesn´t matter now if I´m going to be No.1, 10 or 100, I´m still going to be friendly with the people that I know and the people that I like and I think that once you get to know the other players they are very very nice to.


MATCH RESULT
Caroline Wozniacki (DEN) vs. Alicia Kleybanova (RUS) 6-2 | 6-2


:wavey:

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 22nd, 2009, 03:05 PM
Moved from Danish Delight - Caroline Wozniacki thread - vol 2 As This Is An Article
quote]Caroline had her ribs put back in place

- They also blocked the air pipe, says a startled Caroline, some however should be ready for her single match

19:34 - 27. maj. 2009 | Troels Christensen

PARIS (Ekstrabladet.dk): Caroline Wozniacki Wednesday night got her top two ribs pulled into place. They had risen, so they both pulled the shoulder muscle and blocked her windpipe.

- Yes, it is a bit wild. It was pretty bad, said a startled Caroline after the painful therapy, which after all quite surprised her.

From outside the court, it didn’t look quite so dramatic, although she twice during Wednesday's double match was treated by the physiotherapist for something that resembled an acute, minor shoulder injury.

And she completed despite everything the match with full force in her ground strokes, even though she had difficulty lifting his arm to smash

- It helped with the treatment on the court and it did not hurt when I did my basic strokes, so I was a little surprised when I afterwards was examined a little more thoroughly.

- It turned out that my two upper ribs on the right side, were pulled up during a wrong move and they pulled the shoulder muscle. They also blocked some of the air pipe, so I could not breathe completley freely.

The physiotherapist set the two ribs in place, put a supportive plaster on and ordered the Danish patient to remain at rest last night.

- But she also thought that I probably would be ready for my single, so I hope to be, "says Caroline Wozniacki.[/quote]

I blame it on the heavy schedule, her body dose not get time to restore.
The last thing she needed was doubles matches.
And why the hell did she finish the match.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 22nd, 2009, 03:09 PM
Moved from Danish Delight - Caroline Wozniacki thread - vol 2 As This Is An Article

The latest on Carolines shoulder.

According to todays Extra Bladet, Orthopedic Surgeon Martin Linderg – Larsen who is a self confessed tennis nerd and is a registrar at Bispeberg Hospital Copenhagen had a look at Carolines shoulder yesterday.
(I guess he is/was a spectator at RG and came forward, the danish health travel sevice does not send his sort to non-resident patients abroad even if they are tennis stars. :D)

He said – It is difficult to say anything 100% but I first and foremost tried to rule out any catastrophies. The story about she should have got her ribs put in place, sounds very mysterious to me but I cannot dismiss that there has been something, that has dislocated between the ribs and breast bone. (Danish doctor speak for complete rubbish ???)

But the tenderness is out in the shoulder today, by the biceps tendon, which many tennis players can have problems with. So I consider it more plausible that it could have been strained. It only hurts the moment she serves, and the raquet hits the ball, so with rest, ice and pain killers she can in principle, do what she can with the arm.

But a tennis player should be especially very aware of the biceps tendon. There many of them that have been operated on. He added that there would have to be taken a MIR-scanning , if one wanted to be completely certain.

Caroline Wozniacki did not feel very much wiser, but was however a little more reassured after the examination..
-Even though the physiotherapists are good, it is nice that a doctor has also looked at it. Luckily I am not playing Friday , so my shoulder can be rested.

I doubt that she will have a MIR scan, but maybe she should, think about how long and difficult Sharapovers diagnose was.
As usual she will probably play tommorrow on pain killers. :silly:

And she will be playing doubles with Cirstea at Wimbeldon. :silly:

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 22nd, 2009, 03:14 PM
Moved from Danish Delight - Caroline Wozniacki thread - vol 2 As This Is An Article

Caroline Wozniackis Blog (http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/entry319041.html)

Caroline Wozniackis Blog TV2
Sunday, 31 May 2009 kl. 16:58
Finished in Paris!
Hello everyone!
Here comes another blog from here! I have had a little hassle with injuries here in Paris. First with my shoulder, where I had problems with my serve, but I could play normally without it hurting. It happened in my double match during one of my serves. Nevertheless, I won my second round against Craybas 6-1 6-4.
Yesterday when I played my singles against Cirstea, I got problems with my back, as well. I was well ahead in the first set but lost it and had sætbold in the second set, but didn’t get it. I got a pain in the back in the second set, and hoped that if I might win the set, as it would be too dark to continue and we would have finished today. But I can see now that even if we had finished the game today, so I would have been able to play.
After my match yesterday I could more or less not walk! I had great pain in my back and every time I took a step it hurt. I had to have help to get my clothes off and on, and to walk over to the transport which was 100 meters from the changing rooms.
This morning I was at the hospital where I had a MRI scan, where I had both the back and shoulder scanned. About the back, there are two vertebrae that are slightly displaced, so they go in and press on the nerves. And the shoulder, I have inflammation by the bone.
Now I shall just keep on getting treatment and take it easy, and so I hope that it will not be too long before I am ready again!
Best wishes
Caroline

That's what I call an understatment

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 22nd, 2009, 03:16 PM
Moved from Danish Delight - Caroline Wozniacki thread - vol 2 As This Is An Article

After reading the 2 articles below I am left with the thought WHAT THE HELL ARE THEY THINKING ABOUT. What Piotr says is thick :(

http://www.sporten.dk/tennis/wta-turneringer-2009/caroline-behandles-i-danmark

Caroline treated in Denmark
Caroline Wozniacki still have difficulties with her back but now has been able to travel to Denmark where she is now getting treatment at a private hospital.
Morten Risager, mri@sporten.dk[/EMAIL">mri@sporten.dk"]mri@sporten.dk, Tuesday 2nd June 2009, 15:23
________________________________________
It is still uncertain whether Caroline Wozniacki will announce her withdrawl from next week's WTA tournament in Eastbourne. A back injury was the reason that Denmark's best tennis player was knocked out of the third round of French Open with a lot of pain.
- We have just come to Denmark, and Caroline is right now being treated while I wait outside. We still do not know whether she will be ready for either Eastbourne or Wimbledon. But if she can play, so she will play both single and double in both tournaments, emphasizes Caroline's father and coach Piotr Wozniacki to Sporten.dk while he waits for Caroline Wozniacki to finish her treatment at a private hospital in Copenhagen.

He thus rejects that Caroline Wozniacki needs to cut back in her hard program, if doctors report her ready to play.

- I can not understand why people question whether Caroline is playing too many matches because she is injured. She plays only so many matches, because she has come so far in tournaments. We will continue to play as many tournaments as we do, says Piotr Wozniacki.


http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-22763531.html

Wozniacki: Trains earliest Sunday

TV2 Sporten 02-06-09: 20:53 | by: Miriam Kjer

The tennis player Caroline Wozniacki holds a pause at the moment after incurred a shoulder injury in the French Open. And although the young tennis icon is optimistic, so she does not expect to be back on the training court before the end of the week.
"I take one day at a time right now, and I train again the earliest Sunday or Monday," said Wozniacki to TV 2 Sport.

The Dane was Tuesday in Denmark to receive treatment for her injury, but expected to return to Monaco later in the day to visit her chiropractor there.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 22nd, 2009, 03:21 PM
Moved from Danish Delight - Caroline Wozniacki thread - vol 2 As This Is An Article

What can I say, another negative article about Caroline, Piotr and the injuries.

Fears for Caros career
Caroline Wozniacki risks an early career stop, if she continues with its compact match program, as a slipped disc threatens. That is what feels her former coach and an expert, means.
Morten Risager, mri@sporten.dk, Wednesday 3rd June 2009, 08:29
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Caroline Wozniacki will be announced on Monday as the world's ninth best female tennis player. She is just 18 years old and the highest ranked Scandinavian women's tennis player ever. But the promise of a long and glorious career can end all too soon, after Caroline Wozniacki on Saturday had to leave the French Open with two displaced disks in her spine. According to former Davis Cup player and tennis expert Peter Bastiansen, the comet's career is at stake if she and her father do not listen to the danger signals from the latest weeks injuries.

- When you get an overload injury as a 18-year-old, it is therefore an unmistakable sign that you probably need to think well and thoroughly about the number of matches you choose to play, said Peter Bastiansen, which he himself was operated for a slipped disc during his career.

He considers in particular that Caroline Wozniackis participation in double tournaments should be cut out in the near future to trim a little in an already heavy match program, where the WTA tournament in Eastbourne starts next week, while Wimbledon is waiting later this month.

Caroline Wozniacki landed first yesterday in Denmark to get treatment at a private hospital, because French doctors had warned her not to fly before. Her father and coach Piotr Wozniacki will let doctors determine, whether his daughter can play already next week. But if she is declared ready, she will play both as planned.

- She shall play doubles. I can say that quite clearly. Caroline plays doubles in the tournaments she participates in. She is not number one in the world, she's only 18 years and therefore she plays doubles. It helps her to be better at the things she needs to be better at, said Piotr Wozniacki.

For Caroline Wozniackis former cheftræner in Lyngby, Christian Camradt, it's too much of risk to take.

- Wow. There, I would probably have advised her to take a break before Wimbledon. If it develops into a slipped disc, it can finish her career, which would be a disaster, says Christian Camradt and emphasizes that Caroline Wozniacki is one of the players that takes part in the most tournaments and matches.

To be precise Caroline Wozniacki has played 59 matches since January, when one includes 13 doubles matches. If Caroline Wozniacki is allowed to play by the WTA-doctors in Eastbourne, she will risk playing two matches each day in a week. Peter Bastiansen fully understands both Caroline and Piotr Wozniacki will do that that is neccessary to play and improve her as much as possible. But he sees at the same time dangers in the constellation father and daughter.

- Without him, she would never have got this far. But on the other hand he would like to see her in action as much as possible. When you are involved as a father and daughter, you act more emotionally. If on the other hand it was a professional coach, he would have advised her to take it a bit easier right now, says Peter Bastiansen and believes that Kenneth Carlsen and Sven Groeneveld brief association with Caroline Wozniacki did not change, that it was Piotr Wozniacki, who took the decisions.

poulao
Jun 22nd, 2009, 04:57 PM
Pleace, all Caro frends!

We, the public or fans, get worried when we hear hear she is injured etc.
But the press feeds us all this expert opinions.
Pleace let's be fair and give them the benefit of any dout.
Caro says her self, that she is 100% fit, and I belive her.
Let's instead hope that she reaches that new level, she is reaching for now in Wimbledon.

Best wishes to you all.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 22nd, 2009, 11:13 PM
Moved from Danish Delight - Caroline Wozniacki thread - vol 2 As This Is An Article

The Saga Continues with Carolines rejection of the "Experts" below.

After I had translated it I saw another article where they said that after Wimbeldon she would be going to boxing training !! Poitr says that Carolines thinks that it would be fun so thats something they will try. And that it is very good physical/fitness training.
What are they thinking about, what about Gil Reyes, Agasis trainer, she was there in the spring, and he has so much experience. Paul Duvill knows nothing about tennis he says so himself. ????????????????????

Caroline rejects criticism

Wozniacki rejects that doubles matches wear her down. 'We have things under control,' she said to ekstrabladet.dk
20:33 - 03. jun. 2009 | Opd. 20:35 | Søren Lauridsen

Caroline Wozniacki herself doesn’t mean that she plays too many matches.
Caroline Wozniacki despite her overload injuries will continue to play doubles in the biggest tournaments.

She confirms that to ekstrabladet.dk, although several tennis experts have warned her that too many matches may cost her career.

Peter Bastiansen, former tennis player, and Caroline Wozniacki’s former coach in Lyngby advises her to think about the doubles matches, and thus spare herself.

But Wozniacki denies that they are right.

- All the experts. I do not know what they themselves have tried. I believe in myself and my team and the decisions we take. We have things under control she says to ekstrabladet.dk

- Right now I am a little injured, but that one can not avoid, "said Wozniacki about her injured back where two discs in the spine had moved themselves.

Likes doubles
Piotr Wozniacki, Caroline's father and coach, said today in Berlingske Tidende that Wozniacki will not cut back on doubles, that amongst other things should strengthen her serve and volley game.

And Caroline Wozniacki herself is also not willing to drop the doubles matches.

- I want to play doubles, I like it, "said Denmark's best female tennis player.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 22nd, 2009, 11:19 PM
Moved from Danish Delight - Caroline Wozniacki thread - vol 2 As This Is An Article
The last chapter in the possibly petulant princess with the bad back and shoulder maybe misled by a Demon Dad candidate saga.
Where the princess hasn't been struck down by the wicked tennis injury witch, the demon Dad isn't so demon after all he listens too the wise men anyway. Our young heroine avoids the snares of the Serb savage and with a happy heart (after her team favs had conquered the next door rabble) strides out the next week onto pastures new too test her strength against the other amazones. :worship:


TV2 Sport Saturday, 6 June 2009 kl. 22:57

I play Wimbledon and Denmark well on their way to South Africa!

Hello everyone,

Here comes another blog here from me:)

I just sat and watched Denmark get 3 points home from Sweden! In my eyes it was a good game, and we could get super reached against for them last time! It was also cool to quieten my Swedish friends, who were very cocky before the fight:)

After some lovely holidays, I was able get rid of my injury and will be ready for grass season. It was not a disc that had moved in my back, but two of my vertebrae. And although it did really hurt in the beginning, it was not nearly as serious as a slipped disc. I got my shoulder checked by Klaus Bak (a shoulder specialist doctor), who confirmed that all things were OK in my shoulder, but it was just a little inflammation, which went away after I've relaxed a bit :) I have also received some preventive exercises for both back and shoulder, which hopefully will keep me injury free!

I travel to Eastbourne, England on Wednesday where I will get myself ready on the grass! Sven Groeneveld called me and said that Ana Ivanovic would like to play doubles with me in Eastbourne, but we listened to Peter Bastian's tips for going easy on me in the doubles, so I decided to say no :)

That was it for this time!

Best regards and continued good weekend!

Caroline

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 22nd, 2009, 11:21 PM
Moved from Danish Delight - Caroline Wozniacki thread - vol 2 As This Is An Article

Wozniacki on posters over the whole world
Adidas makes the young Dane its face for tennis sport in a global campaign

POLITIKEN.DK Af Søren-Mikael Hansen 11. jun 2009 kl. 13:06

http://politiken.dk/sport/tennis/article729996.ece

Caroline Wozniacki, who is number nine in the world, will now be marketed across the globe by her sponsor.

It is not just on the court that Caroline Wozniacki has moved up in the tennis sport Super League. Commercially, she is also one of sport's hottest names.

That confirmed Adidas by the decision to use the young Dane as the only model in a worldwide campaign for a new series designed by Stella McCartney - yes, daughter of Sir Paul from the Beatles.

Photography for the campaign took place Wednesday afternoon under humble circumstances on a tennis facility in the north-west outskirts of London, but will probably be anything but humble in expression when it starts to run in late summer.

Stella McCartney has been directly involved in the selection of the main model for the new design, which launches across the world while at the same time, Caroline Wozniacki as the only player on the top level starts using it during the U.S. Open.

"It obviously feels good, that it is I that was chosen and that Stella has also said that she would like me to represent her line. She will always have something that is new and fresh. She constantly seeks new inspiration, and I just think that she thought that I am new and on the way up and would be a good role model for the clothes, she does ", sounds Caroline Wozniacki’s own opinion on why she now becomes the subject of a worldwide campaign for the company she has been associated for several years.

The explanation confirms Adidas.

'Caroline is a good tennis player, while young, open, responsive and full of good humor of court. She seems a natural choice for a design that expresses both sport and style, "said a spokeswoman, who insists on being anonymous.

Mistress of Evil
Jun 23rd, 2009, 04:05 PM
Here it is Caroline's interview after the win over Kimiko Date-Krumm :

Q. Were you surprised at how strong your opponent was today?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I knew kind of what to expect from her, and I knew that she's been doing good on grass before. The game is just different from what I am used to. She was playing really flat, and I really had to get under the ball a lot. She took advantage of that when I was playing short and came to the net and was playing well.

Q. What do you think of that game she plays? Is it kind of a 1990s game, or how do you see it?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, I mean, it was difficult for me to do anything about it because she was really playing so flat. So the only thing I could do was just put it up, so it's very effective. I know why she did well on grass before for sure.

Q. What would you learn from today's game?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I mean, I just fought for every point today. I don't know, I always get experience from every match that I play, and today was another lesson, too. Started well, and I have to be the one deciding, because otherwise I could easily have lost this match.

Q. You went into the tournament in decent form. How far realistically do you think you can go in this tournament?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I don't know, we'll see. You never know. Today I could have been out. I'm just looking at one match at a time, and next match ‑‑ who am I playing, Kirilenko? She's a good player, so I need to be 100 percent focused.

Q. Do you think you have to bring a different mentality into the Grand Slams than you do at other tournaments?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, I actually think I should bring the same mentality into the Grand Slams as I do to the rest of the tournaments, because I'm doing really well at the other tournaments and relaxed. So I just need to be relaxed and enjoy.

A Grand Slam of course is a big tournament, but if you lose, what happens? Nothing really happens. Life goes on. So I think you just need to be relaxed and have fun on court.

Q. But does it feel different to you when you come into the majors? When you came here on Sunday, is there a totally different feeling than from this point?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: It is different, for sure. It's a Grand Slam, a lot of people are coming, it's busy. Everyone knows everyone, wants to say hi, and there's a lot of things going on outside that there isn't at the other tournaments.

Q. Who's the oldest player you've played?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I think she was the oldest one. She was doing good, though.

Q. How much did you know about your opponent? Did you know her when you were small or did you learn about her after she came back?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I've learned about her since she came back. I know that she has been working with Sven Groeneveld for a bit, in '93 I think it was. So he's told me a lot about Kimiko I know that she's been a great player. She was in the semifinals here in '96. So I mean, yeah, I know that she's very big in Japan and that she's a big name and a big role model.

Q. How confident are you with grass? Here at Wimbledon you did well a few years ago in the juniors. Do you like grass compared to other surfaces?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I like grass. I think it suits my game, and I usually like to ‑‑ I mean, I like the grass, like that it's fast, I like that it's shorter rallies. Yeah, I like it.

Q. Do you think your game suits a short, powerful kind of rallies, quick points, ace?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I think so. I mean, it's about being the one who decides, the one who opens up the court first. And I think that my game suits the grass, and I think that I've showed that, also, by winning Eastbourne and playing some good matches there.

Q. How incredible is it that she actually played Wimbledon the year before you were born?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: (Smiling) Yeah, it's amazing that she's still coming back and still playing at this level. I think that's great, and she's in such good shape. So yeah, I'm really impressed.

Q. So you don't feel odd that you're sitting here in interview room two, while she's in the main interview room?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No.

Q. Is that all right for you?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, that's good. I mean, I know that for sure there's a lot of interest in her and also coming back and playing a good match today. So for sure I'm okay.

Q. I know you said that you want to play match by match, and a lot of players say that. But if you left here and were playing well and didn't reach the second week, would that be disappointing?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No. I mean, I think it's important that I play well. If I play well, the results will come. If I get beaten and I've played up to my highest level, then it just means that the opponent played better than me that day and I have to improve some things.

I would be disappointed if I play badly and lose, but if I play good and if I feel like I did and I fought until the last point, then I mean, it's okay. Then the opponent was just better than me.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 26th, 2009, 08:42 AM
Caroline opponent: What a backhand

Humble Maria Kirilenko bowed in the dust after the big beating on Center Court

Extra Bladet 20:34 - 25. jun. 2009 | Troels Christensen

Maria Kirilenko had huge problems with the pressure that Caroline Wozniacki can put in her backhand.

LONDON (Ekstra Bladet): It was a pretty humble Maria Kirilenko, who after her beating on center court met the Danish press.

- I felt actually, that I started okay, but Caroline played really well in the first set and made almost no errors. Her backhand is super good, especially when she hits it long line, and also the serve is also in between.

- It was really hard to win a game, said the Russian, who lost the first nine in a row before she with raised fist could celebrate her reducering to 1-3 in the second set.

Shortly afterwards she began to believe it. Almost:

- I started playing more aggressively, and my serve was better, while she did not hit nearly as many winners. But I was in to much of a rush when I reached 4-4. I was not calm enough.

- But she was though. Others would have probably stalled at the time, but she kept calm.

- How far can she go? Well, she is already in the Top Ten, so she is already good. She is a fighter and a winner and I think she will have some more matches here in Wimbledon?
http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1186864.ece

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 26th, 2009, 08:45 AM
Respekt for Caroline

Caroline Wozniackis next opponent at Wimbledon, Anabel Medina Garrigues, appreciates that the Dane has not changed personality despite top-10 ranking

21:16 - 25. jun. 2009 | Ritzau /Sport

Caroline Wozniacki is a star on the international scene. But success, according to her next opponent at Wimbledon, Spanish Anabel Medina Garrigues, has not left its traces on the Dane.

- She is the same person, although she is number nine in the world. It is not usual on the WTA Tour, where some players create a distance, when they become successfull. But Caroline is the same girl, "says Anabel Medina Garrigues.

- I've seen some players change when they come into the world top. They may not say hello if they have won a match. That is not how it is with Caroline explains the Spaniard who has already met Wozniacki during this year's Wimbledon.

The two know each other quite well and they train often together, as was the case Sunday - the day before the opening of the English Grand Slam tournament. All friendship will be forgotten when they encounter each other in the third round.

- When we are on court, so it is about winning. Afterwards we love each other, she said.

Medina Garrigues and Caroline Wozniacki have met each other four times in the past three Danish victories to follow, while Spain sent Wozniacki out of a WTA tournament in Beijing last year
http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-23278411.html

MsPaula
Jun 26th, 2009, 03:54 PM
:wavey:Respekt for Caroline

Caroline Wozniackis next opponent at Wimbledon, Anabel Medina Garrigues, appreciates that the Dane has not changed personality despite top-10 ranking

21:16 - 25. jun. 2009 | Ritzau /Sport

Caroline Wozniacki is a star on the international scene. But success, according to her next opponent at Wimbledon, Spanish Anabel Medina Garrigues, has not left its traces on the Dane.

- She is the same person, although she is number nine in the world. It is not usual on the WTA Tour, where some players create a distance, when they become successfull. But Caroline is the same girl, "says Anabel Medina Garrigues.

- I've seen some players change when they come into the world top. They may not say hello if they have won a match. That is not how it is with Caroline explains the Spaniard who has already met Wozniacki during this year's Wimbledon.

The two know each other quite well and they train often together, as was the case Sunday - the day before the opening of the English Grand Slam tournament. All friendship will be forgotten when they encounter each other in the third round.

- When we are on court, so it is about winning. Afterwards we love each other, she said.

Medina Garrigues and Caroline Wozniacki have met each other four times in the past three Danish victories to follow, while Spain sent Wozniacki out of a WTA tournament in Beijing last year
http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-23278411.html
Hi Everyone! Caro really is a sweet girl, isn't she? It is so nice to see that she hasn't changed her values and remains down to earth and grounded. She doesn't have that diva attitude that some of the higher ranked girls do. Keep up with the good values, Caro. They are worth far more than any success you will have in your life. You rock!

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 30th, 2009, 10:00 AM
Caroline talks about the Lisicki match. I like No excuses (period, illness, I gave it away ETC) just frustration about her serve.

Lisickis serve destroyed Wozniackis rhythm
DR Sport 29. June 2009 19.13 Tennis
Caroline Wozniacki was fairly satisfied despite defeat in two sets 4-6, 4-6 to German Sabine Lisicki at Wimbledon 1/8-finale.

- Generally, I can not complain. I got to the fourth round and played some good matches. Of course I am not happy now, when I have lost, but I just have to keep training, and will I get my chances many times yet, she says to DR Sport.

It was especially Lisickis hard serves which created problems for the 18-year-old Danish hope.

- She is one of those who serves hardest. When you are in the rally, then you have a chance, but it is hard to get in when she serves those 120 mph (about 193 km / h, Ed.) each time. You cannot get into a rythym, it was just serve and returns. And she served well, it was difficult for me to get them back, says Caroline Wozniacki.

Wozniacki did not take her chances
Dane was not without chances in the match, but they were rarely used.

- Every time I had a possibility (for break), she served aces, and if I had a chance, I didn’t take it. It is difficult to say anything about the play today, because there was not really any play, it was very boom, and then the rallies were finished, determind Caroline Wozniacki.

The 19-year-old German boom-boom-server however, has not removed her faith in the future.

- I are number nine in the world because I have a really high level and have won some tournaments. And that I can be really proud of. But today I did not manage to win, and that is sport sometimes, you can not win every time, even if you'd like to, she says.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jun 30th, 2009, 10:05 AM
Piotr Wozniacki's thoughts after the Lisicki match.
I think this seems like a good assesment and idea.

Piotr: Wozniacki needs a man

Caroline Wozniacki was beaten by German Sabine Lisickis serves when she got pushed out of Wimbledon.

Dane's coach and father, Piotr Wozniacki assessed afterwards that she lacks a counter to players like Lisicki that can thunder a serve out with jusr under 200 kmh.

That she can achieve, among other things, if she finds a man who can act as training partner.

Caroline has to work with the return against hard servers and just learn to block the ball sometimes. She stood a little too much in the same place. The men are taking more chances when returning. That they have too. I think she must work with it in training. Against a man with a good serve. She has to learn some good tips about how men return, says Piotr Wozniacki to Ekstra Bladet.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jul 10th, 2009, 07:23 PM
Thanks to MartinUla

Interview with Piotr Wozniacki
You say "home" and think about...

About Poland. The fact that I spent abroad a half of my life doesn't change it. I still consider myself as Pole, I think in polish. When we were arranging this interview, I was even in Poland.

Family visit?

Not only. I hit on an idea to organize an exhibition tournament in autumn, most likely in Legnica. I came to arrange it.

Who will play there?
I would like this tournament to be a small Open Championships of Poland with Karolina [Wozniacki], Radwanska sisters, Sabine Lisicki and maybe somebody else.

You consider yourself as a Pole but Caroline claims openly that she feels more Danish.

Is it strange? She's a daughter of Poles but she was born and brought up there. She has friends in Denmark so who would she consider herself as? For me it's an honest statement.

Wojciech Fibak claims that despite that fact we should treat her as a compatriot. Lisicki and Wozniak too.

It's nice of him. In fact he's right as they all speak well polish and they are not ashamed where they come from. During Wimbledon my daughter told polish journalists to speak her name Karolina Woźniacka.

She could play for Poland?

She played for Poland! She was a member of Polish Tennis (http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?p=16045881#) Association. Karolina is the team champion of Poland to 12 years old. Sabine Lisicki was in the same team then.

And?

Some parents of defeated girls didn't like it. They protested and Polish Tennis Association changed the rules and didn't let the players who live abroad participate in Polish Championships. But all affair began when Angelique Kerber became the champion of Poland.

So we lost them all because the genuine envy?

Maybe Caroline would choose Denmark. However it for sure made the decidion easier.

Why you chose Denmark?

I studied on Academy of Physical Education in Biała Podlaska and wrote a master's thesis about Denmark's soccer (http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?p=16045881#) representation which reached finals during Euro in 1984. I played soccer and I admired Lerby, Larsen and older Laudrup. The most important factor was that they let me go abroad which was not easy then. I went to Denmark, later to Germany where I had propositons from second and third leauge. I couldn't approve as there were senseless rules then. Officialy you could play abroad when you reached 30 y.o. I was 23 then.

So you decided to play 'unofficially'.

Yeah, you can call it so <laugh>. I was oubviously disqualified for two years. I waited and I could play where I wanted. In the end I landed up in Denmark.

You played soccer. Wife was a representant of Poland in volleyball. Why tennis?

We played with wife as amateurs. Karolina since childhood imitaded her older brother Patryk. He played football (http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?p=16045881#), so she did. He got interested in tennis, she did it as well.

When you realised that she could make a professional career?

When Karolina became a champion of Denmark to 12 y.o. winning all matches 6:0 6:0. She was nine then! I employed a coach then to teach her technique skills. Until then I was her coach but I realised that it should be changed.

Officially you're still her coach.

Rather someone like the coordinator of training, management and schedule.

You differ from Robert Radwański. The father of Agnieszka and Ula does everything himself.

It looks so when you stay aside. He uses the help of other coaches but he doesn't show off with it. I know that the family of Radwański has a manager, Viktor Archutowski.

But Radwański doesn't want to sign the contract with the management agency. You did it and you seem not to regret it?

Whole world is based on agents. If someone having good contact offers you a help, why not to use it?

Because you would pay a 15-20% commision

If you sign ten contracts and you give back 15-20% from each, you have in sum more than you would have signing none or one or two. But you should remember that Radwańscy had a fantastic contract with Prokom which has expired. They seem not to be prepared for this and they must turn up in the new reality.

In Poland many people say that Agnieszka and Ula will never be so high to negotiate the commercial contract themselves.

People don't have the slightest idea what they are telling about! Let's compare with soccer. The quarterfinal of Major tournament is like the quarterfinal of UEFA Champions Leaugue. How many times polish club reached it?

Many people also say that Agnieszka doesn't use her potential and that her father should hire a good coach and retire.

Agnieszka should make such a decidion herself and I know she doesn't want to change anything. There's no point making her happy if she doesn't want it.

Maybe it's worthwhile? After her defeat to Venus Williams her father said he didn't know how to speak to her. 'I talk to deaf ears' - he stated.

He said it just after the match. I know how it is. You are coming out from stands, you are disappointed, nervous and here suddenly journalists come and turn on dictaphones. I think he wouldn't repeat it if he was calm.

What do you think about Radwańskis conflict with Warsaw Open organizers?

I don't believe that Maria Sharapova played in Warsaw for free. I can add that I don't understand the director of Warsaw Open. I was there during the tournament with Karolina and I saw how he treated Agnieszka. He didn't tell her a word. He behaved as if he wanted to show her: 'I am here a big lord director and you have to do what I want, if you don't, I will show you. And he showed - publishing the fragments of the private correspondention with her father.

He achieved what he wanted. Many polish fans turned away from Radwańskas.

Unfortunately. Again there came out the ignorance of the reality of professional tennis. In my opinion, Agnieszka had a full right to feel offended when she got to know that Sharapova comes, from the point of view of this tournament, someone less important then her.

Don't you exaggerate a bit?

I don't think so. The empty stands during Sharapova's matches confirm it. I am absolutely convinced that if Agnieszka played, more people would come. If you make a tournament in Poland, you should first of all care mainly for players from your country. If it weren't for those games, I'm sure that Agnieszka would play for free, even with injury. Karolina would play in Warsaw Open too.

polskatimes.pl

C. W. Fields
Jul 10th, 2009, 07:42 PM
There's no point making her happy if she doesn't want it.
:haha::haha:

FormerlyKnownAs
Jul 10th, 2009, 11:22 PM
OriginallyPosted by FormerlyKnownAs
There's no point making her happy if she doesn't want it.
:haha::haha:

Well I thought it was a bit funny too.
There are others "We played with wife as amateurs." is pretty ambiguous as well!!!!
But then thats how hard translating is, try running something through Google Translate and see what you come up with.:scratch:

I was happy that MartinUla posted it on GM.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jul 12th, 2009, 02:24 PM
Caroline After The Bastad Final From TV2 Sport

http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-23640742.html

Wozniacki is looking forward to a match break

12-07-09: 10:25 | af: Per Colstrup Vinkel/Christian Bové

Although Caroline Wozniacki did not get the victory in the Swedish Open tournament, which she might have wished on her birthday on Saturday, the Danish tennis star was in good spirits afterwards.

Not least, because she now looks forward to a period without matches.

"It will be nice having a break from tournaments. Although it is what one lives for, so it will be nice with a break. When you physically train at home, it is also possible to see friends and do other more normal things, so that I am looking forward to, "said Wozniacki to TV 2 Sport and insists that it is simply must to have a break to keep in shape in the long term.

"When you are, like I am a top-10 player with ambitions to get even further up, it's in the big tournaments I will have to hav success. Therefore, I will now take three-week tournament break. They will be spent on physical training and to rediscovering the hunger which is needed to be in top tennis, "she explained further.

Next stop U.S. Open
Wozniackis next major task is in the U.S., where New York from 31 August to 13 September is the setting for the U.S. Open, which is the year's last Grand Slam tournament. And here the now 19-year-old Dane is looking forward to making a good result:

U.S. Open is one of the tournaments which suits me very much. I hope I can go further than last year, but there is a long time to it. Now, first and foremost to have to built some physique up, then I play three warm up tournaments before the U.S. Open. That cocktail should translate into that I hit top form at the U.S. Open in New York."

Shley
Jul 13th, 2009, 07:27 PM
Caroline To Shine in Stella Attire: http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/LatestNews/Read/0,,12781~1721208,00.html

Article from the wta page about Caro beeing the new Stella girl. The picture is awesome.

Aleksandrina
Jul 13th, 2009, 07:44 PM
The Tennis Week Interview: Caroline Wozniacki

Striking style has been a key component of Caroline Wozniacki's singles success. Wozniacki, who warmed up for Wimbledon by winning her fifth career tournament title on the grass courts of Eastbourne last month, reached her sixth final of the season on Saturday, bowing to Spain's María José Martínez Sánchez, 7-5, 6-4.

When she hasn't been playing deep into singles draws, Wozniacki has been an active doubles presence, playing with partners including Venus Williams, Victoria Azarenka, Shahar Peer, Francesca Schiavone and Sorana Cirstea.

Wozniacki will arrive in New York City next month celebrating her collaboration with a new, notable partner. The ninth-ranked Wozniacki will come clad in a distinctive designer style she will debut at next month's U.S. Open.

Wozniacki will represent the new fall/winter 2009 adidas by Stella McCartney tennis line at the U.S. Open at Flushing Meadows. The top woman player in Denmark's history has been selected to become the exclusive new face of the tennis line and will be playing in apparel and footwear from the distinctive sport performance collection at all upcoming tournaments starting with the U.S. Open.

"For me it is essential to wear products that combine performance and style," Wozniacki said. "I need to have breathable apparel and footwear that is lightweight, stable and well cushioned. With the adidas by Stella McCartney tennis line I feel like I have everything any fashionable female tennis player always dreams about: cutting-edge adidas technologies combined with Stella’s unique designs that actually perform. I always play better when I feel good, that is very important to me so I’m really excited about getting out on court in it!"

Wozniacki, who succeeds Maria Kirilenko in wearing Stell McCartney's tennis apparel, will give the brand top-10 prominence and greater visibility on the game's most prestigious courts.

"It’s very rare for a fashion designer to dress one of the top 10 players in the world," McCartney said in a statement. "I couldn't be more thrilled and happy to be given that opportunity. Let’s hope this will enhance her performance!"

It marks one of the most potent pairings of designer and athlete since noted fashion designer Diane Von Furstenberg designed a line of Reebok tennis' dresses for Venus to wear at both Wimbledon and the U.S. Open.

The tennis court has long served as a sports style runway for new trends in fashion. Famed tennis dress designer Ted Tingling, affectionately nicknamed "the leaning tower of pizzazz" by Hall of Fame writer Bud Collins, caused a Wimbledon scandal when he outfitted Gertrude "Gorgeous Gussy" Moran with lace panties. Tingling distinctive dresses for a series of champions including Maureen Connolly, Billie Jean King, Margaret Court and Evonne Goolagong.

In 1985, American Anne White created a stir by wearing an all-white skin-tight body suit at Wimbledon. Andre Agassi earned international attention when he took the court clad in blue denim shorts and more recently Anna Kournikova's midriff-baring belly shirts, Serena Williams' black spandex cat suit, Tommy Haas' sleeveless Nike t-shirt, Rafael Nadal's sleeveless t-shirts and capri shorts became his signature look and Roger Federer has worn both classic tennis sweaters and trench coats onto Centre Court at Wimbledon.

In creating a design for Wozniacki, McCartney, daughter of Beatle Sir Paul McCartney, drew on form and function to create a unique look.

"Comfort is the most important thing for me, on and off the court," Wozniacki told Tennis Week. "Of course I want to look good, but it's really important to wear products that look stylish and can actually perform. I need to have breathable apparel and footwear that is comfortable, supportive and well cushioned to be able to perform at my very best."

She celebrated her 19th birthday on Saturday and has become a player for all surfaces.

The rapidly-rising Wozniacki has won titles on three different surfaces: Eastbourne (grass) and Ponte Vedra Beach (clay) earlier this year and Stockholm, New Haven and Tokyo on hard court last season. The 2006 Wimbledon junior champion has advanced to the finals of four of her last eight tournament appearances.

"She's a young player and she's quite solid," former World No. 1 Jelena Jankovic said of Wozniacki. "She goes out there and really goes for her shots. Really, she runs well. She doesn't give you many points free, so everything that you have to do, you have to earn it. It's tough to play against players like that. So she's improving every time and getting better and better, and her results are showing."

Wozniacki started the 2008 season ranked No. 64 and surged up the rankings, becoming the first Danish player ever to capture a Tour singles title when she beat Vera Dushevina to win Stockholm in July of 2008. She topped Anna Chakvetadze to take the New Haven title in August then beat Kaia Kanepi to win Tokyo in October as part of a late-summer tear that saw her win 27 of her last 37 matches.

The only other Dane ever to capture a Tour title of any kind was Tine Scheuer-Larsen, who earned seven Tour doubles titles in the 1980s and 1990s, partnering the likes of former greats Mercedes Paz and Jana Novotna. She is the only Danish woman ranked in the top 300 and Wozniacki believes carrying the tennis flag for her nation is a source of pride rather than an added pressure.

"Tennis is a individual sport it's a lot about you and it's about how disciplined you are and who you surround yourself with so I don't think it matters what country you're from," Wozniacki said. "Of course there's more attention on me because I'm the only one in Denmark that high. If I was Russian I'd be just one of many. Definitely I think it's a positive thing that I'm the only one — there's more attention on me and it feels good to try to be a role model for younger kids. But of course I know people are expecting me to win, but I think that's a positive thing because people realize I can play good tennis."

A personable player who smiles on court and often punctuates her answers in interviews with a laugh, the 5-foot-10 Wozniacki exudes a positive personality on court, covers the court quickly, hits well on the run, and has been working to add some sting to her serve. Wozniacki has all the elements of star power in a sport which has seen several top women pull the plug on their careers or succumb to injury in recent years and her pact to wear McCartney's designs solidifies her status as both a player with great promise and sports marketer's dream.

Since 2007 Wozniacki has been part of the adidas Player Development Program, a service that helps nurture young tennis talent through a unique mix of advice and support, giving an extra helping hand towards building a successful career. Together with the player’s own coaching team, the adidas Player Development Program strives to complement with additional training services, advice and motivation. Fernando Verdasco, Sania Mirza, Grigor Dimitrov, Laura Robson, Raluca Olaru and Sorana Cirstea are some of the players currently participating in the program, which does not replace their own personal trainers but instead gives them an extra helping hand to build a career. Over 30 additional players including Ana Ivanovic and Dinara Safina, have used this free service at various stages in the past three years.

The fall/winter 09 adidas by Stella McCartney tennis collection hits retail in August 2009, including high-end department stores — including Lane Crawford, Isetan, Harrods, Holt Renfrew and Nordstrom — as well as www.shopadidas.com, adidas Sport Performance stores and selected sports retailers around the world. Prices range from $175 for the Skynde shoe, $130.00 for the Performance Dress and $175.00 for the Tennis Image Jacket.

Tennis Week caught up with Wozniacki to discuss her new deal and her views on fashion and tennis.

Tennis Week: Caroline, when adidas initially approached you to wear the Stella McCartney collection how did you feel about it?

Caroline Wozniacki: I have been playing in adidas kit for a while now and when I heard that I would be playing in the adidas by Stella McCartney line I was of course super excited! I had seen the clothes before and always thought they were beautiful. Tennis is such a traditional sport and for years the players have been wearing the same type of clothes at the tournaments. But now it has changed slightly and it is nice to be wearing something different to all the other players.

Tennis Week: [/B[B]]Have you seen the Stella clothes Maria Kirilenko has worn and how did you like them?

Caroline Wozniacki: Sure I have seen them! I love the clothes adidas and Stella design. I think I speak for all the girls on tour when I say the adidas by Stella McCartney line is by far the best fashion statement in tennis. It's not traditional, yet it is still very comfortable, it is made for performance and so stylish!

Tennis Week: What are you personal fashion preferences when it comes to on-court and off-court clothes?

Caroline Wozniacki: Comfort is the most important thing for me, on and off the court. Of course I want to look good, but it's really important to wear products that look stylish and can actually perform. I need to have breathable apparel and footwear that is comfortable, supportive and well cushioned to be able to perform at my very best.

Tennis Week: What are you most looking forward to about wearing clothes from the Stella collection? Is there one particular piece that you are especially drawn to?

Caroline Wozniacki: I am really excited about my outfit that I will wear for the first time at the US Open. I do not want to give much away so you will have to come to my first match and check it out for yourself.

Tennis Week: When you were growing up watching tennis, whose fashion sense or style did you admire?

Caroline Wozniacki: I think adidas has done a great job with all the other players for example with Ana Ivanovic. I have seen the dresses she is wearing on court and feel they are so classic and fully suit her. I have for the past couple years really admired what she has worn and I am proud now that I can be part of the adidas by Stella McCartney tennis family.

Tennis Week: When it comes to tennis clothes what is the most important aspect for you? Fit, comfort, color, material?

Caroline Wozniacki: The most important aspect for tennis clothes is the fit and comfort. The fashion element comes next, everybody wants to look good but for me as an athlete it is crucial that I am able to perform on court. If you can find clothing like the adidas by Stella McCartney line that is both fashionable yet also made for performance then you have managed to get best of both sides: performance and style.

Tennis Week: Do you have any interest in modeling as Maria, Daniela and Anna Kournikova have done in the past?

Caroline Wozniacki: To be honest I am fully focusing on my tennis career right now. This year has been successful so far and I am training hard every day. My goal is to stay in the top ten and win some more titles by the end of the year.

http://www.tennisweek.com/news/fullstory.sps?inewsid=6636160

Mistress of Evil
Jul 14th, 2009, 07:11 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/LatestNews/Read/0,,12781~1721208,00.html

From http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/ :

HERZOGENAURACH, Germany - On Monday, July 13, adidas announced Danish tennis sensation Caroline Wozniacki as the representative for the new fall/winter 2009 adidas by Stella McCartney tennis range at the US Open. Currently ranked No.9 on the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour, Wozniacki has been selected to become the exclusive new face of the tennis line and will be playing in apparel and footwear from the distinctive sport performance collection at all upcoming tournaments, starting with the US Open.

"For me it is essential to wear products that combine performance and style," Wozniacki said. "I need to have breathable apparel and footwear that is lightweight, stable and well cushioned. With the adidas by Stella McCartney tennis line I feel like I have everything any fashionable female tennis player always dreams about: cutting-edge adidas technologies combined with Stella's unique designs that actually perform. I always play better when I feel good, that is very important to me, so I'm really excited about getting out on court in it!"

"It's very rare for a fashion designer to dress one of the Top 10 players in the world," Stella McCartney said. "I couldn't be more thrilled and happy to be given that opportunity. Let's hope this will enhance her performance!"

Wozniacki will be wearing key styles from the new fall/winter 2009 tennis collection, including the Performance Dress, which features adidas CLIMALITE technology, the Performance Hot Pant and Bra in smoked pink and the Tennis Image Jacket in dark grape. She will also wear the Skynde tennis shoe, in seed pearl, dark grape and white, which is built on the renowned adidas Barricade V tooling therefore providing the perfect mix of midfoot stability, flexibility and cushioning for maximum comfort.

Since 2007, Caroline Wozniacki has been part of the adidas Player Development Program, a service that helps nurture young tennis talent through a unique mix of advice and support, giving an extra helping hand towards building a successful career. Together with the player's own coaching team, the adidas Player Development Program strives to complement with additional training services, advice and motivation.

The fall/winter 2009 adidas by Stella McCartney tennis collection hits retail in August 2009, including high-end department stores - such as Lane Crawford, Isetan, Harrods, Holt Renfrew and Nordstrom - as well as www.shopadidas.com, adidas Sport Performance stores and selected sports retailers around the world. Prices range from $175 for the Skynde shoe, $130.00 for the Performance Dress and $175.00 for the Tennis Image Jacket.

FormerlyKnownAs
Aug 30th, 2009, 12:54 AM
I think that this article from DR Sporten is interesting.

Tennisstjerner frataget selvstændighed (http://www.dr.dk/Sporten/Oevrig_sport/Tennis/2009/08/28/070347.htm)

Tennis Stars deprived of autonomy

28. August 2009 07.07 Tennis

Caroline Wozniacki is one of many female tennis players that have their father as their coach. Serena Williams, Venus Williams, Marion Bartoli and Sabine Lisicki, like the Dane, receive fatherly advice when they start on Monday participating in this year's last Grand Slam tournament, the U.S. Open.

But the advice can have an expensive price. The close cooperation, which is highly prevalent in women's tennis, may have psychological consequences for the young tennis stars.

- One denies these players the opportunity to rebel against their parents, says Reinhard Stelter, a professor of sports psychology and coaching at the Institute of Sports in the University of Copenhagen.

- Rebellion is a stage in life where one tries to seperate oneself from ones parents and try to develop independence, and it is difficult when the father at the same time the trainer, he says.

The rebellion against the parents, which occurs naturally in most people, risks according to the professor suppression, when a rebellion would undermine the authority of the father as coach.

- It can be rather unfortunate, because the young tennis player is put in a loyalty conflict. In the transition from youth to adulthood there should be the possibility of testing ones identity and experimenting with oneself and in relation to other relationships, "explains Reinhard Stelt.

Although the constellation between father and daughter can inhibit the development of autonomy, Henry Klitvad, President of Danish Tennis Federation, feels convinced that Caroline Wozniacki is able to tackle her father and coach, Piotr Wozniacki.

- I've never experienced that Caroline has been in doubt about working with her father. She has the courage of her convictions and cooperation would stop if there were problems, assesses Henrik Klitvad.

He believes that Piotr Wozniacki is an essential part of the reason that Caroline Wozniacki currently belongs to the world top. At the same time, Piotr Wozniacki is also full of common sense.

- Maybe Piotr will say at some time that Caroline must now find another coach, who can lift her further. I do not experience, that they are locked together. When they are together now, it's because that have always seen the results, says Klitvad who does not believe that cooperation will last forever.

-One is not only fired from one day to the next, when one is the father. But at some point, I think they will say that now we have reached a point where we can not give each other more. It's an honest thing to admit.

Selection of current and former female tennis players who use or have used their father as a coach:

Caroline Wozniacki - Piotr Wozniacki

Serena and Venus Williams - Richard Williams

Marion Bartoli - Dr. Walter Bartoli

Maria Sharapova - Yuri Sharapova

Sabine Lisicki - Dr. Richard Lisicki

Jelena Dokić - Damir Dokic (cooperation has stopped)

Mary Pierce - Jim Pierce (cooperation has stopped)

Jennifer Capriati (has stopped career) - Stefano Capriati

Steffi Graf (has stopped career) - Peter Graf[/font]

stangtennis
Aug 30th, 2009, 02:20 AM
Aren't the Radwańska sisters also coached by their dad?

I always wondered why so many female players are coached by their dad, most of them having never played any torunament tennis themsleves. You would think a former player would often be a better coach than a dad who have never played any serious tennis himself. But then again many girls coached by their dad have been brought to top 10.
I know a good player doesn't always make a good coach and a good coach doesn't have to have been a good player himself. But still the pattern in most sports is that the majority of top coaches have been good players in the same sport themselves. Maybe not world stars but usually at a pretty high national level at least.
I also wonder why there's so many female top players coached by their dad while very few male players. Maybe becuase female players tend to reach the top at a much younger age, while still living at home with their parents and everything and therefore still very much attached to their parents. Nadal is coached by his uncle who thaught him to use his left hand to hold the racquet even though Nadal is actually right handed for everything but tennis. But are there any other top male players coached by their dad (or mum)?
You also hardly see any other sports where world class atheletes are coached by their parents unless they were elite athletes in the same sport themselves. On top of my head I can't think of any other sport than femle tennis where parents coah their world class athelete offspring. Anyone aware of any other sport where this is common like in femela tennis.

FormerlyKnownAs
Aug 30th, 2009, 10:01 PM
Aren't the Radwańska sisters also coached by their dad?

I always wondered why so many female players are coached by their dad, most of them having never played any torunament tennis themsleves. You would think a former player would often be a better coach than a dad who have never played any serious tennis himself. But then again many girls coached by their dad have been brought to top 10.
I know a good player doesn't always make a good coach and a good coach doesn't have to have been a good player himself. But still the pattern in most sports is that the majority of top coaches have been good players in the same sport themselves. Maybe not world stars but usually at a pretty high national level at least.
I also wonder why there's so many female top players coached by their dad while very few male players. Maybe becuase female players tend to reach the top at a much younger age, while still living at home with their parents and everything and therefore still very much attached to their parents. Nadal is coached by his uncle who thaught him to use his left hand to hold the racquet even though Nadal is actually right handed for everything but tennis. But are there any other top male players coached by their dad (or mum)?
You also hardly see any other sports where world class atheletes are coached by their parents unless they were elite athletes in the same sport themselves. On top of my head I can't think of any other sport than femle tennis where parents coah their world class athelete offspring. Anyone aware of any other sport where this is common like in femela tennis.

I am sure some academic(s)somewhere have looked at this.
I would love to read their conclusion, so if you ever see anything please post a link.

stangtennis
Sep 8th, 2009, 10:03 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/26/sports/tennis/26tennis.html
Wozniacki Seems Poised for Stardom
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2009/08/26/sports/26tennis.600.jpg
John Sommers II/Reuters
Ranked ninth in the world, Caroline Wozniacki is considered a player to watch in the United States Open.

By JOHN BRANCH (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/john_branch/index.html?inline=nyt-per)
Published: August 25, 2009

Caroline Wozniacki is not quite the player of the moment in women’s tennis. But she is the one most assigned to future moments. The revolving search for the next big thing has landed on her.

It may be because, at 19 and ranked No. 9 in the world , she is the only teenager among the top 20 (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/RankingsSingles/0,,12781~0~1~100,00.html).

It may be because she is from Denmark, a relative black hole in top-line tennis, or that she is the highest ranked of the Western European players, who have ceded power in recent years to women from former Soviet republics.

It may be because she recently met David Beckham (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/b/david_beckham/index.html?inline=nyt-per) in Los Angeles, declining to mention to him that she is actually a Liverpool (http://www.liverpoolfc.tv/) fan and that her favorite player is striker Fernando Torres (http://www.liverpoolfc.tv/team/squad/torres/).

It may be because she is now the model for Stella McCartney’s line (http://www.adidas.com/campaigns/stellaSS09/content/index.asp?strCountry_adidascom=com) of tennis wear from Adidas, and will be wearing a frilly lilac-colored number for the United States Open, well suited for the back page of the local tabloids.

It may be because she has reached the fourth round of three Grand Slam tournaments (http://www.usopen.org/en_US/players/overview/wta313402.html) since the beginning of 2008, including this year’s Wimbledon and last year’s Open.

Or it may be because she is typically lean, typically blonde and atypically willing to pose for the cameras (her WTA Tour mug shot (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~12631,00.html), unlike most, looks lifted from a magazine cover) and chat amicably with reporters in one of the four languages she speaks.

“I don’t mind being in the spotlight,” she said at the recent tour stop in suburban Cincinnati. “When you do well and you’re an interesting person on the tour, people want to know more about you.”

It is a dangerous game, heaping the game’s future on the back of meteoric teenagers searching for their first major victory. The arc of young tennis players seems as predictable as the behavior of teenagers themselves. Two years ago, for example, Nicole Vaidisova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~11206,00.html) of the Czech Republic reached the quarterfinals or better in three of the Grand Slam events and climbed as high as No. 7 in the world. She was the “It” girl. Now 20, she is ranked 143rd.

And there is danger that Wozniacki is not the best player among her age group. Women’s tennis has a bubble of potential sitting in a group of 20-year-olds, give or take a year. Wozniacki is 0-2 this year against 20-year-old Victoria Azarenka of Belarus and against 19-year-old Sabine Lisicki of Germany.

But they have not generated the buzz of Wozniacki, who has won five WTA Tour tournaments the past two seasons.

She has crawled into the top 10 and is prowling for a defining victory to vault her into the discussion of major-tournament favorites.

Until then, she will have to be satisfied largely by being a favorite of skin-deep bloggers and fans looking for the freshest face with racket-swinging potential.

“So far, it’s been really good,” Wozniacki said of her season as the ordained up-and-comer on the tour. “I’ve been playing some good tennis. I’m happy with the way everything has turned out. People start to expect more from me when I win and I get far into tournaments. But, actually, I’m just putting more pressure on myself.”

Wozniacki is the first woman from Denmark ever to win a singles title on the tour, which has thrust her into national fame. Fans in Poland cling to her (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/21/sports/tennis/21polish.html), too. Her parents, Piotr and Anna, are Poles who moved to Denmark (http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/about-caroline-wozniacki.php) about 20 years ago when Piotr played professional soccer. Anna played volleyball for Poland’s national team. Both their children were born in Denmark, and Caroline’s brother, Patrik, plays pro soccer there.

“The Polish newspapers want me to be Polish,” she said.

She first garnered attention in tennis circles by winning the junior title at Wimbledon in 2006. Expectations catapulted when she made it to the fourth round of the 2008 Australian Open, where she lost to Ana Ivanovic.

“I started to believe I could really do it, and everything just started rolling,” Wozniacki said.

Wozniacki had no career victories against top-20 opponents when 2008 began. She had 10 when it ended, including 4 during her victory at the Pilot Pen tournament in New Haven. (She opened her defense of that title Tuesday, defeating Edina Gallovits, 6-0, 6-0, in 43 minutes.)

A season later, with six more wins against top-20 opponents and two more titles, Wozniacki enters the Open as a player to watch.

If nothing else, she will receive plenty of attention from photographers, and she says she plans to find time to go shopping with her mother in SoHo.

“I love it there,” Wozniacki said. “It feels more European.”

She is likely to be noticed, if not recognized. There is a difference, and Wozniacki is the latest teenage tennis player to find herself perched delicately between.

Bingain
Sep 10th, 2009, 05:20 AM
US Open Post-Match Interview (http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2009-09-09/200909091252550822359.html)

An Interview with Caroline Wozniacki
Photo of Caroline Wozniacki
Caroline Wozniacki
Wednesday, September 9, 2009

An interview with:

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You took out sort of the giant slayer of this tournament. I would have to think about the way you played tonight, you feel pretty good tonight and the way you're playing?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, thank you. It was really tough match for me against Melanie. I mean, she's had such a great run, such an amazing tournament. It's always tough to play against a home favorite.

And I knew how I was going to feel to be out there and the crowd, but I just used the energy and tried to covert it into some good tennis. I'm just so happy that I fought so well today and that I managed to pull the match out.

Q. She's sort of been the crowd favorite this year, but it seemed like there was a lot of support for you out there. I think people have embraced you and your style of play. Did you feel it from the crowd?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I feel like playing here at New York is almost like playing at home. Also when I played Kuznetsova, the crowd was cheering for me a lot. I really love it out there. And playing on the center court, it just feels amazing.

Q. You're going to be playing Yanina Wickmayer next round. What do you know about her? Have you followed her? Have you seen her play?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Actually, I've tried not to watch too much tennis while I was here. I mean, I watched Melanie's matches because they were shown a lot. I mean, she was ‑‑ I mean, she's a young player coming up, so I wanted to see her play.

But I haven't seen Yanina playing too much this tournament, but I know her really well from the juniors and we've played each other growing up.

So, I mean right now I'm just so happy I'm in the semifinals. I'm just going to enjoy a day off tomorrow, and I'll talk to my dad who is also my coach about the strategy. But right now, I don't really have any.

Q. In the on‑court interview, when Pam spoke of her, she almost spoke of it like it was a foregone conclusion, like, Who is she? She sort of said, you know, you'll be the overwhelming favorite. She said her name in a way that sounded a little bit belligerent. Do you think there is a danger in taking a girl like this for granted? She's not here just by good luck and chance.

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, I don't take her for granted at all. She's played great tennis to make it this far. You don't make a Grand Slam semifinals without playing great tennis. So, I mean, I'm going to go out there and fight for every point. I'm not going to give you mean.

I'm just going to try to do my best. There's nothing else I can do. Hopefully I can pull it out. But, I mean, you never know. It's a 50/50% chance when you get out on the court.

Q. What do you make of what Melanie Oudin did during this tournament?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I think she had an amazing run. I mean, she's only 17 years old. She has been playing some great tennis. I think that, you know, she had a lot of attention here, and I think the way she handled all the attention, I think she did very well. I think she has a great team around her, and I'm sure that she'll win many, many more matches in the future, as well.

Q. What was your strategy going into the match?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: My strategy today was just to ‑‑ I don't know, to try to ‑‑ I knew that she had a great forehand and that she's good on the defense, as well, that she's running well.

So I just wanted to keep her mostly on her backhand side, but also make her run to her forehand.

Q. You said you played Yanina in juniors. Can you remember your first match against her?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Um, I remember ‑‑ I don't remember my first match. I just remember that ‑‑ I think we met each other when we were we were both under‑12. So, I mean, that's many years back.

We're friends off the court, as well, and she's had an amazing run and I'm happy for her, as well.

Q. Would you like to tell us how you practiced with adidas team and how the organization of this team?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, the adidas team is very ‑‑ it's very nice. We have Darren Cahill, Sven Groeneveld, Matts Merkel as a hitting partner, and Gil Reyes is the fitness coach.

So it's a great team to have, and it's nice to have someone there to hit with during the tournaments, as well. My dad is my main coach, but it's nice to get some input from the outside, as well. It's great that adidas has made such a great effort to do such a program, and it also makes us a team. The adidas players have a great connection with each other, and I think that's great.

Q. How crucial was it to not fold up :eek: like the Russians did before you? How much was that part of the strategy?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I mean, Melanie, she beat some great players. No doubt about it. I knew that it was going to be tough and I knew that she was going to fight to the last point. I just ‑‑ yeah, I just thought about one point at a time, one ball at a time, and tried not to think too much about the score, even though it's difficult.

I'm a fighter, so I don't give up. I fought to the last point.

Q. Melanie said that you played a very consistent game. Was that your game plan going in, is to make sure, limit your mistakes?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, today definitely I was like, I have to get as many balls back as possible and try to make her run. Keep her on her backhand, but also, you know, make her run on her forehand.

That was my goal, and I think it was a good way to play the match today.

Q. Your body language was positive the whole time. Was that part of the deal, too? Never show her that you were frustrated even if you were?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, today especially today it was important for me just to keep positive, try to just fight for every point. Because I knew if I show her too much emotions she will pick it up straightaway. I've seen that before in her matches. I mean, the crowd helped her through, as well.

So today was just important, just to keep positive, keep fighting for every point.

Q. Going into the semis, you're highly the favorite. Isn't it a frightening here to have a final ahead of you?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Um, I still actually cannot believe that I'm in the semifinals, so it's going to be great to play that match. I'm looking forward to that.

But right now I just want to enjoy this moment. And to be in the semifinals for the first time here in New York, it's incredible.

Q. You have played a lot of matches for the past three weeks because you won New Haven and now. I was wondering, how are you feeling about your body, like fatigue or are you tired?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, I feel great. I feel really good. I feel like I've played a lot of matches. I've been playing some great tennis. I'm really happy, and I like playing matches. I have to practice, anyways, so to me I like to compete. I love to compete. Playing matches just makes it more fun, and I don't really feel tired at all.

Q. No injury?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No injuries. I'm fit for fat. I'm okay.

Q. For people just getting familiar with you as a tennis player, how would you describe yourself as a player, what your strengths are?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I think I have a ‑‑ I'm thinking well on the court. I think that I make the right decisions. I think that I'm a fighter. I run well, but I'm also capable of changing the rhythm, be aggressive. I think I'm an all‑around player.

Q. Are you going to change your game plan against Wickmayer?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I really don't know yet what I'm going to do. I haven't thought about it. You know, I go out there and I will try to stay aggressive. I think that's the way to play.

Q. You come from a small country. Wickmayer, too. Yet this afternoon she has 2,000 boyfriends. How many do you have in Denmark now?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I don't know. I haven't read the newspapers in Denmark, but I'm sure they can find a boyfriend for me. (laughter.)

Q. And real boyfriends, how many do you have?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I don't have any real boyfriends right now, so ‑‑ and usually I keep to one (laughter.)

Q. When you walk into center court, such a big center court, when you walk into the center court, what sort of feeling you get?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: It's an amazing feeling, especially when you're playing at night. Playing on Arthur Ashe Stadium, 23,000 people watching you going on the court, I mean, it's ‑‑ you cannot really describe the atmosphere. It's just ‑‑ it's magical. It's amazing.

Q. Your box was very loud today, the box of people. Do you think they just try to unite to be against the whole stadium?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: That my box was loud? I think that they're trying just to encourage me and trying to make me stay positive and try to give me energy.

Q. Do you have any special plans for celebrating tomorrow, day off?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, not really. I don't have any plans. I just want to enjoy my time with my family and friends who are here.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

C. W. Fields
Sep 10th, 2009, 06:20 AM
I'm not crazy about listening to Caro's interviews. I mean, she says "I mean" and "you know" a bit too much, you know!?

FormerlyKnownAs
Sep 10th, 2009, 09:29 AM
Ja det er rigtig, du vid.

I think Caroline's interviews are just like her matches, she is good at coming up with something without giving anything away.

But i think it was interesting that they had already talked about body language, I had noticed already in the match against Kuznetsova how her face and body language was much more concentrated and focused, good move.
Maybe it works on her as well as her opponent.

stangtennis
Sep 10th, 2009, 11:28 AM
I'm not crazy about listening to Caro's interviews. I mean, she says "I mean" and "you know" a bit too much, you know!?
Agree Wozniacki says "I mean" and "you know" way too much.
Kim Clijsters has the same bad habit of saying "I mean" and especially "you know" all the time and other players does it too. Maybe the players have picked it up talking to each other.

I watched the "Kim Clijsters feature" video here: http://www.tennis-channel.tv/tennis
I counted at least 13 times she said "you know" in the interview.
You know, Clijsters speaks much faster than Wozniacki in English you know, so sometimes you don't notice it as much you know.

But most people have bad habits and things they repeat when they speak. Especially when they don't speak in their native language. Some like Wozniacki and clijsters are worese than others. But I prefer it over some Russian who barelay says anyuthing when they are interviewd in English. Dinara Safina for example only say very simple sentences in English interviews.

stangtennis
Sep 10th, 2009, 11:43 AM
Q. How crucial was it to not fold up like the Russians did before you? How much was that part of the strategy?
What kind of question is that?
Isn't it always crucial for any player to not fold up? I don't think any player has it as part of their strategy to fold up.

terjw
Sep 10th, 2009, 01:33 PM
Agree Wozniacki says "I mean" and "you know" way too much.
Kim Clijsters has the same bad habit of saying "I mean" and especially "you know" all the time and other players does it too. Maybe the players have picked it up talking to each other.


I think when it comes to the way players say things and the "I mean" and "you know" phrases - it's actually quite different the impression I get listening to someone talking in an interview as opposed to reading a transcript. When we talk answering a question - it's never really very good English with lots of repetitions and pauses and no way would we give a written reply like that. It's easier to spot the "You know" and "I mean" repetitions when it's a transcript. Once you spot it of course - then you're always listening for it in the video as well.

So it's funny and amusing to count how many "I mean" "You hnow"etc - but I really try to look at the content rather than the English way the players answer.

stangtennis
Sep 10th, 2009, 07:27 PM
The funny thing is if you compare the transcripts of Oudin's and Wozniacki's post match interviews, Oudin said "you know" and "I mean" 20 times combined, Wozniacki only said "you know" and "I mean" 17 times combined.
Wozniacki had one sentence where she said "I mean" 3 times so I mean you notice it more then you know.

Melanie Oudin said "you know" 11 times and "I mean" 9 times - 20 times combined.
Caroline Wozniacki said "you know" 5 times and "I mean" 12 times - 17 times combined.

Melanie Oudin post match interview http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2009-09-09/200909091252549426687.html
Caroline Wozniacki post match interview http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2009-09-09/200909091252550822359.html

Bingain
Sep 10th, 2009, 07:50 PM
Tennis Blog of The New York Times
September 10, 2009, 12:45 pm
Match Analysis: Wozniacki’s Winning Approach (http://straightsets.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/09/10/match-analysis-wozniackis-approach/)
By Geoff Macdonald

Caroline Wozniacki played a solid, tactically intelligent match to beat Melanie Oudin and become the first Scandinavian woman to reach a Grand Slam semifinal. Unlike Dementieva, Sharapova, and Petrova, she did not overreach with her shotmaking, and forced errors from Oudin. The three felled Russians all tried to overpower Oudin, who came from behind in all three matches to score huge upsets.

What did Wozniacki do differently? To begin with, she imparts more topspin on both sides when compared with the Russian players. She receives the ball with a more flexible hand and wrist at a contact point that allows her to control the ball with spin and racket head speed. This technique holds up well under pressure, as the topspin allows Wozniacki to swing freely but with a safe margin. Petrova’s forehand, by contrast, is hit with a severe Western grip, and she plays her shots flat. Under pressure, her mechanics tighten and the unforced errors come. Wozniacki turned the tables on Oudin, forcing the young American to go for a little too much on her ground strokes.

Amazingly, Wozniacki hit only five winners. Of the 69 points she won, 43 were because of Oudin’s unforced errors. The Dane artfully allowed each point to develop; she played the ball to the right spot, and forced Oudin to earn every point.

The legendary coach Chuck Kriese teaches his players to “chisel the rock,” to patiently chip away and outwork your opponent. While Wozniacki did this, the three seeded Russians tried to swat away the pesky American by trying to hit her off the court. They stopped chiseling and tried to bludgeon their way to victory. To Oudin’s credit, she never stopped fighting or believing in those matches. She chiseled her way to three small masterpieces that have catapulted her to sudden celebrity.

Wozniacki coaxed Oudin to beat herself and comported herself with class. She also tamed the crowd somewhat. In her postmatch interview she complimented Oudin and charmed everyone in Arthur Ashe Stadium.


Geoff Macdonald (http://straightsets.blogs.nytimes.com/author/geoff-macdonald/) is the head coach of women’s tennis at Vanderbilt University. He played college tennis at the University of Virginia and played on the ATP Tour from 1981 to 1984, mainly on the satellite circuit, although he did enjoy a cup of coffee at the 1982 United States Open.

stangtennis
Sep 11th, 2009, 01:30 PM
http://www.star-telegram.com/other_sports/story/1604823.html

U.S. Open semifinalist Wozniacki follows in great Danes’ footsteps

Posted Thursday, Sep. 10, 2009

By CINDY SHMERLER

Special to the Star-Telegram

FLUSHING, N.Y. — Despite what Hamlet might have said, there is nothing rotten in the state of Denmark right now. At least not since 19-year-old Caroline Wozniacki became the first Danish woman to reach the semifinals of a major championship when she ousted the U.S. Open’s version of Shakespeare’s Juliet, 17-year-old Melanie Oudin.

There have been successful Danish men, most notably Kurt Nielsen who reached the Wimbledon final in 1953 and ’55 before losing to Americans Vic Seixas and Tony Trabert, respectively. There was also Jan Leschly, who lost to American Clark Graebner in the semifinals of the U.S. Nationals in 1967.

And then there is the most famous Danish player of all, long-haired, longer-bearded Torben Ulrich, a Danish Davis Cup veteran for four decades who also happens to be the father of drummer Lars Ulrich, a founding member of the heavy metal band, Metallica.

And now there is Wozniacki, who today takes on unseeded surprise semifinalist Yanina Wickmayer of Belgium in a match that follows the showdown between former champions Serena Williams and Kim Clijsters, also of Belgium. If the ninth-seeded Wozniacki and Wickmayer weren’t playing after Williams and Clijsters, they would certainly be considered the warm-up act.

The USTA decided to move the women’s semis up to start today’s schedule, ahead of the men’s doubles final between No. 3 seeds Mahesh Bhupathi and Southlake resident Mark Knowles and fourth-seeded Lukas Dlouhy and Leander Paes, due to the forecast of persistent rain throughout the day, according to USTA spokesman Chris Widmaier.

Wozniacki and Wickmayer have never met in a WTA Tour event (but they competed against each other a lot in the juniors) while Williams and Clijsters have played eight times, including twice in majors. Clijsters retired for two years to get married and give birth to a baby girl, now-18-month-old Jada.

Wozniacki has won more matches than any other woman on tour this year — 61 out of 78 — and has captured three titles, Ponte Vedra Beach, Eastbourne and New Haven the week before the Open.

"I’m thinking well on court," she said. "I think that I make the right decisions. I’m a fighter. I run well but I’m capable of changing the rhythm, being aggressive. I think I’m an all-around player."
...
Kurt Nielsen has also won the "US Open" in mixed doubles in 1957 with Althea Gibson - that was before the 5 events was merged into 1 and named US Open in 1968.

Actually the son of Danish tennis player Torben Ulrich, the Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich was a very good tennis player himself and moved from Denmark to Los Angeles in 1981 hoping to become a pro tennis player. But he became interested in British heavy metal and decided to start his own band and put an ad in the local paper "The Recycler" searching for other musicians to start a heavy metal band. A guy named Hugh Tanner responded to the ad and brought along his friend James Hetfield. James and Lars soon became friends while Hugh left the band and Lars and James found new band members, and that's how the world famous Metallica was started - and this also ment the end of Lars Ulrich's hopes for a pro tennis career.

stangtennis
Sep 11th, 2009, 11:35 PM
http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/articles/2009-09-10/200909101252621126671.html
Wozniacki looks to become new “It Girl”

Thursday, September 10, 2009
By Matt Cronin

After the hard-hitting Sabine Lisicki blew her off the court at Wimbledon, Denmark's Caroline Wozniacki traveled home and decided to change her training routine.

Instead of just drilling, running and lifting a few weights, she decided to box for a couple of weeks as a form of training, which would not only improve her speed and quickness but would inspire her to great heights. As a top-10 player, she knew that she was expected to do more than just make it to the fourth round of a few majors.

“My time will come, and I'll make it further,” said Wozniacki upon her return to play in early August. “It's experience. I've showed I can beat the top players and make it far, but you have to be a little lucky, and the draw has to fit you.”

The US Open draw has fit her just fine, and now the strong-legged 19-year-old has made it to her first Grand Slam semifinal, where she will be the favorite in her match against the unseeded teenager, Yanina Wickmayer.

Coming off her second title run in New Haven, Wozniacki was expected to do well here, but because she has underperformed in the Slams earlier this year, many thought she wouldn't make it past the first week.

But she had cautioned her critics that her rise up the ladder would be gradual and that she was tougher than her cheery and bubbly exterior let on. In New York, she has taken down her close friend, Sorana Cirstea, the same Romanian who had beaten her at Roland Garros and LA. Then she came back from a set and a break down to stymie reigning French Open champion Svetlana Kuznetsova 7-6 in the third set in the most impressive Grand Slam victory of her career.

But that's not all. On Thursday night, she faced down America's newest sweetheart, Melanie Oudin, 6-2, 6-2, by putting up a defensive wall, mixing and matching her shots and not being intimated by the pro-Oudin crowd.

“It was important for me just to keep positive, try to just fight for every point,” Wozniacki said. “Because I knew if I show her too much emotions, she will pick it up straightaway. I've seen that before in her matches. The crowd helped her through, as well. To be in the semifinals for the first time here in New York, it's incredible."

The daughter of former pro soccer player and national team volleyball player from Poland, Wozniacki celebrated her 19th birthday in July and had a party at home that was attended by the Radwanska sisters and Cirstea. They are a pleasant group of fun-loving players, but for a portion of this year, the fiery Miami champion, Victoria Azarenka, or the gritty Roland Garros semifinalist, Dominika Cibulkova, looked like they might be tougher than Wozniacki and her circle of pro friends.

But behind her wide smile, the former Wimbledon junior champion is pretty ambitious, and she loves to work, logging more singles matches (78) than any other player on tour this year. Wozniacki is a thinking player who merely needed to adjust to her rapid rise up the rankings chart before she was ready to charge at a Slam.

“It really went fast, and I didn't expect it,” she said. “I'm happy to have come this far, and I want to prove I'm even a better player.”

Wozniacki is a terrific mover, has a hatchet of a backhand and doesn't mind coming into net to close out points. Her forehand is a little too loopy, and her powder-puff second serve is nowhere close to as effective as her blowtorch flat first serve, but she's a cagey player who rarely plays herself out of matches.

At home, she's wildly popular and now has a small group of Danish journalists following her around tour. She's become a bit of an international star and has been designated as the only woman on tour to wear adidas by Stella McCartney, which she is debuting at the US Open.

“If I walk around in Denmark, people want autographs and pictures,” she said. “Sometimes it's really fun and nice, and sometimes you wish you could just be yourself and do fun things without being on front page of the newspaper.”

Should Wozniacki reach the final, images of her will plaster the walls of her hometown of Koge. But whether she has the experience to best either former US Open champion Serena Williams or Kim Clijsters remains to be seen.

Earlier this year in Sydney, she held three match points against Serena Williams but couldn't pull through. Then at the Australian Open, when she faced national heroine Jelena Dokic and withered under Dokic's relentless attack and the crowd's pleas for a stirring triumph, she fell, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2.

“It was first time I played in stadium and in front of 15,000 people, and it was really difficult," Wozniacki said. "The crowd helped her to take chances at right moments. But I can learn from that, become a better player and move on.”

The Dane apparently has moved on at the US Open and has done a good job connecting with the crowd, receiving solid support when she faced Kuznetsova. Now it's up to her to show that she can maintain her nerve in her next two matches. If she does, she'll be the tour's true “It Girl.”

“I'm going to go out there and fight for every point,” she said. “I'm not going to give you mean. I'm just going to try to do my best. There's nothing else I can do.”

FormerlyKnownAs
Sep 15th, 2009, 11:04 AM
The original article http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1222239.ece

http://multimedia.ekstrabladet.dk/eb/archive/00468/No_name_468213d.jpg

Caroline: I'm completely smashed
The Day After: A tired Caroline reflects on backslappers, critics, pride and the lack of energy to be celebrated.

07:58 - 15. sep. 2009 | Troels Christensen

NEW YORK (Ekstra Bladet): How tired she was, Caroline Wozniacki, when Ekstra Bladet met her on Monday, the day after the final of U.S. Open. Just after lunch and just before a much needed nap.

The intense weeks have caught up with her. In body and soul.

Perhaps because of this, she also lowers her guard and talks openly about her feelings, while her body language and eyes says everything about the physical battery level.

- I have been completely focused the whole way. Every day has been tough mentally. Now that it's finally over, and I can allow myself to relax a bit, then it all comes out.

- How?

- Well, I'm completely smashed. I am sore all over my body and just so tired. I just want to dive into bed. Again.

- Outside pressures increase when one approaches a Grand Slam finale. Have you said no to several things off the court this time?

- Yes, I have. I could really feel that I have become more sought after by the media and everyone else, so if I were to take part in it all, I would be completely smashed. Tennis is the most important.

- It's hard to put into words just after a big finale. How do you see it the day after?

- Well, it was huge. But the best is, almost, that I was not really nervous. I could not feel the size of the match in that way.

- It was just another match that I wanted to win.

- In that way it has given me the knowledge that I can be in there and perform. I feel it says something about my personality, although the stage is big, it's something I can cope.

- It was a long hug between Kim Clijsters and you. What did she say to you?

- Well played, good game. And then she said something like: 'Your time will soon come'. She is so sweet.

- What have you been most proud of?

- Of my game in general. My reactions underway. I have been able to maintain my focus, even though it has been raining and windy. That I have every time, could come back and fought and won.

- Many have said that you were missing a result at a Grand Slam. Is it also a little nice to give a reply to that?

- I've never felt that I had to prove anything to anyone, but I can be a bit tired of so-called experts who the whole time, have to come and be wise.

- I mean: I understand that it is yours and others jobs to do so. But there are others for whom it is maybe not so necessary to seize every chance to comment.

- Yes, somewhere is it very nice to silence them.

- You must have received a flood of greetings from home. Are there any you have been particularly pleased with?

- The most important are those from my closest. From my big brother, friends and girlfriends. It's great that they get up in the night to follow me.

- You are entering a world populated by backclappers. Not all are, well, completely genuine, right?

- Nah-no. But I have got used to it, and believe me: I have gotten really good at sorting. I can see, when there is someone, who just wants to hang on.

- I try to be nice to everyone, but I also know who is there when things go less well. They are the ones I stick with.

- There are probably many who would like to pay tribute to you when you return home to Denmark?

- Yes, I've heard about all sorts of events, and think that it is cool, that people want to celebrate me.

- But may I be completely honest? I just don’t have the energy for it. I so need to relax and be myself. Just being with my closest.

- What do you most look forward to right now?

- When I have slept? Well, I look forward to a couple of weeks without tournaments. That I am not constantly in preparation for a new match.

- Finally, and in hindsight. Was there anything you would like to have done differently in the finale?

- I do not believe in that there looking back and regretting. I'd rather be positive and look ahead, smiles Caroline Wozniacki.

That we will so do. Not forgetting a fantastic performance.

slk45
Sep 18th, 2009, 06:41 AM
Agree Wozniacki says "I mean" and "you know" way too much.
Kim Clijsters has the same bad habit of saying "I mean" and especially "you know" all the time and other players does it too. Maybe the players have picked it up talking to each other.

But most people have bad habits and things they repeat when they speak. Especially when they don't speak in their native language.

Really, I think the non-American players pick up this habit from the American players. Martina Hingis was the absolute worst for "I mean" and "you know." But I think when they come to America to compete for the first couple times, and they converse with Americans, especially Californians, they learn all the bad speech habits. (Seems like JCap was another multiple offender with bad speech habits.)

These extra words are thrown in to take up time while you try to think of what you're saying (like, ummm, you know), so it's no surprise "foreign" players pick up the same habits from people they're talking to.

Bingain
Sep 18th, 2009, 12:02 PM
Really, I think the non-American players pick up this habit from the American players. Martina Hingis was the absolute worst for "I mean" and "you know." But I think when they come to America to compete for the first couple times, and they converse with Americans, especially Californians, they learn all the bad speech habits. (Seems like JCap was another multiple offender with bad speech habits.)

These extra words are thrown in to take up time while you try to think of what you're saying (like, ummm, you know), so it's no surprise "foreign" players pick up the same habits from people they're talking to.

Well said.

There was this young guy I knew who spoke like TV commentator when we talked about basketball. When we started to talk about school exercises, he was all 'you know'. Heck, he even wrote all these 'you know' on discussion papers.

You also see less of these, generally, from seasoned and more matured players who feel like at home when facing journalists.

stangtennis
Sep 19th, 2009, 09:40 PM
Speaking of bad habits, have you noticed how many times Clijsters say "a little bit"?
In her post-match interview after the final she said "a little bit" no less than 14 times: http://www.usopen.org/en_US/news/interviews/2009-09-14/200909141252926699656.html
She even put "a lillte bit" in where it contradicts what she's trying to say, like here where she both says she has become "a lot more" and "a little bit" more understanding of herself. Makes no sense to say both in the same sentence.
I've become a lot more understanding of myself a little bit
This habit is a little bit much worse than the "you know" habit. :rolleyes:

slk45
Sep 20th, 2009, 01:26 AM
Yes, a number of players have been doing that too. It's a part of their press conference sanitizing regimen. Depending on context, the phrase can be laughable, or just curious, or, as you mention, contradictory. Post Hingis-Williamses, the WTA wants things to be just kind of beige. Instead of "I was smokin' her today," it would be "I had a little bit of advantage in my game today." I kind of miss feuds like Hingis & Kournikova had in South America. :hearts: ;) :tape:

Bingain
Sep 20th, 2009, 06:38 AM
One of Jennifer 'You Know' Capriati's interviews:

Q. You still have a final to play, but is this a huge load, to get one of the Williamses off your back - for a while anyway?

JENNIFER CAPRIATI: Yeah. I mean, of course. It's just, you know, a player that's been No. 1 in the world and she's, you know, "the one to beat." I've lost to her, you know, so many times in a row. So she's one of the girls that would be, you know, a lot off the back if I would be able to win, you know. So it's just very, you know -- a personal victory for me. But, you know, it's just on to the next thing, you know. There's another job to do. You know, just gonna enjoy it later on, but, you know, it's just satisfaction of working hard and having it come out and playing well, you know. It really should be the same almost when you win or lose, but, you know, of course that's easy to say, you know... (13 times)

Caro has a long way to go :p;)

slk45
Sep 20th, 2009, 06:47 AM
:worship: That's easy for her to say.


(glad you brought this back to Caro) :cool:

FormerlyKnownAs
Sep 20th, 2009, 08:51 AM
Caroline and Piotr's Take On The Asian Tour.
She will probably try her best as usual, but with all the pressure after USO maybe its better to say that and not win everything, than believe all the hype and expectations and say how far she reckons on getting, and the looking a flop when she doesn't.

My interpretation is that it's a big possibility she will drop Osaka and Luxembourg. This will give her the best start to Doha, I think.
But who knows what Team Wozniacki will do.

Origial article here.
http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1223917.ece


Playing only to avoid fines

Caroline Wozniacki would really rather be free for in playing two tournaments, but has to take part to avoid fines

13:13 - 17. sep. 2009 | soren lauridsen

Wozniacki plays two tournaments in the East in two weeks - but would really rather have the time off.

Caroline Wozniacki has two weeks of vacation before going off to Tokyo and Beijing to play the WTA tournaments. But really, the Danish tennis star would rather have a longer holiday.

Father Piotr has previously said that he wanted to drop the tournaments after Wozniackis near-triumph at the U.S. Open, and Caroline Wozniacki feels the same way.

- Yes, I certainly have it a bit that way. I have achieved everything I wanted to in 2009 and don’t feel that I need to play more, but there are some tournaments that are mandatory, and I get huge fines if I did not come, "said Wozniacki to spn.dk.

Actually, she would rather prepare for the seasons end in Qatar, the Sony Ericsson Championships, which gathers together the eight best players in the world. Now she instead will use the two tournaments to warm up.

- I'll use the next tournaments some training, and I hope that the good form is still there at Doha, "says Caroline Wozniacki.

Both Caroline and Piotr Wozniacki warns that one should not expect great results from Wozniacki at the two tournaments.

Jean-Henri
Sep 20th, 2009, 12:22 PM
Can't see if this pre-US Open article has been posted already.
Found it when I was googling Caro's car!
Not so much about Caro's tennis, but fashion and fairy tales... Dane, Set, Match (http://www.wmagazine.com/celebrities/2009/08/caroline_wozniacki)

C. W. Fields
Sep 21st, 2009, 12:45 PM
Interview with Piotr: http://spn.dk/andensport/tennis/article1823422.ece

Hvordan ser den kommende måned ud for familien Wozniacki?

»Jeg skal rejse med Caroline til Tokyo, Beijing og Osaka. Bagefter skal hun spille i Luxembourg, og når det er overstået, har hun lavet en aftale med nogle veninder om at tage på ferie. Så tager jeg til Monaco og bliver der med min kone, og så kommer Patrick (sønnen, der spiller fodbold, red.) ned og besøger os, når fodboldsæsonen er overstået.«

He says she's gonna play all four tournaments! :eek:

FormerlyKnownAs
Sep 21st, 2009, 04:08 PM
Interview with Piotr: http://spn.dk/andensport/tennis/article1823422.ece

Hvordan ser den kommende måned ud for familien Wozniacki?

»Jeg skal rejse med Caroline til Tokyo, Beijing og Osaka. Bagefter skal hun spille i Luxembourg, og når det er overstået, har hun lavet en aftale med nogle veninder om at tage på ferie. Så tager jeg til Monaco og bliver der med min kone, og så kommer Patrick (sønnen, der spiller fodbold, red.) ned og besøger os, når fodboldsæsonen er overstået.«

He says she's gonna play all four tournaments! :eek:

If you have read the article above you could see that on the 17th they said something completely different.

Your article sounds like Team Wozniacki at its worst.

ALL 4 Tournaments and right up to 2 days before Doha starts if, she goes far in Luxembourg.

Why do they think so short term. Who knows when she will get to Doho again.?

Sometimes its difficult being a fan!!!

krystian
Sep 21st, 2009, 08:23 PM
Interview with Piotr: http://spn.dk/andensport/tennis/article1823422.ece

Hvordan ser den kommende måned ud for familien Wozniacki?

»Jeg skal rejse med Caroline til Tokyo, Beijing og Osaka. Bagefter skal hun spille i Luxembourg, og når det er overstået, har hun lavet en aftale med nogle veninder om at tage på ferie. Så tager jeg til Monaco og bliver der med min kone, og så kommer Patrick (sønnen, der spiller fodbold, red.) ned og besøger os, når fodboldsæsonen er overstået.«

He says she's gonna play all four tournaments! :eek:

hey, what does it exactly mean?

Hvad lavede I dagen efter finalen?

»Vi fik noget mad og sov alle sammen. Vi var meget trætte. Og så var vi på en lille shoppingtur, Caroline lavede lektier, der blev læst lidt i nogle bøger, og ellers så vi fjernsyn og slappede af.«

As I used translator, I understand she was doing her homework? So she has individual system of learning I see ;) It's nice they don't forget about a school :)

Jorn
Sep 21st, 2009, 08:56 PM
What did you do after the Final? "They got some good food, sleep much, was tired, was out shopping, doing homework, watch TV."


If I had won over DKK 6.000.000 in 2 tournaments, I can wait doing the homework.. ;)

Bingain
Sep 22nd, 2009, 12:02 AM
What did you do after the Final? "They got some good food, sleep much, was tired, was out shopping, doing homework, watch TV."


If I had won over DKK 6.000.000 in 2 tournaments, I can wait doing the homework.. ;)

You'd probably have retired as well. I know I would. :lol::p:lick::drool:

FormerlyKnownAs
Oct 9th, 2009, 06:26 AM
My Trip to Asia
Hello Everyone,

Sorry it has been a few weeks since I have put up a new blog update, but I am in Beijing now and have some free time so I wanted to let everyone know what I have been doing. After my great US Open, and trip to New York, I went home to Copenhagen for a few days where I spent some time with my friends and family, and also went to Monaco where I have a home now too. On one of my days off, my brother Patrick and I took a short trip to Paris to attend Eva Longoria and Tony Parker’s charity event with some other tennis players – David Ferrer and Fernando Verdasco. It was so much fun, and I had a good time getting all dressed up for the charity every which was very, very nice.

After about ten days off (which was much shorter than I expected after the US Open because I didn’t expect to get to the finals), I had to head to Tokyo for the first of three events in Asia. I don’t know if it was because the flight was so long, or I was enjoying myself too much at home, but I ended up getting sick with some sort of virus the past six or seven days which has been very unfortunate. In Tokyo, I drew Aleksandra Wozniak of Canada in my first round, and I knew I shouldn’t have played at all, but I was hoping the adrenaline of the match would carry me through it. However, I ended up having to stop at the end of the first set and retire which I was disappointed about. After my match, I ended up staying in Tokyo for a few days to get some rest before I hopped on a flight to Beijing for my next event – the China Open.

In Beijing, I still was not feeling close to 100%, so I asked the tournament director and WTA for a Monday start (instead of playing my first round on Sunday), but it was very frustrating to learn on Saturday that I was scheduled to play my first match on Sunday. I really needed every hour of rest to get over this virus and ready for my first match, but the WTA or tournament director did not seem to care at all and take this into consideration. The WTA Tour is supposed to be a players union, but I certainly don’t think they represented my best interest this week in Beijing and it was very disappointing. In my first round, I ended up playing Maria Jose Martinez-Sanchez, and I played a good first set which I won close 7-5. In the second set, it was really close again but I lost it in a tiebreaker and then in the third set I just completely ran out of energy and ended up losing the match.

Losing my first round in is Beijing was exactly what I was worried about since I have not practiced for more than one hour in the past week. I was hopeful that if th WTA were to give me a first round start on Monday that I could’ve had a much better chance of winning and feeling better as I were to advance through the tournament. I am never one to make excuses because Martinez-Sanchez did play a good match, but I really feel the WTA and tournament director could’ve helped me and they chose not to.

So far my trip to Asia has been disappointing to say the least because I have only played one match and a set in the past two weeks, but I am really looking forward to going to Osaka for my last event in Asia. I have a lot of good memories of Osaka from back in the juniors because it is where I won my first big junior tournament. This is the first time since I have been on the Tour that there has been an event in Osaka, and I am really exited to be playing in it. My goal is of course to win the event, however at this point I would just be happy getting some good matches to prepare for the Sony Ericsson Championships in Doha in three weeks.

After the Sony Ericsson Championships, I am planning to go on a ten day holiday with some of my girlfriends and it has been fun the past few days trying to figure out where we will go to rest and have some fun. I will be sure to announce my holiday plans when I know more, and in the meantime I hope all of my fans are doing well and thank you for all your tremendous support – it means so much to me!

Best Wishes,

Caroline

AstuteLearner8
Oct 21st, 2009, 12:38 AM
Really interesting article about Caroline :)

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/caroline-wozniacki-talk-of-the-tour-1806130.html

Caroline Wozniacki: Talk of the tour

She makes her debut in the elite end-of-season finale next week. But the girl who can speak six languages and is eager to do a Yale business degree is also turning heads on the catwalk

By Paul Newman


Wednesday, 21 October 2009


Caroline Wozniacki might feel a little uncomfortable when she arrives in Doha for next week's Sony Ericsson Championships. It will not be a question of nerves on her first appearance in the elite end-of-season finale so much as the fact that Qatar is one of the few stopovers on the women's tour where the 19-year-old Dane might have trouble conversing with the locals.


Last month's US Open finalist is a natural linguist. Polish is the first language at home, her parents having moved to Denmark when her father, a professional footballer, joined Odense in the late 1980s, but in most other respects Wozniacki has been brought up as a Dane. She learned French and English at school – her English, which is given a regular workout on the tour, is all but word-perfect – while family holidays quickly helped her to develop an understanding of Russian.

"My Dad had a lot of friends and business interests in Russia," Wozniacki explained. "When we went on holiday to Russia when I was younger we spent time with my Dad's friends and their families. The kids only spoke Russian, so I had to learn to communicate with them.

"I think it's much easier to learn languages when you're younger. You're also less afraid to use them. When you get older you think about it 100 times in your head before you say something." Five languages, nevertheless, was not good enough. "I'm trying to learn Spanish at the moment," Wozniacki said. "I have a lot of Spanish friends and I like going to Spain. It's also a really international language, so it's a good one to know.

"For me it's easy to learn new languages. I find that the more languages you speak the easier it is to learn a new one because so many words are similar."

The words "game, set and match Wozniacki" have been among the most familiar on the women's circuit this year. The world No 6 has played more than anyone and went into this week's Luxembourg Open, her last tournament before the season's finale, having won 65 of her 86 matches since opening her campaign in New Zealand in January. The next most active players have been Flavia Pennetta (55 wins from 78 matches at the start of this week), Dinara Safina (55 wins from 70 matches) and Elena Dementieva (54 wins from 72 matches).

Along the way Wozniacki has won three singles titles – plus one in doubles – and $2,069,825 (£1.27m) in prize money, trebling her career earnings. Her run to the final of the US Open, which she lost to Kim Clijsters, reinforced the view that there is plenty more to come from the Dane. Although she lacks the big shots of some of her major rivals, she is an outstanding athlete and a player who thinks about her game.

Given her hectic schedule you would imagine that Wozniacki would have little time for anything other than tennis, but she is hoping to enrol on an online course next year at Yale University. "I'd like to get some kind of degree in business and management," she said. "I'm hoping that I can study mostly online, but if I have to do the exams there I would and if I needed to go into the school for some classes I would do that as well. I'm thinking about life after tennis, but I also think it's good to have something to occupy your mind apart from tennis. I've always enjoyed studying – and feel smarter after I've done something like that! I spend a lot of time on my tennis, but you also have a lot of free time where you just sit in your hotel room. So rather than watching a movie I'd be doing some homework instead."

With Yale in mind, Wozniacki has been looking at properties to buy in New York. "I'm not 100 per cent decided yet," she said. "I'm still looking around and trying to find the best offers. I wouldn't be in New York for many weeks of the year, but I thought buying a property there would help me if I spend some time at Yale, which isn't far from the city. I like New York. It's a great city and it's not too far from Europe either."

Last month's US Open also offered the chance of some serious shopping in the Big Apple, particularly with a runner-up's cheque for $800,000 in her pocket. Did she treat herself to something special? "I didn't actually buy anything for myself. I went shopping, but I bought a lot of things for my brother, a few things for my mum, and a watch for my dad. I bought little presents for everyone around me, but I didn't buy anything for myself.

"I don't spend any more on clothes these days than I have in the past. I like to find nice things and to look at clothes, but if there's something really expensive I always think twice. I only buy clothes that I really, really like." What is the most expensive item she has purchased? "I bought a Louis Vuitton bag for $3,000 in Australia. I use it all the time."

While Wozniacki may be restrained with her shopping, sponsors believe she can persuade others to part with their cash. With her striking good looks, the Dane is increasingly in demand within the fashion industry. In the summer she became the global face of a range of clothing designed by Stella McCartney for Adidas, while in the week after the US Open she was a high profile guest at New York Fashion Week, after which she had lunch with Anna Wintour, the highly influential US editor-in-chief of Vogue and a good friend of Roger Federer.

"She had watched me play and wanted to have a chat," Wozniacki said. "I often look at the magazines when I'm flying and it was really cool to meet her. She's such an important person in fashion." Had there been a promise of a future appearance in Vogue? "She didn't say that but I hope it might happen one day."

Wozniacki is relishing the opportunities that fame is opening up for her – she particularly enjoyed meeting David Beckham and other LA Galaxy players in the summer – but insists there is no danger of off-court activities affecting her sport. "Tennis is the most important thing," she said. "If I do well on court then everything else is just a bonus. I always want to be the best, so I work hard." Qualifying for the elite eight-strong field for the Sony Ericsson Championships was a major goal at the start of the season, but her main ambition is to win Wimbledon. "I love all the traditions," she said. "I love the fact that we play on grass and that everyone has to play in white. When I was growing up, Wimbledon was always the tournament that was shown most on TV. I won junior Wimbledon and it's always been the tournament that I would like to win the most."

Suave and volley: Why tennis and fashion make a great match

The rise and fall of baseline hemlines is a constant source of fascination for the fashion crowd. Tennis players are the only sports stars who look like they're wearing real clothes, as proved by Stella McCartney's range for which Caroline Wozniacki is the face, so no wonder the cognoscenti get excited: no dodgy colour combos, no helmets or clown gloves, and mini-skirts are standard issue.

From Serena Williams' black lycra catsuit at the 2002 US Open (not to mention her knee-high boots) to Maria Sharapova's 18 carat gold Tiffany earrings, tennis is easily the best dressed sport. Witness Roger Federer's spiffy outfits with his own crest and his blossoming friendship with Vogue editor Anna Wintour, whom he accompanied to fashion shows in Milan last month.

Maybe it's because of tennis' traditional flirtation with the upper classes that it's the one sport that captures the fashionable imagination. After all, putting on your whites for a match at the country estate is a far cry from playing footie in the park.

Either way, Lacoste, Adidas and Fred Perry, among many, recognise the "style-ability" of the tennis kit, and the ease of transition from clay and grass to pavement and shopping mall makes it a great commercial option for most sportswear labels.

Harriet Walker

86

Matches played by Caroline Wozniacki in 2009, the most of any women's singles competitor.

FormerlyKnownAs
Dec 4th, 2009, 12:49 AM
Caroline's Latest Blog From The Official

http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/cwl2-500x492.jpg

http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/blog/

My Days in Barbados (http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/blog/2009/12/03/my-days-in-barbados/)

Hi Everyone,

Now that I am back from Barbados, I thought you might like to hear about my trip. I spent 10 days there with my parents and my brother Patrick. We stayed at one of the most exclusive and beautiful resorts of the world, the Sandy Lane Hotel. We had the owner’s 5-bedroom penthouse suite with a butler and full time security. The suite was over 3000 square-feet, with a big jacuzzi in the living room. It was nothing short of amazing. The Sandy Lane Hotel has to be the nicest, most excusive hotel I have ever stayed at.

As I have mentioned in my last blog entry, I was in Barbados to play a one-weekend exhibition with my friend, Serena Williams. I have to admit, it went incredibly well; I was impressed with the job the promoter, Kodi Lewis and his team has done. They organized the exhibition for the 1st time, and I think this was the best 1st exhibition I ever participated in.

Serena and I had a great time; we played in front of 4000 people in the main gym in Bridgetown on Saturday. The crowd was loud and I could tell that they were really excited to have Serena and myself there, which I am grateful for.

I am glad I got to spend some time with Serena not only this past weekend, but over the past few years; and might add that we became pretty close friends. I have so much respect for her and what she has accomplished in her already legendary career. All young tennis players, including myself, owe a great deal to Venus and Serena for doing such a wonderful job promoting not only women’s tennis but women’s sports in general.

On Sunday, I joined Serena, Jeff Tarango and the #1 player from Barbados, Hayden Lewis in playing the 2nd exhibition in the Sugar Hill Tennis Village. This absolutely spectacular tennis-only club is owned by John and David Lloyd. We played mixed doubles in front of 400 VIP guests; I partnered with Hayden to beat Serena and Jeff in a very fun pro-set.

Other than that, I spent my time mostly on court training. I would like to send a special thanks to Hayden, who has been my hitting partner in Barbados; I appreciate your help. When I didn’t practice, me and my family were just hanging out on the beach. Patrick and I went out sailing on a boat but what I enjoyed the most is riding the jet-ski. Altogether, it was a great trip, and I miss Barbados already.

I’m now in Copenhagen, staying with my brother in his new apartment. I will be training and spending time with some of my girlfriends in town. Next Tuesday, I am flying to Herzo, Germany for a day to meet some of the Stella McCartney designers in the Adidas Headquarters. The new Stella McCartney tennis clothing line is coming out soon, and I am very excited to be able to offer some input regarding the new line. I love fashion, and meeting the fabulous designers of Stella McCartney and Adidas is something to look forward to.

I will update you soon on my week in Copenhagen and I will offer you some details regarding my day in the Adidas Headquarters as well.

Thanks for all your support,

Caroline

stangtennis
Dec 16th, 2009, 09:57 PM
Found this new article about Caroline Wozniacki through Twitter: http://twitter.com/search?q=wozniacki

Just started our 2010 Players to Watch Series! First up, Caroline Wozniacki!
Charm, with a Side of Harm: http://www.onthebaseline.com/2009/12/16/caroline-wozniacki-charm-with-a-side-of-harm

http://www.onthebaseline.com/uploads/PTW480x250-10.jpg

SOA_MC
Dec 18th, 2009, 04:15 PM
http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/1967/carow.jpg

Rolex deal report thanks to Gaviotabr from Ivanovic's forum

Carofan
Dec 18th, 2009, 04:19 PM
http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/1967/carow.jpg

Rolex deal report thanks to Gaviotabr from Ivanovic's forum


Article is online...google translate...its not 4 million $ ... but danish kroner...around 800.000$ a year.

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=da&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fekstrabladet.dk%2Fsport%2Fanden_spo rt%2Ftennis%2Farticle1271867.ece&sl=da&tl=en

SOA_MC
Dec 19th, 2009, 12:07 AM
Article is online...google translate...its not 4 million $ ... but danish kroner...around 800.000$ a year.

http://translate.google.com/translate?js=y&prev=_t&hl=da&ie=UTF-8&layout=1&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fekstrabladet.dk%2Fsport%2Fanden_spo rt%2Ftennis%2Farticle1271867.ece&sl=da&tl=en

The pressure is on Caro now with these type of deals coming her way, hopefully she can handle it

:topic: I wish the press would stop using pictures of Caro almost in tears or in tears :rolleyes: There are much better photos they could use

stangtennis
Dec 19th, 2009, 05:03 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=4754585&name=bodo_peter

Yes, we're handing out more 2009 tennis awards

Peter Bodo, Friday, December 18, 2009

Just in case you're not sick of all those year-end awards everybody and his brother gives out at this time of year, here are my selections for 2009:
...

Most improved female: Caroline Wozniacki gets the nod, hands down. She started the year ranked No. 12 and finished it among the elite top five, at No. 4, surpassing solid veterans like Elena Dementieva, Venus Williams and Jelena Jankovic -- the latter two former No. 1s. Oddly enough, note that in the current top 10, only three women have won majors. And the two of them named Williams are probably nearing the end of their career strings. That means Wozniacki, a U.S. Open finalist, ought to have room to operate in 2010.

BuTtErFrEnA
Dec 19th, 2009, 08:33 PM
The pressure is on Caro now with these type of deals coming her way, hopefully she can handle it

:topic: I wish the press would stop using pictures of Caro almost in tears or in tears :rolleyes: There are much better photos they could use

we'll see how she does in aussieland....if she handles the pressure well then she will be good to go...unfortunately more success in aussieland may bring more endorsements and more pressure so it's how she handles any post aussieland pressure that i'm interested in

FormerlyKnownAs
Dec 21st, 2009, 12:39 AM
Søndag, 20. december 2009

Merry Christmas

Hello everyone,

I will start by wishing you all a merry Christmas. Christmas time is for me the nicest time of year. I love to buy gifts and decorating the Christmas tree and all the Christmas presents. I hope that you all have managed to buy all your gifts to them you love. Christmas equals good food and that is something I am really glad for. Even though I work hard here during the Christmas month, so there must also be room for the delicious Christmas food, which is something very special.

As described earlier, I have trained hard physical training together with Poul Duvill. We train hard with boxing and this week I was allowed to go 3 rounds with Mads Larsen. ( 36 years Super-mellemvægt 76,2 kg 182 cm Fights a Europe Champ match in January)
That was quite an experience because it's very different to what I normally accustomed to. I started by going all out and pushed Mads around the ring. The problem was that this was his tactics, because by the end of 2.runde I had run out of energy. My breathing was not as it should be and thus I became tired more quickly, when I was hit and was a little out of balance I ended on the floor for a count. I however came up again and boxed the fight finished.

Last Thursday I was at the gala premiere of Avatar. It is the first time I've seen a movie in 3D and it was quite an experience. There were some amazing effects and it was film you could really get involved in. It was fun to have 3D glasses on and during the movie, I could not help but take them off and look around the room to see how people looked with glasses on. I must say it was a pretty sight, people really looked funny.

Tomorrow I will travel to Kiev, Ukraine where I will play show match (mixed double) together with, Robredo, Ferrer and Kournikova. It's always nice to be involved in such events because the money from the event will go to charity, so it's always something I'd like to support. Additionally, I will be visiting a clinic where I will play a bit with some young children and write autographs.

All the best

Caroline

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/58/16004958-0fc339aba9bebc1ec3445cfa30ef29d5.jpeg

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/60/16004960-8d33f2223802b461685d0b363f1b57b7.jpeg

Jorn
Dec 21st, 2009, 05:40 PM
Saw this on a website, google translated it seems...

Kiev will be visited by world stars of tennis: Anna Kurnikova, Carolina Wozniacki, David Ferrer, Tommi Robredo, Evgenie Kafelnikov, Andrey Medvedev, Victoria Azarenka by the special invitation of the businessman Alexander Onishchenko, founder of Welfare fond "Rodina" . As the general partner of action will act restaurant “Buddha-bar”.

Professional sportsmen will show the competition during a tennis tournament – sparing sets, lasting 30 minutes. After that, guests who have got tickets to a sport event will have the opportunity to take part in a charity auction in the lounge-restaurant “Buddha-bar Kiev”.

Link in Russian http://www.vip-tenis.com.ua/program.html

C. W. Fields
Dec 21st, 2009, 07:29 PM
Kiev will be visited by world stars of tennis: Anna Kurnikova...

Kournikova's a TENNIS STAR!? :eek:

stangtennis
Dec 22nd, 2009, 10:30 AM
Caro wrote on her Danish TV2 blog that she will be playing mixed-doubles at the fund raising event in Kiev with Robredo, Ferrer and Kournikova.
She travelled to Kiev yesterday.
http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/entry353220.html

FAMK
Jan 2nd, 2010, 01:29 AM
Caroline Wozniacki moving quickly beyond trivia question


IT is possibly the best tennis trivia question from 2009: Name the player Kim Clijsters beat to win the US Open?

If you said "Serena Williams", you were wrong. That was a semi-final.

Want another clue?

Name the player who held three match points against Williams in Sydney last year and couldn't convert them?

If you answered "Sam Stosur", you are only partly right. Stosur indeed held match points against the world No 1, but so did our mystery player.

Last clue. Which small European country, not known for its tennis history, has a player currently ranked in the world top five?

If you said "Belgium", you've struck out.

The answer is Denmark.

And our mystery player is Caroline Wozniacki.

If you haven't seen or heard much of her yet, that is about to change.


As a 16-year-old in 2006, Wozniacki, who grew up in Denmark the daughter of Polish parents, finished her first full year on the WTA professional tour at No 237. But in just three years has advanced to No 4.

The fuel igniting her engine as she rocketed up the world rankings last year was winning three titles and appearing in her maiden Grand Slam final barely two months after her 19th birthday.

But in New York in September, Wozniacki's achievement to get to the final was well and truly overshadowed by the storm swirling around Williams and her verbal abuse of a lineswoman in the semi-final against Clijsters.

Such was the impact of that astonishing moment, when Williams's rage after a call of foot fault cost her a penalty point and the match, Wozniacki's five minutes of fame was reduced to mere seconds.

She has every right to feel robbed, but she bares no ill will towards anyone. In fact, she still feels as proud today as she did back in September of walking out on to Arthur Ashe Stadium to play Clijsters in the final.

"I do not play to be in the spotlight," Wozniacki told The Australian from her home in Monte Carlo. "I play because I love playing.

"The whole Kim-Serena situation does not, and cannot, take away the Grand Slam final from me. I was there, I played, I fought, I didn't win, but I played my first Slam final. This is it."

It was the highlight of an outstanding year. The Dane played 26 tournaments, reached the quarter-finals of 15 and appeared in eight finals, winning three titles: Bastad, Eastbourne and Ponte Vedra Beach. She won $US2.3 million of her career total of $US3.2m prizemoney in the one year.

"It was a pretty amazing ride. I enjoyed every minute of it," she said.

"I did not plan to be No 4, I just wanted to crack the top 10. But after making it, I felt that rising even higher is possible."

Having gone so close to beating Williams in Sydney a year ago could have been enough to crush a teen's confidence. And losing to wild-card Jelena Dokic in the third round of the Australian Open a week later should have dragged her down further.

But the daughter of parents who represented Poland in soccer and volleyball has always been taught to keep aiming high.

When asked for her first recollection of her summer in Australia a year ago, she says quite simply: "It was very hot."

"But I played one of the best matches of my career against Serena there. But I still was a little inexperienced and could not deal with the pressure that well.

"Then Jelena also played incredible tennis. I learned a lot from those matches. And next time I will be more prepared."

She is a quick learner as less than three months later she took the first of her three singles titles of 2009 at Ponte Vedra. Ironically she beat another woman also of Polish roots with a strikingly similar name -- Aleksandra Wozniack, of Canada.

The pair have struck up a strong friendship.

"It is always funny when I play her. We call each other `sisters'," Wozniacki said. "When it comes to representing Denmark, there is always pride. But I know that a lot of people support me from both Denmark and Poland, which makes me perform even better.

"I can feel all the attention and support: I am incredibly thankful for this."

She is keen to attract as many Australian fans as possible too. It shouldn't be hard. Not only does she love the fact her Crown Princess is from Tasmania, but she lists her favourite food on her website as "steak and potatoes".

"Australia is such a wonderful country. Aussies are very friendly, and they are very welcoming as well. I love it there."

Wozniacki arrives next week to play in the Sydney International (January 10-17) before heading to Melbourne for the Australian Open (January 18-31).

From the last eight Grand Slams, she has finished no worse than the third round, with her best result being the final in New York last year, along with three other final 16 appearances.

"My good luck and belief," Wozniacki says, when asked why she is consistent on the big stage. "I do not prepare any differently -- all points, opponents, matches or tournaments should be treated the same, with respect."


http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/sport/caroline-wozniacki-moving-quickly-beyond-trivia-question/story-e6frg7mf-1225815361134

stangtennis
Jan 3rd, 2010, 08:25 PM
It was the highlight of an outstanding year. The Dane played 26 tournaments, reached the quarter-finals of 15 and appeared in eight finals, winning three titles: Bastad, Eastbourne and Ponte Vedra Beach.
The author of this article Margie McDonald shouldn't have tried to act wise and ask and answer trivia questions when she can't even do proper journalistic research and get simple trivia facts straight.

Wozniacki did not win Båstad this year. She lost the final to Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez - on Wozniacki's 19th birthday no less.
It's true Wozniacki won 3 WTA tournamnets, but Båstad was not one of them, instead she won New Haven just before th US Open.

stangtennis
Jan 3rd, 2010, 08:48 PM
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/sunday-heraldsun/women-courting-open-intrigue/story-e6frf92x-1225815567495

Meet the ladies courting Open intrigue

* Luke Dennehy
* From: Sunday Herald Sun
* January 02, 2010 11:43PM

THE spotlight will be squarely on the women at this month's Australian Open, with the draw full of feelgood stories, familiar faces, tantrum throwers and glamour queens.

There are about a dozen great stories in women's tennis that promise to steal the headlines from the men when the tournament starts at Melbourne Park on January 18.

Comeback queens Justine Henin and Kim Clijsters, glamour girls returning such as Maria Sharapova and Ana Ivanovic, rising star and the latest "It" girl, Danish world No.4 Caroline Wozniacki, and a very strong Australian contingent led by Samantha Stosur and Jelena Dokic means the focus will be on the ladies.

Throw in Serena Williams's first outing since being fined a record $190,820 for her US Open outburst against a line judge and the storyboard looks compelling.

Editor of Australian Tennis Magazine Vivienne Christie said women's tennis was in great shape.

"What makes the women's game so interesting right now are the variables," she said.

"There's a mixture of established stars like the Williams sisters and young talents such as Caroline Wozniacki and Victoria Azarenka with the potential to dominate at any given event.

"Factor in the comeback queens and it becomes even more intriguing."

The intriguing line-up will have Australian Open organisers excited when it comes to ticket sales and television ratings.

Clijsters made a stunning return to tennis last year winning the US Open and has always been a favourite with Australian crowds. Fellow Belgian Henin is also on the comeback trail, having reversed her decision of 13 months ago to retire.

Last year the story of the tournament was Dokic's inspiring run to the quarter-finals.

There are many Aussies to watch, with former top 10 player Alicia Molik returning to the game and Queenslander Stosur, who has had a brilliant year to be sitting at No.13 in the world.

Stosur made $1,314,042 on tour last year.

Channel 7 commentator Todd Woodbridge said he believed the Aussie women were in good shape, in particular Stosur.

Another Aussie to watch is 18-year-old St Kilda player Olivia Rogowska, who at No.145 in the world, is the third youngest in the top 150.

And, of course, there are always the talented glamour girls who grab plenty of attention.

Sharapova returns after injury kept her away from Melbourne last year and Ivanovic will be looking to erase last year's horrible year, during which she dropped out of the top 20.

http://resources2.news.com.au/images/2010/01/02/1225815/567074-caroline-wozniacki.jpg
Court glamour: Danish tennis player Caroline Wozniacki is the latest 'It' girl on the women's circuit.
Picture: WTA

FormerlyKnownAs
Jan 15th, 2010, 10:59 AM
http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1282710.ece


Sources: Misused in Wozniacki-book
Our words have been distorted, says Morten Christensen and Mikkel Nørby who participated in the book about Caroline Wozniacki and her father

07:15 - 14. jan. 2010 | Jimmi Willemoes Jensen

Kurt Lassen's book about Caroline and her father Piotr was not the story, as sources in the book had imagined.

The author of the book 'Miss Sunshine - and the shadow of daddy' has even led his bearing sources from the sun and into the darkness. It considers both former national team coach Morten Christensen and junior coach Mikkel Nørby.

They both tell how Kurt Lassen turned to them and described how he would write a positive story about how Caroline Wozniacki had managed to get to the top.

- That’s why I feel really bad after reading the result, and I sit here and regret my participation big time. I have been naive and said yes on false pretenses, and I find it hard to forgive myself, that I with my experience could be so naive, says Morten Christensen.

- I mean I am the source for most of the book, although I only spoke with the author in 40 minutes. Here there was nothing that seemed to lead toward anything negative. But the way he has screwed it together, leaves a significantly different and negative image.

Misquoted
- I just said several times that Caroline and Piotr has a unique and loving relationship, but instead looks as though I have great share in her success, that womens tennis is week and Caroline not particularly talented.

- I've never considered myself as her coach. In several relatively short periods, I have worked as a help trainer. Her success is based 90 percent on Piotr training, and 10 percent for all of us others together, "said Morten, who, though, does not generally feel misquoted in the book.

- No, I'm just decidedly misquoted one place on an episode where Piotr should have gone onto the court and have threatened to move Caroline to Poland. The episode has never occurred, "said Morten Christensen, who at the time was coach at Elite Center.

- The rest of the way I have been quoted more or less correctly. It is especially the omissions around the quotes that turns the tone from positive to negative. And I feel really bad that I suggested he call Mikkel.

That is Mikkel Nørby who was interviewed for 30 minutes, obviously also:

Distorting the image
- I was told that it was a positive book about Caroline's development from child to world star. It is not, and that changes the impression of ones quotes a lot.

- My message was meant to mean that it has not always been easy to be Piotr and Caroline, but their cooperation has been unique and their results are in league of its own.

- I believe in spite of what I am quoted in the book that Piotr Wozniacki has been a fantastic coach and father, who has done what it takes, although it has not always been easy.

- At times, he has also been forced to cross some boundaries that those who are not top professional athletes stop at.

- I have personally learned more from Piotr than he from me, and I have deep respect for him as both coach and human being, "says Mikkel Nørby.

Carofan
Jan 17th, 2010, 03:35 PM
I surprised myself: Caroline Wozniacki

Mumbai: Caroline Wozniacki tells DNA that no one expected her to become World No.4 so soon, least of all herself

Did you meet your expectations in 2009?
Well, I never thought that I’d end 2009 ranked No.4, and reach the final of the US Open. I feel that I have been quite consistent in my performance last year. I think I had a pretty good year.

In one of your blog entries you said that ‘You surprised yourself by reaching the final of US Open’. Why?
Yes, I have. All players want to reach a Slam final and I’m so happy that I did that at a very young age. I really did surprise myself...I kind of felt that I overachieved in NYC but no complaints!

At 19, your world ranking makes you a role model for many. Does it bring more pressure?
Being a top athlete means being in the spotlight sometimes. It was hard to cope with it...still is but I guess it’s part of being a top-ranked women’s player. However, my main focus is to play tennis because that’s what I do best.

Are you going to pick and choose your tournaments in 2010?
Looks as if I’ll play over 20 tournaments in 2010. I’ll participate in Copenhagen and Warsaw.

The WTA rankings have been debated upon. Are you happy with the system?
Tennis requires a ranking system but I do not really think that it is my role to decide whether it’s good or bad. There is a system, there is an association, so they will handle the problems with the rankings as well.

How do you handle the pressure of being the only Dane in the top 300?
Denmark is a small country and I’m always very proud to be able to represent my nation. I’m very thankful for all the support I get from both Danish and Polish people.

People have been raving about your mental strength. How do you develop this aspect of your game?
Tennis requires a lot of concentration. You cannot slip up for a moment because your opponent is waiting for you to have a weak moment and will get you then. I came to know this at an early age and it seems to help me a lot.

What do you do in your spare time?
I like hanging out with my brother Patrik, my girlfriends or go to the movies. I like shopping; so basically I like doing all the things a teen likes to do.

Which athlete do you look up to?
I love handball, soccer, so I have a couple of favourites there. I especially like Liverpool and Fernando Torres. As for tennis, my idols were Graf and Hingis.

You received a Liverpool jersey signed by Torres, have you sent him anything in return?
I got the jersey as an early Christmas gift. He signed “To Caroline, best wishes”. It was a pretty cool gift. I haven’t sent him anything yet ...maybe I will one day.

What do you make of Andre Agassi’s confessions?
Andre is one of the best players that tennis has seen. I do not think that his confession takes anything away from his achievements. It shows how brave he is to come forward with something like this. He is not only one of the greatest players ever but also an amazing person.


http://www.dnaindia.com/sport/report_i-surprised-myself-caroline-wozniacki_1335634

FormerlyKnownAs
Jan 18th, 2010, 01:43 AM
http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1284178.ece

Caroline's new weapons

Now she only has to dare use them in the match, says KB Trainer Michael Mortensen, who would have Wozniacki more to the net. Caroline play first match in Australian Open Tuesday

Extra Bladet 10:24 - 17. Jan. 2010 | Troels Christensen

Before Caroline Wozniacki over Hong Kong flew to Australia, she was in one of the most intensive training programs ever on Danish soil.

There were a lot of hours spent on physical training and with the racket. Even with only one hand on the backhand side.

The latter is a small revolution. Michael Mortensen, head coach of KB was the man who through a short month directed and advised:

- We have generally focused a lot on the offensive, he explains, dividing the efforts into several facets.

Instead of only using her highly competent, double backhand, there has been trained quite a bit in hitting a slice backhand (back spin with one hand grip).

- I would like to see her use it as an offensive weapon. That she can vary her play by hitting it and then go to the net behind it.

Use only the one hand

Well forward in the middle of the court, that place where Caroline sometimes can resemble a confused stranger here must be won with a sharp volley. And it should not be necessarily hit over the ball with double grip:

- I think her backhand volley has got really good now. Just as her backhand volley was, more or less already.

- Now she has to translate training to match use and not use two hands when she hits it. She must dare to use only the one hand, even though it may seem a bit of a challenge for her.

- She should get comfortable with doing it, and that she can appropriately do in the matches, she has control over anyway.

Firstly, the weapons arsenal that way gets larger. And secondly it can be used purely strategic and mentally.

- It is a signal to other players, when you show that you are doing something new, so they do not quite know where they have got you. Instead, they are forced to keep a close eye on what you're doing.

- When Caroline, for example, can feel she has hit a winner, then she might like to run forward to the net anyway, so her opponent can see, that now she is suddenly standing there. From then on they could come to think about, when will she do it next time?

- Both visually and aurally it means something that they can hear, that she is doing something, while they may have their eyes fixed on the ball.

She is in fine balance

The serve has also had a service inspection. And a good spot of oil.

- We have especially worked with the second server, which has gotten a little more speed and a little more security in placing, said Michael Mortensen, who is mostly satisfied with Caroline's first-serve.

- But in general it is good to inject a little more energy into the moment of contact, as he puts it about the strings meeting with the ball.

The explanation is simple:

- The serve should give a few more free points to Caroline. It is too much hard work having to grind for them all in long duels. One is also allowed to think about ones health, says the former top doubles player, having said goodbye to the world number four, 3 January.

- At that time I have never seen her in better physical shape. She had wonderful attack in her strokes and was in fine balance with herself. There was a really fine chemistry in the camp, he says, and includes dad Piotr.

Stupid prelude

With this background, it irks him that she starts the Australia Open with three defeats in her luggage.

- It was a bit unfortunate that she had to play already Monday in Sydney after arriving from Hong Kong on Sunday. She had not time to really get used to the heat, and I think normally she would beat a player like Na Li.

- At that time she really needed to get a victory or two before Melbourne. Class players such as Maria Sharapova and Venus Williams can one always loose to. It was no disaster for Caroline.

- But defeat always makes you a little uneasy and makes you ask yourself: How do I actually play right now?

- Tennis has of course much to do with being calm in match situations, and that comes from victories.

- It is therefore very important that she gets a couple of good matches to start with and plays herself into the tournament. If she gets into the second week of The Open, then she could go all the way, as so many others could do it.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jan 19th, 2010, 11:36 AM
A new article from DR Sporten http://www.dr.dk/Sporten/Oevrig_sport/Tennis/2010/01/19/092422.htm

A different aggressive Wozniacki

19. January 2010 09.28 Tennis

The Australian summer sun bakes down on court 15, where Caroline Wozniacki hammers a forehand toward her training buddy Mats Merkel. He sends it back hard towards Wozniacki, who continues toward the net.

Here she comes seldom forward, when she plays in matches, but it has to change. Caroline Wozniacki must be retrained.

- Caroline is a typical baseline player and only comes forward to the network occasionally. Now she must become more aggressive, says her father and coach, Piotr Wozniacki.

It is necessary, if the Danish star will continue his climb up the world rankings, where she is currently number four.

- It is not easy to be a top-10 player and always play the same way, "says Piotr Wozniacki.

Hard prelude
There must be variation, and therefore Wozniacki has worked hard through the winter. She has practiced going up to the net on her serve and taught herself both a new backhand volley and a new backspin backhand, called a slice.

- I have always had a two-hands slice, and I've tried to change to a one hand. It is obviously a little difficult, but I think it's fun, and I think I get better and better, says Caroline Wozniacki, who sees several advantages with the new style:

- It gives better reach, both at the net when I volley, and on the baseline when I slice. And it looks even better, "said Wozniacki and smiles.

She delivers proof herself on court 15. Wozniacki comes forward on the right foot, swings her racket and blocks Merkel's hard stroke with an angled backhand volley executed right out of the textbook.

Several of the roughly 100 audience, who have found their way here on the outer edge of the tennis facility, begin to clap. They usually do not clap at a training session, but Wozniacki’s backhand volley is unusually impressive. She thinks that as well :

- It was quite happy with today. Now it has to just start being used in matches as well, she says after writing autographs on the arms of local teenage boys, who swore never to wash again.

Wozniacki plays her first match at the Australian Open on Wednesday night Danish time when she meets the world number 34, Canadian Aleksandra Wozniak. The aggressive game will be carefully dosed, explains Piotr Wozniacki.

- You cannot change from day to day or month to month, it takes time. We need at least 7-8 months and work in the same direction with the same principles, so then she will definitely be a better player, more aggressive, as one saw today.

C. W. Fields
Jan 20th, 2010, 09:47 AM
Match report from the AO site:

Round one a breeze for Wozniacki

Danish young gun Caroline Wozniacki has breezed through to the second round of Australian Open 2010, upending Canadian Aleksandra Wozniak in straight sets at Hisense Arena.

The world No. 4, looking resplendent in a form-fitting grey patterned dress designed by fashion icon Stella McCartney, was far steadier from the back of the court throughout the 6-4 6-2 win.

Wozniacki was understandably happy to win through against an opponent that in June 2009 was ranked as high as No. 21.

“I had a tough opponent today, so I was really happy to get through. And, yeah, I felt like I was feeling confident on the court and comfortable,” she said.

A US Open finalist last year, Wozniacki said she was trying not to pay attention to the extra attention and expectation that inevitably comes with a high ranking and good performances at the majors.

“I always just look one match at a time and I want to win and that's my goal … I try not to put more pressure on myself than I already do,” she said.

“I didn't expect to do that well this early (in my career). But, I mean, I'm really happy about the way things are going. And I've been practicing hard, so I'm really, really pleased about, yeah, the way I'm playing. Hopefully I can just keep playing better and better.”

Although the two women share surnames that resemble one another, that was where the similarities ended on Wednesday. Wozniacki demonstrated far more consistency and covered the court exceptionally well to frustrate her 34th-ranked opponent.

Games went on serve early in this first-round encounter, played on Day 3 after rainy weather wreaked havoc on the opening day’s schedule.

The Dane looked poised to score the first break in the sixth game by going up 0-40. Instead, she fluffed three routine backhands to allow Wozniak back to deuce, but shrugged off that disappointment to convert on her fourth break point.

Wozniak showed some fight late in the set, staving off a set point when serving at 2-5 and managing to score the break back to get scores to 4-5. But Wozniacki showed her class and immediately responded with her second break of the match, claiming a one-set lead when the Canadian dumped a routine smash into the net.

This appeared to significantly deflate Wozniak – her game became plagued with errors while Wozniacki dominated on return, bringing up her 12th break point for the match in the second game, which she converted to lead 2-0.

The No. 4 seed streaked to a 4-0 lead before Wozniak restored some credibility to the scoreboard with a service break in the fifth game, flashing a wry smile to her coaches’ box in response.

It proved simply a minor setback for Wozniacki. After Wozniak held serve in the sixth game, the Dane held her own to lead 5-2 and celebrated with a clenched fist. She wrapped up proceedings shortly thereafter.

In the second round, Wozniacki will face German Julia Goerges, a 6-0 3-6 6-3 winner over Austrian Tamira Paszek.

C. W. Fields
Jan 21st, 2010, 08:57 AM
2R match report:

Two from two for Wozniacki

No. 4 seed Caroline Wozniacki continues to progress untroubled at Australian Open 2010, moving through to the third round after a straight-sets victory over German Julia Goerges on Thursday.

In the second match on Margaret Court Arena on Day 4, the Dane was simply too consistent and had an answer for everything Goerges produced, completing the 6-3 6-1 victory in one hour and five minutes.

“I’m happy to be through,” Wozniacki said. “I’ve known Julia for a long time already. I mean, I haven’t seen her play too much … but we’re good friends and it’s always tough to play a friend. But I’m pleased with the way I played today.”

Wozniacki was playing her second match in as many days after Monday’s rain-affected start to the tournament, and began strongly with a break in the fourth game.

Maintaining her break to lead 5-2, Wozniacki exhibited trademark steady play, employing plenty of topspin to bring her shots into the court and giving herself plenty of margin over the net.

Goerges, by contrast, was dangerous yet erratic; her power occasionally troubled the fourth seed, but she could not string together several winning points in a row.

The No. 76-ranked German looked capable of mounting a comeback when she held serve in the eighth game and had two break points in the following game.

The Dane became flustered when a couple of close line-calls went against her, but she needn’t have worried; Goerges committed three consecutive backhand errors to give her a set point, and Wozniacki subsequently snatched a one-set lead on her second set point.

The second set began nightmarishly for Goerges as the Wozniacki raced to a 4-0 lead with breaks in the first and third games. Continuing to execute deep, safe shots, Wozniacki simply waited for Goerges to spray an error. The German finished the match with 36 errors to Wozniacki’s 11.

Although Goerges held serve in the fifth game, Wozniacki responded with her own service hold and her third break of the set in the seventh game to secure the win.

In the third round, Wozniacki will play No. 29 seed Shahar Peer, a 6-1 6-4 winner over Bulgarian Tsvetana Pironkova. The Dane said Peer will present a tough challenge.

“She’s a good player. She’s getting a lot of balls back, and she’s a fighter, she never gives up. I know she has a lot of supporters out here so I just need to keep my focus and, yeah, try to be the one who’s dictating,” she said.

“I just hope that I get a day off tomorrow so I can relax a little bit and just have a short practice, and then I’ll be ready for my third round.”

TonyL
Jan 21st, 2010, 02:14 PM
Caro has kept her UEs at a very low number.but i also want to see her to hit more winner :)

stangtennis
Jan 23rd, 2010, 01:45 AM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~1941093,00.html
Kuala Lumpur, Copenhagen, San Diego...

Over in Europe, Denmark will be making history with its first-ever Tour event the week of August 2, at the Farum Arena just 25 kilometers north of Copenhagen. Malaysia might have Dementieva as their golden ticket to success but the e-Boks Danish Open have Caroline Wozniacki under their belt. In fact, it was Wozniacki's father Piotr who helped put the event on the 2010 calendar. His company, Nordic Sports Group, is also one of the sponsors. Wozniacki introduced the tournament at a press conference after the US Open last year, and has expressed that she doesn't mind selling the e-Boks Danish Open, especially to big names like the Williams sisters. The tournament will feature 32 singles players and 16 doubles teams competing for $220,000.

stangtennis
Jan 23rd, 2010, 02:48 AM
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/tennis/caroline-wozniacki-is-loving-spending-her-free-time-on-southbank-melbourne/story-fn4oewqb-1225822546771
Caroline Wozniacki is loving spending her free time on Southbank, Melbourne
Herald Sun (http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/) | January 22, 2010 3:11PM

RISING tennis glamour girl Caroline Wozniacki has been spending her off-court time shopping and dining along Southbank.

The stunning 19-year-old Dane, who is ranked fourth in the world, has raved about Melbourne's waterfront restaurants and fashion boutiques.

"I'm staying in an apartment, as I have in the past, five minutes from all the waterfront restaurants and shopping along the Yarra River," she said.

"It's perfect."

And when out and about along the river, she won't be hard to spot, with an entourage that would rival that of some of the world's biggest rock stars.

"We are a pretty big group," she admitted.

"I'm here with my Mum and Dad, one of my lawyers, my manager, a couple of friends and (poker player) Gus Hansen," she said.

"For the most part, I'm hanging out with my group and enjoying the food and atmosphere.

"I always look forward to coming back to Australia, the weather is usually unbelievable, the people are really nice, the food is great, and the shopping is good," she said.


Gus Hansen who was mentioned in the above article is also a Dane and one of the world's best poker players. He just happens to also be in Melbourne at the moment to play the very big poker tournamnet 2010 Aussie Millions (http://www.aussiemillions.com/), a tournamnet he won in 2007 which earned him an AUD $1,500,000 first prize.
Gus and Caro both live in tax haven Monaco and Gus was a good youth tennis player and still play tennis for fun (or money) regularly.
Gus Hansen: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gus_Hansen
Gus Hansen

Gustav Hansen (born February 13, 1974 outside Copenhagen, Denmark) is a professional Danish poker player who lives in Monaco. In his poker career Hansen has won a record three World Poker Tour open titles, the 2007 Aussie Millions main event and was the season one winner of the Poker Superstars Invitational Tournament. Before turning to playing poker professionally in 1997, Hansen was a world class backgammon player and a youth tennis champion. He was known for being a sports enthusiast throughout his teens, competing in several indoor and outdoor sports as a successful junior athlete. In 2000, he moved to New York City, and tried to make a living playing professional backgammon, but found the field too small for his taste.

C. W. Fields
Jan 23rd, 2010, 07:01 PM
Peer pressured as Wozniacki sweeps through

Caroline Wozniacki has romped into the fourth round of Australian Open 2010 after a straight sets victory over Israel’s Shahar Peer on Saturday night.

The fourth -seeded Dane needed only one hour and 20 minutes to complete the 6-4 6-0 victory as her opponent fell away in the second set.

Peer, the 29th seed, looked promising early in the first set as she broke Wozniacki’s serve to lead 2-0. The Israeli was effective off both forehand and backhand in the set, one where she produced 14 winners in total.

After Wozniacki dropped her opening service game, the 19-year-old responded immediately, showing the class that took her to last year’s US Open final.

Wozniacki broke back with a succession of backhand winners, and then defended three break point chances in the following game to hold serve. At 4-4 Wozniacki, again put pressure on Peer’s serve, and two errors from the Israeli proved costly as she dropped the game. The Dane held to take the set 6-4.

While the first set was competitive, Peer could not manage to stay with her higher-ranked opponent in the second, and she failed to hold serve in a set littered with unforced errors.

The Danish player finished the match off quickly, claiming the set 6-0.

Wozniacki said she was pleased with her performance, particularly with her first serve finishing at 76 per cent for the match.

“I didn’t make any aces … but for sure the first serve percentage was really high and I was really pleased about that. All in all it was a good performance,” she said.

A wardrobe malfunction was the only humorous blight on Wozniacki’s performance, as she lost large white pom-poms off each of her socks in both the first and second set. The umpire was forced to call a let on both occasions, and after the match Wozniacki conceded that she will “think twice” before wearing them again.

The world No. 4 now faces a fourth round meeting with China’s Na Li– who won their most recent clash at the Medibank International in Sydney.

Wozniacki said her thoughts had already turned towards that match.

“I’m going to do my best, but she’s a great player. I think I just need to keep steady.”

The fourth round appearance equals Wozniacki’s best effort at the Australian Open. In 2008, she lost her match in the round of 16 against eventual runner-up Ana Ivanovic.

Fast facts

- Peer had 31 errors, while Wozniacki recorded only 13.

- Wozniacki had 15 winners, while Peer managed 20.

- Peer was just 1-for-8 on break-point conversions, while Wozniacki was a perfect 5-for-5.

Hugh.
Jan 23rd, 2010, 10:49 PM
Press conference after Peer match

http://www.australianopen.com/en_AU/news/interviews/2010-01-23/201001231264246287546.html
An interview with:

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. Have you ever served as well as that?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Um, I didn't make any aces I think, did I? I mean, for sure the serve percentage was really high today, and I was really pleased about that. Felt like I was serving well and winning a lot my points on it.

But I think some days you serve well and some days you serve less good. All in all, it was a good performance.

Q. So tough a first set, but then you kind of ran away. What was the key for you?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I mean, she started really well. She started to ‑‑ she was changing the rhythm, and it was difficult for me just to get into the match. I just kept fighting, hanging in there, and in the end it turned out that I just had that extra gear.

Q. Where were you when Baghdatis retired and you found out you were going on?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Actually, I came here and warmed up at 6:00 at the stadium. Afterwards, I just had a quick look at the scores. I could see it was 6‑Love for Hewitt, so I went to the gym and started working out a little bit just to get the match rhythm, and I got into match mode.

Afterwards, I heard that he retired, so I was already ready. I went and changed fast, and then we went on court.

Q. So overall, the matches score‑wise have been pretty easy. I know you've had a tough fight. You've got to be pretty pleased with your form going into the week.

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, you know, I'm happy about my form and the way I've played. I feel like I've done a good performance here so far. Hopefully next match I can do the same.

Q. When you got here, did you feel like, I need more matches? You didn't get that many in. I know you got some in Hong Kong, but you lost early in Sydney.

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Actually, I felt really good going in here. Even though it sounds weird after I lost first round in Sydney, I felt in a great shape, great fitness‑wise.

I came here and started to practice and play a lot of practice sets and I started to feel really well on the court. I was feeling confident going in here.

Q. Li Na again.

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I'm gonna do my best. She's a great player. She beat me last time. You know, it's gonna be a tough fight. We will see what's gonna happen.

Q. What didn't work for you in that match in Sydney? What do you have to do better this time?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I just think I need to keep steady and be ‑‑ I don't know, keep being a little bit aggressive. She can't be the one dictating the game because then she's dangerous and playing really heavy balls. Just important for me to keep her moving.

Q. Up to this point, you still have a chance to be No. 1 after this tournament. Have you ever thought about that?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No. (Smiling.) Not at all. I mean, I think about one match at a time. We take it as it comes.

Q. Do you consider yourself a bit of an experienced player now? Because it's not like this is your first time around.

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Definitely I'm more experienced than I was just one year ago. I've got a lot of matches under my belt, so it's a great feeling. There's still a lot of players out there much more experienced than me. Venus, Serena, Dementieva, all of these players have been on tour many more years than I have.

I feel good out there and I feel like every time I step on the big courts I enjoy being there. So that's a good, big thing for me.

Q. So you don't have the younger player's nerves as much?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No. Not since I've been on the big courts. I know how it feels. I'm just going in there in my own bubble and I know what I have to do. I try to do it the best that I can.

Q. You are pretty good friends with Serena. Have you been doing stuff together here in Australia?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I mean, we've both been playing on the same days and everything. When we have the off days we're still here a little bit and chit‑chatting, having fun. She's a great and funny girl. We have great laughs in the locker room.

Q. You were a well‑known personality in Denmark. What are your thoughts about three‑time world champion Nicki Pedersen?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: He's a great athlete, for sure. He's a great champion. I know, I mean, it's not easy, no matter what sport you're doing.

Q. You're wearing Stella McCartney, which is very nice clothes. How would you describe your fashion taste off court?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I think I'm feminine, but casual. I like to dress up when I'm going somewhere. Cute summer dresses are always a hit for me.

Q. Do you exchange tips with Serena about fashion?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Definitely. If she sees something that I have that she thinks is nice she comments on it, and the other way around. Yeah, we talk about that kind of thing.

Q. Another question about your clothes line, was there problems with your socks that fell off?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: It was the pom poms. I don't know what happened.

Q. Will you be wearing those again?

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I'll probably think twice.

FormerlyKnownAs
Feb 7th, 2010, 11:46 PM
Caroline's take on the Fed Cup etc from her TV2 blog.
I think she could have handed out some praise for Mai Grage, who won for her 2 very difficult matches.
Also she seems to have this thing about foot ball players??

Caroline Wozniackis Blog (http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/entry359072.html)

The last few days I have been in Portugal to play Fed Cup together with the national team. Our goal was to win one of three matches in our pool so we could guarantee us another season in Group 1 Europe / Africa. We began by losing 2-1 to both Sweden and Hungary. I didn’t play against Hungary as I had stomach problems overnight. It was bad stomach that hit but I could not say whether it was because of something I had eaten the day before. The following day we had to play the decisive match against Latvia on whether we would stay in the group or play a match deciding relegation. Group's last opponent Latvia, had also lost their first two matches, so there was doomed drama from the start. Mai Grage started off by winning 2.singlen in 3.sæt, and thus I could ensure our survival in the group by winning my 1.single. I was still not 100% but I had it better than the day before. I played a sensible game and won 6-2 6-2 and so we were in the group which was our goal. We knew that the team would have to play its best to stay in the group and we did, so I'm glad that I could help so we could be in Group 1.Jeg shared a room with my good friend Malou Ejdesgaard. She made her debut in the Fed Cup team and started off with a victory in doubles against Hungary which was really good. She also played doubles against Latvia, where it was a narrow defeat in 3.sæt. In the position playoff match against Israel, she played singles and there she was up by 1-0 in sets, but unfortunately had to withdraw due to fatigue and dehydration from the day. All in all a very impressive debut for her and a big congratulations from me. We stayed at the same hotel as Benfica did up to their match against União Leiria. I met for example Nuno Gomes in the elevator and had a short chat with him. It's fun when other great athletes recognizes one and gives one credit for the work one is doing. He thinks it was really well done and wished me good luck and fortune in the future. I travel to London on Tuesday where I have to do a photo shoot for Adidas. I hope I can come over and watch Arsenal - Liverpool game on Wednesday evening. It would be fun to see Bendtner in action against my favorite team. I think it will be a great match, so hope very much that it can be possible to get in and see it.

All the best

Caroline

Carofan
Feb 8th, 2010, 06:30 AM
Caroline's take on the Fed Cup etc from her TV2 blog.
I think she could have handed out some praise for Mai Grage, who won for her 2 very difficult matches.


Welcome to the female world :lol: Spend time showing affection and praising a good friend for nothing, and give no credit to the rest including the player who made the difference between success and failure. That blog says a lot about the "team".

FormerlyKnownAs
Feb 8th, 2010, 10:22 AM
Welcome to the female world :lol: Spend time showing affection and praising a good friend for nothing, and give no credit to the rest including the player who made the difference between success and failure. That blog says a lot about the "team".
"Female world" Hopefully not seeming chauvanistic but this kind of 4th grade "best friends" sort of thing was not something I had expected from Caroline. I know she is very mature and professional in her contact with the world, for example the 3 language thing at USO final, and she always gives praise too her oponents when beaten, but this is just school yard stuff.
"team" Hopefully it isn't a sign of Prima Donna "nykker" tendences, she has too do some stuff worthy of them first.
Like staying in the top 10 this year.

stangtennis
Feb 9th, 2010, 08:41 PM
That was also the first thing that struck me when I read that blog entry. She didn't give any credit to Mai Grage, but simply stated the fact that Grage won 2nd single in 3 sets and went on to say that she (Caroline) secured Denmark's survival in the group.
But after that she spent 1/4 of the blog entry praising her best tennis friend in Denmark and Fed Cup roommate, Malou Ejdesgaard and how great she was in her Fed Cup debut and mntioned the outcome of all 3 of her matches.
And the last team member Karina Jacobsgaard who also won a doubles match wasn't even mentioned with a single word in the blog entry.

FormerlyKnownAs
Feb 14th, 2010, 11:52 PM
Caroline's Latest TV2 Blog

Søndag, 14. februar 2010 kl. 15:20 / sport, tennis

London / Dubai

On Tuesday I went to London to meet up with Stella McCartney and Adidas. We stayed in the middle of Oxford Street, which is the main shopping street in London, just like the walking street (Strøget) at home in Denmark. On Wednesday I had to do a photo shoot for Adidas and then to dinner with Stella. It was a great experience and we talked a lot about fashion, tennis and how it is to be a designer. After the photo shoot and dinner, I was in and see Arsenal - Liverpool with my father. It was the first time I had seen such a big match live, there were around 60,000 spectators at the match and what a great atmosphere there was throughout the showdown which Arsenal won 1-0. We got tickets from Nicklas Bendtner and we thank him very much for them. I also got to greet him after the game when he came up to me and my dad. We talked a little and it was super nice, we were very happy that he wanted to arrange some tickets for us.

Thursday noon time we travelled to Dubai where I will play my next tournament. I am for the first time in my life, seeded at number 1 in such a big tournament. It is a super nice feeling to see yourself as 1.seedet, because it shows that all the hard work pays off. When we got to Dubai I had yet another photo shoot and this time it was for the WTA. I should have pictures taken with Radwanska, Hantuchova and a couple of girlsfor the Duty Free. They were some different pictures to what I am normally accustomed to, but then, I have also tried that. I live at the Hotel Hyatt, where I've got a suite overlooking the world's tallest building, Burj Dubai. It really is a fantastic building and I am very impressed by the hard work has gone into it. It is something of a vision that meets when you get up in the morning and look out through the window.

I've have a Bye in the 1st round and meet the winner of Shvedova and Cibulkova in 2nd round. It will be either Tuesday or Wednesday I will play. This tournament has a really strong field, so you have to be ready at the first match. The matches can be followed on Eurosport this week.

All the best

Caroline

There is nothing like a live match in one of the big stadiums, I have experienced amongst others Chelsea v Tottenham at White Hart Lane.
Forget close ups, action replay etc. the atmosphere is electric and loud.

Elisse
Feb 19th, 2010, 11:04 AM
Have a little article sent out by Dubai Press Office....

Wozniacki overcomes valiant challenge from Cibulkova
- Top seed dismisses Slovak and progresses to third round -

Dubai, UAE, February 16th, 2010: Top seed Caroline Wozniacki had to battle her way into the third round of the Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships on Tuesday, overcoming a valiant challenge from Slovak Dominika Cibulkova.
The Dane won 6-2 7-6, but she had to save a set point and fight her way back from 5-1 down in the second set before securing her victory by dominating the tiebreak 7-2.
It was a high quality performance by both players, with Wozniacki keen to build on the momentum that has recently taken her to a career-high three in the world, and Cibulkova anxious to regain lost ground in her career after she was hindered last year by injury and sickness.
Wozniacki claimed the first break to lead 2-0 after Cibulkova had led her first service game 40-0, and the next two games also went against serve to leave Wozniacki leading 3-1 before a netted forehand gave her a further break for the set.
But Cibulkova immediately turned things around in the second set, breaking to lead 1-0 and then holding off two break points in the next game. An easy break followed for 4-1 as the Slovak dominated with her aggressive baseline game.
Cibulkova then held off three more break points to lead 5-1, and a Wozniacki double-fault gave her set point. But Wozniacki held off that threat and began her long climb-back. The 10th game of the set was particularly impressive, as Wozniacki leveled at 5-5 by hitting two successive winning returns off a first serve.
"Dominika's a great player," said Wozniacki. "She is a fighter. She's running well, getting a lot of balls back, so I knew it was going to be a tough match.
"I think I relaxed a little bit (in the second set), and Dominika started to play really well, get more balls in play. Maybe I lost the concentration a little bit and started to play less aggressive, and she got the advantage over me. Then once I started to hit more freely and hit with better depth and a little more aggressively, I got the advantage. I just kept fighting. Even though I was down 5-1, I kept playing for every point, and that paid off in the end."
Wozniacki will next face Shahar Peer, who had little difficulty in defeating 2009 runner-up Virginie Razzano 6-2 6-2.


:wavey:

FormerlyKnownAs
Feb 26th, 2010, 04:15 PM
Carolines Latest Blog From The Official Caroline Wozniack Homeside

http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/blog/


http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/caroline_wozniacki_dubai_aftermath_blogpost.jpg

Dubai Aftermath


Hello Everyone,

I know I have been out of touch lately, so I apologize to all of you. Now that the new season has started, I am pretty busy, as usual. I am traveling a lot again, going from tournament to tournament, and flying from country to country. Sometimes even from continent to continent.

Anyway, I am back home now, preparing for the upcoming American hard court events in Indian Wells and Key Biscayne. I am pretty excited about those tournaments; I always liked Miami. Key Biscayne is simply wonderful. I especially like Coconut Grove with its cute restaurants, and super cool shops. I also like playing in the heat, so I guess I have an advantage over some players because of my physical fitness.

As many of you may know, I played the Barclays Dubai Championships last week. I have a soft spot for Dubai, I think it has an amazing vibe and the people are nice. I was the #1 seed at the tournament, and received a bye in the first round. I am not so sure this was good; I usually like playing tournaments from day one, because I like improving my game from match to match.

Anyway, Dubai did not go the way I not-so-secretly wished it would, but Shahar played really well. I got to give her credit for her performance; she had her chances and took them. Losing early happens to everyone; it will motivate me to play even better tennis next time.

While I was there though, I did some really great things with my good friend Victoria Azarenka. We practiced a lot together, had some chatty dinners, and even went to the movies once. I also met up with Meilen Tu, a former Tour player who is now working for the company I am managed by. I also hit with Meilen once, and I can tell you, she can still hit the ball.

Vika and I have done a photo shoot for Dubai Duty free, I enjoyed that a lot. My makeup was crazy, really colorful and vibrant, and my hair was just simply great. I am looking forward to seeing all those pictures as I think they were somewhat different from what I usually do.

Speaking of photo shoots: I just had the Stella McCartney shoot in London the day before I flew out to Dubai. It went great, and I was told that I will be featured on some New York billboards. I think the photos turned out great. The makeup artists did a wonderful job, and the setting was also very professional. The video will be up on the Adidas website pretty soon, but I promise I will keep you guys updated on this one.

The best thing about the shoot was that I not only met Stella, but also her father, Paul McCartney. I got to talk to him a little, and I wish I had the nerve to ask him to sing a Beatles song for me, ha-ha. Anyway, even without a Beatles song, meeting was something I will probably remember forever. He is a legend after all.

I think this is it in a nutshell for today. Once again, thank you to all of you for supporting me, and I will check in again in a week or so.

Love,

Caroline

FormerlyKnownAs
Feb 26th, 2010, 04:38 PM
Caroline Wozniackis Blog From TV2Sport

http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/entry361045.html

Dubai / Rolex

I want this blog to tell a little about my trip to Dubai and the situation around Shahar Peer. I will not go to much into my matches, but tell little about how the security around Shahar Peer looked. She had 30 security guards and agents assigned to look after her. Distributed such that 15 of them were visible, while the remaining 15 were civilians. She had no real freedom to do what she wanted. She was constantly surrounded by security and could only go to the tennis complex in order to play or train and then back to his hotel. At the hotel there were also security guards who took care of her 24 hours a day.

There was not much she can do, other than sitting in her hotel room and wait for her to play or train. I had a little chat with her about the whole situation after our match, and she told that it only made her stronger, that circumstances were such. It made her want to make an extra effort and she was extra keen on doing so well in this tournament. Shahar Peer had to play all her matches on court 1, as that court was specially made for her. The court was equipped with custom fencing and security, so security for the matches were top notch.

Nobody knew which hotel she stayed in for safety reasons, not even her coach knew what hotel she stayed at. Many of these things really got Peer to perform at her best in a long time and she also played herself into the semifinals, before she lost to Venus Williams.

During my stay in Dubai, I not only played tennis, I also met the head of the Rolex for the first time. Where we had a really good conversation and where I got a brief introduction in Rolex history. I think it will be a great partnership because we both want to be the best and look for perfection. I am very proud to have partnered with Rolex and hope we can complement each other in the best possible way.

I work hard now towards the next tournaments in the U.S., where I aspire to get some good results. I've always felt comfortable in the U.S., so I'm looking forward to start playing matches. Now it is important to train well, so I can perform well when the Indian Wells starts on March 8.

All the best

Caroline

Carofan
Feb 27th, 2010, 08:44 AM
Vika and I have done a photo shoot for Dubai Duty free, I enjoyed that a lot. My makeup was crazy, really colorful and vibrant, and my hair was just simply great. I am looking forward to seeing all those pictures as I think they were somewhat different from what I usually do.Yep, All the guys in GM loved this photo shoot. :lol:

Speaking of photo shoots: Oh, you have photo shoots???

I just had the Stella McCartney shoot in London the day before I flew out to Dubai. It went great, and I was told that I will be featured on some New York billboards. I think the photos turned out great. The makeup artists did a wonderful job, and the setting was also very professional. The video will be up on the Adidas website pretty soon, but I promise I will keep you guys updated on this one.Please don`t. Update us if you win some matches instead.

The best thing about the shoot was that I not only met Stella, but also her father, Paul McCartney. I got to talk to him a little, and I wish I had the nerve to ask him to sing a Beatles song for me, ha-ha. Anyway, even without a Beatles song, meeting was something I will probably remember forever. He is a legend after all.Well, I hope you had your picture taken with him ;)

I think this is it in a nutshell for today. Once again, thank you to all of you for supporting me, and I will check in again in a week or so.

Love,

CarolineCan`t wait for more about training, food and photo shoots. :lol:

FormerlyKnownAs
Mar 5th, 2010, 08:32 AM
A NEW BLOG FROM THE OFFICIAL CW HOMESIDE

Heading to Indian Wells… Thank you Rolex!

http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/caroline_wozniacki_rolex.jpg

Hi Everyone,

As promised, I am here again. I just finished a really busy day today; I actually played twice and had a fitness session as well. These past few days, I have been training really hard in preparation for the American hard court season. Due to WTA guidelines I wasn’t able to play last week, which was tough since I like competing, but I really like Indian Wells and Key Biscayne, so I am excited to play there.

I’m traveling to Indian Wells on Friday. I’ll be staying at La Quinta Resort, which I’ve never stayed in before. I hear it is beautiful, so I am looking forward to this. I also just heard that I will probably be the #2 seed. I am obviously thrilled to be one of the top seeds again after Dubai but at the same time, I will have to get used to the feeling of having the bull’s eye on your back. I am hoping that I will do a little better than I did in Dubai, and hopefully, by the end of the tournament, I will be ranked in the top 3 again.

I am also excited to see my good friend Vika Azarenka in America. I am flying out tomorrow, and we’ll be going to the LA Lakers vs. Toronto Raptors game next week, which should be great. We always have tons of fun, so this game will probably just add to it.

Some other exciting news that I have to share is that I signed a multi-year deal with Rolex recently. I already did some appearances for them at the 2010 Australian Open, but now it is official and I can’t really describe how excited I am. They already have been great to work with and I’ve always loved their watches. Rolex has had a long presence in tennis, and I really am honored to be a part of such a prestigious team. They were kind enough to provide me with two beautiful watches at the Australian Open. They are absolutely amazing, I love them.

As for practicing, I am still doing boxing, as a cross-training and I am good at it. My right hand hits really hard, and I try not to get beaten up when we train. Funny thing is that every time I do boxing, I get so hungry. So a few nights ago, after my day was over, a couple of my friends and I grabbed steak at a great steak house. It was delicious, and I had tons of fun chatting and just hanging out with my girlfriends. I also did some yoga and Pilates. I think it increases strength, and stamina. It will give me a boost for sure. As of right now, I am staying with my brother in his apartment in Copenhagen. My mom and I spent some time in my home in Monte Carlo, too, which was nice of course.

In my last blog entry, I mentioned that I did a photo shoot for Stella McCartney. They just showed me the pictures, and they came out perfect. I think you will all like it too, once they are public that is. But my gear for the French Open and Wimbledon will absolutely be breathtaking. Along with my new Rolex watch, I think I will look pretty good .

I am pretty tired, so I am off to bed now; I am flying out to California tomorrow. Thanks for being supportive!

Love,

Caroline

This entry was posted on Thursday, March 4th, 2010 at 10:04 PM

Carofan
Mar 8th, 2010, 10:05 AM
A NEW BLOG FROM THE OFFICIAL CW HOMESIDE

Heading to Indian Wells… Thank you Rolex!



Hi Everyone,


Hiiiiiiiii Thank you Rolex!:D

Carofan
Mar 8th, 2010, 10:07 AM
Caroline Wozniacki, The Next Number One In Women's Tennis Or...?

Danish Caroline Wozniacki, still only 19 years old, has had a phenomenal 2009, advancing from 12th to 4th in the world - the highlight being her US-Open final loss where Little Miss Sunshine played another audience favourite, the reborn Kim Clijsters. Before that, she enjoyed incredible progress as well, progressing from 237th to 64th to 12th to 4th in the course of 2006-2009 year end rankings. Pretty good for a teenager to say the least and it earned her the 2008 WTA newcomer of the year ahead of Azarenka.

This year, however, is a different matter. Now she got to the top, the questions are - can she stay there? Can she rise even further? Is she a future number one? Or "merely" a consistent top ten player? Or rather the next Ivanovic?

I doubt that we see an Ivanovic scenario. Wozniacki is an extremely determined young woman and her great talent was evident early. A 12 year old Wozniacki told Danish television that she wanted to become number one in tennis. That is still the dream and the goal today and now she is closer than ever before. The 2008 Tour newcomer of the year has refused to make specific public targets for her ranking this year and there is really no reason why she should.

However, as things are now, she might have trouble keeping up her ranking. With the two Belgians returned and Sharapova also trying to make it back to the top, women's tennis has become an all together different ballgame and much harder to excel in. Sharapova is still a big if, but both Henin and Clijsters have made clear that they mean business.

Wozniacki is still 4th, but the difference between Safina (2nd at 6480) and Dementieva (7th at 4855) is not too great - all thrailing Serena at 8645. Henin still hasn't got a ranking and Clijsters and Sharapova also still have some climbing to do.

But let's not only discuss the ranking points. Let's discuss the potential. What has gotten Wozniacki up there together with the very best? Still being a teenager, she has plenty of time to improve every aspect of her game. Her strengths are her speed, her reliant, strong double-fisted backhand and above everything else - her mental game and fighting spirit (albeit not of late, see below).

She hardly ever gives up on a ball and has the ability to focus when the going gets tough. One notable exception to this, was this year's Australian Open, where she lost to Na Li in the 4th round on a day where her game and fighting spirit seemed off for most of the time. But this wasn't typical for her. If anybody doubts her fighting spirit, take a re-look at last year's WTA championships in Doha, where she won a heroic almost three hour fight against Zvonareva to ensure a place in the semis.

She battled through pains and cramps that made her cry in the final game. Having used her medical timeout, there was no other way to win it than to fight through it - so she did. In the semis, after three matches played on injuries, she eventually had to hand the match to Serena one and a half sets down.

Concerning her game and game tactics, she is more of a pusher than a basher. She can be a pusher due to her excellent speed, footwork, relatively good placement on the court and consistent ground-strokes on both sides, especially the double-fisted backhand which is her greatest stroke. She gets almost everything back at the opponent and forces her to hit that one extra stroke - a tactic that can get you remarkably far in the women's game. In a way, it reminds me a bit of Nadal when he first came on to the scene - chasing every ball, not making many unforced errors, but also not hitting that many winners.

Wozniacki hardly ever has a positive winner-unforced errors count, but she gets enough back to make the opponent lose the match by committing more unforced errors than her. Last year's US Open was a case in point (against Oudin and Kuznetsova for example), but this tactic proved obsolete against the well-playing Clijsters, who simply outhit Miss Sunshine and didn't commit enough unforced errors to let her prosper.

That said, getting to the final was a huge step for Wozniacki as critics already were starting to ask why she couldn't perform in the slams (never got beyond the fourth round before that final - but then again - is that so bad for a teenager ranked around ten at the time?). Getting to the final proved that she doesn't choke at Slams - we are yet to see her getting into the second week consecutively, but her mental game should not be what's stopping her.

Notwithstanding her US-Open success, she only averaged ten winners per match as opposed to 25-27 winners per match by players like Serena and Dementieva. She admits she can improve, but won't put her finger on as to the where. So let's see. Her serve and especially the second serve could get a lot better. The second serve is way too easy to attack and the women's tour has many great returners who can punish that. Her forehand is consistent, but not a weapon yet. She hardly hits winners with it and when the going gets tough, it often becomes too short, tentative or error prone.

Her backhand on the other hand is brilliant, but she can still use it more aggressively. Against second-tier players, a defensive tactic can be more than enough. But in the matches between the top-contenders, the aggressor usually comes out on top, so she does need to add some more aggression and attacking skills to her game.

She is a clever player and, as Murray in the men's game, no one is more aware of her shortcomings than her (but both have the natural instinct to stay back and rely on their defense - obviously Murray is a step further in his career, but in this respect they face a similar critique and challenge - and both tried to put in more offense at the Australian Open). In this year's Australian Open we saw a somewhat more offensive side of her - attacking more and coming to the net more often.

However, her results this year, hasn't matched her ambitions. An exhibition match loss to Sharapova and an early loss to Na Li predated the Australian Open, where she again lost to Na Li - being somehow out of focus - not putting in her usual fight. Same thing happened in Dubai against Shahar Pe'er. Has she lost her momentum? Former Danish top players argue that she hasn't adjusted to the new situation - no longer being the hunter, now being the hunted - and claiming that her hunger seems missing this year. That certainly was a possible conclusion seeing those matches, but knowing her professionalism and will to reach her goals, I feel confident that the hunger will return to her.

Bottom line really is - does she have the game to match Serena, Henin, Clijsters, Kuznetsova, Dementieva, Venus and a confident Safina and an injury free Sharapova? Is she the one with the most potential in the new generation? What about the more aggressive and powerful Azarenka? Or Wickmayer? Or Lisicki? Well, it is hard to blame a teenager for not matching the game of a 12-double or 7-double Slam winner. But as she's been playing so far this year, she does not belong in the top five as of today and I do predict she will have a hard time keeping her position in the top five for the next couple of months. She lacks a big killer weapon.

However, a good run at RG or Wimbledon might propel her back up as she didn't excel there last year. She does belong in the top ten and on the verge on top five, but she needs to improve those minor shortcomings in her game to stay in the top five and - in time - improve further. Playing great defense without the necessary winners, she won't win the majority of the matches against the others in top ten, nor against an aggressive Petrova, Lisicki or Wickmayer. It's hard to see her up one set and 4-0 against Serena in a Slam quarter on hard court as Azarenka was. Azarenka's power matches her peers. Wozniacki doesn't - yet. She hasn't got Henin's hand, angles and touch, so she need more power and bigger weapons to stay on top.

Good thing is - she knows that and is still young enough to make those changes. Short term problem - it takes time to make these changes in her game - time that she hasn't got too much of in a fully booked tennis calendar. 2010 prediction? A year end rank clearly in top ten, but no better than fourth - probably between fourth and eight. Long term prediction?

Little Miss Sunshine will get to smile more often than not and will be a serious contender for the Slams and the top-rankings, if not in 2010, then in the years to follow when she hits her prime, matures as a player and develops bigger weapons. She is too talented and determined not to. Number one? Perhaps when Serena retires and the Belgians re-retires.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/358431-caroline-wozniacki-the-next-number-one-in-womens-tennis-or

FormerlyKnownAs
Mar 8th, 2010, 09:52 PM
Thanks Carofan.

A pretty good article. Praise where praise is due, but objective about this year.

Not fawning, and no mention of boxing, singing, eating, football(ers) and of course photoshoots, just tennis.

A realistic look at Caroline.

stangtennis
Mar 13th, 2010, 12:57 PM
http://www.bnpparibasopen.org/News/Tennis/2010/Tournament/WTA-Friday-Wozniacki-Escapes-In-Three.aspx

Wozniacki Conquers King In Three
Indian Wells, U.S.A.
by Staff | 12.03.2010

http://www.bnpparibasopen.org/~/media/9F6982D60CBF47A3B3EF2C402DF453E2.ashx
© Getty Images
Caroline Wozniacki worked hard for a win Friday in Indian Wells.

American Vania King looked on the verge of the first biggest upset of the 2010 BNP Paribas Open, up 4-1 in the third set against No. 2 seed Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark, when her opponent reeled off the final five games to complete a 5-7, 6-2, 6-4 comeback on Friday in Indian Wells.

King fought off triple break point at 4-all in the third set, but finally conceded the crucial break with an unforced error on Wozniacki’s next opportunity. The 19-year-old Dane clinched the win when King’s return sailed long on match point.

“It was a tough match,” said the World No. 4. “Vania was playing really well, but it's tough when you haven't played matches for some time to go in and start playing points again. It's different from practice to play a real match, but I'm happy that I fought through. I just kept fighting for every point and fighting till the end.”

Wozniacki achieved her best finish in Indian Wells last year, when she advanced to the quarter-finals before falling to eventual champion Vera Zvonareva. She finished the 2009 season with three titles in eight finals, including a runner-up finish at the US Open (l. to Clijsters).
...

FormerlyKnownAs
Mar 14th, 2010, 08:40 AM
Checking in from Indian Wells

http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/woz_indian_wells.jpg

Hello Everyone,

I am currently in Indian Wells, CA, and just wanted to give you a quick update on what I have been up to these past few days. I finished playing my first match yesterday against American Vania King. Vania played really well, and I had to battle and fight hard to beat her. I was actually down 4-1 in the third set, and very close to losing. I have to give her a lot of credit for playing so well.

My next match is not until tomorrow,so today I have been hitting a little, just practicing a few things. Other than that, my day has not been crazy busy. I had lunch with my great friend Victoria Azarenka, and now I am going to relax a bit in the La Quinta Resort. The resort is very beautiful, I love hanging out here. There are a few tennis courts, pools, restaurants around here, and I think it is simply gorgeous.

Indian Wells is a very nice place, and I really like this tournament. Whenever I get some time off, I try to spend some time with my friends, the Radwanska sisters. We already went to an Italian place, but I have to admit, we all love Cheesecake Factory, so last night, we had dinner there. At the end of our meal, we agreed on sharing a chocolate-coconut layered cake, so we each had a few bites. Not too much though, but I really enjoyed it. Delicious sin, lol…

A few days ago, I did a short shoot for All Access; it was fun. I think I did okay, and I am excited to see the end result of the shoot. I don’t know when I will have the chance, but I’d like to see it sometime soon. My next opponent is Maria Kirilenko. I think it will be a tough match, she is an accomplished player but I feel good. I think my strokes are alright, I feel confident and ready to battle. I have been working out a lot since my last tournament in Dubai, and I know it will pay off. Of course it is hard to be one of the top seeds, but at the same time, it is exciting and it actually pumps me up and makes me want to do well. I am already looking forward to my next match tomorrow!

My parents are here with me, and they seem to enjoy themselves. I actually got a complimentary car from one of the local car dealerships. It is a convertible, and I like cruising around in it. It makes life easier in Indian Wells to have a car like this.

I think this is pretty much it for today. I am soon going to have to hit a little bit again, but I will be back soon. Thanks for all the support and love.

Caroline

March 13, 2010 at 9:17 pm | Caroline's Blog | No comment

C. W. Fields
Mar 14th, 2010, 09:33 AM
"She gets almost everything back at the opponent and forces her to hit that one extra stroke - a tactic that can get you remarkably far in the women's game. In a way, it reminds me a bit of Nadal when he first came on to the scene - chasing every ball, not making many unforced errors, but also not hitting that many winners."


That's exactly what I've been saying. :)

stangtennis
Mar 18th, 2010, 08:37 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~1997547,00.html

Caroline & Aga Quotes
March 17, 2010

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/javaImages/a0/75/0,,12781~8680864,00.jpg

INDIAN WELLS, CA, USA - How hard is it to play against one of your best friends? According to Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~12631,00.html?) and Agnieszka Radwanska (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~11530,00.html?)... well, here it is in their own words after their quarterfinal wins at Indian Wells.

On separating friendship from competition...
Aga: "We went to dinner a couple of times already at this tournament. It won't make any difference in our friendship... I haven't played against her in the last two years, so it's going to be interesting."

Caroline: "You have to keep professional and see that little yellow ball and hit it inside the lines and over the net. Once you start thinking, 'Okay, it's my friend,' you lose the match. It's important not think about who's on the other side."

On the winner buying dinner...
Aga: "It's always like that. If someone wins, they buy the other one dinner, yes."

Caroline: "The winner has to, so... I hope I'm going to buy dinner."

On the dinner conversation...
Caroline: "We don't talk about tennis. There are so many other things, so we prefer just to have a totally different conversation... We have so much tennis in our daily life and practice so much, work so hard. So when we have the opportunity to just relax, it's nice to have the brain think about something else."

More on the dinner conversation...
Caroline: "Clothes, fashion, make-up, nail polish, boys... Everything!"

On what the "hot nail polish" is these days...
Caroline: "Really bright. I really like the really pink ones. Actually, I always have my nails polished. I didn't this time... maybe I should have."

On what language they use at dinner...
Aga: "Polish."

Caroline: "Polish, yeah."

On how long they have been friends...
Caroline: "I've known both of the Radwanskas equally well. All the way through juniors, since... I think we played some under 12s and under 14s together. Because we spoke the same language, it was easier to stay in contact. It was nice to have some friends on the tour."

How did Caroline and Agnieszka do in their quarterfinal matches? (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100317/keep-your-friends-close_2256076_1997540)

jasminefu623
Mar 19th, 2010, 06:32 AM
after match interview

INDIAN WELLS, CALIFORNIA

C. WOZNIACKI/V. King
5-7, 6-2, 6-4

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. It was a very kind of streaky match. She had 12 straight match and at one point you were down 4-1. How did you turn it around?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: It was a tough match. Vania was playing really well, but it's tough when you haven't played matches for some time to go in and start playing points again. It's different from practice to play a real match, but I'm happy that I fought through. I just kept fighting for every point and fighting till the end.

Q. In boxing parlance, it could be said you got off the floor to win today. Mikkel Kessler would be proud of you. As you noted, you were behind 4-1 the last set, and Vania just won 12 straight points. What was going through your mind at that point?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I mean -- I don't know. I was just telling myself, It's not over yet. She still has two more games before she wins the match.
You know, I just, yeah, I think I stepped it up a little bit at that point, and then I think she -- I think she got a little bit more nervous as well, because she knew that she could finish the match. But, you know, I just kept hanging in there, and that was the clue.

Q. Were you surprised by the level of her play throughout the match?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Um, no. I knew that she was a tough player and that she wasn't going to give me too many free points. You know, I just have to, for the next round, be more focused, especially in the important moments, because I gave too many free, easy points away today. That shouldn't have happened.

Q. Did you do anything tactically to adjust? It looked like you went after her second serve more in the last set.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I tried to do that and tried to be the one who were dictating more, because I knew that the one who was dictating the game was winning.
And of course I was trying to make my legs move a little bit more, because, yeah, so I wouldn't make too many unforced errors.

Q. Your movement is such a strength, but it can also be sort of a defense. How are you going to use your movement offensively? Is that something you want to do?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I mean, I have to. In my game, I have to be able to do both, and change also in one rally to go from defense to offense or the other way.
You know, I just need to get some -- a few more matches, some points going, and I'm hopefully can just play better and better.

Q. I saw a little bit of the match. Your father came out. What kind of things was he telling you, and how helpful is he?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: He just kept telling me, Stay positive; move your legs; take your time till your serve. He told me to, you know -- he said, If you don't start playing more aggressively or do something differently, you're not gonna win this match. You don't have anything to lose now, because she's ahead anyways.

Q. Do you have any trouble, because it's your father, listening to everything he says?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No. You know, when he's on the court I see him as a coach. I don't see him as my father. As soon as we go off the court, he's my father.
Now it's easy for us to take these two parts and separate them.

Q. Do you think having that testing match will make you tougher for the rest of the tournament?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Hopefully. (laughter.)
You know, you never know, but hopefully. For sure I got some points in play today, and I got to run and I got to try a little bit of everything, to playing well, to playing not so well, to playing okay.
So hopefully that can make me stronger for the next round.

Q. Who do you like to win the fight on Saturday night against Joshua Clottey?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Who's fighting?

Q. That's what I thought you would say.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Who's fighting?

Q. Manny Pacquiao. He's widely considered the greatest fighter in the world at the moment.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Really?

Q. He's a little bit small to be fighting Mikkel Kessler.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: What's the weight class?

Q. Welterweight, 147.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, those I don't know too much. No. Sorry. (laughter.)

Q. Are you at all interested in watching the matches tonight?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Tonight?

Q. Yeah.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, definitely. I mean, that's very interesting, and I think it's nice to help the people in Haiti. I think it's nice that when you're able to help other people that you also think about others than yourself. I think it's a great event, and I will support it tonight for sure.

Q. Will it be fun for you to see Steffi? Not many people get to see Steffi play. She doesn't do this very much. Do you remember her when you were growing up? What do you think about watching her tonight?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, she was one of my favorite players. I remember her when I was growing up, and she's still a great player. I saw her play a little bit in Las Vegas last year when I was there. I didn't get to hit with her myself when I was there. I saw her hit some balls, and she's still striking the balls really well.
It's going to be good fun, and I'm sure they're going to enjoy themselves on court tonight.

jasminefu623
Mar 19th, 2010, 06:33 AM
another one

INDIAN WELLS, CALIFORNIA

C. WOZNIACKI/N. Petrova
6-3, 3-6, 6-0

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. So you want to talk about the match? Up, down, and then up.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah. Yeah, it was a match where it just went up and down quite a bit, and you know, I just -- you didn't really know what to expect. It was not really a great rhythm there. I didn't feel the ball as well.
But, you know, I'm just happy that I fought through and I won the match. That's the most important thing. I just think that, you know, yeah, I will be more ready for the next match.

Q. She's powerful, and she's got a lot of different elements in her game. What do you feel you did well to keep her off you?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, she's a great player. Serving really well, serving hard, so it was tough for me to break her serve, especially in the beginning.
In the third, yeah, I took my chance. She's a very powerful player just going for it, so it was difficult. I just told myself to stay in there and to keep my legs moving.

Q. Are you coming into these big events now really thinking you're going to win?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: You know, I believe in myself, of course. I just go in there, and I actually never look at the draw. I just take one match at a time, because there's a lot of great players out there.
There's a lot of tough matches. I could have been out in the first round already.

Q. You mentioned the lack of rhythm. After the second set, what were you thinking? I mean, it didn't seem like there was a lot of rhythm in the match. What did you think to turn around in the third set? What was your goal going into the third set, besides winning the set?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Um, just I told myself to keep my legs moving, keep going and coming into the right position, because that was the most important thing today. You know, when I stood still, then it's difficult to get the balls right in.
At one point in the match, I was standing too still and she had the advantage of the match.

Q. So Zheng is going to present an entirely different set of challenges ti Petrova. Can you talk about that?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah. Last time I played against Zheng I lost to her. It was a tough match. You know, she's a great player. She had a good start of the year, playing aggressively, taking the balls early. I need to be ready and focused.

Q. Are you going to have to take it to her a little bit? What are you going to have to do exactly?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Actually, I haven't thought about the match yet. I'm just happy that I'm through now, and we'll have to see tomorrow what I'm going to come up with.
Most importantly I think it's just important to stick to my game.

Q. You're one of the top players that's really embraced Twitter. Can you talk about that and how it helps you communicate with your fans directly?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I think it's great. Actually, I have to say I've been bad the last week with my Twitter. Actually, I have to say I haven't been on the Internet for a week now, so... (laughter.)

Q. Going through rehab? Having withdrawal?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: So many other things here to do, and I just enjoy it actually not being at a computer.
But, you know, I will get back on Twitter. I like communicating with my fans and with people following me. I think it's a great way to get an insight from like not just on the court, but also how it is behind the scenes.
I think it's nice for the fans, and they are following and coming with comments. I think that's the great way to do it.

Q. What are your feelings about allowing the coach onto the court? Is that positive for you?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I think so, yeah. I think it's nice. It's nice to get some inputs from the outside. Sometimes you don't see it yourself, and it's nice just to get just an advice or two. I think it brings more to the game.
I think the crowd likes it, too. But more when you hear it on TV that you can understand what the coach is saying, and I think that brings some excitement to the game.

Q. Do you really find yourself listening to the coach, or is it just kind of words going by during the match? Do you really take it all in, or is it hard to listen in the heat of battle?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, I think it's important to listen, because they can come with some inputs that you really don't see yourself, and that can help you.
But, of course, there are some things that just goes in and out. Some things stick to you, because there are some things that you already know and some things that, Oh, okay maybe he's right. So I'll try to do something differently.
So you have to be selective, but I listen to it.

Q. Do you remember a time when your coach told you something important? You brought him onto the court, and then you ended up winning basically because of what he said?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Well, it happens. It happens, yeah. I mean, it's difficult now in this moment to say it, but there are just small things. Like your throw to your serve to get the rhythm there, or I don't know, stand a little bit closer to the baseline. Just those small things that can make a big difference.

Q. It's interesting, because you request the coach to come there. It would be the other way around if he was the one requesting to come out to the court. Would you like to see a change where the coach can request to come out to the court during the match? Because if you don't want to talk to him, you don't have to. That's unusual for a sport. Usually the coach can say, I want to come out and all that.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Well, I think that you have such a good communication with your coach, and I have with my dad, who is also my coach. I think that when you see he wants to say something or you feel you need help, I think you communicate so well, so it would be the same thing.

Q. Jie Zheng, is it kind of complicated, because you want to play aggressive, but in other ways you want to play steady at the same time because she likes players who play aggressive and counter punch, huh? How do you approach that?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I think she likes -- she likes when the ball is going flat over the net and when the ball goes fast.
I don't know. I just think I need to play my game, play aggressive, but also being able to run the balls down if I need to and changing the rhythm.
But, again, most importantly, I think it's important for me not to think too much about her game.

Q. You said you weren't on the Internet for a week, and there were other things to do here. What are some of the other things that you're doing?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Well, I have a lot of friends here. Actually, some Polish people that are living here or have a second home here. So I've been at their place.
Then I went to play golf one time. Nothing to really talk too much about. (laughter.)

Q. Where did you play?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: La Quinta.
And then I went -- I don't know. I just have been going for dinners with Radwanska, Azarenka. I don't know. Just spending a lot of time outside my room.

Q. No pressure at Indian Wells, but you're the highest seed remaining. All the other former champions are gone. Any pressure there?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, I don't feel the pressure. I like this tournament. I like playing here.
But I know that tomorrow is gonna be a tough task, and I'll do my best to win that match.

Q. So what have you been eating out, restaurants?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Cheesecake Factory.

Q. That's a nice one; the one in the mall there.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, it's a good one. Mamma Gina's, and a Japanese restaurant. I don't remember what it's called.

Q. Sushi?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No.
THE MODERATOR: Okura?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: It's on Al Paseo, as well.

Q. When you gonna update your Facebook and Twitter page?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I'll have to see. I need to keep my fans updated, so I will do that soon. I will. I promise.

Q. Nicole Vaidisova retired. She's just one year older than you. What do you think? Can you imagine why she decided to retire?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Well, it's difficult for me to say, and the reasons also I don't know. I haven't talked to her for a while. And, you know, I think she should have thought about it.
She went down in the rankings, and maybe she finds it tough to play the small tournaments again when she feels like she actually should be playing the top, on the top level.
I don't know. I think she made a decision that's up to her, and maybe in a little bit she'll say that she wants to come back and work hard. Maybe we'll see her on the tour again. We'll see.

jasminefu623
Mar 19th, 2010, 06:34 AM
the one after the match against zheng

INDIAN WELLS, CALIFORNIA

C. WOZNIACKI/J. Zheng
6-4, 4-6, 6-1

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How hard was it today? Long match?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, it was a long match. It was really tough. She played really well and got a lot of balls back that I thought I had won already.
But, no, I'm really pleased about my game today.

Q. You're up against Radwanska next. She was talking about her game is different than anybody else's in the top 10. Do you feel the same way? Do you feel she's a different player in the sense she doesn't compete in the same way, her balls are a little bit different when she strikes them? Do you agree with that?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I don't know. Last time I played against her was in Stockholm. That was actually my first time that I won, and the year before she won against me in the same round and that was the first tournament she won.
She's a good player. She's getting a lot of balls back. She's thinking. She's smart on the court. But she's a good friend. Tomorrow I think we're just going to relax, have fun, and then we have to see what's gonna happen the day after.

Q. She was attacking you a lot in the second set today. Talk about how you turned that around in the third.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I mean, both of us, I think, played really aggressively and was trying to make the other one run, because the one that opened up the point won the point most of the time.
Sometimes even I thought that she was already far from the court, and somehow she made the angles still on the court.
I mean, she played really well. She played aggressively, really flat. I mean, it was a tough match, and we had so many long rallies. Yeah, I won it, so I'm so happy about that.

Q. So what's been different for you this week? We can consider it now the best tournament you've played this year consistently well. What have you been doing right?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Actually, I think I've played pretty well all the tournaments that I've played. Opponents have just been playing better than me on that day when they beat me.
And then I've had some lacks of concentration where I've playing really well and went down a little bit, and now I've just been staying on the top all the time. I just think it's nice when I get some matches. That's what I need. I need some matches to get into that rhythm.

Q. You've gone three sets, but you really turned it up in the third set, Vania, Petrova, this one. How do you feel physically? How have you been able to do that, sort of peak at the end of the match?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I feel great. I have been working out a lot and done a lot of fitness training. Because, I mean, when you're not allowed to play tournaments or when you don't play, I just want to keep my shape, and that's a really important part of my game.
I just think that I kept my concentration because I was feeling fine. I didn't feel tired. Maybe Zheng was just a bit more tired than I was, and that helped me today.

Q. When you go out with Radwanska, I know you go to dinner and stuff; do you ever talk about tennis?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No.

Q. Never?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No. We don't talk about tennis. There's so many other things we want to talk about, so we prefer just to have a totally different conversation.

Q. So if you didn't know if she had won or lost, you'd never say, How did you do today? How did you play?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, we do that on court; we do that over here. We always know who won and who didn't, because we just keep each other updated.
But once we go for dinner, we already know who won, who didn't, and we don't talk about.

Q. Do you speak to each other in Polish or English?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, Polish, yeah.

Q. A lot of the players say that, and, you know, we find it a little strange, because we tend to talk about work a lot. So is it because it makes it uncomfortable, or is it because you just want to keep tennis out of the brain for a while?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: It's just because we want to -- yeah, there are so many other interesting things and we want to -- we have so much tennis in our daily life and we practice so much, we work so hard. So when you have the opportunity just to relax, it's nice just to have the brain think about something else.

Q. So what do you talk about, clothes?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Clothes, fashion, makeup, nail polish, boys. (laughter.)
I don't know. Everything.

Q. Your parents are friends together?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, they are. Yeah, so they're teasing each other, as well. Probably tomorrow we're gonna have a small jokes to each other, but it's just fun. I mean, we're friends off the court, and we want to win and fight on the court.

Q. What's the hot nail polish these days? Is there a color that's in?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Really bright. I really like the really pink ones. And actually, I always have my nails polished, but this time I haven't. I don't know. Maybe -- I probably should have done my nails.

Q. If you reach the final, will you do your nails?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I don't know. Maybe I'll do them tomorrow. Maybe not. Depends on my mood.

Q. So Agnieszka says that the winner of the match has to buy dinner.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, the winner has to, so...
Well, I hope I'm gonna buy dinner. (laughter.)

Q. So how long have you known her? All the way through juniors, or did you know Urszula better?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, I know both of the girls equally well. All the way through juniors since -- I think we also played some under 12s, under 14s together a few tournaments.
But then in the juniors, just because we spoke the same language, it was easier to get the contact. It was nice to have some friends on the tour.

Q. Can you really go on court and say, I don't really know her? That's just an opponent? I'm playing the ball?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, you have to do that. You have to keep professional in that way and see that little yellow ball and hit it inside the lines and over the net. That's really important that you do that.
Because once you start thinking, okay, it's my friend, what happens, then you lose the match. So it's just important to stay focused and don't think about who's on the other side.

Spiritof42
Mar 19th, 2010, 11:16 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~1997547,00.html

Caroline & Aga Quotes
March 17, 2010

More on the dinner conversation...
Caroline: "Clothes, fashion, make-up, nail polish, boys... Everything!"
:spit: Yes, of course, once you've covered fashion, make-up and "boys", there's really nothing left to talk about. The girl obviously reads too many "women's magazines".


On what language they use at dinner...
Aga: "Polish."

Caroline: "Polish, yeah."
Talking about nail polish in Polish :lol:

WozLolz
Mar 19th, 2010, 11:55 PM
:spit: Yes, of course, once you've covered fashion, make-up and "boys", there's really nothing left to talk about. The girl obviously reads too many "women's magazines".


Talking about nail polish in Polish :lol:

:lol:

Man, those are some deep conversational topics! I wonder how long a conversation about nail polish could last.:drool:

Well, instead of thinking less of my sweet lemon Danish's intellectual curiosity, I'll just assume that Radwanska is too dim to discuss topics such as climate change, Israel/Palestine, China's burgeoning superpower status, etc.:wavey: I'm sure she saves these topics for Vika.:hearts:

TennisFan66
Mar 20th, 2010, 01:28 PM
So you have the world No 3 (now we know No 2) in TENNIS and the journalists asks her what nail polish is 'in'. FFS.

JadeFox
Mar 20th, 2010, 01:31 PM
Hey now, nail polish can be a serious and timely subject! If one's nails clashes with your outfit the results can be disastrous! ;) :lol:

C. W. Fields
Mar 20th, 2010, 01:38 PM
Nails are a big thing among certain top players!
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/02/18/serena-williams-studies-t_n_467061.html

TennisFan66
Mar 20th, 2010, 01:41 PM
Caroline Wozniacki, The Next Number One In Women's Tennis Or...?

Danish Caroline Wozniacki, still only 19 years old, has had a phenomenal 2009, advancing from 12th to 4th in the world - the highlight being her US-Open final loss where Little Miss Sunshine played another audience favourite, the reborn Kim Clijsters. Before that, she enjoyed incredible progress as well, progressing from 237th to 64th to 12th to 4th in the course of 2006-2009 year end rankings. Pretty good for a teenager to say the least and it earned her the 2008 WTA newcomer of the year ahead of Azarenka.

This year, however, is a different matter. Now she got to the top, the questions are - can she stay there? Can she rise even further? Is she a future number one? Or "merely" a consistent top ten player? Or rather the next Ivanovic?

I doubt that we see an Ivanovic scenario. Wozniacki is an extremely determined young woman and her great talent was evident early. A 12 year old Wozniacki told Danish television that she wanted to become number one in tennis. That is still the dream and the goal today and now she is closer than ever before. The 2008 Tour newcomer of the year has refused to make specific public targets for her ranking this year and there is really no reason why she should.

However, as things are now, she might have trouble keeping up her ranking. With the two Belgians returned and Sharapova also trying to make it back to the top, women's tennis has become an all together different ballgame and much harder to excel in. Sharapova is still a big if, but both Henin and Clijsters have made clear that they mean business.

Wozniacki is still 4th, but the difference between Safina (2nd at 6480) and Dementieva (7th at 4855) is not too great - all thrailing Serena at 8645. Henin still hasn't got a ranking and Clijsters and Sharapova also still have some climbing to do.

But let's not only discuss the ranking points. Let's discuss the potential. What has gotten Wozniacki up there together with the very best? Still being a teenager, she has plenty of time to improve every aspect of her game. Her strengths are her speed, her reliant, strong double-fisted backhand and above everything else - her mental game and fighting spirit (albeit not of late, see below).

She hardly ever gives up on a ball and has the ability to focus when the going gets tough. One notable exception to this, was this year's Australian Open, where she lost to Na Li in the 4th round on a day where her game and fighting spirit seemed off for most of the time. But this wasn't typical for her. If anybody doubts her fighting spirit, take a re-look at last year's WTA championships in Doha, where she won a heroic almost three hour fight against Zvonareva to ensure a place in the semis.

She battled through pains and cramps that made her cry in the final game. Having used her medical timeout, there was no other way to win it than to fight through it - so she did. In the semis, after three matches played on injuries, she eventually had to hand the match to Serena one and a half sets down.

Concerning her game and game tactics, she is more of a pusher than a basher. She can be a pusher due to her excellent speed, footwork, relatively good placement on the court and consistent ground-strokes on both sides, especially the double-fisted backhand which is her greatest stroke. She gets almost everything back at the opponent and forces her to hit that one extra stroke - a tactic that can get you remarkably far in the women's game. In a way, it reminds me a bit of Nadal when he first came on to the scene - chasing every ball, not making many unforced errors, but also not hitting that many winners.

Wozniacki hardly ever has a positive winner-unforced errors count, but she gets enough back to make the opponent lose the match by committing more unforced errors than her. Last year's US Open was a case in point (against Oudin and Kuznetsova for example), but this tactic proved obsolete against the well-playing Clijsters, who simply outhit Miss Sunshine and didn't commit enough unforced errors to let her prosper.

That said, getting to the final was a huge step for Wozniacki as critics already were starting to ask why she couldn't perform in the slams (never got beyond the fourth round before that final - but then again - is that so bad for a teenager ranked around ten at the time?). Getting to the final proved that she doesn't choke at Slams - we are yet to see her getting into the second week consecutively, but her mental game should not be what's stopping her.

Notwithstanding her US-Open success, she only averaged ten winners per match as opposed to 25-27 winners per match by players like Serena and Dementieva. She admits she can improve, but won't put her finger on as to the where. So let's see. Her serve and especially the second serve could get a lot better. The second serve is way too easy to attack and the women's tour has many great returners who can punish that. Her forehand is consistent, but not a weapon yet. She hardly hits winners with it and when the going gets tough, it often becomes too short, tentative or error prone.

Her backhand on the other hand is brilliant, but she can still use it more aggressively. Against second-tier players, a defensive tactic can be more than enough. But in the matches between the top-contenders, the aggressor usually comes out on top, so she does need to add some more aggression and attacking skills to her game.

She is a clever player and, as Murray in the men's game, no one is more aware of her shortcomings than her (but both have the natural instinct to stay back and rely on their defense - obviously Murray is a step further in his career, but in this respect they face a similar critique and challenge - and both tried to put in more offense at the Australian Open). In this year's Australian Open we saw a somewhat more offensive side of her - attacking more and coming to the net more often.

However, her results this year, hasn't matched her ambitions. An exhibition match loss to Sharapova and an early loss to Na Li predated the Australian Open, where she again lost to Na Li - being somehow out of focus - not putting in her usual fight. Same thing happened in Dubai against Shahar Pe'er. Has she lost her momentum? Former Danish top players argue that she hasn't adjusted to the new situation - no longer being the hunter, now being the hunted - and claiming that her hunger seems missing this year. That certainly was a possible conclusion seeing those matches, but knowing her professionalism and will to reach her goals, I feel confident that the hunger will return to her.

Bottom line really is - does she have the game to match Serena, Henin, Clijsters, Kuznetsova, Dementieva, Venus and a confident Safina and an injury free Sharapova? Is she the one with the most potential in the new generation? What about the more aggressive and powerful Azarenka? Or Wickmayer? Or Lisicki? Well, it is hard to blame a teenager for not matching the game of a 12-double or 7-double Slam winner. But as she's been playing so far this year, she does not belong in the top five as of today and I do predict she will have a hard time keeping her position in the top five for the next couple of months. She lacks a big killer weapon.

However, a good run at RG or Wimbledon might propel her back up as she didn't excel there last year. She does belong in the top ten and on the verge on top five, but she needs to improve those minor shortcomings in her game to stay in the top five and - in time - improve further. Playing great defense without the necessary winners, she won't win the majority of the matches against the others in top ten, nor against an aggressive Petrova, Lisicki or Wickmayer. It's hard to see her up one set and 4-0 against Serena in a Slam quarter on hard court as Azarenka was. Azarenka's power matches her peers. Wozniacki doesn't - yet. She hasn't got Henin's hand, angles and touch, so she need more power and bigger weapons to stay on top.

Good thing is - she knows that and is still young enough to make those changes. Short term problem - it takes time to make these changes in her game - time that she hasn't got too much of in a fully booked tennis calendar. 2010 prediction? A year end rank clearly in top ten, but no better than fourth - probably between fourth and eight. Long term prediction?

Little Miss Sunshine will get to smile more often than not and will be a serious contender for the Slams and the top-rankings, if not in 2010, then in the years to follow when she hits her prime, matures as a player and develops bigger weapons. She is too talented and determined not to. Number one? Perhaps when Serena retires and the Belgians re-retires.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/358431-caroline-wozniacki-the-next-number-one-in-womens-tennis-or

..............

Thanks for posting. Nice to see a good, well written and thought through article. As for the ' Former Danish top players argue that she hasn't adjusted to the new situation ', I think those 'top' players are Peter Bastiansen and Michael Tauson. Google them and have a laugh.

They are upset and always taking swipes at Caroline in local media, because Caroline has shown no interest in being trained/coached by their friend, Kenneth Carlson. Another ex 'top' player from Denmark.

FormerlyKnownAs
Mar 23rd, 2010, 09:47 PM
Carolines Latest TV2 Blog

Caroline Wozniackis Blog

Tirsdag, 23. marts 2010 kl. 12:33 / sport, tennis

Indian Wells finale!
Hello everyone,
There has gone a little time since the last so I will summarize the time that has passed. I played myself into the finals in Indian Wells, where I unfortunately lost to Jankovic with 6-2 6-4. She played really well and aggressively and I was forced to go after more winners than normal. She kept an incredibly high level which ment that I had to press myself and her more, which resulted in more errors on my part. However, I am extremely pleased with my performance here during the tournament.

I started out with a very tough match against King, where I was down 1-1 in 3.sæt and turned it to 6-4. In addition, I played a very tough match against Zheng in the quarter-finals where I won 6-4 4-6 6-1. Zheng is a fantastic player who plays extremely fast and I had to be focused the whole game through, because she is a player who never gives up.

At the match against Zheng, I had the honor of none other than Bill Gates sitting in my box. He sat there cheering for me so it was very funny to see that he is also interested in tennis. In my semifinal I met my good friend Radwanska whom I trained with during the tournament and with whom I have a really good relationship. We were on holiday together as late as November months, so we have a really good relationship with each other and therefore it is always a little difficult to play against each other.

But when we arrived at the court it was about winning the match and not think too much about who it was who stood on the other side of the net. I won 6-2 6-3 but the match was much closer than the result suggests. Foe example from 1-1 in the 2nd set the last 7 games went to 40-40. I was the sharpest on the important points and therefor I got secured the victory. I'm really happy for what I have achieved the last 10 days and will try to do as good or even better next week where I will play in Miami.

With my good result at Indian Wells, I moved up to No. 2 in the world. This I am very delighted and proud about. I know, however, that much I still need to work on to become even better. I work hard to develop myself as a tennis player and when at the same time the results come, it is a nice bonus. I will not rest on my laurels, but continue to fight and try to get better day by day
All the best

Caroline

WozLolz
Mar 24th, 2010, 12:47 AM
Aww, she's so adorable.:hearts: I wish I could rest on her laurels.:)

Good luck, Caroline!:inlove:

stangtennis
Mar 24th, 2010, 09:58 AM
At the match against Zheng, I had the honor of none other than Bill Gates sitting in my box. He sat there cheering for me so it was very funny to see that he is also interested in tennis.
One of the 3 founders of Apple is named Stephen Gary Wozniak. His ancestors are of Polish descent. So shouldn't it be him siting in Caro's box instead of the founder of Microsoft. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Wozniak

stangtennis
Mar 24th, 2010, 12:40 PM
http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/features.aspx?articleid=4671&zoneid=9

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Viewpoint: Wozniacki can't just be counter-puncher
By James MartinMarch 22, 2010
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http://www.tennis.com/articles/articlefiles/4671-viewpoint_james_martin.jpg

Can a person change? I mean, really change. Can they fundamentally alter who they are and approach life with an entirely different mindset? When my wife and I have this philosophical discussion, which usually centers on the minefields of household chores and TV viewing habits, I take the same uncompromising stance: “No, honey, people can’t change. Now please, you’re blocking the TV and this is a really big game.”

Even after 12 good years of marriage, my wife still sees me as a work-in-progress, a block of clay that can be molded into something else, something better. But as I watched the Indian Wells women’s final—yes, thankfully, my better half begrudgingly scooted out of the way because she knew, despite the beer, salsa and chips, that I was “working”—I started to wonder if tennis players can change. Can they successfully go from employing one style of play to an entirely different one? Can they think differently, too, in terms of how they approach the match and their opponent?

These are questions especially pertinent to Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.tennis.com/players/player_info.aspx?player_name=Caroline+Wozniacki). I’m a fan, but I also believe that if the Dane wants to hold on to her newly acquired No. 2 ranking, she’s going to have to prove that it is possible to remake your game in the pressure cooker that is professional tennis.

Against Jelena Jankovic (http://www.tennis.com/players/player_info.aspx?player_name=Jelena+Jankovic) in the final, Wozniacki was out-hit and overmatched. She committed an uncharacteristically high number of unforced errors, which is the death knell for a player whose game is built around consistency and placement. Credit to Jankovic for staying aggressive and not sabotaging her own efforts, but Wozniacki too often smothered the ball with topspin, especially off the forehand wing, to give her opponent mid-court sitters that allowed her to control the points.

http://www.tennis.com/articles/articlefiles/4671-Wozniacki2.jpg
Wozniacki was overmatched by Jelena Jankovic (http://www.tennis.com/players/player_info.aspx?player_name=Jelena+Jankovic) in the Indian
Wells final Sunday. (Gabriel Bouys/AFP/Getty Images)
As a junior, Wozniacki excelled by playing defensively. In 2006 she won the Wimbledon junior title and reached the final of the Australian Open juniors. She’s also had undeniable success on the pro tour, winning six singles titles and reaching the final of seven others, including the U.S. Open last year.

But how much more upside does this 19-year-old have if she continues to play the counter-attacking game? It sounds like a silly thing to ask, given that she’s so highly ranked and so young. Yet if she doesn’t learn to be more offensive and offensive-minded, she will always be at the mercy of bigger hitters who can put the ball away and dictate play. While Wozniacki is a dogged competitor, it’s hard to imagine her winning major titles if she doesn’t at least learn how to punish more balls and put her opponents under more pressure.

In short, she needs to hit harder and go for more winners.

Problem is, in the modern game players don’t have much time to retool, let alone remake, their strokes and strategies. The off-season is short, so there’s not a huge window to hit the practice courts. There’s also the added pressure of knowing that to take two steps forward you’ll likely have to take a step backwards. Players, or their coaches, or their agents, or all of the above, might not be able to stomach the idea of sacrificing ranking points (and prize money) for the prospect of improving long-term. And others, including Wozniacki’s camp, might make a more present-minded argument like the one economist John Maynard Keynes once did: “In the long run we are all dead.”

Indeed, it’s not often that a player in Wozniacki’s enviable position would undertake such a drastic makeover. But it’s not unheard of, either. The most famous example of a player remodeling his game was Bill Tilden (http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/thespin.aspx?articleid=4634&zoneid=32). In 1919, the 26-year-old was ranked No. 2 in the world, but he knew that to take the next, big step he had to make changes to his game. So he spent the winter away from competition. Instead, he worked out, chopped wood and practiced on an indoor court in Rhode Island with one purpose: to turn his slice backhand into a world-class weapon. The next summer Tilden won his first Wimbledon title and went on to become a dominant world No. 1 for the next six years.

That was during the amateur era, of course, but there have been other more recent examples, though often these makeovers are the result of aging players changing their games in order to survive—Jimmy Connors learning to finish more points at net and Pete Sampras turning to the serve-and-volley are two instances that come to mind. Although Wozniacki is obviously at the beginning of her pro career, her chances of remaining at the top and winning majors will depend no less on her ability to adapt.

She doesn’t need to completely overhaul her game. When she’s in-form, Wozniacki’s consistency off the ground is a legitimate weapon against the hit-and-miss brigade of women’s tennis. At the very least, however, Wozniacki must learn to stop suffocating her forehand with topspin and hit more penetrating shots. And then she’ll need to develop a dependable volley. This is no small task. It requires not only a change in stroke mechanics but also a change in mindset. And that, in the end, could be the biggest hurdle. For a player who’s had so much success impersonating a backboard, it will be a challenge to start thinking more aggressively. Rather than reacting to the ball, she must learn to punish it so she can dictate play.

Going from counter-puncher to playmaker will require Wozniacki to adopt a different mindset that isn’t natural for her. But if she’s to survive, and thrive, at the top of the women’s game, it’s a change she’s going to have to try and make.

James Martin is the editor in chief of TENNIS. Follow him (http://twitter.com/jameshmartin)on Twitter.



Jankovic scores biggest title win at Indian Wells (http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/default.aspx?a=4667&z=9)

FormerlyKnownAs
Mar 26th, 2010, 06:34 PM
The Latest From The Official Homeside Blog

So its her Mum that chose THE dress.:bounce:

Regards from Miami

http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/34-copy.jpg

Hello Everyone,

Hope you are all doing well. I’m back for my weekly update. I don’t even know where to start because my past week has been a little busy.

I am in Miami right now, playing the Sony Ericsson Open. I have not played my first match yet; I start today against Tszvetana Pironkova from Bulgaria. I am already very excited to play because I really like this event. The weather is wonderful, but I must tell you that the air is far more humid here than it was in Indian Wells last week. It took me some time to get used to it, but now I am fine and am ready to go.

Speaking of Indian Wells, I am very happy with my result there. I was a little bummed that I didn’t win in the finals, but Jelena played very well, and I must give her credit. But quite honestly, I could have been out in the first match I played, when I was down 4-1 in the third set against Vania King. Making the finals is something I appreciate and I played some good tennis along the way. I’m particularly happy about my serve, I think it has improved a lot since last season. I’m also happy about moving into the #2 ranking. This is the highest ranking I’ve had, which is exciting, but at the same time I just have to keep my head down and keep working!

Ever since I got to Miami, I have been busy. I have been hitting every day, just to feel the ball. I have been eating out at great restaurants with my parents and the Radwanska sisters, and Vika Azarenka. We went to a Japanese place the other night – it was a lot of fun. I do not like sushi though. I like my food cooked, so I had steak and chicken.

Two nights ago I went to the Player’s Party in Miami. I wore this pretty summer dress that my Mom picked out for me. I really loved it. We posted some pictures on this site too (Gallery section). Agnieszka Radwanska and I of course chatted a lot during the night, along with her sister Urszula, and we hit up the dance floor for a song. We had a lot of fun.

I would like to grab the opportunity to congratulate Melanie Oudin here; she was awarded the WTA Tour Newcomer of the Year. I have been in that spot myself, and I think it is wonderful that they acknowledged what she has done this past year. Well done, Melanie!

I am staying at a gorgeous hotel’s penthouse suite. It is very nice here; the service is great and I simply love the design of the suite. I have been thinking about interior designs lately. My brother has a new apartment in Copenhagen, so I am always looking for ways to improve it for him, which sometimes drives him a little crazy.

I also shot a new commercial for the 2010 US Open Summer Series. I won’t give anything away, but it should turn out to be really good. I’m excited to see it. During the shoot, I was actually thinking about my last year’s US Open run and how amazing the US Open Summer Series is. Dealing with the heat, fans and opponents is hard, but I love it.

Alright, I must go now. Wish me luck in my match today! Thanks for being so loyal to me!

Love,

Caroline

WozLolz
Mar 27th, 2010, 01:01 AM
Regards from Miami

Dealing with the heat, fans and opponents is hard, but I love it.

:lol: ouch.:lol:

Spiritof42
Mar 27th, 2010, 06:48 PM
^ Somehow I don't think that came out quite the way she intended to. :lol:

stangtennis
Mar 29th, 2010, 10:58 AM
http://www.sonyericssonopen.com/News/Tennis/2010/Interview-Transcripts/Interview-Transcripts/Extra-Column/Caroline-Wozniacki-Third-Round.aspx
Press Conference

Caroline Wozniacki - Third Round

Miami, Fl., U.S.A.

01.03.2010

March 28, 2010


C. WOZNIACKI/M. Kirilenko

1 6, 6 1, 6 4

An interview with:

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI

THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. You look much better than you did in the first set. Please tell us what happened, how you got through that, and why you didn't quit.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Well, I obviously didn't feel 100% today. Yesterday I had to retire from my doubles because I didn't feel healthy enough to play.
Today I felt much better this morning, but, I mean, still had some problems with my head and the throat. But, you know, I wanted to go out there and try to win. That's what I did.
Maria was playing a really good first set. I really didn't have too much of a chance. I just thought, okay, I mean, I don't have anything to lose. I just tried to go out there and fight for every point. Even though I didn't feel 100%, I still went out there and fought.
The third set I started to feel better already. I think everything started to get to normal almost, and I felt much better.

Q. Were you dizzy at any point? Did you take something to make you feel better?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Yeah, I felt dizzy, yeah, from the middle of the first set already. I took Tylenol and Advil, and, yeah, I don't know. Yeah, I think, that's it. (laughter.)

Q. Is that all?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No, that was it. But that definitely helped. And I think especially the Advil kicked in end of the second set. I started to feel better. It felt like my dizziness went off a little bit, as well.

Q. Did you have a flu or a stomach bug or do you know what you have?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I don't know exactly what it is. I think it's they told me I have a virus. Viral illness, they called it.
So, yeah, I just need to go to bed and relax and get my feet up and try to come back tomorrow strong.

Q. Do you think it was hard for Maria to play against you knowing she saw something might have been wrong, whatever, was hard to change tactics or thought you might not make it the whole match or whatnot?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I don't know. That's difficult for me to say. She played a great first set, and she gave me the chance to come back in the second, and then I got the belief and I started feeling better.
I just kept hanging in there, and my fighting spirit got to me and I was there.

Q. Both being adidas girls, how well do you know each other?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: We know each other very well. She's a very good friend of mine, and she's a very sweet girl. We talk to each other quite a bit. We're good friends.

Q. How close were you to retiring in this match?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I really didn't think about retiring. I just thought to keep on going. Try to do my best.

Q. Have you ever had your blood pressure taken on court before?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I'm not sure. I think once after yeah, in Doha, I think. Right? I think I had the blood pressure taken.

Q. How was it?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: How was what?

Q. What were your numbers?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I know today they were very low. I don't know how much that means, but... Well, You have to ask the doctor for that. (laughter.)

Q. No dancing tonight, eh?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: No dancing tonight for sure. Room service, a lot of fluids, and just relaxing on my program. Maybe a good movie.

Q. I saw your dad was with you, dad and coach, obviously. What did he tell you?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: He just told me, You're playing great. Keep hanging in there. You're a great fighter.
In the third set he came in and he told me, Relax. You have nothing to lose. To me you're still a champion still playing here, I mean, after two hours and something and not feeling great. I mean, doesn't matter what happens. Just try your best.

Q. You made it to the finals last week at Indian Wells. Do you think maybe also part of it is fatigue that you're experiencing with a lot of tennis the last few weeks?
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: I feel these are just they're really, really high ranked tournaments just under the Grand Slams, and they are almost two week tournaments just like the Grand Slams.
Everybody is playing. It takes a lot of strength not only physically but mentally, as well. You don't really get to come down after such a big final, so I think maybe it just got to me.
Then I had a huge match the first day where I almost went out, and I just think that just took everything out of me.
Again, my fighting spirit didn't give up, and I'm still here.

Q. How is your arrangement working out? I mean, you go to Las Vegas a little with Sven and Gil Reyes.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Actually, I didn't go to Las Vegas. My dad, he's my main coach as always. Sven and Mats are here at some of the big tournaments helping out.
I have a really good fitness coach who is also a boxing coach, but he's preparing me physically. He's doing such a good job. I feel in better shape than ever.

Q. Get plenty of rest, plenty of fluids.
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI: Thank you.

FastScripts by ASAP Sports

Burisleif
Apr 1st, 2010, 03:37 AM
Some comments (and my translation) From post game TV2 interview. (Caro vs Henin)

http://sporten.tv2.dk/article.php/id-29602042:wozniacki-jeg-havde-chancen.html?forside

"Jeg havde mine chancer i kampen, men tog dem ikke. Hun var til gengæld iskold da hun havde chancen, og derfor vinder hun. Det er de helt små marginaler. Så det er klart, at jeg er bitter og ærgelig lige nu,"

"I had my chances in the game, but didn't take them. She, on the other hand, was ice cool when she had the chance, and that's why she won. It's really small margins. So its clear that I'm upset and regretful right now,"



"Vi spiller begge en kamp på et højt niveau. Hun er en stor spiller, der har vundet det meste. Derfor er det selvfølgelig rart, at jeg kan spille lige op med hende, også selvom det er en tom følelse lige nu,"

"We both played a game at a high level. She is an accomplished player, that has won most things. Therefore its obviously nice, that I can play right up with her [level], even if its an empty feeling right now,"



"Jeg kan være rigtig godt tilfreds. Jeg har spillet en masse gode kampe, og føler jeg for alvor har fået gang i sæsonen. Det er selvfølgelig ærgerligt lige nu, men det nytter ikke at være bagklog,"

"I can be really satisfied, I have played a load of good games, and feel I have really kick started my season. Its obviously a shame right now, but its no use to have hindsight."

stangtennis
Apr 5th, 2010, 09:14 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~2011187,00.html (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781%7E2011187,00.html)
Every Update, Tweet, Post & Photo...

March 31, 2010 Average rating: 4 stars

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MIAMI, FL, USA - The WTA Tour and Sony Ericsson jointly announced the launch of SuperFans (www.WTASuperFans.com (http://www.wtasuperfans.com/)) - a groundbreaking social media channel that will live online across the Tour, player, tournament and Sony Ericsson digital and mobile platforms and will become the destination for women's tennis fans across the globe to get closer than ever before to players.

Harnessing the power of social media and the enormous worldwide popularity of Tour stars - some of the most followed athletes on Facebook and Twitter - SuperFans will enable women's tennis to become the most accessible and fan friendly sport in the world by bringing together into a single hub all of the social media channel conversations and content produced by its players. As the Communication Entertainment brand, Sony Ericsson's social media expertise, combined with the Tour's commitment to enhance the fan experience, will ensure that through SuperFans the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour takes fan interactivity, engagement and entertainment to an unprecedented level.

"The social media revolution has enabled professional athletes like myself to have a more meaningful two-way dialogue with fans," said Maria Sharapova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E9499,00.html?), the most followed female athlete in the world. "I love the SuperFans concept, as it makes it easy for fans of women's tennis to hear from us and talk to us."

The SuperFans initiative marks the first time that a major sports league has endorsed, promoted and aggregated the social media channels of its athletes, enabling fans to communicate with players on a deeper and more personal level. The Tour's top social networkers - Venus Williams (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E9027,00.html?), Serena Williams (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E9044,00.html?) and Maria Sharapova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E9499,00.html?) - have close to 5 million combined followers on the internet.

The SuperFans platform will give fans unprecedented insight into the lives of players, on and off the court, providing a single destination for real-time aggregated and consolidated social media feeds. Fans can either look through all player updates or filter their view by a group or an individual. Any videos and images that the players attach to their social media updates through channels such as YouTube and Flickr will also appear on the SuperFans site.

Additionally, through SuperFans, players will have the opportunity to interact with each other and tag each other in photos, enriching the dynamic platform. The Sony Ericsson Xperia X10 mobile phone will be used by players to create photo, video and text content for SuperFans. Also, SuperFans will provide fans with a live tournament experience at select Tour events, offering tickets to their favorite stars' most important matches through a series of competitions.

"SuperFans is an innovative way for our players to connect with their fans," said Stacey Allaster, Chairman and CEO of the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour. "Through the multitude of social media web channels, our sport and players have a fantastic opportunity to create exciting customer experiences."

"We are pleased that Sony Ericsson mobile technology is enabling the creation of spontaneous social content from some of most inspirational athletes on earth," said Lennard Hoornik, Head of Global Marketing, Sony Ericsson. "For millions of tennis fans around the world, SuperFans is a service that delivers on our brand promise of make.believe, which aims to build a fun, playful and inclusive interaction with consumers. SuperFans will bring audiences closer to tennis, giving them a greater access to unique fan experiences."

The Tour's recent advancements in the digital space include the launch of a new mobile WAP site available to fans through their mobile handsets, and the Spanish language version of the Tour's official website, which joined the Tour's existing official language websites in English and Chinese. The Russian version of the website will debut later this year.

The Tour worked with AnalogFolk, a leading UK-based digital marketing agency, on development of the SuperFans program. Promotion of the SuperFans program will be supported through a series of viral videos focused on players, filmed during the Sony Ericsson Open (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Tournaments/Info/0,,12781%7E837,00.html) and set to be released in late April.

Caro's subpage at WTA SuperFans http://www.wtasuperfans.com/caroline_wozniacki

FormerlyKnownAs
Apr 8th, 2010, 10:58 PM
Carolines Latest From The Official Blog

Hello from Ponte Vedra

http://www.carolinewozniacki.dk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/caroblogpic.jpg

Hello Everyone,

I’m checking in from Ponte Vedra Beach. It’s been a good first few days here. As many of you may know, I had a good run in Miami. I lost in the quarterfinals to Justine Henin, who I always looked up to. It is so nice having her back on the WTA Tour (except when she beats me). I am sure we will play many more times in the future and I am already looking forward to it. Of course I would have rather won the match in Miami, but we both played it tough and I was happy with the way I played.

During the first few rounds of the Sony Ericsson Open, I was a little sick. My head was hurting pretty badly, especially against Maria Kirilenko, but the good news is that I am feeling perfectly well now.

After I lost to Justine, my mother flew back to Copenhagen to see my brother Patrik, so my Dad and I just hung out in Miami for an extra three days. I had a really impressive residence in the Viceroy. I would like to thank the Sony Ericsson Open’s staff for arranging this for me and my family, and a special thanks goes to Kim Hall, who has been extremely helpful during my stay at the Viceroy. We had two huge bedrooms, overlooking the Biscayne Bay. It was nice that we had two separate rooms, as we all had some privacy while sharing the same apartment. It was a perfect set-up for our family.

On my last night in Miami, I went out with my good friend Serena Williams. We had a really fun night out around town. I like spending time with Serena, she is such a great person. It always amazes me what a superstar she is in the United States and how nice she is at the same time.

The following day, my Dad and I rented a car and we drove five hours to Ponte Vedra Beach. I am so excited to be back here. I obviously have some fond memories of this place from last year, when I won the event by beating my other good friend Alexandra Wozniak in the finals.

I am staying at the Sawgrass Marriott Resort and Spa. The hotel is located right on the water, and has an amazing tennis and golf facility. The other day my Dad and I played a round of golf, which was a lot of fun. I was actually pretty good at it, which surprised me.

As the only top 10 player at this tournament, my image has been used in a lot of promotion around town. It still feels weird seeing my face all around town but at the same time it is also very exciting. When I first saw my draw and that I actually drew Patty Schnyder, I knew my quest to defend my title won’t be an easy one. Patty is a former top 10 player, and an accomplished athlete. Although the score suggests that the match was easy, it was in fact very tough. I had to earn every point to beat Patty. I honestly think that she was the toughest non-seeded player in the draw. Given that this was my first match this year on clay, I was a little concerned. Hopefully though, I will get a couple of matches under my belt this week in Ponte Vedra before heading over to start the European clay season.

I will play next against Sofia Arvidsson. I know her very well. She is also from Scandinavia, and we have probably played each other at least ten times during exhibitions, junior events, charity matches or on the pro circuit. She is a really sweet girl, and I am looking forward to our match later tonight.

I also played the doubles event this year. My best friend Malou Ejdesgaard and I have received a wild card into the doubles draw. Even though we lost in the first round, I’m confident that Malou and I will play well together once we become a little more experienced playing together. It is great to have my best friend here for this week and then next week in Charleston (we also got a wild card there). I hope she will become a regular fixture on the WTA Tour because she is a good player.

Other than this, I have no more news right now. I am loving the weather in Ponte Vedra Beach and I am really excited to be here. Next week, I will head to Charleston but I will try to check-in before going over there. Hope your Easter weekend was splendid. Thanks for all your support,

Caroline

stangtennis
Apr 8th, 2010, 11:50 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/news/story?id=5065005

Updated: April 7, 2010, 10:51 PM ET
Wozniacki, Pavlyuchenkova to meet

Associated Press

PONTE VEDRA, Fla. -- Defending champion Caroline Wozniacki (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=630) of Denmark defeated Sweden's Sofia Arvidsson (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=393) 6-3, 6-1 on Wednesday night to advance to the quarterfinals of the $220,000 MPS Group Championships.

After winning the first set, in which she lost only seven points on her serve, Wozniacki traded service breaks to start the second set. She broke again at love for a 2-1 lead and shut down Arvidsson from there.

"If I keep playing like this, the other person will have to play well to beat me," she said.

Wozniacki will meet fifth-seeded Russian Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=824), who she beat last week at the Sony Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne. Pavlyuchenkova advanced by beating Bethanie Mattek-Sands (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=497) of the United States 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-2. Mattek-Sands fought off five match points before losing.

Pavlyuchenkova offered her own assessment about playing Wozniacki, the second-ranked player in the world on the WTA Tour.

"If I play like I did in the first and second sets, I have not much chances," she said.

In other second-round matches, third-seeded Dominika Cibulkova (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=334) of Slovakia beat Alla Kudryavtseva (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=478) of Russia 6-3, 6-3 and Canada's Aleksandra Wozniak (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=418) got past Japan's Ayumi Morita (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=321) 2-6, 6-3, 6-2.

Cibulkova, who had lost to Kudryavtseva in all three previous meetings, said the win bolstered her confidence.

"A lot of this is about confidence," she said. "You can be the best practice player but you need the confidence in matches."

The top-seeded doubles team of Mattek-Sands and Yan Zi beat Natalie Grandin and Abigail Spears (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=654) 7-5, 6-2. Andrea Hlavackova (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=742) and Olga Savchuk (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=448) defeated Ekaterina Dzehalevich (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=672) and Marie-Eve Pelletier (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=1066) 6-4, 4-6 (10-8) and Liga Dekmeijere (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=1086) and Patty Schnyder (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=374) beat Americans Julie Ditty (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=637) and Carly Gullickson (http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/tennis/players/profile?playerId=490) 6-3, 6-7 (2), 10-7.


Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press

FormerlyKnownAs
Apr 9th, 2010, 06:42 PM
Caroline Wozniackis TV2 Sport Blog

Fredag, 9. april 2010 kl. 11:36 / sport, tennis

Ponte Vedra Beach

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/46/18806446-3745107d2e8dc50a035e09d358659eb6.jpeg http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/48/18806448-274682ad89fbdaf47965a3f8d0dc9ab7.jpeg

Hello everyone,

Here comes a little greeting from Ponte Vedra Beach. I have in my first two matches, played against Patty Schnyder which I won 6-0 6-4 and Sofia Arvidsson who was defeated by 6-3 6-1. It was two good wins, because they are certainly not bad players.

I mostly use this tournament as training to play me into gravel and work out some tactical things. I have taken a bit of speed off in servers, but tried to get a little more spin in, as a hard serve is not as dangerous on gravel as on hardcourt.

My good friend and new doubles partner Malou Ejdesgaard has also come here to Ponte Vedra Beach. We did not get the best start when we lost the 1.runde, but we must get to know each other on the court and find our rhythm. I am sure that in time will become a solid double team, but it will take some time. However, I am really glad she has come, as we have great fun together. I also spend some of my time here in Ponte Vedra Beach playing some golf, or let me rather say it this way trying to play golf. I think it very fun to stand and hit the ball, but I still need a little training before I can go out and play 18 holes. But it'll come one day, I'm sure. Besides playing golf , I will also go fishing with my dad. I love fishing and have done it since I was quite small. It's nice and relaxing and you can get mind away from tennis and just enjoy the beautiful scenery. We have however been a bit around the city to find fishing rods to no avail. But I want to go out and fish so we'll probably find some fishing rods:)

I am playing the last match today (Friday) NB 19:00 local time, which correspond to 01:00 Danish time against Pavlyuchenkova of Russia. I met her as recently as last week in Miami, I played a really good match against her there and I will have to perform as well today if I want to win over her.

Here to finish of, I just want to wish Liverpool congratulations on the semi-final place, after a 4-1 victory at home against Benfica. My favorite player Torres made two goals that weren’t so bad:)


Thank you for your support.

Best wishes

Caroline

stangtennis
Apr 10th, 2010, 10:32 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100409/another-shot-at-caroline_2256076_2020169

Another Shot At Caroline
April 09, 2010

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/javaImages/52/26/0,,12781%7E8726098,00.jpg

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, FL, USA - The only two teenagers in the Top 40 duked it out in the quarterfinals of the MPS Group Championships (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Tournaments/Info/0,,12781%7E737,00.html) on Friday night and for the third time in their three career meetings Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E12631,00.html?) beat Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E13013,00.html?) in straight sets.

Wozniacki, the No.1 seed and defending champion at the $220,000 tournament, came out firing, breaking away with five straight games from 1-1 to take the first set, 6-1. Pavlyuchenkova, seeded No.5, burst out to a 3-0 lead in the second but Wozniacki went on another tear, taking six straight games for a 61 63 win.

"Anastasia was playing really well, especially in the beginning of the second set. She went for everything and it was all going in," Wozniacki said. "I just kept fighting for every point and it turned out well for me in the end."

Wozniacki had on both of her previous meetings with Pavlyuchenkova in straight sets as well, 61 64 at New Haven last summer and 62 62 at Miami this year.

At the beginning of this week, Sorana Cirstea (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E11720,00.html?) was the third teen in the Top 40, but she turned 20 on Wednesday, leaving Wozniacki and Pavlyuchenkova.

Check out off-court pics from Ponte Vedra Beach right now! (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/gallery/20100408/pics-from-ponte-vedra-beach_2256674_2017836)

Next up for Wozniacki will be No.4 seed Elena Vesnina (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E10548,00.html?), who crushed No.8 seed Melanie Oudin (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E13174,00.html) earlier in the day, 62 61. Vesnina did win one of her four previous meetings with Wozniacki, and came very close indeed to another one in last year's semifinals here, with four match points before falling in a third set tie-break. Check out Wozniacki and Vesnina's head-to-head here. (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/headtohead/caroline-wozniacki_2255881_12631/0,,12781%7E12631%7E10548,00.html)

In the other semifinal, No.3 seed Dominika Cibulkova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E12135,00.html?) will take on Olga Govortsova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E10569,00.html?). In the quarters, Cibulkova beat No.6 seed Aleksandra Wozniak (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E9813,00.html?), 75 61, while Govortsova beat lucky loser Varvara Lepchenko (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E4939,00.html), 63 62. Cibulkova and Govortsova are playing each other for the very first time.

stangtennis
Apr 11th, 2010, 12:15 PM
http://jacksonville.com/sports/local-sports/local-tennis/2010-04-11/story/rally-saves-caroline-wozniacki-mps-group
Rally saves Caroline Wozniacki at MPS Group Championships
The defending champ was on the verge of loss to Elena Vesnina

Posted: April 11, 2010 - 12:19am

By Francine King (http://jacksonville.com/authors/francine-king)

Caroline Wozniacki thought she was headed to Charleston, S.C., for her next tournament.

The defending champion at Ponte Vedra Beach was down a set and a break to her semifinal opponent, Elena Vesnina, before she turned the match around in the second set to win 1-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4 on Saturday.

With a 5-3 lead in the second set, Vesnina was serving for the match at The MPS Group Championships in front of 2,999 at Sawgrass Country Club. But several strong returns and a well-hit shot down the line from Wozniacki helped the 19-year-old Dane break serve and get herself back in the match.

"I thought I was out [of the tournament] already," Wozniacki said. "It didn't look good for me. ... When I broke her to [get to] 5-4, that's when I felt like, 'OK. I have a chance again.' "

The No. 2 player in the world seized that chance with a strong service game to pull even at 5-all, and the players traded service breaks to force a second-set tiebreaker.

Wozniacki jumped to a 4-1 lead in the tiebreaker, eventually forcing an error from Vesnina with a strong serve to split sets.

Early in the match, which was a rematch of a 2009 semifinal at Ponte Vedra Beach, Vesnina appeared ready to run away with a victory. The 23-year-old Russian pushed Wozniacki around the court, took advantage of her unforced errors and finished off key points with winners to break Wozniacki's serve three times and win the first set 6-1.

"I was just missing everything by one, two inches," Wozniacki said. "Once I felt like, 'OK, now I'm back in the rally,' she killed the shot, so I really didn't feel like I could do anything."

What the tournament's top seed could do was run down shot after shot to keep herself in rallies. And it was enough to stall Vesnina' momentum.

"It's frustrating, because she's like a wall; everything goes back," Vesnina said. "I was giving her the ball without pace and she had some trouble to finish the point.

"But at the end of the match, she's a great fighter. When she had the opportunity, she finished the point. That's her character.

Vesnina's impatience to end points got the better of her in the eighth game of the third set when she attempted to finish a 19-stroke rally with a backhand shot up the line that smacked into the net.

"It definitely brings the pressure to the opponent [when you run down balls]," Wozniacki said. "They feel like they have to hit an extra shot, and sometimes they force it, and it can be important points."

That error gave Wozniacki a break chance that she capitalized on to take a 5-3 lead and give herself a chance to serve out the match. Vesnina battled back to pull to 5-4, but Wozniacki won the final four points on Vesnina's serve to earn a berth in today's final against unseeded Olga Govortsova of Belarus.

The Family Circle Cup tournament in Charleston will have to wait one more day.

http://jacksonville.com/sites/default/files/editorial/images/images/mdControlled/cms/2010/04/11/604580915.jpg
Rick Wilson/The Times-Union
Caroline Wozniacki hits a two-handed backhand during her victory over fourth-seeded Elena Vesnina in the MPS Group Championships on Saturday afternoon at Sawgrass Country Club.
More semi-finals pictures here: http://photos.jacksonville.com/mycapture/folder.asp?event=978044&CategoryID=9088

C. W. Fields
Apr 12th, 2010, 10:31 AM
A trio of tennis commentators review some of the top players after Miami. They talk about Caro from 18:30 to 21:35 saying a few interesting things.
http://www.tennis.com/articles/templates/podcast.aspx?articleid=4852&zoneid=28

stangtennis
Apr 12th, 2010, 11:01 AM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100411/caroline-strikes-again_2256076_2021571
Caroline Strikes Again
April 11, 2010 Average rating: 5 stars

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/javaImages/7d/35/0,,12781%7E8729981,00.jpg

PONTE VEDRA BEACH, FL, USA - Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E12631,00.html?) ran her winning streak to 10 in a row at the MPS Group Championships (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Tournaments/Info/0,,12781%7E737,00.html), claiming her second straight title at the clay court event with a 62 75 win against Olga Govortsova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E10569,00.html?).

Wozniacki, the No.1 seed and defending champion at the International stop, had survived a semifinal thriller the day before, rallying from 61 53 down to beat No.4 seed Elena Vesnina (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E10548,00.html?), 16 76(4) 64; things started well against Govortsova as she cruised through the first set, but she was forced to come from behind again in the second set of the final, digging out of a 5-3 hole - saving two set points in that marathon eight-deuce game - to close the Belarusian out in straight sets.

"Olga started playing very well in the second set. Everything she hit was going in," Wozniacki said. "I just started stepping into the court, and after I won that long game at 4-5, I kind of had the advantage. We had so many incredible shots in the match, it was all just about hanging in there in the end."

"I had to change something in the second set, so I just tried to attack every single shot I could," Govortsova said. "I was trying really hard right until the end. She just played too well. It was a good week for me: first tournament on clay this year, first final of the year... I'm very happy with my week."

Check out off-court pics and trophy shots from Ponte Vedra Beach now! (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/gallery/20100410/pics-from-ponte-vedra-beach_2256674_2017836)

Wozniacki picked up her seventh Sony Ericsson WTA Tour title, having won three in 2008 and three more in 2009. It was her second successful title defense - she won back-to-back New Haven titles in 2008 and 2009.

"I love playing here. I've won 10 matches in a row here, I'm so happy to win this title again," Wozniacki, now 7-7 lifetime in finals, said of the title defense. "Of course you play better in the places you like. I've done it in New Haven before. Hopefully I can make it 15 matches in a row here next year."

Govortsova had upset No.2 seed Alona Bondarenko (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E984,00.html?) and No.3 seed Dominika Cibulkova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E12135,00.html?) en route to the final, which was her third career final on the Tour, her first two coming in Memphis in 2008 and in Moscow last fall.

In the doubles final, No.1 seeds Bethanie Mattek-Sands (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E5667,00.html?) and Yan Zi (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E9228,00.html) beat No.2 seeds Chuang Chia-Jung (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E9449,00.html?) and Peng Shuai (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E6355,00.html?), 46 64 108. Mattek-Sands and Yan were forced to come back from 64 20 down, and they also rallied from 4-1 down in the match tie-break; the American won her seventh Tour doubles title while Yan picked up her 17th. It was their first title together.

stangtennis
Apr 12th, 2010, 11:48 AM
http://jacksonville.com/sports/local-sports/local-tennis/2010-04-11/story/its-wrap-wozniacki-repeats-winner-mps-group
It's a wrap: Caroline Wozniacki repeats as winner at MPS Group Championships
She wins her second consecutive MPS title by beating Olga Govortsova

Posted: April 11, 2010 - 11:00pm

By Francine King (http://jacksonville.com/authors/francine-king)

Caroline Wozniacki's brother can expect a new edition to his home decor soon.

The 19-year-old Danish tennis star successfully defended her title at The MPS Group Championships on Sunday, defeating unseeded Olga Govortsova of Belarus 6-2, 7-5 in front of a crowd of 2,997 at Sawgrass Country Club.

That means Wozniacki will be shipping her championship trophy - the seventh she has earned in her career - to her brother, Patrik, a Danish professional soccer player. She said she keeps them on display at his apartment in Copenhagen.

"When I visit him, I like having those in a nice trophy case," Wozniacki said.

But the No. 2 player in the world, who opened the match with a 94 mph ace, wasn't all smiles Sunday. In the eighth game of the second set, after two unforced errors, Wozniacki smacked her racket against the net twice.

Midway through the second set, the top seed at Ponte Vedra Beach was down two service breaks to Govortsova.

Govortsova, 21, realized after dropping the first set that she needed to change tactics and attack more. The strategy worked, helping her to a 4-1 lead, but she said at that point she began to run out of gas.

"You have to be really strong physically to beat her, because you have to run for every shot," Govortsova said of Wozniacki. "Every point might be long, so you have to be ready for that."

The finalists played many long points - and one very long game - on Sunday. With a 5-4 lead, Govortsova was serving for the second set but dropped a 22-point game to Wozniacki. Despite holding two set points, Govortsova double faulted on Wozniacki's seventh break-point chance to help the Dane get back on serve.

"She hit some great winners out of places where I thought it wasn't possible," Wozniacki said of Govortsova's efforts to fight off her break chances. "I just had to dig in there and keep fighting.

"I think I just broke her a little bit there."

In her next service game, Govortsova hit her eighth double fault of the match to give Wozniacki match point. Then, she sealed Wozniacki's 10th consecutive victory at Ponte Vedra Beach when she smacked a backhand off the net.

"I'm really happy that I've won 10 in a row," Wozniacki said. "Hopefully, I can make it 15 for next year."

If she does, she would be only the second player to win three titles in a row at the event (Chris Evert, 1981-1983). The list of back-to-back winners includes Lindsay Davenport, Monica Seles, Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario, Gabriela Sabatini and Steffi Graf.

francine.king@jacksonville.com,

(904) 359-4372

http://jacksonville.com/sites/default/files/editorial/images/images/mdControlled/cms/2010/04/12/604915446.jpg
Rick Wilson/The Times-Union
No. 1 seed Caroline Wozniacki pumps her fist after match point in her straight-sets victory over Olga Govortsova on Sunday in Ponte Vedra Beach.

C. W. Fields
Apr 13th, 2010, 06:41 AM
New blog from Caro, Google translated: http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/

Monday, 12 April 2010

The first tournament victory of the year

Hello everyone,

Here comes a greeting from Ponte Vedra Beach. It was the first tournament on clay and I was excited to get back to Ponte Vedra, where I won the tournament last year. It's always something special to get back to a tournament where you have some good memories. As I wrote in my last blog, I had played two good matches and had played me to the quarterfinals.

I played a very steady match against Pavlyuchenkova won 6-1 6-3. Although I got a little bad start to 2.set (0-3) I held my head high and continued to play my game. I was in the semifinals meeting Vesnina whom I also met last year in the semifinals, which ended up being a thriller where I won 7-6 in 3. set and where I had en route to go to the toilet and vomit. This time it was not much different since I won 1-6 7-6 6-4, after having been down by 1-6 3-5. I continued to the last to fight and believe that I could win the match even though I did not play my best tennis. I knew that I would get my chance in the match, which I did and I used it fully. It was great to win such a match where you did not play your best, but still draws the longest straw in the end.

I had thus played me in the finals for the second year in a row, which is huge and a super cool feeling. I was up against Govortsova from Belarus whom I had never played against as a senior. She had beaten some good players on her way to the finals, so I knew it would be a tough struggle I was going into. I got a really good start to the match and took 1.set 6-2. She began to go more for her strokes in 2. set and it made it difficult to find a good rhythm when duels were not so long. I got behind 3-5 and had to save a few set points at 4-5 before I broke back and turned 3-5 to 7-5 and thus my first tournament victory this year. It was a wonderful feeling and I am extremely pleased with what I have done not only here in Ponte Vedra Beach, but generally the last one and half months. Now I relax and enjoy my victory before heading to Charleston, South Carolina. I spent the day today to relax and shop a little which I think I deserve.

Regards

Caroline

slk45
Apr 13th, 2010, 11:43 PM
A fine picture of Caro in the Charleston Post & Courier online:

http://postandcourier.media.clients.ellingtoncms.com/img/photos/2010/04/12/fcctennis_008_t520.jpg?ac3efcdf003a150190ae6e8aeb7 30cfc03dd9a93

Spiritof42
Apr 14th, 2010, 06:26 AM
Wow! Caroline looks hot in that dress. Thanks for posting.

It would probably be more at home in the picture thread. ;)

C. W. Fields
Apr 16th, 2010, 04:47 PM
New Caro blog from her site:

Hi Everyone,

Hope you are all doing well. I am feeling great and I’m still excited about my 7th career victory last week in Ponte Vedra Beach. I am so happy that I defended my title! The route to the final was certainly not an easy one. I had to face Patty Schnyder in the first round, whom I just played this week in Charleston as well. Anyway, Patty is always super tough to play against. Then in the semifinals, I had my good friend Elena Vesnina on the opposite side of the net. This was actually the second time in two years we faced each other in the semis, and also the second time that I had a comeback win against her. She is such a great competitor, and always a dangerous opponent. The final was a little easier but Olga Govortsova is a tough up-and-comer, so I had to focus on every point. We played some very long points, and she made me move around the court a lot. Thankfully though, I pulled it out.

I would like to thank John Artix, the Tournament Director, and his wonderful staff for a great event. The Sawgrass Hotel was very nice and I enjoyed every minute I spent in Ponte Vedra, so thank you guys for making it a great week for me and my father.

After the final, the organizers of the Charleston event provided transportation for my Dad, my friend Malou and me to Charleston. It was a 4 ½ hour drive, and we hadn’t ever done that before. This year, I am staying at a different hotel in Charleston. The Charleston Place is downtown, walking distance from the shopping area, which is great. I really like shopping, so the location is perfect. I sometimes also like to get away from the tennis environment, and it is a good way to relax and have some peace and quiet to myself.

In the first round I played Barbora Strycova. I had known her from the juniors already, and she is a really feisty player. I was down 4-1 in the beginning so I had to fight really hard to beat her. Then I faced Patty again. I owe her so much respect. Over the past years, I watched her play many times and I tried to learn from her. She is one of the craftiest players on Tour still.

After my second match, I went to a steakhouse with my good friend Victoria Azarenka and my friend Malou. I am happy that I got to spend some time with Vika, but at the same time, I also feel bad for her. She had to pull out of this year’s event with a reoccurring injury. It’s always frustrating when you get injured, and I hope she recovers quickly.

Today, I will be playing Nadia Petrova, who I played in the quarterfinals of Indian Wells. I’m expecting a really tough battle again this time, but I’m confident and I trust my abilities on clay. In case you are interested, the match will be televised on both ESPN2 and Eurosport, so I hope some of you will tune in to cheer me on.

After this event, I’m flying back to Europe. It’s been a while since I’ve been home and I’m really excited to see my Mom. I’m not sure yet if I will stay at my home in Monte Carlo or spend a few days in Copenhagen in my brother’s apartment. What I do know though is that I will be sitting ringside at my Mikkel Kessler’s boxing fight. We’ve been friends for a long time now and this will be the first time that I’m seeing him fight. He’s always been supportive of my career so it’ll be nice to be there and cheer him on!

I guess this is it for today. I’m off to go prepare to play against Nadia. Love,

Caroline

April 16, 2010 at 11:09 am

poulao
Apr 16th, 2010, 05:07 PM
Nice Blog :)

Spiritof42
Apr 16th, 2010, 11:50 PM
New Caro blog from her site:

I had to face Patty Schnyder in the first round, whom I just played this week in Charleston as well. Anyway, Patty is always super tough to play against. Then in the semifinals, I had my good friend Elena Vesnina on the opposite side of the net. This was actually the second time in two years we faced each other in the semis, and also the second time that I had a comeback win against her. She is such a great competitor, and always a dangerous opponent. The final was a little easier but Olga Govortsova is a tough up-and-comer, so I had to focus on every point. We played some very long points, and she made me move around the court a lot. Thankfully though, I pulled it out.

[...]

Then I faced Patty again. I owe her so much respect. Over the past years, I watched her play many times and I tried to learn from her. She is one of the craftiest players on Tour still.

[...]

After my second match, I went to a steakhouse with my good friend Victoria Azarenka and my friend Malou. I am happy that I got to spend some time with Vika, but at the same time, I also feel bad for her. She had to pull out of this year’s event with a reoccurring injury. It’s always frustrating when you get injured, and I hope she recovers quickly.

Caro has so many friends on the tour. No wonder, she always has something nice to say about everyone. :lol:
Vika got stuck at the airport because of the volcanic eruption in Iceland. :hug: It's a good thing there's no tournament next week.

Today, I will be playing Nadia Petrova, who I played in the quarterfinals of Indian Wells. I’m expecting a really tough battle again this time, but I’m confident and I trust my abilities on clay. In case you are interested, the match will be televised on both ESPN2 and Eurosport, so I hope some of you will tune in to cheer me on.
Of course we're interested! What kind of question is that? I doubt my long-distance telepathic cheering had any effect on the match, though. :p

FormerlyKnownAs
Apr 17th, 2010, 10:24 AM
Caroline Wozniackis Blog on TV2 Sport

Charleston semifinale

Lørdag, 17. april 2010 kl. 00:22 / sport, tennis


Hello everyone,

So I have played myself into the semifinals here in Charleston with today's victory over Petrova in the quarterfinals. I had a bye in 1.runde so I entered the tournament in 2.runde where I met Strycov from the Czech Republic. I won 6-4 6-1. It was not without problems, but I kept a cool head at the important times and hauled a relatively secure victory home. In 3.runde I played against Schnyder who I met last week in Ponte Vedra Beach. I played really well at the start of the match until 6-2 4-2. So then Schnyder chanded tactics and I was a little too passive and let her into the match. At 5-5 I broke Schnyder and could serve the match home at 6-2 7-5.

In today's match, I met Petrova from Russia who I had met a few weeks ago in Indian Wells where it was to win in 3.sæt. I knew it would be a hard battle and I could not use my victory from before to so much as it is a new surface and a new match. I played a very sensible game and pressured Petrova to make mistakes. It was hard to find a good rhythm in the match when she hit 2 out and then 2 winner strokes and then a couple of mistakes again. I knew that I had to keep a cool head the whole time and take advantage of the chances I got into the match. It succeeded very well and I won 6-3 6-4.

I use the games to work out different things and every game I have different tasks, I have to try to perform. It is the best form of training games you can get, so I can test some different tactical things out. We live in Charleston and when I do not play then I use the time to go and eat at various restaurants in the city and visit some of the various sights. It is an old but very beautiful city where most of buildings are wooden houses. The world's largest WW2 aircraft carrier is also found here in Charleston.

There come many people yo the matches and they create a really good atmosphere. The weather is good so I think it also helps so that people want to get out and see some tennis in good weather. My good friend and doubles partner Malou Ejdesgaard is still here with me. She should have flown home today, but because of volcanic eruptions in Iceland is closed to all air travel to Denmark. So she stays here a couple of days.

Let me conclude by saying thank you for your support:)

Best greetings

Caroline

jasminefu623
Apr 17th, 2010, 08:54 PM
just found this

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) -- Top-seeded Caroline Wozniacki retired from her semifinal match against Vera Zvonareva at the Family Circle Cup on Saturday after injuring her right ankle.

The Danish player was trailing 2-4 in the first set when she slid for a drop shot and her foot caught on the clay surface. The No. 2 player was assisted to her chair and got her ankle taped.

To cheers from the crowd, Wozniacki returned to the court at Daniel Island. But after Zvonareva held to go up 5-2, Wozniacki double-faulted at 15-15 and retired. Wozniacki was looking for her second straight tournament win, after a victory last week at Ponte Verde Beach, Fla.

Zvonareva meets the winner of the other semifinal between Daniela Hantuchova and Samantha Stosur in the final Sunday.

Wozniacki, who was limping and had her ankle taped as she met with reporters, said she will have an MRI on Sunday. She said while trying to run down the ball, she heard a snap and felt pain.

"I was surprised that I could stand on my leg, which was very positive, actually," she said. "But as soon as I was moving to the sides, it was impossible, so I couldn't play."

Wozniacki suffered a similar injury to her left ankle at Amelia Island two years ago that kept her away from tennis about three weeks. She was asked if she will play the French Open, which starts the last week of May.

"Well, I certainly hope so. As it looks right now, it's not too bad," she said.

Zvonareva missed the clay court season last year after injuring her right ankle in a Family Circle Cup match.

"It's great to be in the finals, but it's not great to be in the finals this way," said Zvonareva, ranked 22nd. "I don't wish anyone to be in that situation because last year it was very difficult for me."

A runner-up in Charleston two years ago, said she spoke briefly with Wozniacki at the net.

"I told her to take care about it and, you know, I have some experience with that and if she needs some advice," she said. "I think she needs to relax a little bit right now because it's difficult too -- there are so many things going through your mind."

It was the first meeting between Wozniacki and Zvonareva on clay. They split two matches last year on hard court.

Read More: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/tennis/04/17/familycircle.cup.ap/index.html?eref=si_tennis&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2Fsi_tennis+%28SI.com+-+Tennis%29&utm_content=Twitter#ixzz0lOBV6SVv
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stangtennis
Apr 20th, 2010, 12:31 PM
I just came across this very long background article about the Wozniacki family in Polish.
http://www.slowopodlasia.pl/index.php?a=1&id=21805
Maybe some Polish speaker would like to do a better English translation than Google?
Polish "Bring some sunshine," the Danish sky

Tremendous progress made in women's tennis this year, Dane Woźniacka Carolina. In the WTA ranking moved from twelfth to fourth place. Her parents are Polish and met in Biala Podlaska. Stefaniak Anna and Piotr Wozniacki studied the AWF and played in the club AZS-AWF. She volleyball, he played soccer.

- I do not know what I am convinced the other end of the Polish. I graduated from high school in Legnica, and although the day was riding my city for the eastern border of the famous train at the time, it first got out of it not in Biala Podlaska, in Warsaw. In 1982 I became the capital of the Academy of Physical Education, but not received from the lack of places. However, I was offered a study in Biała branch, to which I accepted. So I found myself in a charming wooden houses with which so many saw for the first time in his life - says Piotr Wozniacki.
That same year, studied at the same university also began Anna Stefaniak, which, though originated in Krasnik Factory, is also initially did not intend to continue education in Podlasie, only in Krakow. He passed the AWF, and only in the holidays decided to move closer to home. Both actively practiced sport. Peter was a player trzecioligowej Legnica Copper, Anna - Volleyball Steel Krasnik.
- Actually, digging the ball, because the game it can speak, when presenting a higher level. Anyway, after my departure Copper advanced to second division, I finally had the composition of which was broken to them. As I issued the front, that I could not hit the goal, and as the back, then you were losing - ironically sums up their performances in Peter's home club.
The Biala Podlaska team was playing for AZS-AWF, then how not to run by Henry Grodecki, then by Matej Kosik. He immediately assigned him to the right of defense. - From what I heard, nobody wanted to play in that position - he recalls. He also remembers that at one time he was even the team captain responsibilities. The teams, which appeared in the middle of the defense his junior by two years bialczanin Dariusz Magier. Their knowledge of the rapidly turned into a great and lasting friendship until today.

Escape from the Polish

When in 1984, Darius for family reasons he moved to Sweden, Peter decided to follow in his footsteps. - I made the right decision after he received my note that in the middle of the third year of study is likely to leave dean's waiting for me. Officially, I decided to go to Denmark to collect materials for the thesis. However, my intention was to hit to Gothenburg, where he stayed for several months Darek - says Peter.
He was a cold day of February 1985, when it reaches the Swinoujscie and boarded the ferry to Copenhagen. There is detached from organized groups and boarded a train to Sweden. Strongly frightened when a man entered the compartment in uniform. He thought that he is faced with a customs officer or border guard. Fortunately, it was a guard. And Peter arrived without problems teammate.
After a few days in the seaside town they both began to wonder what to do now.
- Piotrek passport hid in the stadium IFK and went to the police. And they began to interrogate him, and came to Sweden - says Magier.
- To me, not retreated to Denmark, I told them both that we invented the story that sailed to Malmoe, then got the train to Gothenburg. They are just that, just between the two cities in Sweden there is no direct connection. It was only then he revealed the whole truth with the help of my lawyer referral written report - added Wozniacki.
Under the existing procedure was deported to the Danish refugee camp. He stayed there only two months, because the first to receive asylum. He was offered a few places to live. He chose Odense, bearing in mind that this city was born Hans Christian Andersen, the author read fairy tales to him by his grandmother.

Do not forget about Annie

Since the beginning of the stay abroad Peter kept in touch with her friend Anna. In so convincingly, that after a few months, it also decided to go on a trip to Denmark. She had some problems with that because, as we both learned later, a colleague of Peter the campus group - weightlifter - he was an informer (after graduation, he joined the secret service). Probably gave so where necessary, to whom Anna is really successful.
His prediction proved correct. Already in Odense, although she was behind three years of science, decided not to return to the country. - When I arrived in Biala Podlaska, and was friends with students of Warsaw University of Physical Education, but it Piotrek managed to convince me to her, mainly by common interests. One of them was a sport. After all, I played in a band led by Kazimierz Fisherman as a left-handed-rozgrywająco attacker - he says.

Still with Darek

In Denmark, they married. With time, their first born son, Patrick, then a daughter Caroline. There have even the idea of moving to Gothenburg. Finally, the other in Odense, where Peter played in the team, which - note - dropped to the second division. But almost every weekend to visit Magiera, although they shared a few hundred kilometers of the city. It was surprising that the operator Stena Line does not give discounts for families of the two tickets. A senior bialscy fans and former players AZS-AWF Biala Podlaska today probably remember several years ago sponsored by bialczanina high quality clothes from this shipping company advertising.
Total also leaving for winter and summer holidays. Skiing is none other than Patrick Magier just shaved the first two years younger Danish namesake. Together they also spent Christmas Eve, including in Zakopane. - The stay specifically remember because I slept with the world champion in windsurfing Dorota Stashevsky. Why? Well, we had to accommodate seven people in one bed - Darius says, laughing.
Then he adds: - The first years after his departure was really very heavy. We had twenty-some years, and yet somehow we had to deal. For example, using the differences in prices in Denmark and Sweden. Peter at one point he founded the company and traded sports equipment brand Hummel. He was her representative when the agreement was signed with the Handball Association in Poland. Not only that, the Polish started to import from Slovakia, as a citizen of Denmark, beer Golden Pheasant. "

Play what Brother

Since they both play football, because - like all the time points D. Magier - it is the most important thing in life, it began to dig their sons. Love for football quickly to the tiny Carolina, which also saw himself as a future piłkarkę. - I really had a problem with this dispute, I do not know what to do when a daughter kept saying that it will play just like my dad, brother and uncle Darius - share an old problem Wozniacki.
Fortunately, good friend helped him, who, during one of the joint stays in Gothenburg took all the hall to play tennis. Peter - Yes I was hooked, that after returning to Denmark, bought equipment for the whole family and gave a new passion. With one of my colleagues are not spoken for two weeks, because I played non-stop balloon, and I could not deal with them, still smeczując in their own shoes.
Patrick started to play, so he saved the club. And Carolina? Well, again, she wanted to do what her older brother. And so began the great tennis career. First, the parents think siedmiolatkę the chair, to learn to count and the referee. After the ball bounced against the wall. - It also wanted to play, but it did not specifically wpuszczaliśmy the courts, because first of all, ourselves very rajcował tennis, and secondly, nobody wanted to play with the child and rocket "to catch butterflies." Only one summer I said to her: "You've earned, we play." Well, we started to great test of patience, which we started to collect fruit as late this year - says Wozniacki.

Where is my commission?

- All well aware that the godfather is Darek Carolina career. He first took us to the tennis racket and gave a hand - Anna stresses.
- And for that to be my commission - immediately enter into her words, laughing, Magier. Then he adds that in Sweden you can not live without sport: - There a few steps walking past a sports facility, and as you can spare the time, then you play what you want. When not knowing the Swedish language came from Biala Podlaska to Gothenburg, out of boredom I left the house and digging the ball. The availability of reference fields is there, as in Denmark. Meanwhile, politicians in Poland now wypinają chest with pride that they create Orliki, or objects that in the west for many years are the same value as ordinary lawns. Wide range of different types of pitches makes rustic children grow many disciplines and relate later successes.
Peter echoes him: - In Denmark, for example, ten years ago, any person upon payment of four hundred crowns, opened for half a year allocated to him within the hall, included a light and played tennis with friends.

As a Swiss watch

Carolina has always liked to compete. At the beginning dreamed of ograniu mom, dad or brother. The prize for the winners were candy or ice cream. On the court after spending seven hours a day. Later, when it needed more and better sparingpartnerów, dad hauled it to other places, often several tens of kilometers one way.
Every working day of tennis, and her brother, a player look the same. Morning trip to school, received by his father, who came with meals prepared by mom, travel for training, and science classes several hours while returning home. The desirability of such a structured life convinced Carolina as early as the age of nine, when she was the mistress of Denmark to twelve years, winning all the duels to zero. Very young girl, surprised everyone, not only skills but also the ability of concentration. In the most popular television in Denmark "talon" soon aired video of a talented girl. She was also one of the characters in the film "World Kids".
Heat is also assesses it, it all began. - Tennis showed talent from an early age. I am always surprised, as she could with the regularity of a Swiss watch to send nearly every ball in around the end line or side - Darek says Magier.
For the further development of the Caroline court was required to hire a coach by her parents for extra activities. The choice fell on her trainer at the club Romanian Ovidiu Meinertza, who paid one hundred U.S. dollars per hour. Peter carefully watched his work for yourself later in the same way to train her daughter. - $ 1,600 per month was the tremendous expense for us, but it brought tangible results. To this day we maintain perfect contact with a trainer - he says.
In Denmark, published a book about his parents-known athletes, was trained by them. Anna and Peter Woźniaccy found in her parents' example next to Tiger Woods, the best golfer the world. The Author has proved that to reach the world level, you must have served at least ten thousand hours, which in the case of Carolina offers nearly three hours a day. For what Woźniaccy stress are necessary: self-discipline, the joy of what you are doing, health and above all to understand. Only then can succeed.

CW or Caroline Wozniacki

With this intention Piotr company decided to set up the CW Sports Club. Top of the name is a Danish tennis players initials. The search for sponsors for the closure of the budget for next year, were successful. Money was needed for trips and participation in subsequent tournaments, first in Denmark, then beyond. And the song Carolina in a tennis hierarchy. The ranking ETA, accounting for tennis players under the age of 14, reached the third place. The next ITF, to eighteen years of age, 15 years having won Wembledon and Orange Bowl and was second in the Australian Open and Roland Garros. This gave her second place in the classification.
There was no departure and dad decided to turn his daughter into seniorowskiego tennis. As a young girl could occur in nine tournaments, with three of the prize pool 75, 50 and 25 thousand. dollars out of the "wild card". The first two wins, was second in the final. This gave the 234th WTA ranking at the end of 2006 another was already the 64th last year to finish 12th on the spot and the current quarter as a tennis player the world.

"Sunshine"

Carolina stands out from other tennis players cheerful disposition. For several months it has the nickname "Sunshine" or "Bring some sunshine." So he called her at this year's U.S. Open, the famous John McEnroe, who one day went to Carolina and sprezentował her his cap, saying: "It will help you get a good result." On the question: "And as I lose, then what?", He added: "You tell everyone that this is a gray-haired, elderly gentleman brought to you niefart. Carolina finally reached up to the finals, which only lost to Kim Clijsters.
On his head a lot of cases their parents. Dad from the beginning of the sports career is her daughter's manager, also deals with training, organizing trips, etc. - For several years, nearly all of his time spend tenisowi. Because success is based on one hundred percent dedication to what you are doing. If something out earlier, we need to do this, regardless of external conditions. Only later is the time for fun. And Carolina observes that until the pain, its nothing needs to be reminded. And we, the parents, through the study of the AWF, we have a concept, like a child to lead. As we know the realities of Biała Podlaska, both practical and theoretical, as it sports - Wozniacki stresses.
God and my grandmother
But there is another aspect of this year's successes Carolina. Faith in God. Every night he prays in Polish (in the family speaks only in that language) and knows that the fourth place in the world this year is sufficient from Him reward for hard work. He believes also that helps a lot it died in last year's holiday grandmother. Playing is in hand with the bracelet attached to her clover, which is present on the eighteenth birthday. It decorates the inscription, "From Grandma to the beloved Karolinki birthday." Niewręczonym gift, because seriously ill grandmother did not survive until Christmas Woźniacka his beloved granddaughter - she died twenty minutes before the match with Jelena Jankovic Caroline wembledońskiego during the tournament.
- The day before I talked with my mother by phone. We had to visit her since just after the tournament. I heard: "Peter, I'm doing everything possible to still see you, but I feel I can not stand." Then turn to us goodbye. The next day, while warm Carolina on the central court, as it was then Jankovic number one, I learned about death. Carolina every now and then she looked at me, but I tried not to show after the fact that has become a tragedy. The game, however, it looks as if the grandmother necessarily want to as soon as it arrived. And Carolina lost the meeting in three sets, as well as mixed doubles with Martin Matkowskim, and immediately flew to the Polish. And last season after a tough win, such as the Victoria Azarenko during the World Masters, I always say: "You see, that my grandmother pulled me out of trouble."

Podlasie is beautiful

Woźniaccy hosted on living again in Biala Podlaska Magierów in early November. They met with a notable group of friends, also found time for a journalist, "Words of Podlasie. From North Carolina, which at the same time, resting among others Radwańskimi with fellow sisters in Mauritius, brought a very precious gift. This dress from her final U.S. Open, specially designed for Adidas by Stella McCartney, daughter of Paul McCartney of the Beatles. Dane of Polish origin was chosen as the sole can play it. In a few weeks tennis dress (size 40) will go to one of our readers. How - this in a forthcoming numbers.
On the question of whether there is a chance to Carolina appeared in Biala Podlaska, Peter's answer: - Chance is always. Can come if only to conduct research on the AWF. But I think Ania about a possible purchase of some property in Biala Podlaska, boPodlasie is very beautiful.
- Increased hopes for the emergence of Carolina should be connected with the fact that he once lost with me in tennis, thus, would not have a worse balance sheet, must now win. And I'm waiting for her in Biala Podlaska - Magier added, laughing, today known bialski businessman father who has Swedish citizenship player trzecioligowego Podlasie.

r.laszuk@slowopodlasia.pl
Photo archive D. Magiera, R. Laszuk

http://www.slowopodlasia.pl/zdjecia_duze/11015

Spiritof42
Apr 21st, 2010, 05:53 AM
I didn't know her mother's maiden name was Stefaniak. :)

Nena_xxx
Apr 21st, 2010, 05:27 PM
nice one... :)

FormerlyKnownAs
Apr 22nd, 2010, 12:43 PM
Caroline Wozniacki Maybe Fails Kessler
Looks like she will play in Stuttgart, if there is ½ a chance.

http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/boksning/article1334302.ece


Caroline Wozniacki Maybe Fails Kessler

The Danish tennis darling is being treated for an injury in Barcelona - may not come and see her friend's big match against Carl Froch in Herning

She should have been sitting ringside to support her good friend Mikkel Kessler when he boxer against Carl Froch on Saturday, but Caroline Wozniacki may have to scrap the plan.

She is currently in Barcelona, where she receives treatment for the injury she incurred in the WTA tournament in Charleston, USA, on Saturday, and it is doubtful whether she can come to Denmark before she next week after the plan must play at a tournament in Stuttgart.

- I really hope that I can take a quick trip by Denmark, but right now I must take one day at a time, says Caroline Wozniacki, whose mobility is not only limited by her foot injury. Also, the Icelandic volcanic ash makes it difficult to get her tight program to hang together.

Treatment in Barcelona
- If the treatment is completed before next Saturday, it is of course also a question whether there are plane tickets available and whether it is possible to come home, says Caroline Wozniacki.

She twisted the right foot and fell in the semifinals of the Family Circle Cup in Charleston. Fears of a serious tendon injury have proven unfounded, and she hopes now, that she early next week to compete in the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix in Stuttgart.

The tournament begins Saturday, but Wozniacki’s first match is scheduled for Tuesday or Wednesday, said her father and coach Piotr Wozniacki.

Take one day at a time
He and his daughter traveled from the U.S. to Madrid, where they arrived Tuesday morning. From there it went by train to Barcelona, where Wozniacki sought help from an expert in ankle injuries.

- I have been checked thoroughly and has been ultrasound scanned. Everything possible is being done to get me ready, "says Caroline Wozniacki.

- I have a sprain and a stretched ligament, and the foot is swollen slightly, but I hope that I am ready again soon. Right now I look only forward one day at a time.

- I will stay here in Barcelona, as long as is necessary. I feel that the treatment is really good and I look forward to next week in a positive spirit, "says Caroline Wozniacki.

Keeping an eye on flights
Piotr Wozniacki stresses that he and his daughter really want to get to Herning, but there are limits to how far they will go to reach the boxing match.

- We will not not get into a car and drive 2000 km to get home. The most important thing right now is Caroline's treatment, says Piotr Wozniacki.

- But if there are tickets to get, we keep open the possibility that we can reach Denmark to watch the match. From there it will then be possible to fly to Stuttgart on Sunday. But it is too early to say anything about it yet, "says Piotr Wozniacki.

C. W. Fields
Apr 22nd, 2010, 01:53 PM
Piotr and Caro are being sued by a man who supposedly helped them make a sponsorship deal with Europæiske Rejseforsikring in 2005 and who claims he is owed DKR 659.000 according to a verbal agreement.

Hard to believe anyone is going to get the support of the court 5 years later based on what was at best (if it's even true) a verbal agreement. As the say in Hollywood; "A verbal agreement isn't worth the paper it's written on!"
The Wozniacki lawyer also says he's "200 % certain of winning" because "the case is not a case".

http://spn.dk/andensport/tennis/article2045846.ece

Spiritof42
Apr 22nd, 2010, 04:26 PM
Yeah, this case sounds rather fishy.

So, has Caroline really become "Danmarks største sportsnavn"? If so, that's pretty cool. I can't think of many countries where the biggest name in sports is a woman.

C. W. Fields
Apr 22nd, 2010, 05:27 PM
So, has Caroline really become "Danmarks største sportsnavn"? If so, that's pretty cool. I can't think of many countries where the biggest name in sports is a woman.

Well, deciding who's the 'biggest' name is always a subjective thing.
In less popular sports Danish athletes have won bigger things than Caro. The most popular sports in Denmark are usually team sports like football and handball and when they win stuff it's more the team than any one individual who gets the attention.
I suppose Caro is the biggest name in the sense she's the athlete most often mentioned in the news even when her results aren't stellar, probably for several reasons: The most superficial being she's very easy on the eye! But more importantly she's the first Dane to distinguish herself in tennis in the professional era. Breaking new ground is always special compared to winning the 117th European Championship to Denmark in badminton. And last but not least tennis has the advantage of being an all year sport (almost). While someone like her boxer friend Mikkel Kessler fights maybe 3 times a year Caro plays a new match every 4th day (on average) and naturally gets more space in the sports pages.

Jorn
Apr 22nd, 2010, 07:35 PM
Ithink Le Mans motorcar driver Tom Kristensen is the biggest Sports star in Denmark, even he only drives that 24 hours a year.

Bingain
Apr 22nd, 2010, 10:36 PM
Piotr and Caro are being sued by a man who supposedly helped them make a sponsorship deal with Europæiske Rejseforsikring in 2005 and who claims he is owed DKR 659.000 according to a verbal agreement.
[...]
http://spn.dk/andensport/tennis/article2045846.ece

DKR659K in presumably commission? In the US, the typical sport agents make a 12% cut. If they use similar percentage there, the deal would have been in the range of DKR5.5 million. Could Caro fetch a deal this size with Europæiske Rejseforsikring back in 2005? She hadn't even won Wimbly Girls.

C. W. Fields
Apr 22nd, 2010, 10:39 PM
DKR659K in presumably commission? In the US, the typical sport agents make a 12% cut. If they use similar percentage there, the deal would have been in the range of DKR5.5 million. Could Caro fetch a deal this size with Europæiske Rejseforsikring back in 2005? She hadn't even won Wimbly Girls.

The sponsorship deal is still running so supposedly it's debt accumulated since 2005.

TennisFan66
Apr 23rd, 2010, 09:52 AM
DKR659K in presumably commission? In the US, the typical sport agents make a 12% cut. If they use similar percentage there, the deal would have been in the range of DKR5.5 million. Could Caro fetch a deal this size with Europæiske Rejseforsikring back in 2005? She hadn't even won Wimbly Girls.

Without being certain, I think this dude is claiming he was offered 25% of all future sponsorship deals (he found)! Not a bad little earner there .. if it is true :lol:

I suppose in the US it is the same. Whenever someone gets into money, always someone else ready with a law suit.

Bingain
Apr 23rd, 2010, 04:28 PM
Without being certain, I think this dude is claiming he was offered 25% of all future sponsorship deals (he found)! Not a bad little earner there .. if it is true :lol:

I suppose in the US it is the same. Whenever someone gets into money, always someone else ready with a law suit.

Heh, 25% on all future deals. Damn, why weren't we all in sports business?

Nah, in the US, I don't think many people would hire a lawyer for something like $50K. They ain't gonna get anything after all the fees. Now, a $500K or $5 million case, that's another ball game.

I have an American Express card. A number of years ago they offered some kind of automatic travel/luggage insurance (don't remember which) for a small premium when you buy airtickets with it. Due to a minor fine print issue some cardholders ended up being ripped off. One of them sued AE, since it was an umbrella situation, it evolved into a class lawsuit. In the end the case was settled out of court. AE would pay about $5 million, IIRC. The guy who first sued AE got like $10,000. The lawyer got like $4.99 million. All the other affected cardholders (if they claimed) would get like $0.02 each. I didn't claim because a postage stamp would cost me around $0.30.

FormerlyKnownAs
Apr 23rd, 2010, 05:49 PM
Piotr was reported somewhere in the Danish press as saying that they had settled the last case out of court, but this one they would go into court, as it would deter others who thought that they could make money by just accusing in the press and then hoping for an out of court settlement.

Spiritof42
Apr 24th, 2010, 05:49 AM
Piotr was reported somewhere in the Danish press as saying that they had settled the last case out of court, but this one they would go into court, as it would deter others who thought that they could make money by just accusing in the press and then hoping for an out of court settlement.
Makes sense to me if they believe the guy doesn't have a strong case against them. Otherwise, it could simply encourage dishonest people to try to extort more money from them. It's happened to celebrities before.

stangtennis
Apr 26th, 2010, 09:01 PM
http://www.porsche-tennis.de/prod/pag/tennis.nsf/web/english-tournament_pressreleases_T10_0080_en
“I am looking forward to playing again in the Porsche Arena”

Stuttgart. Caroline Wozniacki, the world No. 2, sat down with the journalists to answer a variety of questions at the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix’s All Access Hour. The 19-year-old Dane’s thoughts on...

...returning after her ankle injury:
“My ankle feels much better. I’ve been healing really fast. I’m feeling really good. I hope I can start here where I left off. That’s my goal. We have to see. It’s a very strong field here. There’s a lot of good players so it’s not going to be easy. I am looking forward to playing again in the Porsche Arena.”

...playing so many tournaments
“I’m not sure I’m the one that’s played the most tournaments, especially this year. There’s actually some new rules so you can’t play certain tournaments. You know, I’m playing a lot of matches because I’m doing well and last year I had the most matches played. It’s just a positive thing because that means I’ve been reaching far and I think I don’t remember whether it was seven finals last year or eight. I mean that’s just an incredible achievement.”

...being driven around the Porsche test track:
“That was a lot of fun. We went really fast, me and Victoria. The driver was going so fast, stopping and starting but it was a great experience.”

26/04/2010

stangtennis
Apr 26th, 2010, 09:18 PM
http://www.porsche-tennis.de/prod/pag/tennis.nsf/web/english-tournament_pressreleases_T10_0070_en
“A quite special experience”

Stuttgart. The fascination of Porsche can also be felt off-court by the players at the Porsche Tennis Grand Prix. On Monday, the top seeded Caroline Wozniacki (Denmark), last year’s winner Svetlana Kuznetsova (Russia) and Victoria Azarenka (Belarus) lapped the test track at the Porsche Development Center in nearby Weissach in a 450 brake horse power Porsche 911 GT3 RS.

“That was a quite special experience,” said Caroline Wozniacki, the current world No. 2. “I was a little nervous at the start. The white 911 is awesome even when it’s standing still. After the first couple of corners, driving around got to be more and more fun and I wasn’t afraid any more. It’s an unbelievable car. Not only beautiful, but amazingly quick.”

The six-cylinder boxer engine in the production sports car Porsche 911 GT3 RS produces 450 bhp. Top speed is 310 km/h. The most sporting model in the 911 family does the 0 to 100 km/h sprint in just four seconds. 4.1 seconds later and it is travelling at 160 km/h.

Driving around the test track in Weissach at 240 km/h were three players whose serves in Stuttgart’s Porsche Arena will reach speeds of almost 200 km/h. “My motivation to play my best tennis is even greater after such a driving experience,” said Victoria Azarenka. “I now really want to win the tournament and the Porsche Boxster Spyder that goes with it.”

26/04/2010

stangtennis
Apr 29th, 2010, 06:43 PM
http://sporten.tv2.dk/article.php/id-30230966:skadet-wozniacki-tvunget-i-kamp.html

Translation:

"When you know you can't get out in extreme positions and run 100%, then it's obvious that it inhibits you, and you think about it", says Caroline Wozniacki to TV2 Sporten.
...
Did it play any role, that if you did not play today, then you couldn't play in Farum [Danish Open]?

"Yes, certainly. I must play in Farum [Danish Open] and I also will. WTA has some rules and I go in and do what I must".
...
"I need some more treatment, and the most important for me is to get 100% ready as soon as possible".

angliru
Apr 30th, 2010, 01:37 PM
I've analyzed the official match statistics for all the present top 10 players at the last four Grand Slams (FO 2009, Wimbledon 2009, US Open 2009 and AO 2010). Here are some of the results which may or may not reveal anything significant about Caro's game:


Most matches:
S. Williams 25
Safina 20
V. Williams 19
Kuznetsova 18
Wozniacki 18
Azarenka 18
Stosur 15
Radwanska 14
Dementieva 13
Jankovic 12


Tie Break success:
Wins %
Azarenka 3 of 4 75
Jankovic 3 of 4 75
Wozniacki 2 of 3 67
S. Williams 4 of 7 57
Dementieva 1 of 2 50
Kuznetsova 2 of 5 40
Stosur 1 of 3 33
V. Williams 1 of 5 20
Radwanska 0 of 1 0
Safina 0 of 4 0


Winning % when one set down:
Wins %
Azarenka 2 of 3 67
Safina 5 of 8 63
S. Williams 3 of 5 60
V. Williams 3 of 6 50
Wozniacki 3 of 7 43
Kuznetsova 1 of 3 33
Dementieva 1 of 3 33
Stosur 1 of 5 20
Jankovic 0 of 2 0
Radwanska 0 of 4 0


Bagels given:
Azarenka 6
Wozniacki 4
Safina 4
V. Williams 3
S. Williams 3
Radwanska 2
Jankovic 1
Kuznetsova 1
Dementieva 0
Stosur 0


Average match length:
Elapsed time Matches Av. length
(minutes) (minutes)
Radwanska 1230 14 88
S. Williams 2251 25 90
Kuznetsova 1645 18 91
Wozniacki 1656 18 92
Safina 1865 20 93
Azarenka 1712 18 95
Dementieva 1239 13 95
V. Williams 1828 19 96
Jankovic 1195 12 100
Stosur 1517 15 101


Aces per Match:
Aces Matches Aces per match
S. Williams 197 25 7.88
Stosur 65 15 4.33
V. Williams 82 19 4.32
Kuznetsova 55 18 3.06
Dementieva 29 13 2.23
Safina 42 20 2.10
Radwanska 29 14 2.07
Jankovic 18 12 1.50
Wozniacki 24 18 1.33
Azarenka 22 18 1.22


Double Faults per Match:
DF Matches DF per match
Dementieva 84 13 6.46
Safina 116 20 5.80
V. Williams 74 19 3.89
Azarenka 61 18 3.39
Stosur 49 15 3.27
Jankovic 35 12 2.92
Kuznetsova 43 18 2.39
S. Williams 53 25 2.12
Wozniacki 32 18 1.78
Radwanska 19 14 1.36


Average 1st Service Speed:
KMH MPH
V. Williams 175 109
S. Williams 171 106
Stosur 165 103
Dementieva 160 99
Safina 157 98
Kuznetsova 156 97
Jankovic 155 96
Wozniacki 153 95
Radwanska 150 93
Azarenka 149 93


1st Serve %:
Serves 1st serve in 1st Serve %
Azarenka 1174 896 76.3
Wozniacki 1110 783 70.5
Jankovic 839 561 66.9
Safina 1360 898 66.0
Dementieva 880 554 63.0
Radwanska 888 558 62.8
Kuznetsova 1286 807 62.8
Stosur 1173 726 61.8
S. Williams 1605 979 61.0
V. Williams 1251 734 58.7



Winners per match (Average):
Winners Matches W per match
S. Williams 731 25 29.0
Stosur 421 15 28.1
Kuznetsova 483 18 26.8
V. Williams 466 19 24.5
Safina 424 20 21.2
Azarenka 378 18 21.0
Dementieva 259 13 19.9
Radwanska 227 14 16.2
Jankovic 193 12 16.1
Wozniacki 259 18 14.4


Unforced Errors per match (Average):
UE's Matches UE/Match
Stosur 417 15 27.8
Kuznetsova 471 18 26.2
Safina 520 20 26.0
V. Williams 439 19 23.1
Dementieva 297 13 22.8
Jankovic 262 12 21.8
Azarenka 374 18 20.8
S. Williams 498 25 19.9
Wozniacki 337 18 18.7
Radwanska 208 14 14.8


Net Approches per match (average):
Net approaches Matches NA per match
Stosur 346 15 23.1
V. Williams 373 19 19.6
Radwanska 250 14 17.9
Kuznetsova 282 18 15.7
Azarenka 275 18 15.3
Dementieva 183 13 14.1
S. Williams 336 25 13.4
Jankovic 161 12 13.4
Safina 267 20 13.4
Wozniacki 206 18 11.4


The full analysis is pretty extensive and probably a bit 'nerdy'. It's available in the "Statistics" forum:
http://www.tennisforum.com/showthread.php?t=407308

I'm not native English so there may be a few weird phrases or terms in the post. Please forgive that. And feel free to ask if you have questions...

stangtennis
Apr 30th, 2010, 09:09 PM
Caroline Wozniacki French Open Outfit adidas by Stella McCartney (http://wtawomenstennis.co.cc/2010/04/caroline-wozniacki-french-open-outfit-adidas-by-stella-mccartney/)

jasminefu623
Apr 30th, 2010, 09:35 PM
Caroline Wozniacki French Open Outfit adidas by Stella McCartney (http://wtawomenstennis.co.cc/2010/04/caroline-wozniacki-french-open-outfit-adidas-by-stella-mccartney/)

thz for posting that, but i am not quite sure this will be the outfit of caro at FO:confused:
as according to caro the outfit is going to be some breath taking stuff:p so, it can't be this:lol:

stangtennis
Apr 30th, 2010, 10:38 PM
thz for posting that, but i am not quite sure this will be the outfit of caro at FO:confused:
as according to caro the outfit is going to be some breath taking stuff:p so, it can't be this:lol:
No actually I don't think that either.
These outfits are not new are they?
I don't think she will wear her FO outfit at matches before FO.

WozLolz
Apr 30th, 2010, 11:17 PM
as according to caro the outfit is going to be some breath taking stuff:p so, it can't be this:lol:
:lol: Agreed. But I'm sure those shirts/skirts will be infinitely more breathtaking with her in them.;)

stangtennis
May 1st, 2010, 12:06 AM
thz for posting that, but i am not quite sure this will be the outfit of caro at FO:confused:
Come to think of it, I found the above link because it was "Retweeted by StellaMcCartney (http://twitter.com/StellaMcCartney)" (The Official Stella McCartney Team Twitter page), so I don't know what to think. You would think the Stella McCartney Team would not retweet an article full of wrong info about which of their products are going to be used at FO? :scratch:
wta_atp_tennis (http://twitter.com/wta_atp_tennis)

Caroline Wozniacki French Open Outfit adidas by Stella McCartney http://bit.ly/99cXfW

about 10 hours ago (http://twitter.com/wta_atp_tennis/status/13128455521) via web
Retweeted by StellaMcCartney (http://twitter.com/StellaMcCartney) and 4 others

stangtennis
May 2nd, 2010, 07:37 PM
http://www.internazionalibnlditalia.it/1/PopNews.asp?LNG=EN&IDNews=573
02/05/2010 14:25

WOMEN’S TOP SEEDS FACE THE PRESS
Williams sisters, Wozniacki and Dementieva talk about their preparation

Four of the top six women’s seeds came to the Foro Italico on Sunday for press conferences prior to the tournament

Serena Williams, Caroline Wozniacki, Venus Williams and Elena Dementieva were all on hand to discuss their fitness levels and how they have been preparing for the Internazionali BNL d’Italia.

Serena Williams (No.1 seed): “After Australia I was amazed even how I was able to win the tournament. It was definitely the knee that kept me out and I had to totally recover from that whole Australia bonanza. I’ve been focusing on my rehab: gym practice and sleep, and I’ve been spending a lot of time on the court and a lot of time on clay. I really felt as if I was in Groundhog Day – I was so frustrated and so I'm really glad to be out of the United States for a while.”

Caroline Wozniacki (No. 4 seed): “I'm having a lot of treatment to get 100% fit and these ankle injuries take time but I'm staying positive and trying to do my best. They have told me that it can't get worse and that it’s OK to play if I wear strong taping and I get treatment every day. It's getting better every day and I'm just taking it day by day.”

“If you look at the top eight players, then everyone has had small injuries. The cramps that I got against (Vera) Zvonareva (in the 2009 year-ending championships in Doha) affected my next match but it was just because I was tired. I would not change anything from last year and still do the same. Look at me now, I'm playing less tournaments now but I got an ankle injury in Charleston, and so I think it is just important to enjoy what you're doing and keep working hard. You know your body and you know what you can play and what you can't play and when it is enough.”

Venus Williams (No. 4 seed): “I'm feeling pretty good. I took some time off and I started hitting some balls a couple of weeks ago. I've been doing a lot of fitness. You know what it is -- I just like playing a lot and thinking of playing games.”

Elena Dementieva (No.6 seed): “This is my first tournament on the way here so I'm just trying to play more matches as possible to get some practice for the French Open. I think it's important for anyone to focus on the clay court season and I'm just trying to get my game up and get used to practising by the time that Paris will start and get into good shape. I wasn't able to play in Stuttgart because of the Fed Cup, and the best preparation is playing matches and that is the reason why I am playing these tournaments (Rome, Warsaw and Madrid).”
They made a typo as they list Caro as 4th seed (as well as Venus).

angliru
May 3rd, 2010, 10:00 AM
Wozniacki criticizes WTA rules (http://sporten.tv2.dk/article.php/id-30265266:wozniacki-kritiserer-wtatvang.html?cbox2)

Wozniacki criticizes WTA rules
She really wanted to rest. Yet Caroline Wozniacki is back on clay Tuesday when she enters the WTA tournament in Rome. This is despite the fact that she still has problems with the ankle injury she suffered during a tournament in Charleston in April. But the rules of the WTA forces her to play.

"I gotta play. Those are the rules," says Caroline Wozniacki to Ekstra Bladet.

It is not the first time that Caroline Wozniacki is criticizing the WTA for not considering the health of the players. She is unhappy that she as a top 10 player is forced to enter certain tournaments so as not to be punished in ranking.

"Let me put it this way that I myself would have made some other rules. Some who took more account of players' health."

Rest can do wonders
Caroline Wozniacki had to leave the WTA tournament in Stuttgart a week ago in her first match when she was beaten by the lower ranked Lucie Safarova. There's much evidence that the scenario will repeat itself in Rome. Wozniacki will now be treated with massage, ice and ultrasound to be able to play and not aggravate the injury.

"I feel indeed that we're doing a little better day by day," says Caroline Wozniacki.

"It's still not 100 percent, but I hope that a few more days can do wonders."

An early exit from the tournament in Rome means a few days of needed rest before Caroline Wozniacki again has to be ready to play. At the end of the week she enters Madrid, where she hopes to be completely rid of her injury.

Spiritof42
May 3rd, 2010, 01:05 PM
Hard to have any kind of expectations for Rome after reading this.

But if this ongoing controversy is merely about being "punished in ranking" (getting a 0 instead of a 1) for withdrawing instead of potentially not being allowed to play the Danish Open, as Piotr has claimed about Stuttgart, then I don't think she should play injured.

TennisFan66
May 5th, 2010, 11:04 AM
http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1341139.ece

She says she didn't feel much (ankle) during the match, but sore after and had to cool the ankle with ice.

poiuytrewq
May 5th, 2010, 01:28 PM
I don´t understand anything, Williams sisters never play Indian Wells, why Carol has to play Rome?

angliru
May 11th, 2010, 02:03 PM
New blog entry @ tv2 (http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/entry369880.html) yesterday

Hello everyone,

Here are my greetings from Madrid. I have not written much in the past since my days look so much alike, and there hasn't been so much new lately. I lost in 3rd round to Martinez Sanchez who later won the tournament. I spend most of my time training and getting treatment on my ankle so I can be 100% ready for the French Open. So most of the days are like that: getting treatment and training. It gets better day by day and I am very confident regarding the French Open. The weather here in Madrid has not been the best; it rains a bit and is not super hot. Fortunately, there is a roof here so you can play even if it should rain a lot. Last Saturday I went to see Real Madrid play against Athletic Bilbao. Real Madrid won 5-1 and it was a nice match to watch. They played well and made some beautiful goals. There was a good atmosphere in the stadium but it became very silent when Athletic Bilbao shortly before the break equalized to 1-1 with one man less on the field. The atmosphere gradually becam better as Real Madrid scored to 2-1 and finally 5-1. I had VIP seats with father and mother and we enjoyed it. I still think the atmosphere was better at Emirates Stadium when I was there to watch Arsenal - Liverpool earlier this year. But it was a great experience and certainly something I will do again.

I'll play against Kvitova later today (not before 17:15) - a player I've played against once before. She has gone through the qualification and beaten some good players so it's not an easy match. I was in the final last year and have some good memories from here. I will do everything I can to make it as good as last year.

All the best,

Caroline

TennisFan66
May 12th, 2010, 07:25 AM
From todays Ekstrabladet:

http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1344865.ece

I know Piotr is everyones favourite to hate, but he's always sounded very grounded to me.

Onwards and upwards Caro!

stangtennis
May 12th, 2010, 10:10 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100512/audio-from-the-magic-box_2256076_2049034

Audio From The Magic Box

Alona Bondarenko (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E984,00.html?)
On preparing for Madrid and beating Wozniacki (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/SEWTATour-Archive/Archive/Audio/Bondarenko_Wozniacki.mp3)...

Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E12631,00.html?)
On her disappointment of losing to Bondarenko (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/SEWTATour-Archive/Archive/Audio/Wozniacki_resultswillcome.mp3)...
On her ankle and looking forward to the French (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/SEWTATour-Archive/Archive/Audio/Wozniacki_French.mp3)...

stangtennis
May 15th, 2010, 05:21 PM
http://www.pwo.polsat.pl/eng/news.php?i=12

The draw is out

May 15th 2010 | 16:14

Caroline Wozniacki, Marion Bartoli and Aleksandra Wozniak - these players took part in the official draw ceremony. And what is even more important, they were all happy with the draw.

Marion Bartoli is the fourth seed. In the first round she will play Klara Zakopalova from the Czech Republic. Aleksandra Wozniak has drawn a qualifier. Caroline Wozniacki is the top seeded player, so her fans have to wait till Wednesday to see her on the court. In her first match - the second round of the tournament - she will face either Angelique Kerber from Gemany or Polona Hercog from Slovenia.

Caroline Wozniacki: I would rather play Angelique, cause she's one of my best friends on the tour, she also has Polish roots and I wish her all the best for the tournament.

Aleksandra Wozniak: I hope that it will be one of the Polish girls, who are trying to qualify. The more Polish names in the draw, the better.

Marion Bartoli: I am really happy with the draw, I played Klara Zakopalova once on clay and I won. I am in a really good shape right now, probably the best in my career, so I'm really confident coming into this tournament.

stangtennis
May 17th, 2010, 07:52 PM
http://www.pwo.polsat.pl/eng/news.php?i=17
All access hour!
May 17th 2010 | 16:48

Every journalist dreams of talking to the best tennis players in the world. Thanks to the WTA Tour, in Warsaw every journalist could have asked Caroline Wozniacki, Elena Dementieva, Marion Bartoli and Li Na a question. Here's what the players said:

Caroline Wozniacki:
I am very happy that I can play in Poland. Every player has a different system of preparations, when it comes to getting ready for a Grand Slam. I like playing a week prior to such a big tournament, that's why I've decided to come here.

I hope that I will have a lot of supporters in Warsaw, I have always said that I feel half-Polish. I love Polish food. My grandmother will come here on Wednesday, I can't wait!

Elena Dementieva:
I like playing in Poland, I have good memories from Warsaw and I hope that I can do well here this time as well.

Winning gold during the Olympic Games is my biggest success so far. I was beyond happy when I won. It was my dream since I was a little girl.

There are a lot of young players on the tour. I can see the game develop, the generation is changing. These girls hit harder, better. But I have experience on my side. I play professional tennis for 10 years already, I've reached a final of a Grand Slam. I hope that I can still improve.

Na Li:
Tennis in China is getting more and more popular. I don't know how many people play tennis, but I can say one thing - too many. When one wants to book a court, one has to do it at least a day earlier. Booking a court on the same day is impossible.

I hope that I can do wel in this tournament. I feel good on clay. I've played Stuttgart and Madrid and I've reached quarterfinals in both of these tournaments.

Marion Bartoli:
I like to play a week prior to a Grand Slam, it helps me get match pratice, I'm getting used to the surface. It's important especially before Roland Garros, where every French player feels additional pressure.

I don't have any idols in women's tennis right now. When I was little, I liked Monica Seles. She played two-handed on both sides, that's why I play like that right now. Having an idol now would be really weird. I have to play against these players, so I have to be original, have my own style.

WozLolz
May 17th, 2010, 08:15 PM
http://www.eurosport.pl/tenis/wta-warszawa/2010/wozniacki-strzelila-gola_sto2328358/story.shtml?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

Wozniacki scored journalists

Legion falls on the courts, so Caroline Wozniacki went to football training. In the hall Bemowo met in the classroom with the representation of Polish journalists.

In return, got the shirt with number 2, because I was still occupied a position in the WTA world ranking.
Wozniacki allowed herself to be persuaded to score a penalty kick, which probably used.

In addition to the star Polsat Warsaw Open with journalists also trained her father Peter, a former football player and Copper Basin Legnica Lubin. Piotr Wozniacki got a shirt with the ten, the number of whom dream of every footballer.

http://i.eurosport.pl/2010/05/17/608751-7452508-317-238.jpg
http://i.eurosport.pl/2010/05/17/608752-7452515-458-238.jpg

lolz, not sure the article makes any sense in english...but she looks cute! :hearts:

Aryman3
May 18th, 2010, 04:58 AM
Caro's Interview for the Polish daily "Rzeczpospolita"(=Res Publica)

Tata uczył tenisa i Chopina
Krzysztof Rawa 17-05-2010,

Karolina Woźniacka specjalnie dla „Rzeczpospolitej” o Polsce, duńskim księciu i koszulce od Fernando Torresa


Rz: Dlaczego pani chce, by w Polsce mówiono Karolina Woźniacka, a nie Caroline Wozniacki?

Karolina Woźniacka: Bo tak w zasadzie się nazywam. Tak jest tutaj naturalnie.

Ile jest w pani Polki?

To, że mam polskich rodziców, coś dla mnie znaczy. Czuję, że mam tę polską krew w sobie i jestem chyba pół-Polką. Myślę, że przede wszystkim widać to w moim charakterze. Gram w Warszawie po raz pierwszy i jestem ciekawa, czy kibice potraktują mnie jak swoją.

Co pani najbardziej lubi w kraju przodków?

Zawsze jak przyjeżdżałam do dziadków, ujmował mnie wyjątkowy spokój dookoła, zupełnie inna atmosfera niż gdzie indziej na świecie. No i polskie jedzenie. Jest niesamowite, bardzo je lubię, kopytka, rosół, właściwie wszystko.

Potrafi pani coś zrobić sama z naszej narodowej kuchni?

Za wiele to ja nie ugotuję, za to potrafię coś upiec. Ciasta, pieczywo, bardzo to lubię.

Hymn polski pani zaśpiewa? Mickiewicza i Słowackiego zacytuje?

Nauczyć się tego w Danii – to było dla mnie trochę za trudne. Całego hymnu nie potrafię zaśpiewać, tylko kawałek. W tych kwestiach jednak jestem bardziej obywatelką Danii.

Gra pani na pianinie, to może chociaż Chopina od czasu do czasu...

Grałam nawet całkiem dobrze, ćwiczyłam solo i na cztery ręce z koleżanką. Było fajnie, ale od kilku lat przestałam, brakuje czasu. Nie wiem, jak teraz wypadłaby ta moja gra. Bez ćwiczeń nie warto podchodzić do klawiszy. Chopina też próbowałam, tata mnie uczył, on też potrafi grać.

Jak nauczyła się pani pisać po polsku?

Sama. Nie było to wcale takie trudne. Właściwie to samo przyszło. Zaczęłam od listów z polskimi dziewczynami. Na początku robiłam błędy, one mnie poprawiały i w końcu tak wyszło, że nauczyłam się pisać w miarę poprawnie.

Jakie miejsca w Polsce wydają się pani ciekawe, pominąwszy strony rodzinne?

Nigdy nie byłam w Krakowie, a słyszałam, że to piękne miasto. Agnieszka Radwańska już mnie zaprosiła, tylko jeszcze nie udało mi się dolecieć.

A znalazła pani swoje ważne miejsca na świecie?

Najpierw jest Nowy Jork. Trudno nie lubić miejsca, w którym wszystko można zrobić o każdej godzinie dnia i nocy. Polubiłam je od pierwszego razu. Ważny jest też Londyn, ma specyficzną atmosferę, lubię tam przyjeżdżać także dlatego, że w Londynie mieszka wiele koleżanek i kolegów. Monte Carlo – mieszkam tam od trzech lat, podoba mi się to, że jestem tak blisko morza, pogoda niemal zawsze słoneczna, często się coś dzieje. No i Kopenhaga – miasto, w którym się wychowałam. Urodziłam się w Odense, ale gdy miałam dwa lata, rodzice przeprowadzili się do stolicy Danii, więc mówię, że to moje miasto rodzinne.

W jakim języku pani śni?

To zależy. Jak jestem w Polsce i dużo rozmawiam po polsku, to wtedy mam polskie sny. Jak wyjadę do Ameryki, wtedy śnię po angielsku, a jak przyjeżdżam do Danii na dłużej, to po duńsku. Łatwo mi się to zmienia. Tylko z tatą zawsze rozmawiam po polsku.

Gdyby pani miała pochwalić swoją ojczyznę z paszportu, to co by pani powiedziała?

Powiedziałabym, że Dania to bardzo spokojny i bezpieczny kraj, w którym obywatel wiele dostaje od państwa. Zachorujesz, masz od razu miejsce w szpitalu, chcesz się uczyć, edukacja jest za darmo. Opieka socjalna świetna. Ludzie otwarci. Poza tym jest czysto i ładnie.

No i monarchia łaskawa dla sportowców...

Tak, następca tronu książę Fryderyk bardzo interesuje się sportem, również moją karierą, dał mi stypendium, gdy miałam 11 lat, grałam z nim miksta kilka razy, widujemy się od czasu do czasu.

Jak wygląda życie sławy tenisa w Danii?

Ludzie podchodzą, gratulują mi, proszą o autografy, a najczęściej tylko popatrzą i idą dalej. Jest spokojnie. Sława mi nie przeszkadza.

Pani sława sięga znacznie dalej, widać to np. w Internecie, plotki w sieci pani nie denerwują?

Nie, bo nigdy ich nie czytam.

Ale jedną niech pani wyjaśni, jak to było z koszulką na Gwiazdkę od Fernando Torresa?

Liverpool to moja ulubiona drużyna piłkarska, Fernando Torres i Steven Gerrard to ulubieni piłkarze, ale naprawdę nie wiem, jak to się stało, że parę dni przed świętami dostałam paczkę z koszulką Torresa, jego autografem, gratulacjami i życzeniami sukcesów. Nie mam też pojęcia, kto posłał w sieć moje zdjęcia w tej koszulce, na pewno nie ja.

Sieciowe wynalazki ostatnich czasów twitter i Facebook jednak pani wykorzystuje?

Twitter tak, bo uważam, że to, co robię, jest dla kibiców interesujące.

Można pogodzić zawód tenisistki z nauką?

Myślę, że tak. Robię to za pośrednictwem Internetu. Mogę dopasować naukę do wolnego czasu. Na razie zdobyłam w ten sposób dyplom amerykańskiej szkoły średniej. Teraz chcę tak samo studiować. Interesuje mnie biznes albo podobny kierunek.

Czemu pani lubi Agnieszkę Radwańską?

Bo jest otwartą dziewczyną, wesołą, nigdy nie siedzi w jednym miejscu, nie jest nudna, zawsze coś się z nią dzieje. Zawsze też mamy o czym pogadać.

Na korcie jest raczej chmurna, skupiona na grze...

Poza nim jest całkiem inna. Trzeba ją zobaczyć na gali WTA w Miami.

Źle, że nie gra w Warszawie?

Każda zawodniczka ma swój plan.

Nie chcę w to głęboko wchodzić, w takich sprawach decyduje się samemu.

Jaki jest podział ról w rodzinie wobec pani kariery?

Tata od zawsze mnie trenował i wszędzie ze mną jeździ. Mama raczej kibicuje, ale jak jest na turnieju, to wypierze rzeczy, ugotuje, stworzy dom. Brat ma swoją karierę piłkarską, ale zawsze mi kibicuje.

Nie ma pani wrażenia, że w damskim tenisie jest dziś za mało finezji?

To się zmienia. Oprócz siły trzeb mieć do wygrywania i głowę, i technikę.

Nie widzi pani gróźb dla tenisa, myślę o dopingu albo nielegalnych zakładach?

Myślę, że nie ma wielkiego dopingu w tenisie. Zakłady – nie wiem. Nigdy nie zdarzyło się, by ktoś chciał zapłacić mi za mecz. Nie wydaje mi się, że to jest problem.

Pomysły WTA na atrakcyjne rozgrywki podobają się pani?

Zmieniłabym trochę regulaminy dla najlepszej dziesiątki, zwłaszcza zniosłabym przymus grania w wyznaczonych turniejach. Inne sprawy: jastrzębie oko, podpowiedzi trenerów mi się podobają. Z tenisa można zrobić show.

Wspomnienie pierwszego finału US Open wciąż jest silne?

Tak. Chociaż finał z Kim Clijsters przegrałam, to mam dobre wspomnienia. To był mój świetny turniej, chciałabym przynajmniej kilka razy go powtórzyć.

Dramatyczne skurcze podczas Masters w Dausze też pani pamięta?

Pamiętam dobrze, bo przecież wygrałam ten mecz ze Zwonariową, choć nie wiem do końca jak. Nie wiedziałam, że mam tyle siły w sobie, zobaczyłam, że można przekraczać własne granice.

Czuje pani tęsknotę za życiem bez stresów, treningów, meczów i podróży?

Niczego bym nie zmieniła. Tenis dał mi bardzo dużo, zwiedziłam prawie cały świat. Naprawdę mam dobre życie

Protoss
May 18th, 2010, 05:30 AM
English translation please. :) Thanks. :)

Agata.
May 18th, 2010, 10:33 AM
Poznaj... Karolinę Woźniacką

Jak się czujesz? Jesteś w pełni przygotowana do turnieju?
Tak, myślę, że wszystko jest w porządku. Rok temu musiałam wycofać się z powodu kontuzji. Mam nadzieję, że teraz uda mi się pokazać polskiej publiczności.

Jakie są Twoje oczekiwania przed turniejem?
Chcę zagrać kilka dobrych spotkań, pokazać się polskim kibicom. Zbudować formę przed zbliżającym się turniejem Rolanda Garrosa. Zależało mi na tym, żeby tu być. W środę przyjedzie moja rodzina, będzie babcia. To dla mnie ważny turniej.

Stella McCartney przygotowuje ci już kreację na paryski turniej?
W Paryżu zagram jeszcze w tym stroju, który mam. Za to na US Open szykuje się coś naprawdę widowiskowego. Czarna, obcisła sukienka. To będzie coś!

Uważasz się za faworytkę warszawskiego turnieju?
Zawsze chcę być najlepsza. Wychodząc na mecz, masz 50% szans na zwycięstwo i trzeba swoje procenty wykorzystać. Staram się jednak myśleć o najbliższym spotkaniu, a nie o całym turnieju.

Patrząc procentowo: w jakiej części jesteś Polką, a w jakiej Dunką?
W Polsce jestem Polką, w Danii – Dunką.

from: http://www.pwo.polsat.pl/news.php?i=23


My translation:


Getting to know… Karolina Woźniacka

How do you feel? Are you fully prepared for the tournament?
Yes, I think that everything is all right. One year ago I had to withdraw because of injury. I hope that now I will manage to show myself to the Polish spectators.

What are your expectations before the tournament?
I want to play a few good matches, show myself to the Polish spectators. I want to build my form before the upcoming Roland Garros. I've cared about being here. On Wednesday my family will come, my grandmother will be there. It’s an important tournament for me.

Has Stella McCartney already been preparing an outfit for you for RG?
In Paris I’ll still play in the outfit I’ve already had. But for the US Open she is preparing something really spectacular. A black, close-fitting dress. It’s gonna be something!

Do you consider yourself as a favourite of the tournament in Warsaw?
I always want to be the best. When you’re coming out to play a match, you have 50% of chances to win and you need to take advantage of this percentage. However, I try to think about the nearest match, not about the whole tournament.

Looking at the percentage: in what part are you a Pole and in what a Dane?
In Poland I’m a Pole, in Denmark- a Dane.


Sorry, if I made any mistakes in translation.

stangtennis
May 18th, 2010, 11:02 AM
Caro's Interview for the Polish daily "Rzeczpospolita"(=Res Publica)

Tata uczył tenisa i Chopina
Original article: http://www.rp.pl/artykul/60574,481247_Tata_uczyl_tenisa_i_Chopina.html

Google translation: http://translate.google.com/translate?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rp.pl%2Fartykul%2F605 74%2C481247_Tata_uczyl_tenisa_i_Chopina.html&sl=auto&tl=en

TennisFan66
May 18th, 2010, 01:40 PM
@ Agata: Thanks :)

WozLolz
May 18th, 2010, 03:57 PM
My translation:
Looking at the percentage: in what part are you a Pole and in what a Dane?
In Poland I’m a Pole, in Denmark- a Dane.

:lol: Someone should take up politics post-tennis.

Also, Stella needs to get with the program if there's not going to be a new dress until the US Open!

p.s. thank you for translating, agata.:worship: you do a much better job than google tranlate. ;)

stangtennis
May 18th, 2010, 04:10 PM
p.s. thank you for translating, agata.:worship: you do a much better job than google tranlate. ;)
Yes, maybe agata will also translate the Rzeczpospolita article that I linked to above?

angliru
May 19th, 2010, 06:29 AM
Caro's tuesday blog entry @ tv2.dk (http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/entry370944.html):

Hi everyone,

Here are some greetings from Warsaw. I'm here with my dad and we have been very well received. It's nice to come to Poland and I consider myself half Polish since both my parents are also from Poland. I get a visit from my grandmother on Wednesday, and it will be delightful to see her again. It's not often I see my family from Poland when I travel nearly all year, so it is extra nice to see my grandmother on Wednesday.

Yesterday my dad and I were playing some football with the Polish journalists, or at least my father played with while I juggled a bit and kicked penalty. The Polish journalists have also sent an invitation to the Danish media and journalists to set up an international match between Poland and Denmark.

I have bye in the first round and will meet the winner of Hercog - Kerber this Wednesday. I look forward to playing in front of my second home audience. It is the first time I have to play tournament in Poland so I'm really looking forward to it.

There is not much to write about because I spend my time training, eating, and talking with journalists. I have trained some different aspects to be fully prepared to the French Open which starts in about one week. My shape is where it should be, so I expect to perform optimally next week.

That's all for now.

Best greetings

Caroline

Burisleif
May 19th, 2010, 07:16 PM
Here (http://blog.oregonlive.com/tennis/2010/05/french_open_why_you_should_believe_in_caroline_woz niacki.html) is an optimistic little blog from Oregon

Caroline Wozniacki, Roland Garros »
French Open: Why you should believe in Caroline Wozniacki
By Douglas Perry, The Oregonian
May 19, 2010, 4:30AM
The Associated Press

The call came in the middle of the night. Bolting upright in bed, I fumbled for the phone. I held the receiver to my ear, my hand shaking. A voice, deep and whispery and threatening, slithered across the line:

“Caroline Wozniacki? Really?”

OK, it wasn’t a phone call. It was an email. There’s just no way to make an email sound portentous. The email was sent -- click! -- in the middle of the night, though, so that’s something. My choice of women’s champion in my French Open preview clearly unsettled the man, kept him awake at night, tossing and turning until finally he had to get up and do something to make things right.

I understand the reaction. Ever since she twisted her ankle and lay on the court writhing in pain last month, Wozzie hasn’t been herself. Maybe the copious tears she shed in front of the world embarrassed her. Let’s hope not. That tumble looked like it really did hurt.

But that’s not the only problem with picking her to win Roland Garros. Even in complete health and playing full out, Wozniacki can’t beat Serena Williams or Justine Henin, right? I mean, come one, a kitten can bat a blade of grass harder than Caroline hits the ball.

My response to that: Don’t believe the conventional wisdom. Wozniacki made it to the top of the juniors heap (she won Little Wimbledon back in 2006) playing a quintessentially juniors game. Push the ball back, move it around, do the hokey pokey and turn your opponent around.

The Associated Press
An ankle injury at the Family Circle Cup almost derailed Caroline's French Open hopes.
A lot of good athletes have had success in the teen ranks doing this, but few make the leap to the big time. (Donald Young, anybody?) Wozniacki is different. She’s only 19 years old, and she’s still essentially playing her juniors-style game -- “baby tennis,” in Jimmy Connors’ parlance. And yet she reached the U.S. Open final last fall and rose to No. 2 in the world this spring.

We can snicker all we want at her game and her chubby toddler's arms, but the girl has the talent and -- just as important -- the smarts to be a champion. Under her spell, even the most stubborn opponent mindlessly moves out of position, like she’s got a stick with a carrot on the end hanging in front her eyes.

Yes, if Wozniacki wants to hang out in the Top 5 year in and year out, she’s going to have to bulk up a bit and start going for bigger shots. But right now, right here, her ability to take pace off the ball and modulate the rhythm of rallies can do the job. The reason: The WTA of 2010 is dominated by skittish wild horses. Remember Victoria Azarenka’s collapse at the Australian Open against Serena? Remember Elena Dementieva’s collapse against Alisa Kleybanova at the Malaysian Open? Remember Dinara Safina's ... well, you get the picture.

There are two WTA players we know aren’t going to have emotional breakdowns on court: Serena and Justine. But Serena likes to bang her head against a brick wall and watch the bricks go flying. That predilection has always made the French Open a tough one for her. She’s won the tournament just once. Add this to the fact that she’s been injured and is still getting back in the flow of things, and you’ve got the potential for an early exit for the World No. 1. As for Justine: She seems determined to play attacking tennis, even on her beloved clay. She could win the whole thing this way, or she could find herself slightly off in Paris and get picked apart by Jelena Jankovic or Wozniacki ... or Patty Schnyder.

So, yes, Caroline Wozniacki. Really. The women’s tour is primed for a surprise champion at this French Open. It’s a bit of a stretch to call it a surprise when the World No. 3 wins a major, but it’ll have to do.

angliru
May 22nd, 2010, 02:54 PM
Source: tv2.dk (http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-30697460:serena-jeg-f%C3%B8ler-med-caroline.html)

Serena: I sympathize with Caroline

One can almost feel Serena Williams' compassion of Caroline when tv2.dk asked her how she would feel playing with an ankle injury for four weeks, like Danish Caroline Wozniacki did.

"Oh, I'm glad it is not me. It really must be hard for Caroline to play under these circumstances, because if she doesn't, so she must pay large fines," Williams tells tv2.dk in Paris.

Caroline Wozniacki is in Paris Sunday to play the French Open.

Not an easy decision
Serena Williams has had several lengthy injuries in her career. Anyway, the American find it difficult to give a simple advice to Wozniacki.

"It's hard to give advice, it's a tough world and a tough system. The best thing is probably to listen to ones body; that's what I do," says Williams to tv2.dk.

With 12 Grand Slam titles at the CV, it's hard to argue against that the American has been good to keep herself fit and sharp, even though Williams is now 28 years.

Ten players may win title
While Williams is safe leading the world rankings, she has not won tournaments on clay this year. And according to the American, it is not certain she will take the title in Paris.

"There are ten players who can win. There are so many good players at the top, so it's all about hitting the form in Paris. If I had played more, then I would probably be the favorite, but I don't think too much about it, "says Serena Williams to tv2.dk.

Serena Williams is seeded 1 in Paris and has drawn the Swiss Stefanie Voegele in the first round of French Open . Caroline Wozniacki - ankle injury or not has drawn the Russian Alla Kudryavtseva. Wozniacki beat her last year in two sets in their so far only encounter.

FormerlyKnownAs
May 25th, 2010, 07:19 AM
It will be interesting to see how this goes.
Caroline played OK when she was waiting for her Grandma whom she was close too to die.
She spoke to her on the phone before a match and after the match she got the news that she was dead.

http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-30744702:tragedie-ryster-wozniackilejr.html

Tragedy shakes Wozniacki camp

25-05-10: 05:30 | af: Per Colstrup Vinkel, tv2.dk på Roland Garros i Paris

He has been there for every match Caroline Wozniacki has played since the Dane turned professional. But when Denmark's tennis darling Wednesday plays the second round of the French Open against Tathiana Garbin of Italy, Piotr not find the crowd.

"My sister died Sunday after being diagnosed with cancer three weeks ago. She just thought she had a cold, luckily I was with her last week and visit her in Poland," says Piotr Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

His sister, Teresa, who was 46 years old will be buried in Poland on Wednesday.

Unpredictable outcomes
While Piotr travels to Poland to be present at his sister's funeral, Ana Wozniacki will stay with her daughter in Paris. Together with the Dutch coach Sven Groeneveld will try to support the Dane through the match in the second round Wednesdays.

"I do not know how it will go. It is a completely new experience that I am not there. I hope Sven Groeneveld can take over my role and I hope and believe he can fill the part," says Piotr Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

However, there are also other Danes in place in Paris to support Wozniacki. During Monday's first round match, football players Thomas Kristensen and Morten Nordstrand could be seen enjoying Wozniackis easy victory in the first round.

Family Tragedy
Sister's death leaves Piotr Wozniacki alone, as both his parents are dead. And the heavy loss affects the entire family.

"It's a family tragedy, who could have imagined being be left alone already now. We are all affected by it. But I hope Caroline is big enough to cope without me, I am after all only a small part of her success "says Piotr Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

Piotr Wozniacki hopes to be back in Paris, if Wozniacki wins in the second round on Wednesday and thus will play the third round in Paris.

stangtennis
May 25th, 2010, 11:53 PM
http://www.rolandgarros.com/en_FR/news/articles/2010-05-25/201005251274800053492.html
Getting to know… Caroline Wozniacki
Tuesday, May 25, 2010
By Eric Frosio

Denmark’s Caroline Wozniacki, ranked No.3 in the world, always has a smile on her face. So, naturally, today’s “getting to know…” interview has a humorous theme.

What’s your favourite comedy?
White Chicks (with Shawn and Marlon Wayans). It’s an American film where two FBI agents do a bit of cross dressing. It’s incredibly funny.

What makes you laugh the most?
Being with my friends and spending the evening joking around.

Who is your favourite comic actor?
Jim Carrey.

Who is your favourite comic actress?
Cameron Diaz.

Who is the funniest male tennis player on the circuit?
Novak Djokovic, but that’s no surprise. Gaël Monfils is pretty funny. He’s crazy, in a good way. He’s always messing around. He really makes me laugh.

Who is the funniest female tennis player on the circuit?
Serena Williams. She’s a good friend: she’s always smiling and loves to laugh.

What’s the most annoying thing on the circuit?
Waiting around. Like when it starts raining just before I’m about to play. That’s really annoying.

What’s your favourite joke?
That’s a tough question. I always laugh at funny stories.

Who does the best imitations?
Novak Djokovic. He’s an expert.

Who makes you laugh no matter what?
Andy Roddick. His body language, his imitations. He’s always talking between points. It makes me laugh.

C. W. Fields
May 27th, 2010, 06:27 AM
New caro blogs http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/

Roland Garros

Hello everyone,

Here comes a little greeting from Paris, Roland Garros. However, I would just make my trip to Poland finished. It was a super nice tournaments where the whole tournament directors and the audience was amazing. They were really nice against me and my family. I had interviews with virtually all television stations in Poland. I was regarded as one of their own and it was a nice feeling. The courts were a little heavy and soft because of all the rain that had been recently. I got a little twist of the ankle again in my first match against Hercog and when I still felt it a little in the match against Zheng, I chose to pull out. It was important for me to be completely ready for French Open. Today, I played my first match here in Paris and won 6-0 6-3. It was great to get a good start and I feel that I played a really good match. I felt comfortable on the court and it is slightly faster than normal red clay. I always felt that I had surplus and was never afraid to lose. I have to meet Garbin in 2. round and it will definitely be a hard match because she is a dangerous player on clay. I know however that if I play to my best, I have a good chance of winning. I will tonight enjoy my victory with my family and a few friends before I go to bed. I will play doubles tomorrow with Hantuchova vs Malek / Petkovic on court 8. We play fourth match so it'll be a long day that will consist of a little workout and later in the evening doubles match.

I write soon again here from Paris.

Best greetings

Caroline


Roland Garros day four

Hello everyone,

It's been a little strange today because I have not had my dad by my side. Already this morning I was alone with my mother and I am not used to that when I am in a tournament and especially the Grand Slams. We were however running the daily routine of breakfast and warming up before the match. I was however very surprised that both Söderling and Tsonga were quickly finished, so I had to change my training time first from 15 to 14 and later to 13:30. It began to rain so I had time to relax and gear up properly for my match.

Before the match I talked to my dad on the phone to discuss the latest tactic in place. I played really stable and felt comfortable on court. She varied her game a lot with angles and drop shots, but I moved well and ran most of the balls down. I tried to be aggressive all the time and put pressure on Garbin. My tactics succeeded fully and I won comfortably 6-3 6-1. I meet Dulgheru of Romania in 3. round. She has played incredibly well lately so it will be a hard match.

Yesterday, I played doubles with Hantuchova and we won 7-5 7-6 over Petkovic / Malek. We played a great doubles together and she is really a sweet girl. We feel good together on court and understand each other well. She is very experienced and I'm happy to play with her and she makes me play better. Next round we face 2 x Williams so it will be a hard match and it will be fun to play against my two good friends.

I have a lot of friends from Denmark down here and cheer for me, so it's great to have support from home. I also thank all my fans for your support, because it means a lot to me.

Best greetings

Caroline

TennisFan66
May 27th, 2010, 08:28 AM
It was a clearly relieved Caroline Wozniacki, who in convincing style ran and played Tathiana Garbin down and qualified for the third round at French Open in two sets of rapping.

- I'm even a little surprised as well as I moved me today. It gives me no doubt a lot of confidence and security toward next fight. I've got a really good tape on the ankle, which helps so I did not notice a foot, sounding happy in her mobile from Paris to ekstrabladet.dk.

- I also feel I played very well. I kept a cool head, was focused and never let her into the match, "says Caroline Wozniacki in the third round of meetings of the Romanian grushaj, Alexandra Dulgheru.



Kilde: http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1352638.ece#ixzz0p72EbsnA

angliru
May 27th, 2010, 08:42 AM
Google actually does quite a good job in making these articles understandable, but there are always some funny or laughable 'translations':

"two sets of rapping" ~ two rapid sets!
"Romanian grushaj" ~ Romanian clay specialist.

Thanks for the articles everyone :yeah:

TennisFan66
May 27th, 2010, 09:41 AM
Google actually does quite a good job in making these articles understandable, but there are always some funny or laughable 'translations':

"two sets of rapping" ~ two rapid sets!
"Romanian grushaj" ~ Romanian clay specialist.

Thanks for the articles everyone :yeah:


Acutally I did some editing :lol: Try to use google translate and you'll see some really silly translations of part of the article.

poulao
May 27th, 2010, 10:57 AM
"Romanian grushaj" ~ Romanian clay shark

angliru
May 27th, 2010, 08:19 PM
From tv2.dk (http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-30818652:piotr-t%C3%A6nkte-ikke-p%C3%A5-caroline.html):

Piotr: Didn't think of Caroline

After having been to Poland to attend his sister Teresa's funeral, Piotr Wozniacki was Thursday back in Paris and was as always present when his daughter Caroline trained. But the trip to Poland has made father Wozniacki to think about the life.

"10 days ago I visited my sister in Poland, and now she is dead. It is brutal, and of course I had to go to the funeral. At that moment tennis didn't matter," says Piotr Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

Caroline Wozniacki is scheduled to play her third round match in singles against Alexandra Dulgheru Friday.

Not impressed
Although Caroline Wozniacki has won the first two matches at French Open without major problems, there is still a long way before the father and coach Piotr is satisfied.

"She has defeated the players she must defeat. She has played sensibly but it's only now that the tournament really starts. Now Caroline must perform," Piotr Wozniacki says to tv2.dk.

Caroline Wozniacki has never previously been further than the third round at French Open. But she will now if she lives up to her seeding as number three and defeats Alexandra Dulgheru.

Only the winner will be remembered
According to Piotr Wozniacki, Caroline Wozniacki must do a lot more to be a part of the tennis history. Not even the final at the U.S. Open last year will be remembered according to her father.

"Who can remember who lost at the U.S. Open four years ago? The only reason we remember the European Championship in 1992 [soccer/football] is because Denmark won. What if we had lost the finals? We remember the champions, not who has been number one for three weeks, the real champions are those who win the big tournaments," Piotr Wozniacki told tv2.dk.

Here, late Thursday afternoon, rain has interrupted the game at Roland Garrosfor the second time today. Few matches have been finished, and it therefore remains uncertain whether Caroline Wozniacki will play Friday.

C. W. Fields
May 29th, 2010, 09:03 PM
New Caro blog: http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/

Roland Garros, four round

Hello everyone,

Then the first week here at the French Open is gone. As you probably know I won my match against Dulgheru yesterday with 6-3 6-4. That was not my best match but I won and that's what's most important. I'm glad I could fight back from 1-3 in 1. set and 1-4 in 2. set. She is a very difficult player to play against, because she's constantly varying her game and makes it difficult to get a good rhythm against her. However, I am incredibly happy to be through to 4. round because it's the first time I try it here at French Open. I feel in really good shape and believe that if I play to my best I can beat anyone, but it will be difficult and I must concentrate from the first ball.

I'm free from the singles today, but will play doubles later with Hantuchova vs Williams / Williams. It will be a difficult match but I think we have a chance to surprise them because I feel that Hantuchova and I play well together. It will also be a bit special match as both Serena and Venus are some of my really good friends here on the tour.

I spend most of my time to relax and get massages when I'm not playing. It is important to gear up and not use too many unnecessary powers when the tournament is so long. It may be what ultimately decides if one wins or loses. I have a super team with me and they helped me through the match yesterday when I needed it most.

I look forward to play my four round match, but first it's about my doubles here later.

Best greetings

Caroline

angliru
May 31st, 2010, 08:06 PM
From tv2.dk (http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-30894443:wozniacki-er-glad-for-slovak.html)

Wozniacki is pleased with Slovak

It started well but ended abruptly. Caroline Wozniacki's teamwork with Slovakian beauty Daniela Hantuchova ended before it really had begun. In Paris the Slovakian had to withdraw before the match in the second round because of a minor injury.

'Of course it is unfortunate that Daniela had to withdraw, but I understand her decision. She was slightly injured, and then singles has to be the 1st priority. But we have already talked about playing together again,' Wozniacki told tv2.dk.

Caroline Wozniacki will play her quarter final in singles against the Italian player Fransesca Schiavone.

Cosy
It was the first time the Danish / Slovakian team played together. And after a close battle, they got a debut victory in the first round against a German team. And Wozniacki likes the partnership in many ways.

"Daniela's a world-class doubles player. And beyond that she is very nice and we are happy together, so she is a perfect companion for me," said Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

Caroline Wozniacki is currently not ranked among the top 100 doubles players in the world, but a regular partnership with Hantuchova might change that.

No mixed doubles
On the whole, Caroline Wozniacki likes playing doubles, which she uses for training. Before she also used to play mixed doubles, with Gael Monfils from France, among others, but there's no room for that anymore.

"I really like to play mixed doubles, it's really fun. But it is too much if I at a rest day have to play two doubles, so I've chosen not to play it anymore," Wozniacki tells tv2.dk.

C. W. Fields
May 31st, 2010, 08:33 PM
New Caro blog http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/

Quarterfinal!

Hello everyone,

A hard day at the office is finished with a fantastic nice result. I'm in the quarterfinals here at the French Open for the first time and it's a wonderful feeling. That was a really tough match today which lasted three hours and luckily I pulled the longest straw and won 7-6 6-7 6-2. I think my hard physical training up to French Open have paid off and gave me the extra energy toward the end of the match. I could see that Pennetta seemed very tired in 3. set where I was on top physically.

After the match there was a lot of media and press to deal with and then a trip down to the physio and massager to get treatment and be massaged thoroughly. I'm glad that I'm free tomorrow so I can gather strength for my quarter-final where I am going up against another Italian, and this time it's Schiavone. There was a fantastic atmosphere in the stands and it was great to play. However it was very windy so the conditions were not optimal, but it was the same for both of us.

I also make a vlog (video blog) for Eurosport, where I have a few minutes every day in "game set and mats." I shoot my everyday life here in French Open and show a little of the stuff I do during the tournament. I think it is a fun little thing so people can see how it is to be a player at the Grand Slams.

Best greetings

Caroline

angliru
Jun 4th, 2010, 08:11 AM
There has been a lot of articles about Caro in the Danish medias since her QF loss in French Open. I don't have time to make translations at the moment but here are some links:

Danish 'experts' discuss Caro's possibilities of winning a slam:

http://www.sporten.dk/tennis/mundhugges-om-caroline


Sven Groeneveld says Caro needs to improve many aspects of her game:

http://www.sporten.dk/tennis/traener-wozniacki-har-meget-forbedre


Caro's latest blog entry @ tv2.dk (Wednesday, June 2nd):

http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/entry372756.html

angliru
Jun 13th, 2010, 10:31 AM
Another brief blog entry at tv2.dk:

http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/entry373752.html

angliru
Jun 14th, 2010, 04:19 PM
An article in Daily Mail (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/tennis/article-1286093/Caroline-Wozniacki-Id-love-Steven-Gerrard-score-World-Cup-final-hat-trick--just-long-England-lose-4-3-Denmark.html#ixzz0qjM1wT3O) (in English, obviously).

It's about her and her family's passion for football, the World Cup, and about Wimbledon.

stangtennis
Jun 14th, 2010, 08:55 PM
Caroline Wozniacki: How Good Does She Have to Be?

Published by Paula Vergara on Jun 14, 2010

Many of today’s top tennis players have to deal with high expectations coming from every direction. But is it fair? On the Baseline’s Paula Vergara takes a look at Caroline Wozniacki’s game, her chances of going deep at Wimbledon, and how the media may be judging her (and her game) a bit too harshly.

http://www.onthebaseline.com/2010/06/14/caroline-wozniacki-how-good-does-she-have-to-be

stangtennis
Jun 14th, 2010, 09:13 PM
An article in Daily Mail (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/tennis/article-1286093/Caroline-Wozniacki-Id-love-Steven-Gerrard-score-World-Cup-final-hat-trick--just-long-England-lose-4-3-Denmark.html#ixzz0qjM1wT3O) (in English, obviously).

It's about her and her family's passion for football, the World Cup, and about Wimbledon.
Back home in Denmark, she is so popular that they call her the Little Princess
Does anyone actually call her "Little Princess" or did Daily Mail just make that up to make the article more interesting? I don't recall ever hearing anyone here in Denmark calling her "Little Princess".

C. W. Fields
Jun 15th, 2010, 09:01 AM
Does anyone actually call her "Little Princess" or did Daily Mail just make that up to make the article more interesting? I don't recall ever hearing anyone here in Denmark calling her "Little Princess".

I've never heard it, either. And if you do a Google search on "Wozniacki" and "lille prinsesse" all you get is news posts where Caro and Princess Isabella are both mentioned.

TennisFan66
Jun 15th, 2010, 09:45 AM
DM can be a real gutter tabloid, but thats a nice article about Caro.

Maybe the 'Little Princess' title apart :help: At least they didn't make up any other stuff ..

stangtennis
Jun 15th, 2010, 10:43 AM
Maybe the 'Little Princess' title apart :help: At least they didn't make up any other stuff ..
Wozniacki, whose father Piotr was a professional footballer in his native Poland and whose brother, Patrik, is a striker with Danish league side BK Frem,AFAIK, if you write "Danish league side" you mean the best Danish league. But BK Frem is not in the best Danish league, they only play in the Danish 1st division (2nd best league).

Piotr was a professional footballer in B1909 in Odense, Denmark too. That's the reason he and his wife and approx 2-year son moved to Denmark. Caroline who's 4 years younger than Patrik was first born a couple years after they moved to Denmark.

Mary Cherry.
Jun 15th, 2010, 04:50 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOmEI9bowz4

Seems like the same interview where the Daily Mail quotes came from, but all straight from Caro herself :)

Burisleif
Jun 15th, 2010, 04:59 PM
AFAIK, if you write "Danish league side" you mean the best Danish league.

"League side" is non specific and refers to a team in the league system. If you meant Premiere League or Super League you would specify that... that how it works in the UK.

Mary Cherry.
Jun 15th, 2010, 05:06 PM
AFAIK, if you write "Danish league side" you mean the best Danish league. But BK Frem is not in the best Danish league, they only play in the Danish 1st division (2nd best league).

Piotr was a professional footballer in B1909 in Odense, Denmark too. That's the reason he and his wife and approx 2-year son moved to Denmark. Caroline who's 4 years younger than Patrik was first born a couple years after they moved to Denmark.

You're almost as bad as kman :sobbing:

poulao
Jun 18th, 2010, 01:21 PM
Caroline: I am very positive

- It is wonderful to be back at Wimbledon, and I am striking the ball well, "says an optimistic Dane


After a few days of intense training in Eastbourne Caroline Wozniacki marched yesterday to London, where she has trained this morning with Na Li and claims her self to hit the ball well.

- I am very positive. I played really well this morning and have a good feeling to be able to control the ball. I've always been happy to come to Wimbledon, which I won as a junior in 2006.

She has as usual not looked further ahead in its lot than the first match against Tathiana Garbin.

- I played against her in Paris, and it went well. She is the type who tries to mix the game and pull off the pace, so for me it is obviously important to do the opposite. I must keep pace, be aggressive and good on the server and return, says Caroline, a recipe for a good start in London.

Source:http://ekstrabladet.dk/sport/anden_sport/tennis/article1365004.ece

angliru
Jun 18th, 2010, 07:14 PM
Blog entry @ tv2.dk (http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/) (some google translations)

Hello everyone,

Here is a greeting from London. It didn't turn out as I had hoped for in Eastbourne and unfortunately I lost in round 1 to Rezai of France. She played a good match and was somewhat better on the important points than I was. However, I have been training a lot and played some sets in practice against different opponents which compensates for the lack of real match training. I would have preferred to play more matches on the grass before Wimbledon but that was unfortunately not to happen.

My program up to Wimbledon is very simple since it consists of training, food, rest and recharging towards 1st round. So there is not much to write about. I know now that I will play against Garbin in round 1 and my plan is to take control from the start and keep the initiative. I will not look further in the tournament, but take one match at a time. I will try to keep full attention toward my match against Garbin and minimize my involvement with the medias so I can be 100% ready when the tournament starts.

I am looking forward to play and hope for a good support from Danish supporters. There is usually a very good ambience when I play here because of the many Danish supporters.

I will also watch Denmark's match against Cameroun tomorrow just as I watched their first match against Holland. I hope they can take revenge and win so they'll be right back in the game. I will sit in my national team jersey and cheer for Denmark. Best greetings

Caroline

poulao
Jun 19th, 2010, 12:35 PM
Wozniacki: Never becomes good enough

Caroline Wozniacki is now preparing for Wimbledon starting Monday

In Eastbourne Caroline Wozniacki lost in the first round. She got as such only a single match on grass before it goes off at Wimbledon. Worrying many thought - Wozniacki herself is tired of the many pundits.

-I am never good enough. If I lose the finals, it is bad if I win a tournament people look at who I've beaten. People talk too much, it never stops, "said Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

In the first round at Wimbledon Wozniacki meets the italien Tathiana Garbin.

Looking inwards
Although the results in recent seasons usually have gone favrable for the 19-year-old Dane, and since summer 2008 has won seven titles on the WTA Tour, has frequently been criticized for her play, coaches and tournament planning.

"I do not care what all sorts of people think. There was a time when I read what all the wise were saying. But now I've learned to focus on myself and I'm fine, "said Wozniacki to tv2.dk few days before it goes of at Wimbledon in London.

The Dane is currently ranked as number three in the world. The hitherto high point came when she reached the finals in the 2009 Grand Slam tournament U.S. Open.

Get highlights
The seven WTA titles have all come in junior tournaments, where most players start as tournament winners. And according Wozniacki, then the next goal is also markedly higher.

-There is a huge difference between playing WTA tournaments and Grand Slams. At the Grand Slams there are 128 players, and all go for the peak there. You have to play youre best to win - and I will of course do everything to make it myself, "said Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

Source:http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-31382221:wozniacki-bliver-aldrig-god-nok.html

poulao
Jun 21st, 2010, 11:20 AM
Wozniacki: Has become wiser

She is just 19 years, but still her fourth Wimbledon as an adult. And Caroline Wozniacki feels that the last three years has made her better equipped to manage through the grandest tournament of them all.

- I have not changed much, but so anyway. I've learned to have my priorities in order. For example, an interview is moved to after training, and not vice versa. That way you could say I have gotten smarter, "says Caroline Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

Wozniacki plays the first round at Wimbledon Tuesday, where she meets the Italian Tathiana Garbin.

Good feeling
After a somewhat disappointing effort in Eastbourne, where Wozniacki had to leave the tournament after the first round, the past three days have been training in London. And the arrow is pointing upwards.

- Some weeks you have a good feeling other weeks less good. But this week I am positive and am hitting it well, I feel i'm playing well, so it can not be much better, "said Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

The Dane's best ever result at Wimbledon was a fourth round match in 2009.

Details are in focus

With a couple of hours of training each day, Caroline Wozniacki now is well adjusted to play on the green grass of Wimbledon. And besides the point game, there has also been room to work on the details.

- Of course it is always just a few things here and there one would like to have addressed. And with the few days I've had here to train, there has been good time for it - it has been nice, "said Wozniacki to tv2.dk.

Source:http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-31453010:wozniacki-er-blevet-klogere.html

TennisFan66
Jun 21st, 2010, 04:53 PM
Sounds like Caro is in good spirit :) .. As for the 'never good enough', she is so right. There is nothing new in it though. It was the same just after Dubai, where Caro lost to Peer in (3R?) and the papers were full of 'experts' with their 'expert' advice. She basically just told them to STFU as she didn't care about their opinion. .. I like that. A lot. Caro knows whats best for Caro. Simples.

poulao
Jun 21st, 2010, 06:08 PM
It is a thread in GM on this article, someone is trying to interpret it as though Caro says 'I do not give a fuck', kind of. :shrug:

stangtennis
Jun 22nd, 2010, 05:51 PM
Caro's brother Patrik Wozniacki is blogging from Wimbledon in Danish here: http://tv2sport.dk/blog/patwoz

He just played his last season match with his football Frem against the coming 1st league team AC Horsens and scored a goal and Frem won 2-0. But his team will be relegated from the Danish 2nd league to the 3rd league anyway. So now he has summer holiday and will follow Caro at Wimbledon all the tournament.

TennisFan66
Jun 23rd, 2010, 10:02 AM
Wozniacki lands huge sponsorship contract and play safely on in Wimbledon

The Wimbledon start forgetting Caroline Wozniacki never.

At Grand Slam tournament second day secured herself not only a convincing victory at 6-1, 6-1 over Italian driver Tathiana Garbin, but the semi-seeded Danish teenager U.S. advisor also published the news of her scoring of an economically balanced sponsorship contract with the financial firm American Express.

Just as expected, was her advisor John Tobias of the U.S. marketing group BEST also satisfied.

Read also: Wozniacki: I am very satisfied

- Caroline, any sponsor's dream. Her success on the tennis court noted not only in Scandinavia. Earlier this year got Rolex her signature, and now it is official that American Express will have her as an eye catcher in various ad campaigns next year, said John Tobias, who did not want to put a monetary value on the contract size. But as she serves 20 million. crowns on her now four international contracts, it is estimated that the contract is around five million.

- Is it official? Of course I am happy at Caroline's behalf. But it will have no material impact on our economy. We already have a black American Express card, joked her father, Piotr Wozniacki.

stangtennis
Jun 23rd, 2010, 03:39 PM
American Express also had commercials featuring Caroline Wozniacki and Shahar Peer during US Open 2009.

Caroline Wozniacki interviewed by American Express
HWjPQZZ2ozQ

Caroline Wozniacki interviewed by Shahar Peer
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Caroline Wozniacki "Challenge a fan"
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angliru
Jun 24th, 2010, 03:13 PM
The Danish tennis coach Bjørn Hilberg - probably best known for being a coach of Na Li once - has expressed his opinions on Caro's chances vs. Chang. I'm too busy to make a translation (and it's probably too brief to be interesting anyway) but here is a link:
http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-31608350:wozniackis-modstander-har-fordel.html

poulao
Jun 24th, 2010, 08:59 PM
After Kai-Chen Chang match Interview (http://www.wimbledon.org/en_GB/news/interviews/2010-06-24/201006241277387054144.html)

poulao
Jun 25th, 2010, 02:42 PM
Wozniacki not worthy topseedet

She is seeded third and the fourth in the world. And exactly why the expectations are high in Danish Caroline Wozniacki, also from the international media.

- Caroline disappoints me in the form that she is seeded three. She leaves too much game to the opponent, and so do I not see her as a worthy seeded three, "says Alyson Rudd, who has covered international women's tennis for years, for tv2.dk.

Caroline Wozniacki has in two hours won two rounds at Wimbledon.

No gasp
Alyson Rudd is tennis journalist at the prestigious British newspaper The Times. She was in place during yesterday's match, where Wozniacki in two sets defeated Chang from Taipei.


- Caroline makes very few exceptional shots. She is incredibly stable from the base line, and she knows it is enough to win. But actually, I was more impressed by Chang, who went fo her shots, "says Alyson to tv2.dk.

Caroline Wozniacki meets in the third round Saturday Russian Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova.

A talent
Rudd often compare Wozniacki with Kim Clijsters, when the two met in the finals at the U.S. Open last year. And here is no doubt.

- Caroline look like an emerging player next to Clijsters. I realize that Clijsters has more experience, but I expect simply more of a third seed. As I see it, she has no chance to win a Grand Slam with this style of play, says Rudd to tv2.dk.

The dane's best result to date at Wimbledon was last year, when she had to leave the tournament after the fourth round.

Souece:http://sporten.tv2.dk/tennis/article.php/id-31644730:wozniacki-ikke-værdig-topseedet.html

Burisleif
Jun 25th, 2010, 03:00 PM
Perhaps Alyson was unaware she was watching a 2R tennis match, and not a women's Sunday football match?
Being an Ex footballer she probably assumed the idea was to get the ball in the net?

SanZiana
Jun 25th, 2010, 03:46 PM
Being an Ex footballer she probably assumed the idea was to get the ball in the net?

:lol:

Thanks for the article poulao.

I don't understand why Alyson Rudd makes this point. She is comparing completely different players in terms of their experience. Clijsters has won Grand Slams before and Caroline has made 1 final. Caroline is number 4 in the world so why should a 3 seed surprise her?

TennisFan66
Jun 25th, 2010, 06:20 PM
Caroline Wozniacki finding her feet among the legends

Alyson Rudd
Last updated June 25 2010 12:01AM

If you had to sum up Caroline Wozniacki, the No 3 seed, in one word, you would plump for “sunny”.

Quite probably she has heard the phrase “what a lovely girl” said of her many times, but she is not quite a smiling assassin. She smiles all right, but she does not kill out on court.

The Dane is one of the leading players at this year’s championships. We know this for two reasons. She was introduced to the Queen yesterday, and only the Williams sisters are seeded higher than her.

However, how many people, catching sight of Her Majesty chatting to Billie Jean King and Martina Navratalova, wondered who the pretty blonde was among the tennis legends? Wozniacki is one of those top-ranked players who are still under the radar.

The 19-year-old won the Wimbledon Girls title four years ago and it could hardly be said of her that such early promise has faded. Wozniacki made the final of the US Open last year, the first Dane to do so in 55 years, and in many ways she must be ahead of schedule, particularly with the women’s game in a phase where the more mature players are shining.

This ought to be a tournament in which a teenager with such consistent achievements at least scares the likes of Kim Clijsters, who beat her in the US Open final.

Wozniacki, though, for all her sunny nature, does not shine quite brightly enough. Her second-round match on Centre Court culminated in a straightforward win, but she failed to dazzle a crowd that needed a firework display and Michael Macintyre in full throttle before their attention was likely to be grabbed.

Wozniacki had the misfortune to follow not only Andy Murray’s match against Jarkko Nieminen, but also the departure of the Queen from the Royal Box. The spectators did not so much drift away as lurch towards the exits, and those who remained were lost in little daydreams involving Her Majesty returning to watch Britain’s No 1 in the final. If they stirred at all, it was mostly because of the Dane’s opponent.

Wozniacki is from a sporting family. Her father, Piotr, who is also her coach, played football professionally in Poland and her mother, Anna, was a member of the Poland national volleyball team. Patrik, her brother, is a striker for Frem, a football club in the Danish first division.

She grew up, then, with success as a natural backdrop and this might account for how relaxed she appeared on court, where, against Chang Kai-chen, she let the percentages take their toll on the newcomer. Her opponent was able to outwit her more often than a No 3 seed should be out-thought, but Wozniacki knew that her serve would dig her out of a hole.

This was Chang’s first Wimbledon and, with a world ranking of 89, she might have been expected to succumb in fairly plain manner. Instead, the match was more about the teenager from Taiwan than the favourite. She was audacious almost throughout and had she been less interesting, she might have won.

Instead, it was Wozniacki who bounced off the court pleased with her 6-4, 6-3 victory, beamed pretty solidly, complimented England on winning in the World Cup and admitted that she was so nervous when she met the Queen that she could not recall what was said to her beyond wishing her well in the tournament.

The Dane will progress farther, but needs more than regal encouragement if she is to win her first grand-slam tournament.

Sporting dynasties

• Caroline Wozniacki has good sporting pedigree. Her father, Piotr, played football professionally, her brother, Patrik, is a professional footballer, and her mother, Anna, played international volleyball.

TennisFan66
Jun 25th, 2010, 06:44 PM
Fashion houses lob £5m into Wimbledon war

Centre Court will become a catwalk for the next fortnight as fashion houses invest a record £5m in dressing the top female tennis stars

Barry Flatman and Maurice Chittenden
Published: 20 June 2010




http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/multimedia/archive/00036/wozniacki-580_36465a.jpg

Caroline Wozniacki wears her Wimbledon outfit designed by Stella McCartney (Ketchum PR)


It’s advantage Stella McCartney at Wimbledon this week as fashion houses invest a record £5m in dressing the top women players.
Centre Court will become the catwalk for the next fortnight as designers try to catch the attention of television audiences worldwide.
Wimbledon’s traditional all-white rule gives McCartney an early lead over the colourful outfits usually worn at other tournaments by the Williams sisters, Serena and Venus, who are respectively seeded first and second.
McCartney is dressing Caroline Wozniacki, 19, a Danish player of Polish origin. She is seeded third in the ladies’ draw. Her outfit, designed by Sir Paul McCartney’s daughter for Adidas, will include Climalite technology mesh panels on the sides for optimum ventilation.
Wozniacki said: “I always play better when I feel good, that is very important to me. So I’m really excited about getting out on court in it.”
McCartney said: “It was really important to show real women working out and showing their bodies, and to marry the two worlds, fashion and sport, which is what the collaboration is all about.”
The biggest spender at Wimbledon is Nike, which in January extended its contract with Maria Sharapova, the 2004 champion, for eight years for £43m. Sharapova will wear the Lawn Rose dress, which is layered like an upturned rose.
Serena Williams, who is also sponsored by Nike, will wear the Control Lawn dress, inspired by the Wimbledon tradition of strawberries and cream. The white outfit features red piping.
Serena was once known for being more flamboyant than her sister in her choice of unusual and risqué outfits on court. In 2002 she wore a black lycra catsuit at the US Open and followed it two years later with a denim skirt and knee-high boots. She now has a £25m deal with Nike.
It was Venus, however, who stunned audiences at the French Open last month by appearing to play in a negligee and without knickers. She was actually wearing flesh-coloured underwear.
Claudia Croft, head of fashion at The Sunday Times Style magazine, said: “Stella McCartney’s work is the most ground-breaking. Most trendy sportswear is only for watching TV or going down the shops in, but her stuff looks good and you can play sport in it. It is much better than the Williams sisters’ bordello outfits.”
A spokesman for Wimbledon said: “The rule is that outfits should be almost entirely white. A little bit of decorative boarding is usually allowed, but great big swathes of colour are out.
“We keep a selection of plain white shirts in the referee’s room and if an umpire decides a player is breaking the code when they remove their tracksuit they can be asked to change.”
Another headache for the umpires might be Andy Murray’s behaviour if he gets to play in the second round on Centre Court on Thursday when the Queen makes her first visit to Wimbledon since 1977. But organisers denied there would be any attempt to “muzzle” Murray, who is notorious for swearing during matches.
An insider said: “We have banned vuvuzelas and all football coverage but I imagine any player would be on their best conduct if they were playing in front of the Queen.”



(Just as I was copying articles from The Times anyway :lol: )

C. W. Fields
Jun 26th, 2010, 07:27 AM
New blog entry http://blog.tv2.dk/caroline.tv2/

angliru
Jul 7th, 2010, 02:50 PM
From tv2.dk (http://sporten.tv2.dk/article.php/id-31985034:wozniacki-er-savnet-i-sverige.html):

Wozniacki is missed in Sweden

All Swedish players lost in first round of this week's WTA tournament in Båstad, Sweden. And if you ask the tournament director the tournament lacks something.

- We would love to have Caroline Wozniacki here. She is so popular, and it's very noticeable that she is not here this year. There are fewer spectators, so we hope she comes back next year, says Nina Wennerstrøm to tv2.dk.

Caroline Wozniacki was in the finals of Båstad last year, when she lost to Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez in three sets.

Swedes disappointed
Swedish women's tennis has become a little better on the international scene in recent years. Both Sofia Arvidsson and Johanna Larsson are in the top 100, but lost early in Båstad.

- We had higher expectations for our Swedish players, so when we are faced with a tournament to promote Scandinavian tennis it would obviously be nice with a Scandinavian top player, "says Wennerstrøm.

Caroline Wozniacki can't play in Båstad because she had to choose between Båstad and WTA in Copenhagen because of WTA rules.

Negotiations going on
Nina Wenerstrøm has already begun negotiations to obtain Caroline Wozniacki as an attraction to the Swedish tournament in 2011.

- I spoke with Mikkel Nissen (Wozniacki's manager, Ed.) to find a solution. We hope the tournaments Båstad and Copenhagen next year may be placed on the calender so Caroline can play both. It would benefit the entire Scandinavia says Nina Wennerstrøm to tv2.dk.

Caroline Wozniacki's next tournament is held in Copenhagen in the first week of August. A tournament you can follow directly on tv2.

FormerlyKnownAs
Jul 11th, 2010, 06:28 PM
Article from TV2 Sporten for Carolines 20th


20 year old: Wozniackis comet career
11-07-10: 13:41 | by: Per Colstrup Angle

Caroline Wozniacki turns 20 on the 11th of July. And even though she is young, the Danish tennis star already has a long career behind her.

The Dane started already at the age of 13 in 2003 to playing international tournaments for players under 18.

We've looked back at the Danish tennis darlings highpoints of the years gone by.

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/58/20201258-b0ed1f3e878c581dd2969cd351388525.jpeg
Photo: Scanpix
2003
Caroline Wozniacki debut on the ITF tour for players under 18, even though the Dane himself barely aged 13 years. In the first tournament in Copenhagen the Dane reaches the finals, where she loses the first round.

Already the week after, Wozniacki is in action again. This time it is still an ITF tournament, this time in Kolding. And here was the Dane goes the whole way. In the finals she defeated the three years older Hanne Skak Jensen in three sets. Wozniacki began slowly making their presence felt on the international scene.

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/63/20201263-09260dda3f44703b063175b66c5f2569.jpeg
Photo: Danish Tennis Federation
2004
Caroline Wozniacki continued this year where 2003 left off, with victory on the international junior tour. From February to March Dane won 20 matches in a row, which resulted in four singles titles and a huge jump up the junior world rankings.

The summer was used in Denmark, where Caroline Wozniacki was moved up to the adult level, when she took part in the Senior DM at KB in Copenhagen. The only 13-year-old girl was in Denmark known as a talent, but when she after a week of nothing but victories could call itself the Danish senior champion, the majority were sur that here was an extraordinary talent. Wozniacki became the youngest Danish senior champion ever.

In the autumn shot Wozniacki, who was 14 years old, to the top in Osaka Mayors Cup, one of the most prestigious junior tournaments in the world.

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/70/20201270-ca786104228daa7d6b78b2affa43115f.jpeg
Photo: Scanpix
2005
The year in which Caroline Wozniacki trod onto the big stage, the WTA tour. In Cincinnati the Dane was awarded a Wild Card. However, she could do nothing against the Top seeded top-10 player

At the same time as her debut on the adult tour, the Danish tennis talent continued on the junior tour. Here at the end of the year came of the greatest performance ever so far for Wozniacki. At the Orange Bowl in Florida the Dane went all the way. The Orange Bowl is regarded as the unofficial World Cup. The Dane was now among the absolute future stars.

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/90/20201290-4ebffbb6a6a0f0d34dd1139e33778179.jpeg
Photo: Scanpix
2006
The years absolute highpoint for Wozniacki came when she was in the summer of that year, won the junior series in singles at Wimbledon. It was the first time in more than 60 years than Dane won a single series at Wimbledon.

Wozniacki had begun to play more and more senior tournaments. It was only the really big junior tournaments which now had an interest. At the end of the year she won again Osaka Mayors Cup, a tournament that was the last junior tournament for Dane. In the adult world rankings Wozniacki ended the year as number 237th. In 2006, Wozniacki also won Hans Justs sports prize.

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/09/20201309-f64ce9983b37c3237e626e4fc9cdfb42.jpeg
Photo: Scanpix
2007
From the beginning of the year Wozniacki had full speed with her senior career. In both Italy and the United States the Dane swept to the top in minor senior tournaments, which meant the Dane quietly climbed up the world rankings.

In both Wimbledon and U.S. Open won Wozniacki first round in the main tournament, which meant Wozniacki broke through the top 100, finishing the year as number 67th

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/22/20201322-54c965fb37104833f427fb9b6a978020.jpeg
Photo: Scanpix
2008
A big Danish tennis year began already in February, when Wozniacki for the first time beat a top 10 player, when she defeated Marion Bartoli.

August was the really big month, when Wozniacki won her first WTA tournament in Stockholm, and later that month when she reached the third round at the Olympics in Beijing. At the end of the month she won her second tournament in New Haven before she was when the fourth round of U.S. Open.

Year ends with a tournament victory at home in Odense and a historically high ranking as number 12 in world rankings.

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/56/20201356-bfb2b388e40169de437fb24222370828.jpeg
Photo: Scanpix
2009
Dane starts the year having match points against Serena Williams in Sydney, but loses. She wins another three tournaments in Ponte Vedra Beach, New Haven and Eastbourne.

However, it is undoubtedly her performance at the U.S. Open in New York people will remember. With one victory after another, Wozniacki went all the way to the final. Here she met, however, the superior power of Kim Clijsters. The performance creates tennis fever in Denmark, and at the end of the year Wozniackireceives BT's gold for performance. Dane ends year with participation by Masters in Doha and a ranking as number four in the world.

http://i2-images.tv2.dk/s/82/20201382-a823457c391a1d6fbfad5afb3d62faae.jpeg
Photo: Scanpix
2010
As number four in the world the expectations to Caroline Wozniacki are big. With the fourth round at Australian Open, quarter-final at French Open and fourth round at Wimbledon performance is not quite on top.

A single tournament victory, there has been for Wozniacki as she regained the title in Ponte Vedra Beach. One of the highlights of the season comes in August when the Dane is headlined at the newly established WTA tournament at Farum

stangtennis
Jul 26th, 2010, 08:11 PM
http://www.onthebaseline.com/2010/07/26/assessing-the-big-names-part-two
Assessing the Big Names, Part Two

Published by Guest Writers on Jul 26, 2010

After reviewing the players who have shined (http://www.onthebaseline.com/2010/07/23/assessing-the-big-names-part-one/) during the first half of 2010, Matt Trollope offers some constructive criticism about a few women who need to kick it up a notch in the final part of the tennis year.

...

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI

http://www.onthebaseline.com/uploads/caroline_wozniacki_IW_450.jpg

Best results: Won Ponte Vedra Beach, F Indian Wells, SF Charleston, QF Roland Garros, Miami

Year so far: Incredibly, Wozniacki has only faced two players in the Top 10 all year, for just one win – a straight-sets decision over Radwanska in Indian Wells. After a slow start to the season, she performed solidly during the North American spring hardcourt circuit. She collected one minor title on green clay at Ponte Vedra Beach, before fighting through injury throughout the rest of the claycourt season, retiring from matches in Charleston and Warsaw. She fell to eventual champion Schiavone in the quarterfinals at Roland Garros, and was wiped off the court in her fourth round match at Wimbledon against the unheralded Petra Kvitova.

Looking ahead: The Dane has many points to defend in the coming months, with a victory at New Haven last year preceding her unlikely run to the final at Flushing Meadows.

In summary: A ranking of No. 4 is flattering to Wozniacki. She has failed to take advantage of her high seedings and cushy draws at majors, and an overloaded schedule has meant she has not been fresh, focused and fit for the biggest events. She stands to plummet in the rankings if she fails to defend her points from last year’s US Open.

Rating: 5.5/10

jasminefu623
Aug 19th, 2010, 07:01 PM
Don't know this had been posted or not

From Paul Fein's Tennis Confidential

The Fairy Tale Life of Caroline Wozniacki

Ah, if only life were like a fairy tale. Little girls dream about saving the life of a handsome prince, as “The Little Mermaid” did in one of Hans Christian Andersen's classic fables where adventure, love and morality intertwined. One can just imagine young Caroline Wozniacki being enchanted when her parents read her the bedtime story of how the mermaid tried to win over the prince.

How fitting that Wozniacki was born and raised in Odense, Denmark, the birthplace of Andersen. Wozniacki never had to endure the mermaid's tragic loss of her family and her voice in her noble and unsuccessful yet ultimately rewarding quest.

Her middle-class parents were outstanding Polish athletes who immigrated to Denmark. Wozniacki grew up with little adversity, aside from hitting balls alone against a wall for hours because no one would play with her as a seven-year-old. Much like the determined mermaid, she relentlessly chased her own dream of becoming a tennis champion.

Wozniacki improved so dramatically that, as a 10-year-old prodigy, she appeared on Danish television. A year later, her life really took a fairy tale turn when she found a prince of her own. Prince Frederick Andre Henrik Christian, heir to the Danish throne and an avid tennis fan, invited Wozniacki to Fredensborg Palace where they played mixed doubles with his friends. The Prince even attended her Wimbledon junior matches and helped defray her travel expenses with a $3,000 check.

At age 13, she emerged as Denmark's top woman player. In 2009 Wozniacki, 19, broke through and joined the pro elite. With the support of her loving father-coach Piotr, she won tournaments on grass, clay and hard courts, a rare feat, and stunned everyone by reaching the U.S. Open final. There, Kim Clijsters, another attractive and popular blonde, derailed the less-experienced Wozniacki. She wound up ranked No. 4 in 2009 and full of hope that her fairy tale-like journey from little Denmark, a country not known for world-class female tennis players, will continue this year.

In this interview, the cheerful rising star talks about her game and her fame, where she’s come from and wants to go, her passion for fashion, and about the rest of her charmed life.



PF: You've described your life as "just like a fairy tale." What do you mean by that?

CW: I feel that my life is complete right now. I love being where I am, I worked to become a professional tennis player all my life, and now I feel like that my dream has started to finally come true. I feel content.

In an international survey, Denmark was rated the happiest country in the world. What makes you and the Danish people so happy?

It's because Denmark is the greatest place on earth, of course. Or maybe because blondes have more fun. (Laughter) Honestly, I really don't know, but it could be because we find the little joys in life.

You said, "The Danish people like me a lot because I think people can relate to me." Why do people relate to you, a wealthy and famous tennis star?

I didn't used to be famous and wealthy. I think I am still pretty down-to-earth, which makes people feel connected to me. I always like to keep myself grounded, and I do not want to forget where I came from.

The first sign of your great competitiveness came when you were little and you couldn't get anyone to play tennis with you. What happened?

I come from a very athletic and competitive family. My parents both played sports, and my brother Patrik played soccer and tennis when he was young. When I could not get anyone to play with me, I played against a backboard for hours. Then I begged my Dad, so he had to spend hours and hours hitting with me on court.

When you were 11, Prince Frederik Andre Henrik Christian, the heir to the Danish throne, invited you to the royal castle. Why did the Prince invite you, and what was that experience like?

Prince Frederick created a fairy tale for me. He was a big tennis fan, and he heard about me when I was very young and invited me to the Palace, and has even offered to help me with some of my travels. He was very generous, and I still feel honored about being in touch with him.

You had an early tennis rivalry with your older brother Patrik. Please tell me about that, and what he does now?

We are a sports-obsessed family. I used to play a lot with Patrik. He is four years older than me, but I started beating him. Now he is a professional soccer player in Denmark. I am so proud of him. He has always been there for me, and he is one of my biggest supporters. And, of course, I am his most devoted fan as well.

You father Piotr played pro soccer in Poland and Denmark, and your mother Anna played volleyball for the Polish National Team. Besides giving you outstanding sports genes, how have your parents helped you become a professional athlete?

My background is not that unusual. I picked up a racket as a kid and quickly convinced Mom, Dad and big brother on the court [that I had great potential]. Dad then became my coach. My family often travels with me even now, and I am grateful for their incredible support.

Your mother recently said, "We have never put pressure on Caro, she puts pressure on us." What did your mother mean?

I always liked challenges, I like pressure, I thrive under pressure. I think my Mom must have meant this. Also, being a professional tennis player is very demanding on my family, so their lives are also a bit more stressful nowadays. Also, when I was a little girl, I always begged someone to play with me, so I guess I put pressure on them this way too. (Laughter)

In January 2009, former superstar Martina Navratilova predicted: "Wozniacki will rank in the top 5 within a year because she has a great all-around game and a really good attitude." What is your reaction to that vote of confidence?

It is an honor to hear something like this from Martina. She is the best player ever out there, and gaining her respect means a lot to me.

You seem to truly love tennis. What appeals to you most about tennis?

The constant fighting, the competition, the struggle, the complexity of this beautiful game. You have to keep focused and have clear goals, which keeps me motivated.

During the U.S. Open, respected TV analyst Mary Carillo said: "Three years ago at the junior U.S. Open, Caroline was the second seed and was defaulted in the first round for abusive behavior. New she's this sweet little cupcake on the court." Why were you defaulted? And how have you changed during the past three years?

I'd rather not talk about this any more. People make mistakes, and I made one. I had more temper when I was a junior, but I grew up and learned to cope with my emotions better.

You come from Odense, the birthplace of Hans Christian Andersen. What was life like growing up there?

Odense is a very special place; it's charming. I had a happy childhood, and yes, I did listen to Andersen's Fairy Tales before going to bed.

The week before the 2009 Australian Open, you had three match points against Serena Williams in Sydney, but you couldn't convert them and Serena prevailed 6-7, 6-3, 7-6. What did you learn from that match?

I came to realize that I improved a lot thanks to my rigorous off-season training. I always analyze my matches and try to remember key points. I learned a lot from that match about decision-making, about the importance of hitting the right shot at the right time. I feel that I became a stronger player after how I coped with it.

Your biggest win of the year came in the U.S. Open round of 16 when you upset sixth-seeded and 2004 champion Svetlana Kuznetsova 2-6, 7-6, 7-6. What were the keys to that victory?

I felt pressured, I felt excited, and above all, I was standing within a hand-reach of my biggest win. I knew I had to go for shots I didn't necessarily feel comfortable with, and I knew I had to keep steady. I executed my plan great. I was disciplined, and for some reason, it all clicked. It was unbelievable because Svetlana is such a great player.

After a nervous start in the U.S. Open final against Kim Clijsters when you fell behind 2-0, you regrouped and led 5-4, 30-15 on your serve. Then you let the first set slip away. What happened?

I got a little nervous, but Kim played great. I don't think I let it slip away. She just played well. She deserved the win, she worked for it, and I don't really feel that I have handed it to her, or let it slip away at all.

Two revealing statistics in the U.S. Open final were winners, which Clijsters led 36 to 10, and break points converted, which Clijsters did on 5 of 8 chances. Do you agree that these two areas were the keys to the match?

Yes. Kim is a more aggressive player than I am, but I am working on being more aggressive. I am still very young. I had to deal with nerves a bit as well, and might have made some poor choices with the break points, too. But there is always room to improve, so I am happy I can work on these areas.

What do you remember most about winning at Stockholm last year to become the first Danish woman to win a Tour singles title?

It created a huge buzz in my home country, and I got a lot of attention. I just wish I could have done that in Copenhagen, but hopefully this year, I can play there when Copenhagen stages its first WTA tournament. I was shocked how interested people were in my win. I got so many congratulatory notes. Two weeks later, fans actually gathered in the hockey arena in Copenhagen to watch me play my matches at the Beijing Olympics on the big screen. Danish people are amazing. They never fail to support me, no matter where I play.

Serena Williams says she likes Twitter because "It's a great way to communicate with your fans." How do you communicate with your fans?

I am pretty active, I write blogs, I post photos on my own website, www.carolinewozniacki.dk, but I also twitter. My first Tweet was on December 2nd. I think fans feel connected to me this way, and their support is very important to me.

The only other Danish woman to capture a Tour title in the Open Era was Tina Scheuer-Larsen who won seven doubles titles in the 1980s and 1990s. Have you talked with Tina about her life and times on the pro tour?

I don't get too many chances to talk to Tina, but she has been supportive, and of course, I respect what she has done in her career. She was a pioneer in a way for Danish women, and paved the way for my being a professional.

Why did you decide to work for two weeks with Gil Reyes, Andre Agassi's former trainer?

Gil is a great strength and conditioning coach, and Andre was always in a great shape. Fitness is a key part of my game, so I felt that Gil could help me, and I contacted him. He is very motivating and pushes me to my own limits, which is very much needed when I am in the off-season.

This year you won three tournaments − Ponte Vedra Beach on clay, Eastbourne on grass, and New Haven on hard courts. What are your thoughts about that rare achievement in versatility?

It could be explained by my all-court game. I feel comfortable on every surface, or I try to convince myself that I really do. I always try to build up my shape, so that my peak is timed for the final. I try to improve on every surface. It has worked so far.

In your biggest U.S. Open matches against Kuznetsova, Melanie Oudin, Yanina Wickmayer and Clijsters, your second serve averaged only 74, 71, 72 and 74 miles per hour. Is this the part of your game that needs the most improvement?

This is also part of being more aggressive. When my second serve improves, I probably won't have to run as much, and then I would be in a better attacking position. I am working on my second serve, though.

Denmark hosted the United Nation's climate change conference December 7-18 with most of the world's heads of state attending. During the past 25 years little Denmark has become the world leader in energy conservation and wind power. What are your thoughts about that?

The current state of the world worries me a bit. Climate change affects every single person and nation all over the world. The conference and the world need cooperation, which is a huge effort. Together, we are stronger. But each person has to add something as well. We all have to take responsibility to conserve energy and reverse global warming.

Mikkel Kessler, the outstanding super middleweight boxer, recently said, "Denmark has 5 ½ million people, and 90 percent of the people know me." How famous are you in Denmark? And do you like or dislike being famous?

People know me and seem to like me. The only negative part of being famous is the tabloids, which often cause some uncomfortable moments for me. But it is part of what I do. I realize, though, that I am a tennis player, not a celebrity, and I live by these athletic standards at all times.

Do you have a boyfriend?

Despite what all the tabloids say, I do not date a lot. I also like to keep my private life private.

Like Maria Sharapova and Ana Ivanovic, two of the Tour's most glamorous women, you have your own clothing line and unveiled it at the U.S. Open where you wore a frilly lilac-colored Performance Dress and a Tennis Image Jacket in dark grape. Please tell me about it and what inspired you to do it.

I am so glad I get to work with the fabulous designers of Adidas and Stella McCartney. I just came back from a visit to the Adidas headquarters in Herzo, Germany, where I met the head designers of Stella McCartney. I love fashion. I like to be involved in creating what I wear. Our new collection is simply beautiful.

This year Ivanovic told the Daily Mail newspaper: "There's really not much friendship between the girls on tour. There's so much rivalry and jealousy, so everyone just hangs out in their own camp. In the locker room and players' lounge you can feel the jealousy. It's a shame, because it would be so nice if we could catch up over dinner or go shopping. But, sadly, I have no close friends on the tour." Do you agree with Ana?

Tennis is a very cut-throat competition. We are travelling a lot, practicing, and then heading to the hotel to rest. It is hard to form real friendships while on Tour. But I am fortunate enough to have some great friends among the girls.

On November 28, Serena Williams joined you in Barbados for an exhibition to promote tourism in Barbados. Would you please tell me about that and the four exhibitions Serena and you did last year.

Serena is such a great person. What she and Venus have done for the sport is admirable. We, young players, owe them so much respect. I became close to Serena, thanks to all our exhibitions together. Barbados was amazing, I stayed in a beautiful resort, where I got to train, and have some fun jet skiing as well. The exhibition was organized for the first time, and it was the best first-organized event I have ever been to.

Which languages can you speak?

Danish, English, and Polish. These are the languages I'm fluent in.

At the Sony Ericsson WTA Tour Championships, you beat Victoria Azarenka and Vera Zvonareva but you were forced to retire against Serena Williams in the semis because of hamstring and abdominal injuries. That had to be a big disappointment. But what did you learn from the season-ending Championships?

I was not 100 percent fit going into the tournament, and I experienced the worst cramps of my life against Vika. I felt lucky I could pull through. I had to fight so hard. It would have been a miracle if I could finish against Serena. It was hard to call it quits, but I could not risk getting more injured. It seemed wise. The Championships was an amazing experience, and Doha was simply gorgeous.

When your career is finished, how would you like to be remembered?

I'd like to be remembered as a great player, and an even greater person, who left her mark not only in the world of tennis, but in the world in general.

^ ^ ^
Wozniacki Favorites:

Food − Tacos
TV Show − "House"
Music − Mariah Carey
Exercise − Boxing, swimming
Sports (other than tennis) − Soccer, basketball
City to shop in − New York
Designers − Armani Exchange, Diesel, Miss Sixty, Louis Vuitton, Gucci
Players when I was growing up: Steffi Graf, Martina Hingis
Beauty Products − Proactiv
Tennis Racquet − Babolat Aeropro Drive
Tennis Shoes − adidas Barricade
Actor − Johnny Depp
Movies − Titanic, Wedding Crashers, Lord of the Rings, National Treasure
Tournaments − Wimbledon, U.S. Open, Indian Wells
Player to watch − Roger Federer
Soccer Player − Fernando Torres

angliru
Aug 20th, 2010, 10:03 AM
Thanks for the interview :yeah:

Danish people are amazing. They never fail to support me, no matter where I play.
She's too kind :)

stangtennis
Aug 20th, 2010, 04:45 PM
http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100819/caro-francesca-rematch_2256076_2128452
Caro & Francesca Rematch
August 19, 2010 Average rating: 4 stars

http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/javaImages/a2/21/0,,12781~8987042,00.jpg

MONTRÉAL, Canada - It will be déjà vu for Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~12631,00.html?) this week in Montréal, as she will face the same Italian 1-2 she faced at Roland Garros (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Tournaments/Info/0,,12781~838,00.html) - this time though, she hopes to make it through the double trouble.

Watch live tennis this week on TennisTV.com - $30 off annual pass! (http://www.tennistv.com/page/WTAoffereu/0,,11444,00.html?WT.mc_id=SEWTA2)
(blackout applies to European territories due to rights restrictions)

In a rematch of their three hour round of 16 encounter in Paris, Wozniacki prevailed once again on Thursday, sharpening up after the first set and eventually getting past Flavia Pennetta (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~6578,00.html?) in the round of 16 in Montréal, 46 63 61. Wozniacki closed strongly, winning 10 of the last 11 points.

"The second set was a new match, a new set," Wozniacki commented after the match. "She fought and wanted to hang in there, but I knew going into the match it wouldn't be easy because we've had tough ones before."

Watch Caro and Francesca's pre-tournament thoughts here! (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/OffCourtNews/Read/0,,12781~2124621,00.html)

In her next match at the French, Wozniacki fell in straight sets to eventual champion Francesca Schiavone (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~7820,00.html?). She will have a chance to avenge that loss on Friday, after Schiavone, the No.6 seed, scored a 64 63 win over Dinara Safina (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~8108,00.html?) in the second night match, battling back from a 2-4 start to win in two.

"I felt like I was playing really good tennis today," Wozniacki added. "We had long rallies and I had my rhythm. This is what you practice for, to go out there and play at such a high level. I hope I can continue that way going forward."

Wozniacki improved to 4-0 lifetime against Pennetta, but is 0-2 in her head-to-head against Schiavone (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/headtohead/caroline-wozniacki_2255881_12631/0,,12781~12631~7820,00.html) - both losses coming in straight sets.

Safina had beaten Andrea Petkovic (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~10087,00.html) and No.18 seed Nadia Petrova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781~6564,00.html?) en route to the third round, her first time winning back-to-back matches since January.

Mary Cherry.
Aug 21st, 2010, 01:57 AM
During the U.S. Open, respected TV analyst Mary Carillo said: "Three years ago at the junior U.S. Open, Caroline was the second seed and was defaulted in the first round for abusive behavior. New she's this sweet little cupcake on the court." Why were you defaulted? And how have you changed during the past three years?

I'd rather not talk about this any more. People make mistakes, and I made one. I had more temper when I was a junior, but I grew up and learned to cope with my emotions better.

:eek: Anyone know what happened?

TennisFan66
Aug 21st, 2010, 02:01 AM
:eek: Anyone know what happened?

It's been discussed previously in a thread here. .. I'd rather not repeat what some say Caro said. Then again there wasn't any camera or mics, so its pretty much all hear say and 3rd hand rumours ..

stangtennis
Aug 22nd, 2010, 06:38 PM
http://www.lovemeansnothing.ca/blog/?p=263

Sunshine Caroline breaks through the rain

Caroline Wozniacki isn’t even the top seed at the Rogers Cup this week, but she’s going to be the No 1. seed at the the U.S. Open. There’ll be plenty of double takes and a few snide remarks — she may have reached the final there last year, but had some luck with the draw — the out-of-form Svetlana Kuznetsova was the only Top 25 player she beat along the way. She’s only defeated one top 10 player this year and hasn’t won any big titles either. That makes her a weak No. 2, and certainly an incongruous top seed at a Grand Slam.

http://www.lovemeansnothing.ca/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/kuzz-cwoz2.jpg (http://www.lovemeansnothing.ca/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/kuzz-cwoz2.jpg)

But it’s not her fault she’s there. Wozniacki has done what the system asks. She’s played in all the tournaments she’s supposed to, sometimes — foolishly but also courageously — fighting through injuries to do so. She’s been consistent. And she’s been rewarded with a high ranking.

Should she be thinking more long term? Probably. Should the ranking system be a little different? Definitely.

But before the U.S. Open draw is made and the stream of negativity begins, let’s take a little time to look at some positives about the 20-year-old from Denmark.

Compared to the rest of her age group, she’s ahead of the game. Her good friend Victoria Azarenka was the first to win a big title with her triumph at the Sony Ericsson Open last year, but Wozniacki was the first to get to a Grand Slam final and has been by far the most successful in terms of rankings.

And she’s done it even though she’s not the biggest or most powerful player out there. Adidas coach Darren Cahill, who works with Wozniacki occasionally as part of the company’s player development program, described what enables Wozniacki to be so successful with what she has.

“I think she has incredible defensive skills, firstly,” he said at Toronto last week. “She’s got a wonderful base and that’s been schooled into her from a young age.

“She moves extremely well, her balance is great, beautiful backhand.

“I think her forehand has got stronger over the last couple of years. And her serve has been a work in progress and it continues to get better.

“But I think she’s got that X-factor when it comes to competing. She hates to lose.”

Leave it to a coach to describe a weakness as ‘getting stronger’ or a ‘work in progress’ — but Wozniacki’s lack of a big weapon is why there are doubts about whether she’s truly going to be a Grand Slam contender.

But she’s also determined to keep improving, says Cahill.

“She knows she has to get faster, she has to get stronger, particularly if she wants to play her type of game, which is a defensive game,” he said. “And I think she’s trying to build more of an attacking game around her great defensive skills.”

Off the court, Wozniacki is strikingly pleasant, with a beaming smile that’s earned the nickname, “Miss Sunshine.” Only of the few ways to get a frown is by asking why she plays so many tournaments.

Her grin didn’t even switch off during the frustration of Saturday’s rain delays, which resulted in the semifinals being postponed.

aM2BopR1oLw

Wozniacki and her semifinal opponent, Svetlana Kuznetsova, are two of the most gregarious and popular players on tour, and they entertained the crowd with a little impromptu soccer instead.

Kamakshi

http://www.lovemeansnothing.ca/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Headshot-Kamakshi-Tandon-150x150.jpg (http://www.lovemeansnothing.ca/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Headshot-Kamakshi-Tandon.jpg)

Tags: Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.lovemeansnothing.ca/blog/?tag=caroline-wozniacki), Coupe Rogers (http://www.lovemeansnothing.ca/blog/?tag=coupe-rogers), Svetlana Kuznetsova (http://www.lovemeansnothing.ca/blog/?tag=svetlana-kuznetsova), U.S. Open (http://www.lovemeansnothing.ca/blog/?tag=u-s-open)

stangtennis
Aug 23rd, 2010, 11:28 PM
After rain comes sunshine: http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/news/20100823/sunshine-after-the-rain_2256076_2132550

Sunshine After The Rain


August 23, 2010 Average rating: 5 stars


http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/javaImages/61/48/0,,12781%7E8996961,00.jpg

MONTRÉAL, Canada - She struggled early in the week but once the going got tough, Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E12631,00.html?) got going. The No.2-ranked player in the world beat two of Russia's best back-to-back on Monday for her third Sony Ericsson WTA Tour title of the year, and the ninth of her career, at the Rogers Cup (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Tournaments/Info/0,,12781%7E740,00.html).

Wozniacki, the No.2 seed at the Premier-level stop, had close encounters with Patty Schnyder (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E7693,00.html?) and Flavia Pennetta (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E6578,00.html?) in her first two matches of the week, scoring 75 75 and 46 63 61 wins. From the quarterfinals on she had few problems though - at least not with anything match-related. She avenged a French Open (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Tournaments/Info/0,,12781%7E838,00.html) quarterfinal loss to Francesca Schiavone (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E7820,00.html?), 63 62, to start.

On Saturday she won the first two games on Svetlana Kuznetsova (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E4467,00.html?) when rain stopped play, and that rain would keep going for two days. On Monday the final four took Uniprix Stadium's courts and Wozniacki shone, completing a 62 63 win over Kuznetsova then easing past No.8 seed Vera Zvonareva (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E9376,00.html?), 63 62.

"I was only thinking about one match at a time and one point at a time, to be honest," Wozniacki said. "This was such a huge tournament and almost all the top players were playing, so it's a great feeling for me to leave here as a winner. I was very happy there were so many people watching today and the weather turned out great - it was nice to have such a fantastic atmosphere."

Wozniacki, who has also won titles this season from Ponte Vedra Beach and Copenhagen, is just the second player to win three Tour titles this year, alongside Kim Clijsters (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E1583,00.html). Fittingly, Wozniacki and Clijsters also finished last year's summer hardcourt season on a high note, meeting in the US Open (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Tournaments/Info/0,,12781%7E840,00.html) final; they will also be the Top 2 seeds at the final Grand Slam of the year this year.

Zvonareva beat an injury-hampered Clijsters en route to her 24th career final; she is now 10-14 in those. She beat Victoria Azarenka (http://www.sonyericssonwtatour.com/page/Player/Info/0,,12781%7E11289,00.html?) in the other semifinal.

"It was difficult preparing myself to play against Victoria the past couple of days. Vika and Caroline have absolute different styles of game," Zvonareva said after the match. "Also, playing the final felt like I was playing a semifinal... in my head, I was just not in the final, and then I got so frustrated with myself I couldn't concentrate, because playing against such a good player like Caroline, you have to play a lot of balls. The concentration just wasn't there today."

stangtennis
Aug 24th, 2010, 12:02 AM
Rogers Cup

2010 Interviews http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interviews.php

Monday, August 23

Caroline Wozniackie (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/wozniackie_aug_23.doc)

Vera Zvonareva (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/zvonareva_aug_23.doc)

Svetlena Kuznetsova (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/svetlena_kuznetsova_aug_23.doc)

Victoria Azarenka (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/victoria_azarenka_aug_23.doc)


Sunday, August 22

Caroline Wozniacki & Victoria Azarenka (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/wozniacki-azarenka_aug_22.doc)

Svetlena Kuznetsova & Vera Zvonareva (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/kuznetsova-Zvonareva_aug_22.doc)


Friday, August 20

Victoria Azarenka (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/azarenko_aug_20.doc)

Caroline Wozniackie (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/wozniackie_aug_20.doc)

Francesca Schiavone (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/schiavone_aug_20.doc)

Svetlena Kuznetsova (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/kuznetsova_aug_20.doc)


Thursday, August 19

Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/wozniacki_aug_19.doc)

Vera Zvonareva (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/zvonareva_aug_19.doc)

Svetlena Kuznetsova (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/kuznetsova_aug_19.doc)


Wednesday, August 18

Bethanie Mattek-Sands (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/mattek_aug_18.doc)

Kim Clijsters (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/clijsters_aug_18.doc)

Caroline Wozniacki (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/wozniacki_aug_18.doc)

Elena Dementieva (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/dementieva_aug_18.doc)

Dinara Safina (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/safina_aug_18.doc)


Tuesday, August 17

Jelena Jankovic (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/jankovic_aug_17.doc)

Iveta Benesova (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/benesova_aug_17.doc)

Kim Clijsters (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/clijsters_aug_17.doc)


Monday, August 16

Stephanie Dubois (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/dubois_aug_16.doc)

Dinara Safina (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/safina_aug_16.doc)

Aleksandra Wozniak (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/wozniak_aug_16.doc)


Friday, August 13

Chris Evert (http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/interview/2010/evert_aug_10.doc)



http://www.rogerscup.com/women/english/whiteEdgeBottom.gif

stangtennis
Aug 25th, 2010, 12:55 PM
No rest for hard-working Wozniacki (http://espn.go.com/sports/tennis/blog/_/name/tennis/id/5494524/no-rest-for-hard-working-wozniacki)
http://espn.go.com/sports/tennis/blog/_/name/tennis/id/5494524/no-rest-for-hard-working-wozniacki

stangtennis
Aug 26th, 2010, 03:44 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/cpress/20100826/ca_pr_on_te/20100825_ten_new_haven

Wozniacki, spurred on by support of Yale football team, wins at Pilot Pen
http://l.yimg.com/a/i/us/nws/p/lo_cpo130.gif (http://us.rd.yahoo.com/dailynews/cp/SIG=10kr7s9lm/*http://www.cp.org/)

Pat Eaton-Robb, The Associated Press Pat Eaton-robb, The Associated Press – 36 mins ago

NEW HAVEN, Conn. - U.S. Open top-seed Caroline Wozniacki got a little help from the entire Yale football team Wednesday as she cruised to a 6-4, 6-1 win over Dominika Cibulkova at the Pilot Pen tournament.

Wozniacki, who won in Montreal on Monday and is this tournament's two-time defending champion, has a special relationship with the team. She took time last year to visit a Yale practice and talked to the players about mental toughness. They responded this year by appearing en masse, in their jerseys at her opening match.

"They are really nice guys, and that they all came and supported me today was just fun," she said. "We should make this a tradition."

Wozniacki got off to a rough start, and was down 4-3 in the first set. In between games, she got some treatment for a stiff back and responded by giving up just two points the rest of the set.

"I was telling myself, 'I want to play, move your feet, come on let's go,'" Wozniacki said. "We don't want to play three sets of course, I want to win in two."

It didn't hurt, she said, to have about 80 good looking guys yelling for her.

"We've kind of adopted her as our professional women's tennis player, and hopefully we're her American college football team," Yale coach Tom Williams said.

Wozniacki plays Italian Flavia Pennetta in the quarter-finals. Pennetta advanced with a 6-3, 6-2 win over Olga Govortsova of Bellarus. If Wozniacki wins Thursday, she will clinch the U.S. Open Series championship.

In other matches, Russian Elena Dementieva moved into the quarter-finals with a 7-6 (4), 6-7 (5), 6-4 win over Kateryna Bondarenko of Ukraine.

Dementieva, who is ranked No. 13 in the world, has dropped out of the top 10 for the first time since 2008. She said she spent four weeks in bed after tearing her left calf muscle in June during the French Open, and it has taken her some time to feel comfortable on the U.S. hard courts.

"I expected to play summer matches to get my confidence back, and just to feel the surface" she said. "Unfortunately, I was not able to do so."

She had plenty of time on the surface Wednesday, playing for just over three hours in a back-and-forth contest that featured 13 service breaks.

She will face Marion Bartoli next. Bartoli beat Anastasia Rodionova 6-3, 6-1 on Wednesday.

Nadia Petrova, playing her second straight match on the grandstand court, beat Bethanie Mattek-Sands in straight sets, 6-3, 6-3. She will face Australian Samantha Stosur in the quarter-finals.

"I'm getting to that stage when I get really confident and feeling ready for the Open," Petrova said.

Russian Dinara Safina needed two tiebreakers to get by Daniela Hantuchova 7-6 (4), 7-6 (2).

Safina was happy with her serving, which she said has been slow to come back since she ruptured a muscle and suffered a stress fracture in her back in January. She won 73 per cent of her first-serve points, and 81 per cent in the second set.

"Before it was one of my weapons, but because of my injury I was suffering a little bit," she said. "Slowly I'm getting my motion back and am starting to use it much more."

In the men's draw, top seed Marcos Baghdatis needed three sets to beat Juan Ignacio Chela and earn a quarter-final berth.

Chela took the first set 6-1, before Baghdatis came back to win the next two 6-3, 6-2.

Baghdatis said he didn't get much sleep Tuesday night and had a bad morning, getting up earlier than he needed to, because he thought he had an earlier match.

"I was a bit tired, so I started the match like I started my day, basically," he said. "But then, I found a solution to win. I fought the match. I stopped crying."

James Blake, who grew up in nearby Fairfield, lost his second-round match in straight sets to Russian Alexandr Dolgopolov 6-4, 6-2.

Blake had won the first game on Tuesday night, before rain forced play to be suspended. When the players got back on the court Wednesday afternoon, Dolgopolov won the first five games, and was never really threatened.

Blake, now 30, has dropped to 111 in the world rankings, but said he still feels he has some good tennis left in him.

"I've gotten almost everything in my life through working as hard as I can and putting my head down and hoping for the best, and that's what I've got to do now," he said. "It's tougher and tougher as the results aren't coming."