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VeeJJ
May 10th, 2008, 04:40 PM
See now i had no idea that Marat and Dinara were related cause they had different last names. Dinara has an A added to hers. Then i thought about it and Maria has an A added to her name as well since her dad's last name is Sharapov.

It's a common thing in Russia for females to have an A add to their last name???

Pie800
May 10th, 2008, 04:43 PM
yup. But it differs with the surname. For instance, you would not place an "a" at the end of surnames such as Chakvetadze, Kirilenko. As with Kournikova, Sharapova, Safina, Dementieva, Zvonareva, and several others, this is the case.

SOA_MC
May 10th, 2008, 04:45 PM
It is common in Russia they do it to make their names sound more feminine

joão.
May 10th, 2008, 04:45 PM
I've always find that funny.

VeeJJ
May 10th, 2008, 04:47 PM
yup. But it differs with the surname. For instance, you would not place an "a" at the end of surnames such as Chakvetadze, Kirilenko. As with Kournikova, Sharapova, Safina, Dementieva, Zvonareva, and several others, this is the case.

Oh, so if the last name ends wit a V the irls will get an A added to it to make it more Feminie. kk, got it

Irina123
May 10th, 2008, 04:49 PM
Oh, so if the last name ends wit a V the irls will get an A added to it to make it more Feminie. kk, got it
not only V. All russian second names form like that. Chakvetadze and Kirilenko are not russian last names

And it's not just to make more feminine, it's the russian language specific. Ending of words (adjectives for example) depends on gender.

Bulgaria
May 10th, 2008, 04:50 PM
Well this is not only common in Russia. The names in Bulgaria are the same. And it's not strange at all.

pka_liloo
May 10th, 2008, 04:50 PM
not to make it more feminine, but to point out that it is a female last name.

TTomek
May 10th, 2008, 04:53 PM
similar in Poland

Marta Domachowska but her dad Domachowski

Agnieszka Radwańska but her dad Radwański

he -ski, she -ska :p

Arhivarius
May 10th, 2008, 04:53 PM
yup. But it differs with the surname. For instance, you would not place an "a" at the end of surnames such as Chakvetadze, Kirilenko. As with Kournikova, Sharapova, Safina, Dementieva, Zvonareva, and several others, this is the case.

Chakvetadze- is Georgian surname, Kirilenko- Ukranian.
Most of the Russia surnames has -a at the end. The nouns, adjectives and verbs have male and female forms as well.
And this is very good for the language.
At least you know who you are talking about.
It's not like English, where you can read the whole page about somebody and still do not know who is that person - male or female.

égalité
May 10th, 2008, 04:55 PM
It's not to make names sound more feminine. It's just how Russian names work.

Sharapov/Sharapova
Safin/Safina
Linetsky/Linetskaya

You don't add an "a" to Chakvetadze and Kirilenko because they're not Russian last names. Chakvetadze is Georgian and Kirilenko is Ukrainian.

Slutati
May 10th, 2008, 04:58 PM
Golovin would be Golovina if they stayed in Russia.

TTomek
May 10th, 2008, 04:59 PM
Golovin would be Golovina if they stayed in Russia.
yep...

would sound funny :lol:

Irina123
May 10th, 2008, 05:02 PM
yep...

would sound funny :lol:
actually her name Golovin sounds funny for a russian :p A girl with male second name ;)

Arhivarius
May 10th, 2008, 05:03 PM
yep...

would sound funny :lol:

To tell you the truth for Russian ear it sounds awful now.
Such a nice girl with very clear Russian and very male surname.

Slutati
May 10th, 2008, 05:04 PM
Tatiana Golovin is such a sexy name:hearts::inlove:
Tatiana Golovina sounds a bit funny.

Irina123
May 10th, 2008, 05:05 PM
Tatiana Golovin is such a sexy name:hearts::inlove:
Tatiana Golovina sounds a bit funny.
Golovina sounds correct
Golovin sounds funny
:D

Slutati
May 10th, 2008, 05:09 PM
Golovina sounds correct
Golovin sounds funny
:D
Well I'm sure it sounds correct to you, but Tatiana Golovina sounds funny to me it almost rhymes:lol:

Marcelo.
May 10th, 2008, 05:18 PM
Didn't Martina Hingis born Hingisova ??I wonder why she changed.?

Dodoboy.
May 10th, 2008, 05:27 PM
Demska Demski

I like the polish way better.

Slutiana
May 10th, 2008, 05:31 PM
Golovin would be Golovina if they stayed in Russia.
I think it sounds better. Although I don't mind Golo-veen or Golo-van or whatever it is. :o

Svetlana.
May 10th, 2008, 06:45 PM
Ones on ESPN they said Yuri Sharapova and we started laughing because to Russians it's like saying Sharapova's father is a female. :lol:

pka_liloo
May 10th, 2008, 07:27 PM
I think it sounds better. Although I don't mind Golo-veen or Golo-van or whatever it is. :o

:lol: it's not Golo-van, it's Golovina - you read it just like you spell it and make an accent on "a" or sometimes on second "o" ;)

AndreConrad
May 10th, 2008, 07:33 PM
:lol: it's not Golo-van, it's Golovina - you read it just like you spell it and make an accent on "a" or sometimes on second "o" ;)

Same happened with New York Times when they written Angnieszka's dads name as Robert Radwanska instead of Radwanski. To Polish (or perhaps every slavic) person it sounds like calling a man Mrs.

Elwin.
May 10th, 2008, 07:34 PM
same with the Czechs i guess. Zakopalova, Benesova, Vaidisova, Kvitova etc.

If Misa had the Czech nationality her name was; Michaella Krajicekova Weird name :lol:

Fire_Fox
May 10th, 2008, 08:31 PM
Yeah!

And Ana Ivanovic shoul be Ana Ivanovna(Russian) :lol:

Arhivarius
May 10th, 2008, 10:14 PM
Yeah!

And Ana Ivanovic shoul be Ana Ivanovna(Russian) :lol:

Not exactly.
Ivanovna in Russian is not last name. It is patronymic name, meaning "the daughter of Ivan".
All Russians have first name, patronymic name and surname.
The full name of Masha is Maria Yurievna Sharapova.
Yurievna means "daughter of Yuri"
It is very informative, actually.
If you know the full name of the person then you know the name of his/her father.
I think, it is also in a way shows some respect to fathers.

serenus_2k8
May 10th, 2008, 10:26 PM
Weird but interesting, so when a Russian female marries, do they take the female version of their new husband?

AndreConrad
May 10th, 2008, 10:34 PM
Weird but interesting, so when a Russian female marries, do they take the female version of their new husband?

That is the rule with slavic names, some languages have a form for the name when you are single and it is a name of your father and different when it is of your husband, but this distiction becomes obsolete in most languages.

xcrtbckhnd
May 10th, 2008, 10:59 PM
Is it accurate that the ending "skaya" denotes Jewish descent?

OsloErik
May 11th, 2008, 12:07 AM
Lots of immigrants keep the spelling changes, too. I met a doctor in the United States who told me how odd some of the nurses find it when a Polish father has a daughter and gives her a different last name.

Arhivarius
May 11th, 2008, 12:17 AM
Weird but interesting, so when a Russian female marries, do they take the female version of their new husband?

In general it is true. Some prefer to keep their maiden last name.

Arhivarius
May 11th, 2008, 12:23 AM
Is it accurate that the ending "skaya" denotes Jewish descent?

Not necessarily.
If Jewish female has the ending "skaya" ( it is female form, male form is ski or skii in this case) it usually means that she descends from Poland, Belorussia or Ukraine, where her ancestors could get such a name, which is typical for that region.

Lunaris
May 11th, 2008, 12:48 AM
same with the Czechs i guess. Zakopalova, Benesova, Vaidisova, Kvitova etc.

If Misa had the Czech nationality her name was; Michaella Krajicekova Weird name :lol:
Krajíčková ;)
Not weird at all. :p

azza
May 11th, 2008, 01:15 AM
Alicia Molikova.
Samantha Stosurova

Brett.
May 11th, 2008, 01:33 AM
Not exactly.
Ivanovna in Russian is not last name. It is patronymic name, meaning "the daughter of Ivan".
All Russians have first name, patronymic name and surname.
The full name of Masha is Maria Yurievna Sharapova.
Yurievna means "daughter of Yuri"
It is very informative, actually.
If you know the full name of the person then you know the name of his/her father.
I think, it is also in a way shows some respect to fathers.

Wow, i didn't know that. Very interesting.

Alicia Molikova.
Samantha Stosurova

Did you know that Alicia's parents are 100% Polish? so you can't add ova in her name

Arhivarius
May 11th, 2008, 02:53 AM
Wow, i didn't know that. Very interesting.



Did you know that Alicia's parents are 100% Polish? so you can't add ova in her name

Nope. :)
-ova is not Polish.
For Polish such ending like -evska, -ovska are typical.
She could be something like Molikovska. :)
It can be original name, too. Although it sound a bit Czech or Ukrainian to me. It's hard to tell not knowing ancestry.
It's all mixed over there. There are a lot of folks from neighboring countries.

njnetswill
May 11th, 2008, 03:05 AM
I got very good with Russian names through tennis and reading Dostoevsky. :yeah:

SOA_MC
May 11th, 2008, 03:08 AM
shutup

You mean shutuprova hey that sounds like a name of certain Russian player:tape:

Arhivarius
May 11th, 2008, 03:11 AM
I got very good with Russian names through tennis and reading Dostoevsky. :yeah:

Good for you. :)
It's a pity that Dostoevsky didn't write anything about tennis.
He could be more popular these days. Especially at this forum. :D

wild.river
May 11th, 2008, 03:17 AM
there's a russian guy in my school whos last name is braverman. i think he's jewish. is that a pure russian last name?

Arhivarius
May 11th, 2008, 03:20 AM
there's a russian guy in my school whos last name is braverman. i think he's jewish. is that a pure russian last name?

Absolutely not.
This -man ending is typical for Jewish, whose ancestors used to live in Germany.

Juarito
May 11th, 2008, 03:32 AM
Really interesting thread! In Latin America our surnames are usually spanish and italian such as López, Fernández, Suárez, Salerni, Zabaleta, Sabatini even if it´s a girl or a boy, he gets the father´s surname. In Spain they use to get the father and mother´s both such us Anabel Medina Garrigues, Lourdes Dominguez Lino, etc.

Brett.
May 11th, 2008, 03:44 AM
shutup

No, you shut up, Aaron! :rolleyes:

Nope. :)
-ova is not Polish.
For Polish such ending like -evska, -ovska are typical.
She could be something like Molikovska. :)
It can be original name, too. Although it sound a bit Czech or Ukrainian to me. It's hard to tell not knowing ancestry.
It's all mixed over there. There are a lot of folks from neighboring countries.

Ahhh, i see! ;)

mal
May 11th, 2008, 03:49 AM
Wow, i didn't know that. Very interesting.



Did you know that Alicia's parents are 100% Polish? so you can't add ova in her name

How does that change if they are Jewish or Moslem?
For example, can a man have one of those "son of names?

I always thought, that ov was the same a off.

Fire_Fox
May 11th, 2008, 09:40 AM
Not exactly.
Ivanovna in Russian is not last name. It is patronymic name, meaning "the daughter of Ivan".
All Russians have first name, patronymic name and surname.
The full name of Masha is Maria Yurievna Sharapova.
Yurievna means "daughter of Yuri"
It is very informative, actually.
If you know the full name of the person then you know the name of his/her father.
I think, it is also in a way shows some respect to fathers.

:haha:
Man , don`t tell me an instructive story. I know that. It was a joke.
Russian is my native language! :lol: ;)

Hakapeszi
May 11th, 2008, 12:25 PM
:haha:
Man , don`t tell me an instructive story. I know that. It was a joke.
Russian is my native language! :lol: ;)

But it can be new and interesting information for others.

adner
Aug 13th, 2009, 03:40 PM
Nope. :)
-ova is not Polish.
For Polish such ending like -evska, -ovska are typical.
She could be something like Molikovska. :)
It can be original name, too. Although it sound a bit Czech or Ukrainian to me. It's hard to tell not knowing ancestry.
It's all mixed over there. There are a lot of folks from neighboring countries.
Nah, her name would be simply "Molik". Some Polish surnames don't change at all(generally only "adjectivelike" names decline as Polish adjectives do while nouns don't).

miffedmax
Aug 13th, 2009, 04:05 PM
I'm pretty sure that Dementieva translates to "Lovely bangs."

Mrs. Dimitrova
Aug 13th, 2009, 04:09 PM
I believe it's Maria Yuryevna Sharapova, not Maria Yurieva Sharapova. So does that make her daughter of Yuri still? :haha:

Julian.
Aug 13th, 2009, 04:31 PM
Btw, why Makiri's surname is Kirilenko whereas Anastasia's surname is Pavlyuchenkova?

I thought Pavlyuchenko is a Ukrainian name and shouldn't be changed?

Hakapeszi
Aug 13th, 2009, 05:15 PM
Btw, why Makiri's surname is Kirilenko whereas Anastasia's surname is Pavlyuchenkova?

I thought Pavlyuchenko is a Ukrainian name and shouldn't be changed?

I don't know, just guessing...

maybe her father is not Pavlyuchenko rather Pavlyuchenkov

Vamos Feńa
Aug 13th, 2009, 05:21 PM
I can't get used to when a female has a male ending surname like Wozniacki instead of Wozniacka or Sarah Pitkowski. Sounds so akward.

olivero
Aug 13th, 2009, 05:32 PM
I can't get used to when a female has a male ending surname like Wozniacki instead of Wozniacka or Sarah Pitkowski. Sounds so akward.

It's interesting that while many of Polish decent players have their 'male' surnames (Wozniacki, Lisicki) Olivia Rogowska has the original female form ;)

Vyacheslavovna
Aug 13th, 2009, 05:39 PM
See now i had no idea that Marat and Dinara were related cause they had different last names. Dinara has an A added to hers. Then i thought about it and Maria has an A added to her name as well since her dad's last name is Sharapov.

It's a common thing in Russia for females to have an A add to their last name???

I understand the confusion. (Not really if you call yourself a tennis fan ;))

I remember watching two Kenyan runners in a distance event and thinking "those two look alike". I listened to the commentary and they had different surnames, so I assumed they weren't related. But the commentators went on to say that they were brothers, but had different names.

In most of Ethiopia and Kenya, a child's surname is the first name of their father. But when they are circumcised around 15, they are given a new surname and brothers will often choose different surnames to help distinguish themselves from one another.

If interested, here is a link http://www.kivafriends.org/index.php?topic=1628.20;wap2

From watching PRIDE MMA, I also found out that in Japan the surname, is not the last name but the first name: they would announce "SAKURABA KAZUSHI!!!"

I think some Chinese and Korean people living in the west, put the surname in capitals, so its clear which is which: PARK Ji Sung, of Man U

Julian.
Aug 13th, 2009, 05:51 PM
I don't know, just guessing...

maybe her father is not Pavlyuchenko rather Pavlyuchenkov

but there is actually a Russian soccer player and his name is Roman Pavlyuchenko. I'm pretty sure it's a Ukrainian name.

Hakapeszi
Aug 13th, 2009, 06:15 PM
It's interesting that while many of Polish decent players have their 'male' surnames (Wozniacki, Lisicki) Olivia Rogowska has the original female form ;)

The used surname depends on their birthplace, I think. If they registered a non women name-end changing country, they use unchanged fathernal name.

Backhand_stille
Aug 13th, 2009, 07:23 PM
Yeah!

And Ana Ivanovic shoul be Ana Ivanovna(Russian) :lol:

Serbia, Slovenia and Croatia are only Slavic countries who don't add "A" on end of surnames for ladies! I think...am I right?? :confused:

njnetswill
Aug 13th, 2009, 07:27 PM
Serbia, Slovenia and Croatia are only Slavic countries who don't add "A" on end of surnames for ladies! I think...am I right?? :confused:

I don't think Ukrainians do.

adner
Aug 13th, 2009, 07:36 PM
Serbia, Slovenia and Croatia are only Slavic countries who don't add "A" on end of surnames for ladies! I think...am I right?? :confused:

As I have already said today, not all Polish surnames used by ladies end with "a". For example our famous cross-country athlete, Justyna Kowalczyk has a surname ending with "k" and its a Polish surname.

Joana
Aug 13th, 2009, 07:38 PM
but there is actually a Russian soccer player and his name is Roman Pavlyuchenko. I'm pretty sure it's a Ukrainian name.

Pavlyuchenko and Pavlyuchenkov are two different names.

Backhand_stille
Aug 13th, 2009, 07:45 PM
we have also rule in Serbia when we dont tell a name of girl only surname we add -eva on the end...exemple: Ivanoviceva osvojila titulu u Montrealu (Ivanovic won title in Montreal)!But that is only if we didnt tell a name of girl and in that case we add -eva on the end becouse of sounds more feminime...
Also Ana is child of Miroslav and becouse that we used Ivanoviceva but If Ana will be a wife of some Ivanovic than she will bi Ivanovcka not Ivanoviceva...we that used only in talk when we didnt tell a name of girl...when we tell a name we used clear surname Ivanovic becouse name is sound feminime...counfused Slavc :)

TTomek
Aug 13th, 2009, 08:02 PM
It's interesting that while many of Polish decent players have their 'male' surnames (Wozniacki, Lisicki) Olivia Rogowska has the original female form ;)
maybe she has her mother surname :p

Julian.
Aug 13th, 2009, 08:04 PM
Pavlyuchenko and Pavlyuchenkov are two different names.

oh i see. i didn't know that. thanks for the info.. :)

LeonHart
Aug 13th, 2009, 08:39 PM
It's the same for almost all European languages. It's like in Spanish a boy is Chico and a girl is Chica. It's not really anything strange :shrug:

Anabelcroft
Aug 13th, 2009, 08:44 PM
we have also rule in Serbia when we dont tell a name of girl only surname we add -eva on the end...exemple: Ivanoviceva osvojila titulu u Montrealu (Ivanovic won title in Montreal)!But that is only if we didnt tell a name of girl and in that case we add -eva on the end becouse of sounds more feminime...
Also Ana is child of Miroslav and becouse that we used Ivanoviceva but If Ana will be a wife of some Ivanovic than she will bi Ivanovcka not Ivanoviceva...we that used only in talk when we didnt tell a name of girl...when we tell a name we used clear surname Ivanovic becouse name is sound feminime...counfused Slavc :)

Interesting!

LeonHart
Aug 13th, 2009, 08:46 PM
I understand the confusion. (Not really if you call yourself a tennis fan ;))

I remember watching two Kenyan runners in a distance event and thinking "those two look alike". I listened to the commentary and they had different surnames, so I assumed they weren't related. But the commentators went on to say that they were brothers, but had different names.

In most of Ethiopia and Kenya, a child's surname is the first name of their father. But when they are circumcised around 15, they are given a new surname and brothers will often choose different surnames to help distinguish themselves from one another.

If interested, here is a link http://www.kivafriends.org/index.php?topic=1628.20;wap2

From watching PRIDE MMA, I also found out that in Japan the surname, is not the last name but the first name: they would announce "SAKURABA KAZUSHI!!!"

I think some Chinese and Korean people living in the west, put the surname in capitals, so its clear which is which: PARK Ji Sung, of Man U


In Japan/Korea/China they put their surnames in front, that is correct :angel:

But of course when they convert their name to Westerners they put it in the back :p That's why people get confused with Li Na and Jie Zheng's name :lol:

Books in Asia also read from left to right rather than the standard western books that go right to left.

Kworb
Aug 13th, 2009, 08:52 PM
In Japan/Korea/China they put their surnames in front, that is correct :angel:

But of course when they convert their name to Westerners they put it in the back :p That's why people get confused with Li Na and Jie Zheng's name :lol:

Books in Asia also read from left to right rather than the standard western books that go right to left.

Good job adding to the confusion by putting Na's first name second and Jie's first name first :p

njnetswill
Aug 13th, 2009, 09:30 PM
Books in Asia also read from left to right rather than the standard western books that go right to left.

Mainland China goes the same direction as the West.

LeonHart
Aug 13th, 2009, 09:32 PM
Good job adding to the confusion by putting Na's first name second and Jie's first name first :p

I know, I'm included on the list that get confused :angel:

In Taiwan names are usually 3 to 4 characters long, where as in China names are usually just 2 characters (first and last name) so it adds to the confusion :mad:

LeonHart
Aug 13th, 2009, 09:33 PM
Mainland China goes the same direction as the West.

Ah, didn't know that, thanks. My mom has several Chinese books and they all go the other way.

Tennis-Chick
Aug 13th, 2009, 09:48 PM
It's interesting that while many of Polish decent players have their 'male' surnames (Wozniacki, Lisicki) Olivia Rogowska has the original female form ;)

So is Olivia's dads name Rogowski (or whatever the male version is) or has the whole family just decided to use Rogowska?

dragon.serbia
Aug 13th, 2009, 10:23 PM
we have also rule in Serbia when we dont tell a name of girl only surname we add -eva on the end...exemple: Ivanoviceva osvojila titulu u Montrealu (Ivanovic won title in Montreal)!But that is only if we didnt tell a name of girl and in that case we add -eva on the end becouse of sounds more feminime...
Also Ana is child of Miroslav and becouse that we used Ivanoviceva but If Ana will be a wife of some Ivanovic than she will bi Ivanovcka not Ivanoviceva...we that used only in talk when we didnt tell a name of girl...when we tell a name we used clear surname Ivanovic becouse name is sound feminime...counfused Slavc :)

Ivanovicka


I shame myself that I didn't know difference when you need to use Ivanovicka and Ivanoviceva.
sorry for my english

MechWarrior2k
Aug 13th, 2009, 10:43 PM
I don't think Ukrainians do.

You're right, though Russians in Ukraine do tend to add -a to their surname. Also, some Russians in Ukraine only add -a to their surname if it's like for example Kerensky - Kerenska instead of Kerenskaya.