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View Full Version : HELP - Trying to plan a trip to Wimbledon


eugreene2
Apr 13th, 2008, 01:58 PM
I just decided this morning that I am going to WImbledon. I went to the US Open last year and I want to try a different slam this year. No, I don't have any tickets but I understand that I can get grounds passes once I get there. (IS THAT TRUE?) My plan is to go the first week.

Anybody else have any advice? Places to stay? Reasonable Hotel area or other options. Is there any hope of getting a center court ticket by camping out or the like? So to anyone that has been or is going this year, please give me some info. Thanks! :)

Silvio Dante
Apr 13th, 2008, 02:01 PM
Would you like to meet up with me? I'm going

Uranium
Apr 13th, 2008, 02:03 PM
:cool:

eugreene2
Apr 13th, 2008, 02:03 PM
Sure if I can work everything out.

TheBoiledEgg
Apr 13th, 2008, 02:05 PM
if you're camping out to get centre court tickets, the pavement will do, bring a tent and sleeping bag.

Silvio Dante
Apr 13th, 2008, 02:06 PM
I did that one year and my alarm didn't go off...I slept right through Nathalie Tauziat`s match

Slutiana
Apr 13th, 2008, 02:07 PM
Yeah, get there on any day bright and early and you can go and queue up for a ground pass. If you get there really early, you could be in within two hours. Just bring things to keep you amused.
I dno about hotels and stuff but once you're in there, you can queue up for used center court tickets. I wouldn't advise it, though or you'll waste half your day queuing up.

eugreene2
Apr 13th, 2008, 02:09 PM
if you're camping out to get centre court tickets, the pavement will do, bring a tent and sleeping bag.

O good so you CAN get centre court tickets? I would do that for 1 of the days, just to say I watched a match on centre court. Prob camp out tuesday night so I can watch Venus' 2nd round match on Wed.

Just read Box's message. THANKS BOX!!!

TheBoiledEgg
Apr 13th, 2008, 02:45 PM
the people who camp out get the seats right at the front, you can ask the person at the kiosk where you wanna be (1st come 1st served)

Bartosh
Apr 13th, 2008, 02:56 PM
I have a question:
Ticket for the central court and court nr 1 is for one match or one day? Thanks ;)

eugreene2
Apr 13th, 2008, 03:06 PM
I'm sure it's for the whole day. I wonder how early you can start the line. I dont wanna take any chances. As long as I have my lap top, cell and food, I'll hav plenty to pass the time. LOL

hayleytrotter
Apr 13th, 2008, 03:09 PM
there is always the chamption tennis tours website as well.
Its pricey, but if your budget allows it... go for it.

Mina Vagante
Apr 13th, 2008, 03:14 PM
Come meet me :)

Lapin
Apr 13th, 2008, 11:04 PM
Have a read of this! It's something I found on the web a few years back so the prices are a little out of date, but having queued myself I can really recommend it - great fun!! (Beware though, because you really will want to do it all again next year - Wimbledon is addictive!! ;) )


by Dulcie Jackson
June 2001
Wimbledon is here again! I can't believe that it's come round so soon.

I always get really excited about Wimby in about March, when I realise it won't be that long, then it suddenly creeps up. Not that I'm some patriotic gin-soaked Wimby freak. Well, Wimby freak okay, I admit, but I don't subscribe to all the stuff that gets thrown around by the press every year, about it being "the best tournament in the world" etc. etc. No, I like it because it's here and I can go to it...and the most important reason of all...because you can queue for it! Yes, this is a vitally important fact.

The problems with Wimbledon are known all too well. It's on grass, the tennis is boring, serves are supreme, it rains too much and (for overseas fans) the matches take place in the early hours of the morning. Not to mention the way the British press get some kind of strawberry fever which renders them incapable of seeing British interests in an objective (and therefore pessimistic) light. And the "best tournament in the world" attitude seems to be particularly prevalent in the Wimbledon management committ ee, which seems to think that since they are Wimbledon everyone else has to change their seeding policy to suit them.

I can really see why some don't like Wimbledon. The only reason why I don't dislike it is because actually going there gives you a whole new perspective which the press, and the Wimbledon committee, don't show to overseas fans at all. And that's what I'm writing about.

Making preparations

Wimby gives out a large part of its tickets by public ballot, for which you have to send them an SAE (stamped addressed envelope) the previous December -- I have never yet been lucky there -- but the rest of the Centre Court, No. 1 and No. 2 tickets are saved to be sold on the day to people queueing at the gate. The thing is that there aren't that many (about 600-1200 for Centre/No.1 each per day, I think), so if you want one, you have to queue overnight for one.

Queuing really isn't so bad, because everybody brings tents, sleeping bags, cards, thermos flasks, mini-TVs, radios, food, and assorted camping paraphernalia, and sets up a little camp on the pavement. The first year I camped was an impulse decision made with my friend Jessica, who wanted to see Henman on Centre while I wanted to see Pioline-Kafelnikov on No.1. We caught the train up to London, then a taxi to Wimbledon, and we arrived at about 1am. Jessica had been moaning at me in the taxi, "This is crazy. We didn't need to do this. No one is going to arrive at Wimbledon at 1am the night before. We're going to be the first ones." I conceded that we might be amongst the first 5 or so.

So you imagine our faces when we got out and saw tents and tents stretching out into the distance, just outlined in the moonlight. It took us 15 minutes to walk to the end of the queue. There must have been 400 tents or so that we walked past, plus people in sleeping bags stretched out in the open air, either sleeping or blinking dazedly at us. We rounded a corner, greeted by a posse of security guards chatting, and finally found the end of the queue. Luckily for us this part of the queue ran through a field, so the traffic noise was distant.

A long night's camping

So, time to set up the tent. Unfortunately I had never put up a tent before, and Jessica cannot see in the dark. So she held the torch while I wrestled with the tent, trying to slot a second pole into a third while the first slid out, and lifting folds of canvas, trying to sort out assorted holes, rings and layers. After 15 minutes or so it was looking more tent-like than canvas pancake-like, and after 20 minutes we had managed to get the inner mosquito net successfully attached.

We sat down. We were surely crazy. But when we looked up all we could see was the shallow canopy of trees silhouetting the navy blue starry sky, and just the next morning a tantalising lineup of tennis would be waiting for us.

The best thing of all is that as an overnight queuer you can not only choose which court you want according to who you want to see, but you can also pick your seats. A ballot ticket holder is just given a day and seat numbers months in advance, way before you know who is playing and where. Jessica was worried because since we had come so (relatively) late, with 450-odd people ahead, we were borderline for Centre Court. (There are two separate queues, North and South). I could be sure though that I would see Pioline on No. 1.

We talked to a group of lads from Newcastle, who invited us over to their camp to play cards. After 45 mins of Black Queen, it was somehow irrationally decided that a 2am trip to go and look at the part of Centre Court visible from outside was absolutely necessary. I trudged with the others, by now very tired. Jessica was bounding around like a mad thing, getting very excited. Okay, we've seen it, now I'm really going to bed.

Rise and shine!

I woke up at 6am. Vague morning-type sounds of newspaper sellers and other queuers wandering around. I unzip the tent blearily, and floods of golden dawn sunshine make me screw up my eyes. The field looked like a school playing field, with an impromptu game of football going on, and a hotdog seller handing out steaming sausages in buns. Ugh. It's far too early. I lie down again.

Suddenly, something bashes the tent and a strong firm voice rings out: "Up and moving in ten minutes, everyone!" I snap out of dozing. There's a blazered steward with a stick or something moving along the line, waking everyone up. It's 6:50, and we have ten minutes to pack this tent, which neither of us have done in our life! Clothes and sleeping bags are flung out, and poles and toggles are unhooked. Ten minutes later we are wide awake and our hearts pumping, but our tent is somehow squashed into its bag , two feet by five inches.

Everyone shuffles along a bit. Jessica and I take turns to go to the toilet and wash. This is the difficult part of the morning, when you really want to go back to bed, but you keep on moving along at 5 minute intervals as all the space between the tents is compressed. The time passes with people going by giving out freebies or selling newspapers, and the occasional news crew or BBC camera doing filming for whatever promotional clip. Every national daily has at least one seller going round, so you can have your pick. Most people buy one and peruse the order of play.

I look back along the line and note smugly how there are hundreds of people behind us just in our vicinity. The end of the queue is out of sight, but I knew from previous experience of same-day queueing that 10am is about as late as you can safely leave it if you want a ground pass. The queue stretches for aaaaaages. It's insane.

Approaching the promised land

The next exciting part of queueing is when you finally go up the wooden bridge crossing the road next to the grounds, and the iron wrought walls of Wimbledon with the entirely green Centre Court looming above come into view. You can sense the excitement levels increase from the general chatter around you. People start getting more lively.

Then they start handing out the tickets. What they do is a couple of stewards come over to the start of the queue armed with a variety of brightly coloured wristbands and a dangerous-looking clicky thing. Each court has a different colour. They move their way down the queue person by person, asking which court they would like, then clicking the wristband into place. Court 1 is silver today, while Centre is fluorescent green. I admire my shiny silver wristband. Jessica just misses out on Centre, by about 3 people, so joins the silver banded people. The green-banded people ahead look happy and smug, or at least they do to Jessica, who decides to sulk for the rest of the day.

Then all you do is sit and wait till 10:30am, when they open the gates. Official Wimbledon people come round with rolls of large "I Queued at Wimbledon 1999" stickers and little freebie programmes to give out. The Mr Kipling man arrives, dressed in a Mr Kipling cake costume and gives out sixpacks of strawberry cakes to everyone who looks hopeful as he goes past. The Mr Kipling freebies are a feature of every Wimbledon queue. Six cakes per person is too much for anyone, even me, so you find lots of abandon ed ones everywhere, but despite the rubbish it's a nice thing to have when you've not yet had any breakfast.

The freebies are great. We also get Robinsons drinks, orange juice, rain macs, varieties of baseball cap, newspapers, and even bananas. That was last year when I camped with another friend, and suddenly we all heard the sound of steel drums. Then a truck came into view, carrying a steel band on the back plus people holding bunches of bananas, throwing them at random people in the queue. Some people shouted out "over here!" and were rewarded with more bananas. It was surreal. Then the Banana Wagon disappeared out of sight, and I never did get a banana myself.

Finally they let you in at 10:30 or so. You go to tables to have your bags searched, then you're let to your ticket gate to pay and to choose your seats.

All the way the stewards are there to help people, to tell them where to go. These stewards manage the flow of people into the ticket area, but others wander up and down the queue, giving directions to late arrivals, and stopping to answer questions or just have a chat about the weather. They are typically dressed in Wimbledon navy blazer with green pinstripes, a rimmed peaked cream hat, shirt and tie with obligatory Wimbldon badge. 99% of them are old wrinkly gentlemen who look like they have had a long soak in the gin, but they are very polite and helpful, and they all look like they are enjoying themselves. The ticket guy shows me his plan of the courts, and I plump for the first row, right behind the players.

We made it!

We're in!! Finally we can get rid of our bags, which are quite numerous. We go to the toilets under Centre to change into clean clothes, and queue up at Left Luggage to have our tent stuff filed away on shelves. It's free, I think, and you can get rid of all your clobber for the whole day.

This is where you look around and remember why you did this. Wimbledon is remarkably big, and busy, and above all it really is green everywhere. Except when it's purple. The canvas, the massive wall of ivy, the uniforms, the stalls, the ticket stands, the flower boxes, all green. You all know this. But it's more impressive when it surrounds you entirely. Even the flowers were purple. They have a massive order of play 12 foot tall in the central area (also green), with people milling around peering up at it and muttering to each other whether to see Goran Ivanisevic on Court 13 or the doubles with Federer on 18.

We wander round to Court 3. The atmosphere is something like a big tennis/strawberries and cream themed garden party. It's relaxed and open, but there is also the tinge of expectation about the dramas that will unfold on 19 courts at once in just an hour or so. This is especially so around the outside courts, which are as far from the Wimby unfriendly, elitist, Brit-centric stereotype as you can get. It feels more like a street market, with narrow pathways between small courts with only a little seating a nd wooden benches around the sides, packed with people clapping for Basuki vs. Po or Ulihrach vs. Voltchkov.

They have about 9 courts all next to each other, all separated by canvas. Next to Court 13 the canvas is so high beside the stands you just end up weaving past other fans in a mysterious maze of dark green canvas, and you suddenly emerge beside Court 6. I love this bit. I love wandering round all the courts, absorbing the atmosphere. Another great thing to do is get a takeaway stirfry from the lovely restaurant under Centre in its little carton and go and eat it with your freebie chopsticks on the big hill, watching whatever is happening on Centre on the big screen with the other picnickers.

That day with Jessica I did see Pioline-Kafelnikov. It was a lovely hot sunny day. Court 1 is okay, but the outside courts are the most fun. Court 2 is small and intimate, and my favourite of all because it creates an arena of drama but you are so close to the players.


Wimbledon is a lot of fun to go to, and it's actually pretty egalitarian with its ticketing policy and cheap prices (£12 for a ground pass, cheaper than any of the British ATP events); it's contrary to the stereotype in lots of ways. The best bit is, I leave to do this all again tomorrow!!

sammy01
Apr 13th, 2008, 11:16 PM
just got allocated my tickets through my club today, i've got second tuesday tickets (ladies qtr finals), but im having trouble with who to go with my friends dropped out so im talking to my other friend but i dont know them very well. i dont wanna miss the tickets as its centre court on the day i wanted grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!

eugreene2
Apr 14th, 2008, 12:39 AM
Have a read of this! It's something I found on the web a few years back so the prices are a little out of date, but having queued myself I can really recommend it - great fun!! (Beware though, because you really will want to do it all again next year - Wimbledon is addictive!! ;) )


by Dulcie Jackson
June 2001
Wimbledon is here again! I can't believe that it's come round so soon.

I always get really excited about Wimby in about March, when I realise it won't be that long, then it suddenly creeps up. Not that I'm some patriotic gin-soaked Wimby freak. Well, Wimby freak okay, I admit, but I don't subscribe to all the stuff that gets thrown around by the press every year, about it being "the best tournament in the world" etc. etc. No, I like it because it's here and I can go to it...and the most important reason of all...because you can queue for it! Yes, this is a vitally important fact.

The problems with Wimbledon are known all too well. It's on grass, the tennis is boring, serves are supreme, it rains too much and (for overseas fans) the matches take place in the early hours of the morning. Not to mention the way the British press get some kind of strawberry fever which renders them incapable of seeing British interests in an objective (and therefore pessimistic) light. And the "best tournament in the world" attitude seems to be particularly prevalent in the Wimbledon management committ ee, which seems to think that since they are Wimbledon everyone else has to change their seeding policy to suit them.

I can really see why some don't like Wimbledon. The only reason why I don't dislike it is because actually going there gives you a whole new perspective which the press, and the Wimbledon committee, don't show to overseas fans at all. And that's what I'm writing about.

Making preparations

Wimby gives out a large part of its tickets by public ballot, for which you have to send them an SAE (stamped addressed envelope) the previous December -- I have never yet been lucky there -- but the rest of the Centre Court, No. 1 and No. 2 tickets are saved to be sold on the day to people queueing at the gate. The thing is that there aren't that many (about 600-1200 for Centre/No.1 each per day, I think), so if you want one, you have to queue overnight for one.

Queuing really isn't so bad, because everybody brings tents, sleeping bags, cards, thermos flasks, mini-TVs, radios, food, and assorted camping paraphernalia, and sets up a little camp on the pavement. The first year I camped was an impulse decision made with my friend Jessica, who wanted to see Henman on Centre while I wanted to see Pioline-Kafelnikov on No.1. We caught the train up to London, then a taxi to Wimbledon, and we arrived at about 1am. Jessica had been moaning at me in the taxi, "This is crazy. We didn't need to do this. No one is going to arrive at Wimbledon at 1am the night before. We're going to be the first ones." I conceded that we might be amongst the first 5 or so.

So you imagine our faces when we got out and saw tents and tents stretching out into the distance, just outlined in the moonlight. It took us 15 minutes to walk to the end of the queue. There must have been 400 tents or so that we walked past, plus people in sleeping bags stretched out in the open air, either sleeping or blinking dazedly at us. We rounded a corner, greeted by a posse of security guards chatting, and finally found the end of the queue. Luckily for us this part of the queue ran through a field, so the traffic noise was distant.

A long night's camping

So, time to set up the tent. Unfortunately I had never put up a tent before, and Jessica cannot see in the dark. So she held the torch while I wrestled with the tent, trying to slot a second pole into a third while the first slid out, and lifting folds of canvas, trying to sort out assorted holes, rings and layers. After 15 minutes or so it was looking more tent-like than canvas pancake-like, and after 20 minutes we had managed to get the inner mosquito net successfully attached.

We sat down. We were surely crazy. But when we looked up all we could see was the shallow canopy of trees silhouetting the navy blue starry sky, and just the next morning a tantalising lineup of tennis would be waiting for us.

The best thing of all is that as an overnight queuer you can not only choose which court you want according to who you want to see, but you can also pick your seats. A ballot ticket holder is just given a day and seat numbers months in advance, way before you know who is playing and where. Jessica was worried because since we had come so (relatively) late, with 450-odd people ahead, we were borderline for Centre Court. (There are two separate queues, North and South). I could be sure though that I would see Pioline on No. 1.

We talked to a group of lads from Newcastle, who invited us over to their camp to play cards. After 45 mins of Black Queen, it was somehow irrationally decided that a 2am trip to go and look at the part of Centre Court visible from outside was absolutely necessary. I trudged with the others, by now very tired. Jessica was bounding around like a mad thing, getting very excited. Okay, we've seen it, now I'm really going to bed.

Rise and shine!

I woke up at 6am. Vague morning-type sounds of newspaper sellers and other queuers wandering around. I unzip the tent blearily, and floods of golden dawn sunshine make me screw up my eyes. The field looked like a school playing field, with an impromptu game of football going on, and a hotdog seller handing out steaming sausages in buns. Ugh. It's far too early. I lie down again.

Suddenly, something bashes the tent and a strong firm voice rings out: "Up and moving in ten minutes, everyone!" I snap out of dozing. There's a blazered steward with a stick or something moving along the line, waking everyone up. It's 6:50, and we have ten minutes to pack this tent, which neither of us have done in our life! Clothes and sleeping bags are flung out, and poles and toggles are unhooked. Ten minutes later we are wide awake and our hearts pumping, but our tent is somehow squashed into its bag , two feet by five inches.

Everyone shuffles along a bit. Jessica and I take turns to go to the toilet and wash. This is the difficult part of the morning, when you really want to go back to bed, but you keep on moving along at 5 minute intervals as all the space between the tents is compressed. The time passes with people going by giving out freebies or selling newspapers, and the occasional news crew or BBC camera doing filming for whatever promotional clip. Every national daily has at least one seller going round, so you can have your pick. Most people buy one and peruse the order of play.

I look back along the line and note smugly how there are hundreds of people behind us just in our vicinity. The end of the queue is out of sight, but I knew from previous experience of same-day queueing that 10am is about as late as you can safely leave it if you want a ground pass. The queue stretches for aaaaaages. It's insane.

Approaching the promised land

The next exciting part of queueing is when you finally go up the wooden bridge crossing the road next to the grounds, and the iron wrought walls of Wimbledon with the entirely green Centre Court looming above come into view. You can sense the excitement levels increase from the general chatter around you. People start getting more lively.

Then they start handing out the tickets. What they do is a couple of stewards come over to the start of the queue armed with a variety of brightly coloured wristbands and a dangerous-looking clicky thing. Each court has a different colour. They move their way down the queue person by person, asking which court they would like, then clicking the wristband into place. Court 1 is silver today, while Centre is fluorescent green. I admire my shiny silver wristband. Jessica just misses out on Centre, by about 3 people, so joins the silver banded people. The green-banded people ahead look happy and smug, or at least they do to Jessica, who decides to sulk for the rest of the day.

Then all you do is sit and wait till 10:30am, when they open the gates. Official Wimbledon people come round with rolls of large "I Queued at Wimbledon 1999" stickers and little freebie programmes to give out. The Mr Kipling man arrives, dressed in a Mr Kipling cake costume and gives out sixpacks of strawberry cakes to everyone who looks hopeful as he goes past. The Mr Kipling freebies are a feature of every Wimbledon queue. Six cakes per person is too much for anyone, even me, so you find lots of abandon ed ones everywhere, but despite the rubbish it's a nice thing to have when you've not yet had any breakfast.

The freebies are great. We also get Robinsons drinks, orange juice, rain macs, varieties of baseball cap, newspapers, and even bananas. That was last year when I camped with another friend, and suddenly we all heard the sound of steel drums. Then a truck came into view, carrying a steel band on the back plus people holding bunches of bananas, throwing them at random people in the queue. Some people shouted out "over here!" and were rewarded with more bananas. It was surreal. Then the Banana Wagon disappeared out of sight, and I never did get a banana myself.

Finally they let you in at 10:30 or so. You go to tables to have your bags searched, then you're let to your ticket gate to pay and to choose your seats.

All the way the stewards are there to help people, to tell them where to go. These stewards manage the flow of people into the ticket area, but others wander up and down the queue, giving directions to late arrivals, and stopping to answer questions or just have a chat about the weather. They are typically dressed in Wimbledon navy blazer with green pinstripes, a rimmed peaked cream hat, shirt and tie with obligatory Wimbldon badge. 99% of them are old wrinkly gentlemen who look like they have had a long soak in the gin, but they are very polite and helpful, and they all look like they are enjoying themselves. The ticket guy shows me his plan of the courts, and I plump for the first row, right behind the players.

We made it!

We're in!! Finally we can get rid of our bags, which are quite numerous. We go to the toilets under Centre to change into clean clothes, and queue up at Left Luggage to have our tent stuff filed away on shelves. It's free, I think, and you can get rid of all your clobber for the whole day.

This is where you look around and remember why you did this. Wimbledon is remarkably big, and busy, and above all it really is green everywhere. Except when it's purple. The canvas, the massive wall of ivy, the uniforms, the stalls, the ticket stands, the flower boxes, all green. You all know this. But it's more impressive when it surrounds you entirely. Even the flowers were purple. They have a massive order of play 12 foot tall in the central area (also green), with people milling around peering up at it and muttering to each other whether to see Goran Ivanisevic on Court 13 or the doubles with Federer on 18.

We wander round to Court 3. The atmosphere is something like a big tennis/strawberries and cream themed garden party. It's relaxed and open, but there is also the tinge of expectation about the dramas that will unfold on 19 courts at once in just an hour or so. This is especially so around the outside courts, which are as far from the Wimby unfriendly, elitist, Brit-centric stereotype as you can get. It feels more like a street market, with narrow pathways between small courts with only a little seating a nd wooden benches around the sides, packed with people clapping for Basuki vs. Po or Ulihrach vs. Voltchkov.

They have about 9 courts all next to each other, all separated by canvas. Next to Court 13 the canvas is so high beside the stands you just end up weaving past other fans in a mysterious maze of dark green canvas, and you suddenly emerge beside Court 6. I love this bit. I love wandering round all the courts, absorbing the atmosphere. Another great thing to do is get a takeaway stirfry from the lovely restaurant under Centre in its little carton and go and eat it with your freebie chopsticks on the big hill, watching whatever is happening on Centre on the big screen with the other picnickers.

That day with Jessica I did see Pioline-Kafelnikov. It was a lovely hot sunny day. Court 1 is okay, but the outside courts are the most fun. Court 2 is small and intimate, and my favourite of all because it creates an arena of drama but you are so close to the players.


Wimbledon is a lot of fun to go to, and it's actually pretty egalitarian with its ticketing policy and cheap prices (£12 for a ground pass, cheaper than any of the British ATP events); it's contrary to the stereotype in lots of ways. The best bit is, I leave to do this all again tomorrow!!

Thanks Lapin ... I just got hyped all over again.

tiptop
Apr 14th, 2008, 12:46 AM
As a Londoner I can only tell you: Get yourself an oyster card (http://www.tfl.gov.uk/tickets/oysteronline/2732.aspx).


You should also check out this thread: Who is going? (http://www.wtaworld.com/showthread.php?t=324876)

IanRadi
Apr 14th, 2008, 12:51 AM
I have a question:
Ticket for the central court and court nr 1 is for one match or one day? Thanks ;)

I'm going to the US Open this year and I'd like to know that as well. And what about if I want to watch auxiliary courts? Do I have to pay for each court or can I walk around those courts?

eugreene2
Apr 14th, 2008, 01:05 AM
Ian - I went to the Open last year and yes the grounds pass is for the full day. It gives you access to all the courts EXCEPT the main show courts - Ashe & Armstrong.

DutchieGirl
Apr 14th, 2008, 02:17 AM
Ugh I'm going to Wimby too - queueing SUCKS! If you want a centre court ticket, be ready to queue all night. :help: As for cheap hotels in London - well good luck generally, but being right in the middle of summer and having Wimby on makes it damn near impossible. ;)

eugreene2
Apr 14th, 2008, 03:54 AM
Ugh I'm going to Wimby too - queueing SUCKS! If you want a centre court ticket, be ready to queue all night. :help: As for cheap hotels in London - well good luck generally, but being right in the middle of summer and having Wimby on makes it damn near impossible. ;)

Wow this is the first "negative" response, yet I do see that you're going. :lol: I've actually already found some really good deals for hotels and having camped out for some events here in the states, I usually have fun with it. Meeting people, playing cards and playing games on my PSP - it sounds like I'll prob be on the side of the people who say Wimbledon is addictive. But I do appreciate hearing from the other side. Because of course, you're joking!!! ;)

tiptop
Apr 14th, 2008, 04:26 AM
Wow thi[s is the first "negative" response, yet I do see that you're going. :lol: I've actually already found some really good deals for hotels and having camped out for some events here in the states, I usually have fun with it. Meeting people, playing cards and playing games on my PSP - it sounds like I'll prob be on the side of the people who say Wimbledon is addictive. But I do appreciate hearing from the other side. Because of course, you're joking!!! ;)

Check out the thread I linked for you. There are two or three backpackers mentioned where you seem to get a fair deal for your money. Before I came to live here I once stayed in the Generator hostel (http://www.generatorhostels.com/) which is full of college kids but still quite okay for London. Especially the prices are good. I f you follow this link (http://www.powerhostels.com/hbaffiliate/index.cfm?fuseaction=hostelavail&hostel=4643&affid=5&nights=5&arrival=22-Jun-2008&currency=GBP&lan=en) you can see the basic prices for June (reach from 17£ fordorms to 50£ for singles).


Enjoy your stay. :)

tiptop
Apr 14th, 2008, 04:30 AM
Wow this is the first "negative" response, yet I do see that you're going. :lol: I've actually already found some really good deals for hotels and having camped out for some events here in the states, I usually have fun with it. Meeting people, playing cards and playing games on my PSP - it sounds like I'll prob be on the side of the people who say Wimbledon is addictive. But I do appreciate hearing from the other side. Because of course, you're joking!!! ;)

Oh, sorry didn't see you had already found a place to stay.;)

Silvio Dante
Apr 14th, 2008, 08:19 AM
Come meet me :)

Do you mean eugreene2...or me too? :)

DutchieGirl
Apr 14th, 2008, 11:07 AM
Wow this is the first "negative" response, yet I do see that you're going. :lol: I've actually already found some really good deals for hotels and having camped out for some events here in the states, I usually have fun with it. Meeting people, playing cards and playing games on my PSP - it sounds like I'll prob be on the side of the people who say Wimbledon is addictive. But I do appreciate hearing from the other side. Because of course, you're joking!!! ;)

Sorry, but I don't see the fun of standing in a line for hours on end when I could be out seeing the city. I much rather like how the AO works, and you can buy ground passes before the event starts. I am going, but hopefully this year I don't have to queue many days. Probably didn't help that the time I went was supposed to be to see Misa make her debut and she injured her knee the week before at Rosmalen. Kinda dampened my mood of going to Wimby anyway. And no, I wasn't joking - queueing SUCKS. :ras @ queueing!

TheBoiledEgg
Apr 14th, 2008, 11:58 AM
Sorry, but I don't see the fun of standing in a line for hours on end when I could be out seeing the city. I much rather like how the AO works, and you can buy ground passes before the event starts. I am going, but hopefully this year I don't have to queue many days. Probably didn't help that the time I went was supposed to be to see Misa make her debut and she injured her knee the week before at Rosmalen. Kinda dampened my mood of going to Wimby anyway. And no, I wasn't joking - queueing SUCKS. :ras @ queueing!

Queueing is one of the ancient British traditions :lol:
no wonder it didnt take off in Aus cos they were all prisoners :p

DutchieGirl
Apr 14th, 2008, 12:03 PM
Queueing is one of the ancient British traditions :lol:
no wonder it didnt take off in Aus cos they were all prisoners :p

Yeah - stupid Brits. I'm a 1st generation Aussie btw, so that convict shit doesn't worry me. :p

Bartosh
Apr 14th, 2008, 12:37 PM
I think I don't understand :p I want tickets for centre court or court n1 so I should be around Wimbledon Park at 9 pm in previous day or at night or in the morning? :p And from where I take a tank? :lol: Sorry for my English :p

Paule22
Apr 14th, 2008, 12:45 PM
To get a ground pass, go there from 8-9 in the morning, and it's (almost) guranteed, that you will be in by 11. I went to Southfields last year.

Check out Palmers Lodge, just a really great place to stay in London. On the other side its not really important where you will sleep, because you will be tired anyway. But if you can get a good place, why not. And dont try to get a hotel, the cheap ones are beyond anything you can possibly imagine(shitholes), and good ones are far too expensive.

Queing in Wimbledon is great, I love it. :)

I think I don't understand :p I want tickets for centre court or court n1 so I should be around Wimbledon Park at 9 pm in previous day or at night or in the morning? :p And from where I take a tank? :lol: Sorry for my English :p

As what I've heard 5am in the morning should be fine. But the difficult thing is to get there so early, because only the busses are running.

Dave.
Apr 14th, 2008, 01:32 PM
I got to Southfields and started queueing at around 7am I think, and I got into Wimbledon at 10, a good hour before play began.

tiptop
Apr 14th, 2008, 02:38 PM
Queueing is one of the ancient British traditions :lol:
no wonder it didnt take off in Aus cos they were all prisoners :p

Indeed, it's part of the national heritage. ;)


btw the always useful london transport journey planner

http://journeyplanner.tfl.gov.uk/user/XSLT_TRIP_REQUEST2

IanRadi
Apr 14th, 2008, 03:51 PM
Ian - I went to the Open last year and yes the grounds pass is for the full day. It gives you access to all the courts EXCEPT the main show courts - Ashe & Armstrong.

Thank you so much :D

And what about Ashe and Armstrong? Are tickets for the whole day or for each match?

GoDominique
Apr 14th, 2008, 05:18 PM
Queueing is fun. Don't listen to the grumpy old b**** trying to spoil the party.

On the days where Murray isn't playing, arriving at 9 am for a Ground pass is sufficient at either queue (there are two each day). On the other days 8.30 should be fine, with 8 am you are 100% sure.
Never queued overnight, but for Centre Court many people join the queue the night before, 2 am is probably the latest but a lot depends on who's playing. I once got Court No.1 tickets after arriving at 6 am but it was very close, I recommend 4-5 am.

GoDominique
Apr 14th, 2008, 05:20 PM
Oh and last year I had a hotel room for 35 pounds. As Paule22 said, it certainly wasn't up to German standards. ;) Yeah, it was pretty awful. But I skipped breakfast and I was so tired that I didn't mind the uncomfortable bed. There are probably better options though.

hingis-seles
Apr 14th, 2008, 05:34 PM
The queueing sounds like the best part. But it's no fun alone, and none of my friends are particularly fond of tennis...what they do know is only because of my obsessive rambling. ;) :p

eugreene2
Apr 14th, 2008, 06:31 PM
Well I'm excited - I see some good deals on hotels from hotwire.com. I'm just afraid it may be too far away from Wimbledon since I have to queue everyday. So I'm about to check out some of the spots you all have suggested. Hopefully, I'll meet some of you in line. LOL

Paule22
Apr 14th, 2008, 08:19 PM
The queueing sounds like the best part. But it's no fun alone, and none of my friends are particularly fond of tennis...what they do know is only because of my obsessive rambling. ;) :p

Queueing is even ok, if you are alone. You get all the freebies(smoothies, apples, sun protection etc.) and all people are in a faboulus mood. If you are kind of an open person, you will get to know some people in 5 minutes.

Well I'm excited - I see some good deals on hotels from hotwire.com. I'm just afraid it may be too far away from Wimbledon since I have to queue everyday. So I'm about to check out some of the spots you all have suggested. Hopefully, I'll meet some of you in line. LOL

I will say it once more: DO NOT BOOK A HOTEL IN LONDON - unless you are willing to pay more than 200$ or are 100% sure it's a good place. You will be appalled with what kind of shit they come up even for something like 150$.

Every hostel in the city area is ok, to get to Wimbledon in the morning. Look for websites like hostelworld.com and book some place which has a good rating. As I said before, Palmers Lodge is great.

eugreene2
Apr 14th, 2008, 09:07 PM
I will say it once more: DO NOT BOOK A HOTEL IN LONDON - unless you are willing to pay more than 200$ or are 100% sure it's a good place. You will be appalled with what kind of shit they come up even for something like 150$.

Every hostel in the city area is ok, to get to Wimbledon in the morning. Look for websites like hostelworld.com and book some place which has a good rating. As I said before, Palmers Lodge is great.

Paule - one more question. Hotwire is offering me a 3.5 star hotel in London SW7 area for $93 US dollars a night. It's apparently near London's Natural History Museum. But of course, with hotwire, they never tell you the name until you pay. I've never had bad experiences with Hotsire so I'm very tempted. My question is with London's public transportation, will it be hard for me to get down to Wimbledon at 4am for queueing? Let me know Thanks.

Mina Vagante
Apr 14th, 2008, 09:29 PM
Paule - one more question. Hotwire is offering me a 3.5 star hotel in London SW7 area for $93 US dollars a night. It's apparently near London's Natural History Museum. But of course, with hotwire, they never tell you the name until you pay. I've never had bad experiences with Hotsire so I'm very tempted. My question is with London's public transportation, will it be hard for me to get down to Wimbledon at 4am for queueing? Let me know Thanks.

You didnt PM me back :o:sad:

Shouldn't be :)

Paule22
Apr 14th, 2008, 09:38 PM
Should be the Holiday Inn London Kensington Forum. Looks quite good, if you check Tripadvisor, though some people are disgusted. For me it would be the question, why paying an extra 60$ per night, when travelling alone and not with your girlfriend. But thats up to you, I just wanted to warn you, Ifor myself and my family made a lot of bad experiences while staying in London. Its quite good situtated if you want to get to Southfields.

You can get there by bus at 4 am and then you have to walk the rest of the way. I would say that it will take you from South Kensington about an 50min-60min at nighttime.

eugreene2
Apr 14th, 2008, 09:58 PM
OK Paule, Thanks. I'm checking out Palmers Lodge now. I love Trip Advisor. Those comments are :lol:

GoDominique
Apr 14th, 2008, 11:10 PM
Hey Paule, that Lodge sure looks nice but isn't it quite a journey getting to Soutfields station? How long does it take by tube?

The huge plus side of my hotel is that it's 2 min walk from Earls Court station which is just 10 min from Southfields. And there are tons of shops, food, internet cafe etc. That's why I wouldn't mind to book there again. Actually I'm considering it right now. ;)

Paule22
Apr 14th, 2008, 11:54 PM
Sure, it's 40 minutes. Actually last time I slept at some dodgy hostel next to Kings Cross and that was allright for me (distancewise). I like travelling by tube :)

The thing is - its easy and fast to get to Stansted(maybe I should have mentioned that, because I normally fly to Stansted) from Palmers Lodge (National Express stops at Finchley Road), it's clean, they have good beds and good breakfast. And it's quiet. Sure, could be nearer to Wimbledon, but for me its definetely worth the trip. Its up to you, what is more important.

Komm fahr hin, aber nicht wieder krank werden ;) Bin auch da, vom Dienstag bis Donnerstag.

DutchieGirl
Apr 15th, 2008, 12:14 AM
Queueing is even ok, if you are alone. You get all the freebies(smoothies, apples, sun protection etc.) and all people are in a faboulus mood. If you are kind of an open person, you will get to know some people in 5 minutes.


Every hostel in the city area is ok, to get to Wimbledon in the morning. Look for websites like hostelworld.com and book some place which has a good rating. As I said before, Palmers Lodge is great.

I queued by myself and I got no freebies. :shrug: No one came around and offered anything on the day I was queueing. I had two big groups of people either side of me, so I didn't even really have anyone to talk to, as they all knew each other anyway. That's not fun!

DutchieGirl
Apr 15th, 2008, 12:15 AM
Queueing is fun. Don't listen to the grumpy old b**** trying to spoil the party.

On the days where Murray isn't playing, arriving at 9 am for a Ground pass is sufficient at either queue (there are two each day). On the other days 8.30 should be fine, with 8 am you are 100% sure.
Never queued overnight, but for Centre Court many people join the queue the night before, 2 am is probably the latest but a lot depends on who's playing. I once got Court No.1 tickets after arriving at 6 am but it was very close, I recommend 4-5 am.
:haha: Look who's talking. I'm probably younger than you are anyway! And I'm not trying to spoil any party - I'm just saying my experience of queueing - which as NOT fun. It was boring as all hell. But hey, if people like to stand around in a queue for 5 hours, then go for it. I am not one of those people.

GoDominique
Apr 15th, 2008, 12:16 AM
Sure, it's 40 minutes. Actually last time I slept at some dodgy hostel next to Kings Cross and that was allright for me (distancewise). I like travelling by tube :)

The thing is - its easy and fast to get to Stansted(maybe I should have mentioned that, because I normally fly to Stansted) from Palmers Lodge (National Express stops at Finchley Road), it's clean, they have good beds and good breakfast. And it's quiet. Sure, could be nearer to Wimbledon, but for me its definetely worth the trip. Its up to you, what is more important.

Komm fahr hin, aber nicht wieder krank werden ;) Bin auch da, vom Dienstag bis Donnerstag.
Dass du das noch weißt :o :lol: ja, das war Mist, der letzte Tag und die Rückreise waren ein Abenteuer. :eek:

I will consider it, maybe just 3 days like you. No rain please. :fiery:

GoDominique
Apr 15th, 2008, 12:25 AM
I queued by myself and I got no freebies. :shrug:
Next time open your friggen eyes and ears. :)

DutchieGirl
Apr 15th, 2008, 12:34 AM
Next time open your friggen eyes and ears. :)
:rolleyes: That's the best you can come up with.

GoDominique
Apr 15th, 2008, 12:49 AM
:rolleyes: That's the best you can come up with.
LOL. When there are about 100 people in this thread raving about the freebies and you are the only one who didn't get any - well, isn't that a little strange?

DutchieGirl
Apr 15th, 2008, 12:53 AM
LOL. When there are about 100 people in this thread raving about the freebies and you are the only one who didn't get any - well, isn't that a little strange?
Yeah and as I said above (maybe you should open your eyes and read): I am giving MY experience of queueing. If everyone else loved it - great for them. I am saying how I found it. Are you trying to tell me I can't give my views on this? That'd be pretty dumb given this is a public message board.

Lapin
Apr 15th, 2008, 01:05 AM
Thanks Lapin ... I just got hyped all over again.
Glad you enjoyed it! :)
This is a great thread, brings back so many memories! :D Lol at the talk about the queue being awful :lol: Queues are awful, yes, and in the UK you have to queue for just about everything, BUT, the Wimbledon queue is fun - must be the sense of anticipation of the day ahead! I've been going for years and you pretty much meet up with folk to talk to every time, and of course the fact that you are in the queue at that time of the day (or night!) means you're all tennis fans, so there's lots in common to talk about and you meet lots of folk from other countries too.

I guess you've been looking at the Wimbledon.org website and seen there is a restriction now on the size of bag you can take into the grounds; the left luggage is outside now for tents, camping equipment, etc.

Just one tip about the 'freebies' that you get given in the queue: Wimbledon stewards and officials are under strict orders to conviscate ALL freebies (spoilsports! :p) The reason is they know that companies use the queue for advertising and want to make sure no-one is seen on T.V. later in the day with a Daily Mail raincoat or whatever! Last year one company gave out Tri-legged stools for people to sit on; there was a huge pile of them conviscated and thrown into a skip by where the officials search your bag :eek:. If you get something free that's edible, then it's best to eat it in the queue, they even conviscated bags of crisps that people were given one year! If you get given a freebie that you want to keep, then hide it at the very bottom of your bag underneath everything else and hopefully they won't find it!! :p
Also, if you want to take a flag in, you'll have to hide that well too, as for some reason they will conviscate those aswell, or tell you to put them in left luggage! (Even putting it in a pocket might be better than in your bag which they search.) Once inside a flag is OK but try to keep it out of view (or at least out of reach :p) of the officials!!

Lapin
Apr 15th, 2008, 01:13 AM
I think I don't understand :p I want tickets for centre court or court n1 so I should be around Wimbledon Park at 9 pm in previous day or at night or in the morning? :p And from where I take a tank? :lol: Sorry for my English :p
For Centre Court from around 2am the previous night....

Sorry I'm not sure where you can take a tank from, I've never seen anyone arrive in one of those at Wimbledon before! :lol:

(BTW, I'm only joking! Your english is fine, but I think you need to take a taxi not a tank! :p :D)

Paule22
Apr 15th, 2008, 05:24 AM
Stickers, Free Stickers!!!

Dave.
Apr 15th, 2008, 10:18 AM
I don't understand how anyone could find that queue fun! It was horrible. Some days it goes quicker than others but still it's such a drag. Freebies or no freebies, the queue is nothing to be excited about. All i wanted to do was get inside, knowing I have a ticket, and then plan what I want to do for the day. How anyone could find waiting outside (in the cold!) for hours fun is beyond me.

GoDominique
Apr 15th, 2008, 11:51 AM
Free raincoat with the Daily Telegraph!

The YOGHURT was the best though. :drool:

CooCooCachoo
Apr 15th, 2008, 01:58 PM
Ugh I'm going to Wimby too - queueing SUCKS! If you want a centre court ticket, be ready to queue all night. :help: As for cheap hotels in London - well good luck generally, but being right in the middle of summer and having Wimby on makes it damn near impossible. ;)

I'm more nuanced. For me, queuing is fun for one or two days, but it sucks if you have to do it many days in a row.

As for hotels, I'd suggest a hostel :shrug: You will hardly be in your room anyway, so you might as well pay way less if all you need is a bed and a shower.

Am planning to go again as well, by the way ;)

CooCooCachoo
Apr 15th, 2008, 01:59 PM
Free raincoat with the Daily Telegraph!

The YOGHURT was the best though. :drool:

The freebies depend on the day though ;)

I was more happy with the Pink Lady apple :drool:

CooCooCachoo
Apr 15th, 2008, 02:01 PM
Paule - one more question. Hotwire is offering me a 3.5 star hotel in London SW7 area for $93 US dollars a night. It's apparently near London's Natural History Museum. But of course, with hotwire, they never tell you the name until you pay. I've never had bad experiences with Hotsire so I'm very tempted. My question is with London's public transportation, will it be hard for me to get down to Wimbledon at 4am for queueing? Let me know Thanks.

Near London's Natural History Museum? That means Kensington. Great area, really. But I wouldn't want to spend $93 a night ;) Guess it depends on your budget.

BTW If you are close to the museum, you are close to a tube station too.

eugreene2
Apr 15th, 2008, 04:08 PM
Wanna know something funny? As tempting as it is to stay at a hostel - liked what i saw with Palmers and the Generator (i like a party atmosphere), my only drawback is there aren't tvs in the rooms. :lol:

I like watching TV when I'm in my room. (I know, what a lame reason) For 35/night, I shouldn't have any complaints. And if my roomies are stuck-up, keep to themselves type of people, I'll be really upset. No TV and no one to talk to. :lol:

TheBoiledEgg
Apr 15th, 2008, 04:17 PM
you can get one of those cheap hostels (meaning room-share) but if there's alot of you, its good.
its less than 20 per night.

http://www.st-christophers.co.uk/
they got a few around London.

Paule22
Apr 15th, 2008, 04:46 PM
Wanna know something funny? As tempting as it is to stay at a hostel - liked what i saw with Palmers and the Generator (i like a party atmosphere), my only drawback is there aren't tvs in the rooms. :lol:

I like watching TV when I'm in my room. (I know, what a lame reason) For 35/night, I shouldn't have any complaints. And if my roomies are stuck-up, keep to themselves type of people, I'll be really upset. No TV and no one to talk to. :lol:

At most hostels they have a tv room and internet.

QUEENLINDSAY
Apr 15th, 2008, 09:15 PM
I so wanted to go!!

DutchieGirl
Apr 16th, 2008, 01:00 AM
I don't understand how anyone could find that queue fun! It was horrible. Some days it goes quicker than others but still it's such a drag. Freebies or no freebies, the queue is nothing to be excited about. All i wanted to do was get inside, knowing I have a ticket, and then plan what I want to do for the day. How anyone could find waiting outside (in the cold!) for hours fun is beyond me.
Glad i'm not the only one then. ;)

DutchieGirl
Apr 16th, 2008, 01:05 AM
you can get one of those cheap hostels (meaning room-share) but if there's alot of you, its good.
its less than 20 per night.

http://www.st-christophers.co.uk/
they got a few around London.
There are HEAPS of hostels in Earls Court, which is close enough to Wimby - I stayed there last time I went, and it's a nice enough area, heaps of shops and restaurants around too. This time My friends and I will stay at a B&B (they chose, not me) in Putney Green - which is even closer. :banana: Too bad it's 27 pounds per person per night - but we have our own kitchenette in the room & no share facilities, so I can't complain too much. :lol:

DutchieGirl
Apr 16th, 2008, 01:07 AM
Wanna know something funny? As tempting as it is to stay at a hostel - liked what i saw with Palmers and the Generator (i like a party atmosphere), my only drawback is there aren't tvs in the rooms. :lol:

I like watching TV when I'm in my room. (I know, what a lame reason) For 35/night, I shouldn't have any complaints. And if my roomies are stuck-up, keep to themselves type of people, I'll be really upset. No TV and no one to talk to. :lol:
Hostels will have a games/tv room (well most do, if they don't then :tape: ). Ok, it's not IN your room, but you can still watch tv. ;)

eugreene2
Apr 16th, 2008, 02:03 AM
Thanks everyone for your help and advice. :worship: I bought my plane ticket and lodging accomodations today. So I guess I'm going. FINALLY! :cool:

I'll be there for a week so I hope to meet some of you - June 26 to July 1. Holla

squig2k
Apr 16th, 2008, 02:39 AM
I'm mainly just interested in getting a ground pass. Is this queue separate from the centre court/no.1 queue? and will it be safe arriving at 8/9am to get a ground pass? cheers

DutchieGirl
Apr 16th, 2008, 05:15 AM
I'm mainly just interested in getting a ground pass. Is this queue separate from the centre court/no.1 queue? and will it be safe arriving at 8/9am to get a ground pass? cheers
No, it's not separate. All in the same queue. Getting there at 8am should be fine. I got there just after 8am and I was in by about 11:45 (I think play was beginning at midday. Anyway, I was in 15 mins before play started).

adeegee
Apr 16th, 2008, 09:52 AM
It's very hard to give an exact time people should arrive if they want Centre/Court 1 tickets, I've arrived at 1am and only managed to get Court 1 one year and then at 5am and managed to get on Centre Court. Kind of depends on the matches to be honest, if Murray is playing on Centre then you'll need to be there pretty much all night if you want Centre, but on the other hand Court 1 is possible. The seating part of Court 2 is also down as a show court, but you can get into the standing part of there with a ground pass. As I say, it's hard to predict exact times, but if you want a guaranteed Centre Court ticket I'd say be there by 11pm the night before, Court 1 you probably need to be there about 2-3am, and Court 2 (seats) about 5-6am. Ground passes are usually fairly easy to get, getting there by 9 or 9.30am is ok but the later you leave it, the longer the queue and you might not get in until after 11.

Personally, I find the queue lots of fun. I usually go with a load of friends and have a bbq, a few drinks, play some games and various other things. It's a good laugh. If you can go with people you know it makes it more enjoyable though for sure. You can meet lots of interesting people though, most in the queue are usually very friendly. The only problem is the weather, it's not the greatest experience if it pisses it down with rain all night or is freezing. Check the weather forecast before you go, I also know people who have queued all night then seen 30 mins of tennis the next day. Most people bring tents, I don't bother though, we bring a car and park it in the queue and just move it in the morning.

One thing I would say is that ground passes tend to be great for the first week. Obviously some of you will want to see Serena, Maria, Justine etc....but in all honesty, the chances are their first 4 rounds are all going to be beatdowns. You don't get many thrilling matches on the show courts on the opening week. You can still see some fairly big names on the outside courts, and the matches tend to be better. You can always head to the practice courts as well if you want to see your favourites :)

One last thing, qualies are great too. It's at a different venue to Wimbledon itself (a couple of miles down the road). It's free and players are usually very accessible. I'd highly recommend it if you're able to make it.

Hope this helps :hatoff: I've been there many times so if anyone has any questions I'd be happy to try and answer.

Bartosh
Apr 16th, 2008, 12:07 PM
It's very hard to give an exact time people should arrive if they want Centre/Court 1 tickets, I've arrived at 1am and only managed to get Court 1 one year and then at 5am and managed to get on Centre Court. Kind of depends on the matches to be honest, if Murray is playing on Centre then you'll need to be there pretty much all night if you want Centre, but on the other hand Court 1 is possible. The seating part of Court 2 is also down as a show court, but you can get into the standing part of there with a ground pass. As I say, it's hard to predict exact times, but if you want a guaranteed Centre Court ticket I'd say be there by 11pm the night before, Court 1 you probably need to be there about 2-3am, and Court 2 (seats) about 5-6am. Ground passes are usually fairly easy to get, getting there by 9 or 9.30am is ok but the later you leave it, the longer the queue and you might not get in until after 11.

Personally, I find the queue lots of fun. I usually go with a load of friends and have a bbq, a few drinks, play some games and various other things. It's a good laugh. If you can go with people you know it makes it more enjoyable though for sure. You can meet lots of interesting people though, most in the queue are usually very friendly. The only problem is the weather, it's not the greatest experience if it pisses it down with rain all night or is freezing. Check the weather forecast before you go, I also know people who have queued all night then seen 30 mins of tennis the next day. Most people bring tents, I don't bother though, we bring a car and park it in the queue and just move it in the morning.

One thing I would say is that ground passes tend to be great for the first week. Obviously some of you will want to see Serena, Maria, Justine etc....but in all honesty, the chances are their first 4 rounds are all going to be beatdowns. You don't get many thrilling matches on the show courts on the opening week. You can still see some fairly big names on the outside courts, and the matches tend to be better. You can always head to the practice courts as well if you want to see your favourites :)

One last thing, qualies are great too. It's at a different venue to Wimbledon itself (a couple of miles down the road). It's free and players are usually very accessible. I'd highly recommend it if you're able to make it.

Hope this helps :hatoff: I've been there many times so if anyone has any questions I'd be happy to try and answer.

Thank you :worship: I will have a 3 days for Wimbledon and I want to be on a center court or court no1 on one day ;) So if I go to Church Rd at 3 am I will get a tickets to court no1? probably yes? ;) So if I will be around a Wimbledon at 3.00 - when the line will start going? :p

eugreene2
Apr 16th, 2008, 02:38 PM
Wait, here's a million dollar question! If you get a ticket for Centre Court and get bored at the beatdowns, can you use your centre court ticket as a grounds pass or are you stuck watching the boring matches?

At the US Open, if your ticket allowed you to get in Ashe, then you automatically could get in the outside courts. (grounds pass)

TheBoiledEgg
Apr 16th, 2008, 02:40 PM
Wait, here's a million dollar question! If you get a ticket for Centre Court and get bored at the beatdowns, can you use your centre court ticket as a grounds pass or are you stuck watching the boring matches?

At the US Open, if your ticket allowed you to get in Ashe, then you automatically could get in the outside courts. (grounds pass)

CC ticket gets you in all other courts except #1 (#2 court is only standing room)

Mina Vagante
Apr 16th, 2008, 02:42 PM
Wait, here's a million dollar question! If you get a ticket for Centre Court and get bored at the beatdowns, can you use your centre court ticket as a grounds pass or are you stuck watching the boring matches?

At the US Open, if your ticket allowed you to get in Ashe, then you automatically could get in the outside courts. (grounds pass)

Yup you can go to the other matches, you just can't go to Number 1 court. You can sometimes get into court 2 because not all of the seatrs are for ticket holders, but yes if you can have centre tickets you can use it as a ground pass aswell. :)

savestheday91
Apr 16th, 2008, 02:46 PM
Wait, here's a million dollar question! If you get a ticket for Centre Court and get bored at the beatdowns, can you use your centre court ticket as a grounds pass or are you stuck watching the boring matches?

At the US Open, if your ticket allowed you to get in Ashe, then you automatically could get in the outside courts. (grounds pass)

It works the same way :)

adeegee
Apr 16th, 2008, 03:37 PM
Thank you :worship: I will have a 3 days for Wimbledon and I want to be on a center court or court no1 on one day ;) So if I go to Church Rd at 3 am I will get a tickets to court no1? probably yes? ;) So if I will be around a Wimbledon at 3.00 - when the line will start going? :p
Well.....I wouldn't bet my life on it, but I'd say if you get there at 3am there's an extremely good chance you'll get on Centre Court or Court 1, yes ;)

The queue starts moving at around 7am, the posh guys working for Wimbledon will wake you up if you're asleep :o but they don't start letting you in until several hours later, they're just moving you to a different place. It's a bit frustrating :mad:

Super_Marion
Apr 19th, 2008, 11:08 AM
if Murray is playing on Centre then you'll need to be there pretty much all night

I'm not no so sure this year. He has let us down and needs to rediscover the affection of spectators and fans. Romancing them with English roses would be a good start.

Super_Marion
Apr 19th, 2008, 11:17 AM
I plan to attend. Mon - Thurs.

Pity they are confiscating flags, because I just had an idea of making a Marion banner.