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nikita771
Sep 27th, 2007, 12:59 PM
Bill O'Reilly Says He's Being Smeared

Sep 26, 11:18 PM (ET)

By DAVID BAUDER



NEW YORK (AP) - Fox News Channel's Bill O'Reilly said Wednesday his critics took remarks he made about a famed Harlem restaurant out of context and "fabricated a racial controversy where none exists."

He criticized the liberal group Media Matters for America as "smear merchants" for publicizing statements he made on his radio show last week.
O'Reilly told his radio audience that he dined with civil rights activist Al Sharpton at Sylvia's recently and "couldn't get over the fact that there was no difference" between the black-run restaurant and others in New York City.
It was just like a suburban Italian restaurant, he said. "There wasn't any kind of craziness at all," he said.


O'Reilly told The Associated Press that Media Matters had "cherry-picked" remarks out of a broader conversation about racial attitudes. He had told listeners that his grandmother - and many other white Americans - feared blacks because they didn't know any and were swayed by violent images in black culture.
"If you listened to the full hour, it was a criticism of racism on the part of white Americans who are ignorant of the fact that there is no difference between white and black anymore," he told the AP. "Circumstances may be different in their lives but we're all Americans. Anyone who would be offended by that conversation would have to be looking to be offended."

His radio show was a conversation with Fox News contributor Juan Williams, author of a book about the coarseness of some black culture. Williams defended O'Reilly during a Tuesday appearance on "The O'Reilly Factor."

"It's so frustrating," Williams said. "They want to shut you up. They want to shut up anybody who has an honest discussion about race."

Sharpton, appearing on O'Reilly's TV program Wednesday, acknowledged that he found accounts of what O'Reilly said "disturbing and surprising," but added that he had not heard the radio broadcast.

"You and I have gone to dinner before in Harlem, and I've never heard you say anything offensive," said Sharpton, speaking from Baton Rouge, La. "I'm going to listen to the tape and I'm going to give a judgment."

The controversy was similar to one that enveloped presidential candidate Joe Biden last winter. When Biden praised rival Barack Obama as "articulate" and "clean," many saw this as a way of conveying those were unusual characteristics for blacks.

Sylvia's manager Trenness Woods-Black told the New York Daily News that O'Reilly's remarks were "insulting" and showed he has little knowledge of the black community.

At one point on the radio show, Williams mentioned that too many people see little else in black culture beyond profane rap. "That's right," O'Reilly said. "There wasn't one person in Sylvia's who was screaming, 'M.F.-er, I want more iced tea.'"

Karl Frisch, spokesman for Media Matters, said it is typical for O'Reilly to criticize his group for merely reporting what he says.

"We didn't call him a racist," Frisch said. "We said his comments were ignorant and racially charged, and we stand by that."

O'Reilly said that the Williams conversation was carried on more than 400 radio stations and that there wasn't one complaint from a listener.

"This isn't about a racially insensitive remark," he said. "Anybody can listen to the unedited version of the conversation on Billoreilly.com. You want to think I'm insensitive to race, you go right ahead."

The real story, he said, was about the "corrupt media culture" in which outlets like CNN and MSNBC do stories about his remarks "because they're getting killed in the ratings."
"The O'Reilly Factor" is seen by more people - 2.2 million average this year - than its direct competitors on MSNBC and CNN combined. MSNBC's "Countdown" with Keith Olbermann averages 721,000 viewers in the time slot while CNN's 8 p.m. show averages 611,000, according to Nielsen Media Research.

roarke
Sep 27th, 2007, 02:04 PM
Bill O'Reilly Says He's Being Smeared

Sep 26, 11:18 PM (ET)

By DAVID BAUDER



NEW YORK (AP) - Fox News Channel's Bill O'Reilly said Wednesday his critics took remarks he made about a famed Harlem restaurant out of context and "fabricated a racial controversy where none exists."

He criticized the liberal group Media Matters for America as "smear merchants" for publicizing statements he made on his radio show last week.
O'Reilly told his radio audience that he dined with civil rights activist Al Sharpton at Sylvia's recently and "couldn't get over the fact that there was no difference" between the black-run restaurant and others in New York City.
It was just like a suburban Italian restaurant, he said. "There wasn't any kind of craziness at all," he said.


O'Reilly told The Associated Press that Media Matters had "cherry-picked" remarks out of a broader conversation about racial attitudes. He had told listeners that his grandmother - and many other white Americans - feared blacks because they didn't know any and were swayed by violent images in black culture.
"If you listened to the full hour, it was a criticism of racism on the part of white Americans who are ignorant of the fact that there is no difference between white and black anymore," he told the AP. "Circumstances may be different in their lives but we're all Americans. Anyone who would be offended by that conversation would have to be looking to be offended."

His radio show was a conversation with Fox News contributor Juan Williams, author of a book about the coarseness of some black culture. Williams defended O'Reilly during a Tuesday appearance on "The O'Reilly Factor."

"It's so frustrating," Williams said. "They want to shut you up. They want to shut up anybody who has an honest discussion about race."

Sharpton, appearing on O'Reilly's TV program Wednesday, acknowledged that he found accounts of what O'Reilly said "disturbing and surprising," but added that he had not heard the radio broadcast.

"You and I have gone to dinner before in Harlem, and I've never heard you say anything offensive," said Sharpton, speaking from Baton Rouge, La. "I'm going to listen to the tape and I'm going to give a judgment."

The controversy was similar to one that enveloped presidential candidate Joe Biden last winter. When Biden praised rival Barack Obama as "articulate" and "clean," many saw this as a way of conveying those were unusual characteristics for blacks.

Sylvia's manager Trenness Woods-Black told the New York Daily News that O'Reilly's remarks were "insulting" and showed he has little knowledge of the black community.

At one point on the radio show, Williams mentioned that too many people see little else in black culture beyond profane rap. "That's right," O'Reilly said. "There wasn't one person in Sylvia's who was screaming, 'M.F.-er, I want more iced tea.'"

Karl Frisch, spokesman for Media Matters, said it is typical for O'Reilly to criticize his group for merely reporting what he says.

"We didn't call him a racist," Frisch said. "We said his comments were ignorant and racially charged, and we stand by that."

O'Reilly said that the Williams conversation was carried on more than 400 radio stations and that there wasn't one complaint from a listener.

"This isn't about a racially insensitive remark," he said. "Anybody can listen to the unedited version of the conversation on Billoreilly.com. You want to think I'm insensitive to race, you go right ahead."

The real story, he said, was about the "corrupt media culture" in which outlets like CNN and MSNBC do stories about his remarks "because they're getting killed in the ratings."
"The O'Reilly Factor" is seen by more people - 2.2 million average this year - than its direct competitors on MSNBC and CNN combined. MSNBC's "Countdown" with Keith Olbermann averages 721,000 viewers in the time slot while CNN's 8 p.m. show averages 611,000, according to Nielsen Media Research.

Well when he says things like there is no difference between white and black anymore" it tells you what he thinks despite his whining about being smeared.

"couldn't get over the fact that there was no difference" between the black-run restaurant and others in New York City Comments like this only fuels the notion that they obviously doesn't think much of black people in the first place. His kinds of comments does not in any way serve to help in the on going fight against racism, but it does show the basis, the foundation and the faulty core on which racist behavior and beliefs are based. The belief of superiority is based on falsehoods. We have been trying to say that for centuries. It's all in their imagination!

Infiniti2001
Sep 27th, 2007, 02:10 PM
http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/5964/iconblahblahjc3.gif pot calling kettle

What Bill O'Reilly Just Learned About Black People
By Rory O'Connor, AlterNet. Posted September 26, 2007.

Here's a look at O'Reilly's latest racial gaffe from his eye-opening visit to Harlem, plus the "lowlights" of his thoughts on race over the last few years.


If he weren't such a ridiculous, pathetic oaf, I'd invite Bill O'Reilly up to my 'hood for a little white-on-white bonding, re-education and diversity training -- if he weren't afraid to set foot in it!

It would obviously surprise, and perhaps even frighten the Man Who Wouldn't Shut Up, to learn that I now live in Harlem -- along with many other white people, not to mention a wide and growing assortment of Asians, Hispanics, Arabs, African Americans and all the rest of what makes Manhattan such a vibrant, interesting and exciting place to live and work.

Apparently O'Reilly, trapped back in time as well as in his suburban cocoon and Fox bunker, hasn't noticed any of the ongoing changes in Harlem -- or for that matter the rest of America -- that have taken place since he and I attended the same very Catholic, very strict and very segregated college prep school in lily-white Long Island back in the '60s.

Back then there was only one skinny little black kid in the class -- and he was regularly brutalized by the hulking football players. Given that racist background -- and given the further fact that he obviously hasn't progressed much since then -- it comes as no surprise that O'Reilly recently expressed his surprise that "there was no difference" between Sylvia's, a world-famous Harlem restaurant, and other restaurants in New York.

"I mean, it was exactly the same, even though it's run by blacks, primarily black patronship," the amazed talkmeister told his national audience of millions.

This latest in a depressingly long series of O'Reilly racial dustups began last week on his syndicated radio program, while he was discussing a recent dinner he had enjoyed at Sylvia's with his new pal Al Sharpton.

O'Reilly told his audience he "had a great time, and all the people up there are tremendously respectful." (For Bill, it's somehow always all about him!) He added, "I couldn't get over the fact that there was no difference between Sylvia's restaurant and any other restaurant in New York City. I mean, it was exactly the same, even though it's run by blacks, primarily black patronship."

Later, while talking with Fox News contributor (and National Public Radio senior correspondent) Juan Williams, O'Reilly further exposed his cosseted ignorance, saying, "There wasn't one person in Sylvia's who was screaming, 'MF-er, I want more iced tea.' You know, I mean, everybody was -- it was like going into an Italian restaurant in an all-white suburb in the sense of people were sitting there, and they were ordering and having fun. And there wasn't any kind of craziness at all."

Just imagine -- those crazy MF-ers in Harlem "ordering and having fun" just like they do in Italian restaurants in the "all-white" suburbs that O'Reilly STILL inhabits! What will they think of next -- donning leisure suits? (Frankly, the only crazy people I've ever heard yelling obscenities in New York restaurants were O'Reilly's Fox fellow travelers screaming for more booze in Langan's, the Irish pub they hang out in near their Sixth Avenue headquarters.)

The racist ranter then compounded his idiocy by noting, "I think black Americans are starting to think more and more for themselves. They're getting away from the Sharptons and the Jacksons and the people trying to lead them into a race-based culture. They're just trying to figure it out. 'Look, I can make it. If I work hard and get educated, I can make it.'"

As noted above, this embarrassing outburst is far from the first time O'Reilly has made provocative statements about race. (See Media Matters for America for documentation.)

But here are a few past lowlights:



During the Feb. 5 edition of Fox News' "The O'Reilly Factor," in a conversation about President Bush's description of Barack Obama as "articulate," O'Reilly told a Temple University professor, "Instead of black and white Americans coming together, white Americans are terrified. They're terrified. Now we can't even say you're articulate? We can't even give you guys compliments because they may be taken as condescension?"


On the Aug. 16, 2006, edition of "The O'Reilly Factor," O'Reilly called for "profiling of Muslims" at airports, arguing that detaining all "Muslims between the ages of 16 and 45" for questioning "isn't racial profiling," but "criminal profiling."


In a Feb. 27, 2006, conversation with a caller about the disproportionately few jobs and contracts that have gone to locals in the rebuilding of New Orleans, O'Reilly said: "[T]he homies, you know ... I mean, they're just not going to get the job."

On the Sept. 13, 2005, broadcast of "The Radio Factor," O'Reilly claimed that "many of the poor in New Orleans" did not evacuate the city before Hurricane Katrina because "[t]hey were drug-addicted" and "weren't going to get turned off from their source," adding, "They were thugs."

On the recent (Sept. 19) edition of O'Reilly's Westwood One program "The Radio Factor," the all-white-suburb-inhabiting race man once again opined with false authority about "black people," whom he clearly has little-to-no contact with. Here's part of the transcript:


O'REILLY: Now, how do we get to this point? Black people in this country understand that they've had a very, very tough go of it, and some of them can get past that, and some of them cannot. ... So it's there. It's there, and I think it's getting better. I think black Americans are starting to think more and more for themselves. They're getting away from the Sharptons and the Jacksons and the people trying to lead them into a race-based culture ..."
Then, after trashing Sharpton, the two-faced O'Reilly turns around and praises him as "a very, very interesting guy."


O'REILLY: You know, I was up in Harlem a few weeks ago, and I actually had dinner with Al Sharpton, who is a very, very interesting guy. And he comes on "The Factor" a lot, and then I treated him to dinner, because he's made himself available to us, and I felt that I wanted to take him up there. And we went to Sylvia's, a very famous restaurant in Harlem. I had a great time, and all the people up there are tremendously respectful. They all watch "The Factor" ...
Fat chance! Ain't nobody in Harlem watching this guy unless they want to know when to duck ... but Bill's ego, like his ignorance, apparently knows no bounds.

Is it at all possible, one wonders, that O'Reilly can't "get over the fact that there was no difference between Sylvia's restaurant and any other restaurant in New York City" because he hardly ever meets or talks with anyone outside the narrow little world his narrow little mind is exposed during his daily commute from Long Island's North Shore to 1211 Avenue of the Americas? "I mean, it was exactly the same," O'Reilly said with evident wonder. "Even though it's run by blacks, primarily black patronship. It was the same ..."

Fancy that, "those people" are capable of being just like "us!" Amazing! All you can add is "God Bless America," because after all, "that's really what this society's all about now here in the U.S.A."

To the newly and self-anointed Soul Brother No. 2: "There's no difference. There's no difference. There may be a cultural entertainment -- people may gravitate toward different cultural entertainment, but you go down to Little Italy, and you're gonna have that. It has nothing to do with the color of anybody's skin."

Incredibly, O'Reilly somehow stopped short of repeating the old saw that some of his best friends are black (even his most loyal listener would never believe that!) although he did add, "I like that soul food ... It was great."

I'll tell you what would really be great -- if Bill O'Reilly just took his ill-gotten gains and retired to his North Shore estate tomorrow. Instead, he blathers on ... and on. Not only do blacks not yell obscenities at the wait staff, we learn they also can dress well. Some even go so far as to wear tuxedos!


O'REILLY: You know, and I went to the concert by Anita Baker at Radio City Music Hall, and the crowd was 50/50 black/white, and the blacks were well-dressed. ... The band was excellent, but they were dressed in tuxedoes, and this is what white America doesn't know, particularly people who don't have a lot of interaction with black Americans. They think that the culture is dominated by Twista, Ludacris and Snoop Dogg.
Would that it were! Instead the culture is still dominated by dumb-ass, ignorant old white farts like Bill O'Reilly, spouting bromides from the '50s while we're busy going to hell in a hand basket. So here's an open offer to my fellow Flyer from Chaminade High -- come on up to my neighborhood sometime soon, get educated, and join the rest of us in the 21st century!

Either that or just shut the F up, you silly MF-er!

http://www.alternet.org/mediaculture/63651/

Wigglytuff
Sep 27th, 2007, 03:53 PM
oh he is such a cry baby.

listen if you dish it you have to be able to take, bill can dish it but he can NEVER take it and he never ever gets what he dishes.

HippityHop
Sep 27th, 2007, 04:06 PM
There are Black people who would argue that there is still a big difference between white and black culture.
Whether they are correct or not is beside the point.

EDIT: Incidentally, I saw Juan Williams on O'Reilly's show the other day and Williams did think that the remarks were taken out of context and misconstrued. I haven't heard what Shaprton has to say about it but I listen to his show on XM when I can, and he may address it there.

But this is why I say that context is so important. When I see people cut a portion of a longer post and comment on it, instead of quotiing the entire post (easier to do than cutting portions) I'm convinced that it's only to try and make the original poster seem to hold a position that they don't have. It's dishonest.

roarke
Sep 27th, 2007, 04:13 PM
There are Black people who would argue that there is still a big difference between white and black culture.
Whether they are correct or not is beside the point.

Missing the point aren't you! It is not about the difference in culture per se. He is clearly implying that somehow black people are less civilized than white people. It is about manners, respect and intelligence.

Wigglytuff
Sep 27th, 2007, 04:16 PM
Missing the point aren't you! It is not about the difference in culture per se. He is clearly implying that somehow black people are less civilized than white people. It is about manners, respect and intelligence.

well he is saying that this is what he excepted and he was SHOCKED that this is not always the case.

i think he misses why it is that he is being called on this. because he admitted to being a racist and is too stupid to know that (not that his being a racist should be surprise to anyone but samsung101)

HippityHop
Sep 27th, 2007, 04:19 PM
Missing the point aren't you! It is not about the difference in culture per se. He is clearly implying that somehow black people are less civilized than white people. It is about manners, respect and intelligence.

I don't think so. I was editing my previous post at the same time that you were posting. However in this case, I can only go by what I heard Williams say on the show a couple of days ago. He sided with O'Reilly. I haven't yet listened to the entire broadcast, which I will do when I get the time, and then make up my mind.

There's enough real crap to call O'Reilly on without making up stuff is my point.

Pureracket
Sep 27th, 2007, 05:39 PM
There are Black people who would argue that there is still a big difference between white and black culture.
Whether they are correct or not is beside the point.

EDIT: Incidentally, I saw Juan Williams on O'Reilly's show the other day and Williams did think that the remarks were taken out of context and misconstrued. I haven't heard what Shaprton has to say about it but I listen to his show on XM when I can, and he may address it there.

But this is why I say that context is so important. When I see people cut a portion of a longer post and comment on it, instead of quotiing the entire post (easier to do than cutting portions) I'm convinced that it's only to try and make the original poster seem to hold a position that they don't have. It's dishonest.Why do you Bush neocons always roll out your token Blacks like Juan Willims, Alan Keyes, and Shelby Steele in order to justify racism? Historically, they've proven themselves to be on the wrong side of the discussion when it comes to these issues.

vejh
Sep 27th, 2007, 05:45 PM
What Bill is saying isn't racsim as much as it is the ignorance of sterotyping. I'm not mad at him, neither do I find it insulting per say. He is saying what a lot of us blacks actually do think if we're honest with ourselves. But of course, he is white, and he is Bill, so he is not allowed to go there; and that's just unspoken rules in this society which he should be well aware of.

He's also right about the fact that there can be no honest discussion about race; at least not in such a public manner.

Pureracket
Sep 27th, 2007, 05:53 PM
What Bill is saying isn't racsim as much as it is the ignorance of sterotyping. I'm not mad at him, neither do I find it insulting per say. He is saying what a lot of us blacks actually do think if we're honest with ourselves. But of course, he is white, and he is Bill, so he is not alowed to go there; and that's just unspoken rules in this society which he should be well aware of.

He's also right about the fact that there can be no honest discussion about race; at least not in such a public manner.What you're not stating is, though many Black think it themselves, it still doesn't make these comments any more right than when a Black person says he walked in a white restaurant after a rainy day, and he was surprised that it didn't smell like a kennel. True, some of my white friends do think that white people smell like dogs when they're wet, but I think it's a rather prejudiced thing to say and an awful, awful thing to let a person get away with saying.

By the way, I have tons of white friends, and none of them smell like dogs at any time. None of my Black friends would make a normal and sane person uncomfortable in a restaurant either.

Wigglytuff
Sep 27th, 2007, 06:56 PM
What you're not stating is, though many Black think it themselves, it still doesn't make these comments any more right than when a Black person says he walked in a white restaurant after a rainy day, and he was surprised that it didn't smell like a kennel. True, some of my white friends do think that white people smell like dogs when they're wet, but I think it's a rather prejudiced thing to say and an awful, awful thing to let a person get away with saying.

By the way, I have tons of white friends, and none of them smell like dogs at any time. None of my Black friends would make a normal and sane person uncomfortable in a restaurant either.

:worship: :worship: :worship:

Black Mamba.
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:30 PM
What Bill is saying isn't racsim as much as it is the ignorance of sterotyping. I'm not mad at him, neither do I find it insulting per say. He is saying what a lot of us blacks actually do think if we're honest with ourselves. But of course, he is white, and he is Bill, so he is not allowed to go there; and that's just unspoken rules in this society which he should be well aware of.

He's also right about the fact that there can be no honest discussion about race; at least not in such a public manner.

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


Is that you Rev. Peterson? I didn't see you at the last BOND meeting.

roarke
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:40 PM
What Bill is saying isn't racsim as much as it is the ignorance of sterotyping. I'm not mad at him, neither do I find it insulting per say. He is saying what a lot of us blacks actually do think if we're honest with ourselves. But of course, he is white, and he is Bill, so he is not allowed to go there; and that's just unspoken rules in this society which he should be well aware of.

He's also right about the fact that there can be no honest discussion about race; at least not in such a public manner.

Racism is one of the corner stones of stereotyping! If anyone believes that all people of a race behaves in the generally held misconceived stereotypes and do nothing to educate themselves beyond these stereotypes then they are racist. It is incumbent upon them to get themselves educated beyond stereotypes. It they do no then they accept these stereotypes as true because it lends credence to their own feelings of superiority.

ico4498
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:50 PM
I'm going to listen to the tape and I'm going to give a judgment.

whenever these right wing media types mess up they run to Al for absolution ... sure seems like he's their leader.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 01:03 AM
Why do you Bush neocons always roll out your token Blacks like Juan Willims, Alan Keyes, and Shelby Steele in order to justify racism? Historically, they've proven themselves to be on the wrong side of the discussion when it comes to these issues.

Number one: I am not a neocon. I will put my civil rights bona fides up against yours anyday.

Number two: I am not rolling out Juan Williams. It so happens that he was the one who was being interviewed when these remarks were made so he would have a better take on it than I would and I dare say that you would.

As I stated earlier I have not heard the interview but I intend to listen and make up my own mind as to whether O'Reilly was trying to be sarcastic or if he was being a fool.

Number three: I lived through the kind of racism that I doubt that you have ever experienced in your life and thanks to people like me, you won't have to experience it.

Now go back to feeling sorry for yourself. Enjoy.

Pureracket
Sep 28th, 2007, 01:13 AM
Number one: I am not a neocon. I will put my civil rights bona fides up against yours anyday.

Number two: I am not rolling out Juan Williams. It so happens that he was the one who was being interviewed when these remarks were made so he would have a better take on it than I would and I dare say that you would.

As I stated earlier I have not heard the interview but I intend to listen and make up my own mind as to whether O'Reilly was trying to be sarcastic or if he was being a fool.

Number three: I lived through the kind of racism that I doubt that you have ever experienced in your life and thanks to people like me, you won't have to experience it.

Now go back to feeling sorry for yourself. Enjoy.It must be lonely up there in your loft. Are you really being serious with statements like, "....I doubt that you have ever experienced in your life and thanks to people like me...."? :rolleyes:

It's soooo obvious that your smarmy, little attitude and your sarcastic questioning is based on your superiority complex. To prove that, you have totally and freely assumed the position of martyr and saviour for racism. Classicly veiled neocon crap. I swear they teach you guys this.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 01:20 AM
It must be lonely up there in your loft. Are you really being serious with statements like, "....I doubt that you have ever experienced in your life and thanks to people like me...."? :rolleyes:

It's soooo obvious that your smarmy, little attitude and your sarcastic questioning is based on your superiority complex. To prove that, you have totally and freely assumed the position of martyr and saviour for racism. Classicly veiled neocon crap. I swear they teach you guys this.

When you have lived as a Black man in Mississippi in the 1950s as I have, get back to me.

Pureracket
Sep 28th, 2007, 01:51 AM
When you have lived as a Black man in Mississippi in the 1950s as I have, get back to me.Yeah, because that's truly, truly the worst that a person could've ever gone through as a Black person. Seriously, do you even think how you sound? Again, tokens do not represent the whole.

You should shake your 1950s approach when you post.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 01:54 AM
Yeah, because that's truly, truly the worst that a person could've ever gone through as a Black person. Seriously, do you even think how you sound? Again, tokens do not represent the whole.

You should shake your 1950s approach when you post.

I'll do me, you do you.

Pureracket
Sep 28th, 2007, 01:56 AM
I'll do me, you do you.Wonderful....

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 03:01 AM
When you have lived as a Black man in Mississippi in the 1950s as I have, get back to me.

well looks like you left a lot in the 1950s i say you go back and get them. :wavey:

LoveFifteen
Sep 28th, 2007, 03:28 AM
"Muthafucka, get me some more iced tea!" :o

Bill O'Reilly is so pathetic. His comments are embarrassing and exceedingly prejudiced. I'm glad he said this shit because it just reminds me who Republicans are and why I hate oppose them.

ico4498
Sep 28th, 2007, 03:37 AM
poll: do you believe Hippity is a civil rights activist from the 50's?

me: when yah make personal claims of grandeur on a board ... back it up! no disrespect to Hoppity, but its too easy to make grandiose claims anonymously.

show me or forget it.

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 03:39 AM
poll: do you believe Hippity is a civil rights activist from the 50's?

me: when yah make personal claims of grandeur on a board ... back it up! no disrespect to Hoppity, but its too easy to make grandiose claims anonymously.

show me or forget it.

no. i dont. i dont believe the girl(she claims to be a male, but i doubt it) is older than 20 so how can she have been a civil rights activist from the 1950s.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:32 AM
Come taste the wine, come hear the band.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:35 AM
poll: do you believe Hippity is a civil rights activist from the 50's?

me: when yah make personal claims of grandeur on a board ... back it up! no disrespect to Hoppity, but its too easy to make grandiose claims anonymously.

show me or forget it.


Do you honestly think that you're important enough for me to have to prove something to you?
Believe what you will. But this is just cyberspace and everyone here may or may not be who they claim to be.

ico4498
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:44 AM
Do you honestly think that you're important enough for me to have to prove something to you?
Believe what you will. But this is just cyberspace and everyone here may or may not be who they claim to be.

silly, no need to prove anything to me. yah made a claim to all the board readers. without proof its just another baseless claim.

if yah marched in the 50's god bless yah. as is, just another faceless allegation. as valid as a stock market tip written on the wall of a public john.

Apoleb
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:53 AM
Is anyone surprised by HippityHop's comments? :lol: I've called it long ago that he's a self-hating punk.

What those comments reveal (though most of us knew it anyway) is that O'Reilly is full of racial prejudice. Anyone who isn't able to see that needs help. The fact that he thinks polite behavior by a bunch of black people in a freakin restaurant is interesting enough to mention on a radio show tells loads about what he thinks of black people. I'm not going to generalize and say all Republicans are like that, but I'd say a very big chunk of white conservative in the US feel the same way. And then those same morons argue that race isn't much of an issue anymore.

lizchris
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:01 AM
You know, Bill O'Reily is milking this for all it is worth.

His dumb radio show was about to be canceled and he uses a fine establishment like Sylvia's to lift the anemic ratings and get a new contract. The fact that he is still trying to defend himself shows that he is what a lot of people say hei s; a bigot who has a deep seeded hatred for black people. Is anyone aware of what he said about a group of black singers who were entertaining a charity event he was emceeing? One of the singers was in the bathroom and the group was late getting on stage. This shitstain had the nerve to say that the group (which consisted of all young men) was outside sealing the hubcaps off of the luxury cars. When he was confronted with his obvously racist statement, he said it was no big deal and that no one at the function would seriously think these young men were doing that. Yeah right!

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:12 AM
What Bill is saying isn't racsim as much as it is the ignorance of sterotyping. I'm not mad at him, neither do I find it insulting per say. He is saying what a lot of us blacks actually do think if we're honest with ourselves. But of course, he is white, and he is Bill, so he is not allowed to go there; and that's just unspoken rules in this society which he should be well aware of.

He's also right about the fact that there can be no honest discussion about race; at least not in such a public manner.

You're right. The proof is the reaction to your post. Right away you were dismissed as being Rev. Peterson which is supposed to be an insult.

Those of us who are old enough may remember that Bill Clinton had a commission to study Race in America and it was a good idea despite not accomplishing much.
Many Black intellectuals often opine that America must have a serious discussion about race if it is to heal. Of course the demographics of the country are about to make the Black/white dichotomy irrelevant.

But if you think about it honestly, why on earth would any white person of good will want to engage in a serious honest dialogue about race? One of the main streams of radical Black thought, particularly in the 60s, was that all whites are racist even the ones who don't know it. I even remember being in encounter groups (a total waste of time) where the enlightend white folks were agreeing with every vile thing that the "real" Blacks were saying about them. You still see some of that today.

The way that the white liberals of today show their "non-racism" is by patronizing Blacks and letting Blacks get away with statements that any other ethnic group would be called on immediately.

So when Black people don't address the substance of an argument but instead go right to the ad hominem attacks it's shrugged off because, let's face it, many people think that we are not capable of addressing an argument in a reasoned manner. As I've said before, it's the soft bigotry of low expectations.

Apoleb
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:12 AM
Would that it were! Instead the culture is still dominated by dumb-ass, ignorant old white farts like Bill O'Reilly, spouting bromides from the '50s while we're busy going to hell in a hand basket. So here's an open offer to my fellow Flyer from Chaminade High -- come on up to my neighborhood sometime soon, get educated, and join the rest of us in the 21st century!

Either that or just shut the F up, you silly MF-er!


:haha: Loved that.

ico4498
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:17 AM
all whites are racist even the ones who don't know it.

you do realize you're the only one spouting that crap in this thread?

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:23 AM
Is anyone surprised by HippityHop's comments? :lol: I've called it long ago that he's a self-hating punk.

What those comments reveal (though most of us knew it anyway) is that O'Reilly is full of racial prejudice. Anyone who isn't able to see that needs help. The fact that he thinks polite behavior by a bunch of black people in a freakin restaurant is interesting enough to mention on a radio show tells loads about what he thinks of black people. I'm not going to generalize and say all Republicans are like that, but I'd say a very big chunk of white conservative in the US feel the same way. And then those same morons argue that race isn't much of an issue anymore.

for the longs time i didnt even she was black thats how much anti-blackness flows out of her. i mean how can anyone with such a deep resent towards blacks, be black. and yet it is possible.

but yeah bill is a twat. shame we could not enter him. well langers won in his stead.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:28 AM
you do realize you're the only one spouting that crap in this thread?

Thank you, thank you, thank you. If you go back and read my edit of post number 5 in this thread you will see that you made my point perfectly. I couldn't have asked for a better example. :worship:

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:36 AM
for the longs time i didnt even she was black thats how much anti-blackness flows out of her. i mean how can anyone with such a deep resent towards blacks, be black. and yet it is possible.

but yeah bill is a twat. shame we could not enter him. well langers won in his stead.

I generally avoid responding to your posts since it seems to me (and to others judging from other posts about you)that you see Blacks as being perpetual victims of white folks.

But I've come to the conclusion that it's generational. You've grown up in an era when you expected everything to be handed to you and when it's not, you cry racism. I grew up in an era when I knew that I had to be the equal of whites and even when I was better, that nothing was going to be handed to me.

So it's no wonder that you see my expecting Blacks to be the absolute best that we can be as anti-Black. How times have changed.

ico4498
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:46 AM
Thank you, thank you, thank you. If you go back and read my edit of post number 5 in this thread you will see that you made my point perfectly. I couldn't have asked for a better example. :worship:

err, we don't really live in the same space and time.:lol:

http://www.inhi-fi.com/robots/01/tzone4.jpg

the Hippity Zone is a whole 'nother world ...

tennisbum79
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:47 AM
Why do you Bush neocons always roll out your token Blacks like Juan Willims, Alan Keyes, and Shelby Steele in order to justify racism? Historically, they've proven themselves to be on the wrong side of the discussion when it comes to these issues.
And there is Reverend Jesse Peterson, who is a fixture on FOXXNOISE.
Sean Hannity loves him because he does his dirty job.
This guy says the most vile things against black people, and only people.

If he said the same thing against white. Sean will be asking any black guest to denounce him.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:49 AM
err, we don't really live in the same space and time.:lol:

http://www.inhi-fi.com/robots/01/tzone4.jpg

the Hippity Zone is a whole 'nother world ...

Oh I think we do. And I also think that you're a bit embarrased that you proved the point I made in that post so convincingly. :lol:

ico4498
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:50 AM
i'll take a walk on the wild side. what was your point?

tennisbum79
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:52 AM
You're right. The proof is the reaction to your post. Right away you were dismissed as being Rev. Peterson which is supposed to be an insult.

Those of us who are old enough may remember that Bill Clinton had a commission to study Race in America and it was a good idea despite not accomplishing much.
Many Black intellectuals often opine that America must have a serious discussion about race if it is to heal. Of course the demographics of the country are about to make the Black/white dichotomy irrelevant.

But if you think about it honestly, why on earth would any white person of good will want to engage in a serious honest dialogue about race? One of the main streams of radical Black thought, particularly in the 60s, was that all whites are racist even the ones who don't know it. I even remember being in encounter groups (a total waste of time) where the enlightend white folks were agreeing with every vile thing that the "real" Blacks were saying about them. You still see some of that today.

The way that the white liberals of today show their "non-racism" is by patronizing Blacks and letting Blacks get away with statements that any other ethnic group would be called on immediately.

So when Black people don't address the substance of an argument but instead go right to the ad hominem attacks it's shrugged off because, let's face it, many people think that we are not capable of addressing an argument in a reasoned manner. As I've said before, it's the soft bigotry of low expectations.
I have heard many people say the want a honest discussion about race but some them them really want is to be able to say to espouse their racist though w/o being challenged.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:52 AM
i'll take a walk on the wild side. what was your point?

Read post number 5. You're a smart guy/girl (we never can tell in cyberspace). You'll get it.
;)

ico4498
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:55 AM
not that intrigued, make the zone real or forget it.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 06:00 AM
not that intrigued, make the zone real or forget it.

Well you should be that intrigued. To paraphrase I said that when people take things out of context it is usually to make it appear that a poster holds a position that they do not hold.

You deliberately took a line out of my post to make it appear that I think that all whites are racist. You knew exactly what you were doing. ;)

Considering the fact that it's much easier to hit quote and use the entire post, I'll leave it to others to decide if you were being dishonest. :devil:

ico4498
Sep 28th, 2007, 06:14 AM
click on the blue arrow silly, your complete ramble is there for anyone to see.

the quoted subtext is all i cared to respond to ... sue me. you are the only person raising the point the blacks feel whites are racist just by being white in this thread.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 06:20 AM
click on the blue arrow silly, your complete ramble is there for anyone to see.

the quoted subtext is all i cared to respond to ... sue me. you are the only person raising the point the blacks feel whites are racist just by being white in this thread.

Well, if you think that's what my point was, you are not as smart as I gave you credit for. I thought that you were a better reader than that. Hey I was wrong.

And I have no intention of suing you. But I think my point stands. The honest posters who don't feel the need to take things out of context can make up their own minds.

EDIT: An honest poster who wanted to challenge what I said would have quoted at least the entire sentence which reads: One of the main streams of radical Black thought, particularly in the 60s, was that all whites are racist even the ones who don't know it.

ico4498
Sep 28th, 2007, 06:30 AM
Hippity, i have a headache ... too much time in your zone. yah really don't seem to get it, i didn't think the entire ramble was quote worthy. its mostly regurgitated klan nonsense.

reality beckons ...

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 06:35 AM
Hippity, i have a headache ... too much time in your zone. yah really don't seem to get it, i didn't think the entire ramble was quote worthy. its mostly regurgitated klan nonsense.

reality beckons ...

:lol: Bobby Seale, Anglea Davis, Julius Lester, H. Rap Brown, Eldridge Cleaver and others will be glad to know that. :lol:

If it makes you happy though I won't be responding to any more of your posts since it's clear that you are not interested in real dialogue. Pleasant dreams. :cool:

ico4498
Sep 28th, 2007, 06:37 AM
I won't be responding to any more of your posts

thanks!:lol: