PDA

View Full Version : Wigglypuff Seeks Classical Music Appreciation Lessons.


Wigglytuff
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:17 AM
There are tons of great composers from the different historical eras and each one has hundreds of pieces. I need some well free online course or serious of articles to put some order to all and to introduce to great works.

right now i am liking

Bach - piano Concerto No 1. in D minor, Allegro non troppo ed energico

Beethoven - Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op. 125, 'Choral': IV.
Moonlight Sonata No.14 in C-sharp minor - Presto
Sonata No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 27 _ 2 Moonlight Sonata

Mozart - String Quartet in C, Op. 59 No. 3 - 3rd movement
String Quartet in C, Op. 59 No. 3 - 4th movement
String Quartet in F, Op. 59 No. 1 - 4th movement

dont ask me what any of this means i just copied the track names.

p.s. i thought the Wigglyshit part might amuse my haters. :) :lol:

mandy7
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:27 AM
I'm into the Foo Fighters right now.

Wigglytuff
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:28 AM
I'm into the Foo Fighters right now.

:lol: :lol: :lol: nice!

mckyle.
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:30 AM
:hearts: :kiss: :hearts:

congrats on the most intelligible post you have EVER made. :worship: i think the one word posts you have taken to lately really suit you. well done. :bigclap: :smooch:

Oh.

Snape was good.

Wigglytuff
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:32 AM
Oh.

Snape was good.

glad to see that little factoid gives your life meaning. :unsure: :unsure: :clap2: :clap2: :confused:

mckyle.
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:38 AM
glad to see that little factoid gives your life meaning. :unsure: :unsure: :clap2: :clap2: :confused:

Ok.

mandy7
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:54 AM
:lol: :lol: :lol: nice!

Actually, my gf is really into them, and i'm trying to listen to them as much as possible as well. So that when they announce a new tour, and they come to Holland or Belgium, we can go, without me having to ask: What song is this?

But the new single is AWESOME!

mckyle.
Sep 27th, 2007, 07:55 AM
Actually, my gf is really into them, and i'm trying to listen to them as much as possible as well. So that when they announce a new tour, and they come to Holland or Belgium, we can go, without me having to ask: What song is this?

But the new single is AWESOME!

I know this is bad but I can't ever watch them because the lead singer looks so scary to me :help:

mandy7
Sep 27th, 2007, 08:03 AM
I know this is bad but I can't ever watch them because the lead singer looks so scary to me :help:

Dave's a legend though :D.
He looks like a rocker :rocker2:.

Sam L
Sep 27th, 2007, 09:09 AM
Classical music is very broad. There are categories within it including baroque, classical and romanticism as the major ones.

Bach is an example of baroque. Mozart and Beethoven are examples of classical - the Viennese style. And as for romanticism look for composers like Tchaikovsky.

Baroque simply sounds like church music. This period coincides with the late European renaissance - age of discovery. Expect to hear many lute and violins sounds. Pachelbel's Canon is from this era.

Classical music has come to dominate the classical music scene in that people think of composers like Mozart and Beethoven when thinking of it. This evolved from baroque music and starts to involve pianos and a range of other instruments. This coincided with the Age of Enlightenment in European history.

Following this is the romantic era. Expect to hear more bigger orchestras and much more modern sounds. This is the time of nationalism in a way a reaction to the German classicism of the earlier period. This is when every European country started to rise and say "me too!" and produced their own Romantic era classical music. One of my favourites from this era is Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade.

And of course, this is just a brief overview. There are many, many subcategories within each of these as well as other categories like modern classical music and music of the Middle Ages.

I suggest you sample different composers from different eras and see what you like the most. But yes Mozart and Beethoven are both good introductions to the genre.

LudwigDvorak
Sep 27th, 2007, 01:16 PM
My username. :hearts:

Beethoven actually isn't one of my favorites, but Antonin Dvorak is--his No. 9 Symphony (From the New World) is his most famous, and probably best, but his other symphonies are divine too.

The mini-era of the Impressionists is probably the one I visit the most though, with Claude Debussy and Erik Satie. I dig Ravel too, but the first two I mentioned are my clear favorites. Basically, any French composer in the 19th century is worth your time.

If you maybe want something a bit more modern too, Gorecki is popular. Symphony No. 3 is very famous, and rightfully so--one of the most beautiful pieces I've ever heard. The Gustav's--Holst and Mahler--are also worth investing time into. Particularly Holst, his Planets symphony everyone loves.

You probably aren't looking for suggestions, but yeah, that's just my favorite classical music. if you listen to any of it, :rocker2:.

requiem
Sep 27th, 2007, 02:07 PM
my username by mozart

no further comment needed

Wigglytuff
Sep 27th, 2007, 02:37 PM
My username. :hearts:

Beethoven actually isn't one of my favorites, but Antonin Dvorak is--his No. 9 Symphony (From the New World) is his most famous, and probably best, but his other symphonies are divine too.

The mini-era of the Impressionists is probably the one I visit the most though, with Claude Debussy and Erik Satie. I dig Ravel too, but the first two I mentioned are my clear favorites. Basically, any French composer in the 19th century is worth your time.

If you maybe want something a bit more modern too, Gorecki is popular. Symphony No. 3 is very famous, and rightfully so--one of the most beautiful pieces I've ever heard. The Gustav's--Holst and Mahler--are also worth investing time into. Particularly Holst, his Planets symphony everyone loves.

You probably aren't looking for suggestions, but yeah, that's just my favorite classical music. if you listen to any of it, :rocker2:.
suggestions help too!!! :)

fufuqifuqishahah
Sep 27th, 2007, 03:46 PM
if you like weird, quirky stuff.... then... anything 20th century! :rocker2:

My 20th century suggestions off the top of my head...
Francis Poulenc - Concerto in D Minor for Two Pianos
Igor Stravinsky - The Rite of Spring
Witold Lutoslawski - Variations on a Theme by Paganini for Two Pianos

lilly
Sep 27th, 2007, 06:52 PM
this is a very interesting thread, we need MisterQ!!!

jellybelly
Sep 27th, 2007, 10:13 PM
I like lots of classical musicians like Charlotte Church, Sara Brightman, Joss Stone, Bond, Paul Potts, Andrea Bocelli, Alfie Boe, Matt Biteti and most of all Il Divo! They are all quite good.

Dementieva_Dude
Sep 28th, 2007, 12:24 AM
Umm...as far as pieces that are relatively "easy" to listen to and enjoy....

Chopins's Nocturnes in C#minor and Eb
Vivaldi's Four Seasons ("Spring" is the best-known, "Fall" is my favourite)

For a modern interpretaion of a classic, try "Blue Rondo à la Turk" by Dave Brubeck

nikita771
Sep 28th, 2007, 12:34 AM
I suggest listening to Rachmaninov. His Piano Concerto No. 2 in C Monir, Opus 18 is amazing! It's my favorite piece of classical music ever.

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 12:46 AM
claude debussy - very soulful, for a french guy. :)

but my dear, i hope you are well versed in jazz too.

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 02:03 AM
claude debussy - very soulful, for a french guy. :)

but my dear, i hope you are well versed in jazz too.
i dont know what that would have to do with anything.

wta_zuperfann
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:49 AM
Hi Wiggly!

If you want to learn about classical music, I suggest that you begin with the greatest composer who ever lived: Louis Moreau Gottschalk!

http://w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de/cmp/gottschalk.html

http://www.louismoreaugottschalk.com/

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:28 AM
Hi Wiggly!

If you want to learn about classical music, I suggest that you begin with the greatest composer who ever lived: Louis Moreau Gottschalk!

http://w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de/cmp/gottschalk.html

http://www.louismoreaugottschalk.com/

thank you. i will definately check this out. the new amazon store is such a great place to get classical music and the bitrate is pretty good.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:41 AM
Classical music is very broad. There are categories within it including baroque, classical and romanticism as the major ones.

Bach is an example of baroque. Mozart and Beethoven are examples of classical - the Viennese style. And as for romanticism look for composers like Tchaikovsky.

Baroque simply sounds like church music. This period coincides with the late European renaissance - age of discovery. Expect to hear many lute and violins sounds. Pachelbel's Canon is from this era.

Classical music has come to dominate the classical music scene in that people think of composers like Mozart and Beethoven when thinking of it. This evolved from baroque music and starts to involve pianos and a range of other instruments. This coincided with the Age of Enlightenment in European history.

Following this is the romantic era. Expect to hear more bigger orchestras and much more modern sounds. This is the time of nationalism in a way a reaction to the German classicism of the earlier period. This is when every European country started to rise and say "me too!" and produced their own Romantic era classical music. One of my favourites from this era is Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade.

And of course, this is just a brief overview. There are many, many subcategories within each of these as well as other categories like modern classical music and music of the Middle Ages.

I suggest you sample different composers from different eras and see what you like the most. But yes Mozart and Beethoven are both good introductions to the genre.


True as far as it goes. However Beethoven is really the transitional figure from Viennese Classicism to the Romantic style. In fact Beethoven was so original and radical that even his first published pieces (especially his c minor trio) shocked Haydn with whom Beethoven was studying at the time.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:43 AM
Hi Wiggly!

If you want to learn about classical music, I suggest that you begin with the greatest composer who ever lived: Louis Moreau Gottschalk!

http://w3.rz-berlin.mpg.de/cmp/gottschalk.html

http://www.louismoreaugottschalk.com/

Please tell me you're joking. Gottschalk is an interesting diversion for someone who is looking for obscure piano music. But the greatest composer who ever lived? That's a stretch. :lol: :lol:

Apoleb
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:52 AM
claude debussy - very soulful, for a french guy. :)

but my dear, i hope you are well versed in jazz too.

Oh, between HippityHop and woosey, I can't really chose. :lol: It's amazing how insecure some people are. Did you really have to find a way to make this thread about race, and even suggesting that French artists *cough*(replace for white) can't be soulful.

I'm still a beginner, and I'm enjoying more and more classical music. Favorites include Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata", Vivaldi's "Winter" and some of Bach's (too lazy to check the names).

But anyway, a CD version of classical music can never match a live performance. For anyone living in New York City, I fully recommend seeing the Astoria symphony. I had the pleasure of seeing one of their concerts about 3 weeks ago in a church, and for 16$, I was overblown. They are still kinda fresh (about 3 years), and there were slightly more people watching them than artists in the symphony. :lol: I got to sit in one of the front benches, and it was amazing to see the effort every musician put in, for such a small audience.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 06:40 AM
French = white? Chevalier de Saint Georges. Google him.

Apoleb
Sep 28th, 2007, 06:51 AM
French = white? Chevalier de Saint Georges. Google him.

*shakes head*

I know that there were/are French citizens who aren't white. But considering how racially charged woosey's posts usually are, the fact that he clearly was trying to bring race in this thread and the stereotype that white people in general aren't soulful, I'm inclined to believe that he was trying to subtely imply that Debussy was soulful for a white guy without making a fuss.

HippityHop
Sep 28th, 2007, 06:59 AM
*shakes head*

I know that there were/are French citizens who aren't white. But considering how racially charged woosey's posts usually are, the fact that he clearly was trying to bring race in this thread and the stereotype that white people in general aren't soulful, I'm inclined to believe that he was trying to subtely imply that Debussy was soulful for a white guy without making a fuss.

Anyone who thinks that white people aren't soulful is not a musician. Musicians know better.
Dizzy Gillespie used to say that he could tell if a jazz player was white or Black simply by listening. He was put to the test and he was wrong about 80% of the time.

And again I guess it depends on what one means by soul.If Stax records is the standard then Motown was not soulful.

If Aretha Franklin is the standard (in her Queen of Soul days) then can Whitney Houston compare?

But since this is a classical music thread (classical in the broad sense) anyone who can't hear soul in Rachmaninoff or in Dvorak has no soul (musically speaking) themselves.

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:05 PM
Oh, between HippityHop and woosey, I can't really chose. :lol: It's amazing how insecure some people are. Did you really have to find a way to make this thread about race, and even suggesting that French artists *cough*(replace for white) can't be soulful.

I'm still a beginner, and I'm enjoying more and more classical music. Favorites include Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata", Vivaldi's "Winter" and some of Bach's (too lazy to check the names).

But anyway, a CD version of classical music can never match a live performance. For anyone living in New York City, I fully recommend seeing the Astoria symphony. I had the pleasure of seeing one of their concerts about 3 weeks ago in a church, and for 16$, I was overblown. They are still kinda fresh (about 3 years), and there were slightly more people watching them than artists in the symphony. :lol: I got to sit in one of the front benches, and it was amazing to see the effort every musician put in, for such a small audience.

clearly, you don't get sarcasm. and you don't get tongue and cheek. obviously, people don't generally regard classical music as being soulful idiot.

btw, you're the one who brought race up. i referred to debussy as "french." not white. french is a nationality, not a "race" bozo. you are the one who is obsessed.

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:09 PM
i dont know what that would have to do with anything.

i suppose it has as much to do with this discussion as the foo fighters and charlotte church. :rolleyes:

but, i think you've answered my question with your statement. you probably don't know much about jazz.

the point is that americans are woefully ignorant about their own classical music - jazz. cinema and "jazz" are the u.s.' greatest cultural gifts to the world.

americans should be as informed, if not more informed about who billy strayhorn, errol garner, art tatum, john coltrane and miles davis as they are about europeans derived art music.

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:15 PM
*shakes head*

I know that there were/are French citizens who aren't white. But considering how racially charged woosey's posts usually are, the fact that he clearly was trying to bring race in this thread and the stereotype that white people in general aren't soulful, I'm inclined to believe that he was trying to subtely imply that Debussy was soulful for a white guy without making a fuss.

first of all, you're making a dumb inference based on your own silly perceptions of "racially charged" arguments you claim i'm making. your inference is wrong. and i don't generally regard the french as soulful. now, russians - they are plenty soulful. you assume i'm as stupid and shallow as you are.

second, woosey is not a he. woosey is a she. :devil:

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:18 PM
i suppose it has as much to do with this discussion as the foo fighters and charlotte church. :rolleyes:

but, i think you've answered my question with your statement. you probably don't know much about jazz.

the point is that americans are woefully ignorant about their own classical music - jazz. cinema and "jazz" are the u.s.' greatest cultural gifts to the world.

americans should be as informed, if not more informed about who billy strayhorn, errol garner, art tatum, john coltrane and miles davis as they are about europeans derived art music.
oh lord.

you know if you want to soap box, start your own thread and do that there. because i am not touching this a with 20 foot pole.

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:22 PM
Oh, between HippityHop and woosey, I can't really chose. :lol: It's amazing how insecure some people are. Did you really have to find a way to make this thread about race, and even suggesting that French artists *cough*(replace for white) can't be soulful.

I'm still a beginner, and I'm enjoying more and more classical music. Favorites include Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata", Vivaldi's "Winter" and some of Bach's (too lazy to check the names).

But anyway, a CD version of classical music can never match a live performance. For anyone living in New York City, I fully recommend seeing the Astoria symphony. I had the pleasure of seeing one of their concerts about 3 weeks ago in a church, and for 16$, I was overblown. They are still kinda fresh (about 3 years), and there were slightly more people watching them than artists in the symphony. :lol: I got to sit in one of the front benches, and it was amazing to see the effort every musician put in, for such a small audience.

i will check out the moonlight sonata.

i have a question do you which peice is the super famous one that goes...
dah dah dah daaaaaaaaaah with like a big thud each time.

i know that doesn't help much. but i figure one has to true.

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:31 PM
oh lord.

you know if you want to soap box, start your own thread and do that there. because i am not touching this a with 20 foot pole.

why didn't you get as bent out of shape when others chimed in to give nonclassical recommendations? but you can't touch this with a 20 foot pole. :rolleyes: right. :rolleyes:

i just recommended that you know about jazz and you're exasperated? girl go have a sip of that wine you say you are learning to critique.

so, you probably are ignorant about this genre. admit your ignorance and move on. no need to berate me because i added something else to the mix.

Sam L
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:37 PM
why didn't you get as bent out of shape when others chimed in to give nonclassical recommendations? but you can't touch this with a 20 foot pole. :rolleyes: right. :rolleyes:

i just recommended that you know about jazz and you're exasperated? girl go have a sip of that wine you say you are learning to critique.

so, you probably are ignorant about this genre. admit your ignorance and move on. no need to berate me because i added something else to the mix.

You just don't get it do you? :rolleyes: You really need help with your obsessions. That's all I'll say. Stop hijacking someone else's thread - like you usually do - and go seek attention somewhere else.

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:40 PM
You just don't get it do you? :rolleyes: You really need help with your obsessions. That's all I'll say. Stop hijacking someone else's thread - like you usually do - and go seek attention somewhere else.

no, you just don't get "it." i can't help that some of yall don't get much. :rolleyes:

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:43 PM
why didn't you get as bent out of shape when others chimed in to give nonclassical recommendations? but you can't touch this with a 20 foot pole. :rolleyes: right. :rolleyes:

i just recommended that you know about jazz and you're exasperated? girl go have a sip of that wine you say you are learning to critique.

so, you probably are ignorant about this genre. admit your ignorance and move on. no need to berate me because i added something else to the mix.

i didnt say anything when you made your first comment. i asked why, maybe you had something reasonable to say but it turns out you just wanted to soapbox. which i am not going to go there.

and if read what happened mandy and co just said what THEY like, they didnt soap box at all. and when it started to go the wrong way i just ignored them.

did NOT berate you :lol: :haha:, i was actually very nice to you. i said i am not touching it. you want to soap box and go on personal attacks and preach about what you THINK is a requirement, all because i said i wanted to learn about classical music.

i say you need to stop whatever it is you are doing and take a breath and move on because it's not that serious. my wanting to learn about this music has NOTHING to do you with what you called a short coming for america. relax guy. its really not that serious.

Apoleb
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:49 PM
obviously, people don't generally regard classical music as being soulful idiot.

Speak for yourself. I don't know any person who has any sort of interest in classical music and who doesn't think it's soulful and can convey so much emotion.

So, soulful for a "classical musician" or for a French? :lol: Regardeless, it's a stupid point anyway, whether it was addressed to classical musicians, French people or white people.

Anyway, your post history clearly shows what you are obsessed with. For someone who wants to impose on black celebrities and posters what they should like, who they should date and how they should behave, your post was hardly surprising. Your (some what hostile) questionning of wiggly's knowledge of Jazz out of nowhere in a thread devoted to the discussion of classical music shows what an insecure little trot you are. But that's as much time I'm spending on you today.

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:56 PM
Speak for yourself. I don't know any person who has any sort of interest in classical music and who doesn't think it's soulful and can convey so much emotion.

So, soulful for a "classical musician" or for a French? :lol: Regardeless, it's a stupid point anyway, whether it was addressed to classical musicians, French people or white people.

Anyway, your post history clearly shows what you are obsessed with. For someone who wants to impose on black celebrities and posters what they should like, who they should date and how they should behave, your post was hardly surprising. Your (some what hostile) questionning of wiggly's knowledge of Jazz out of nowhere in a thread devoted to the discussion of classical music shows what an insecure little trot you are. But that's as much time I'm spending on you today.

:worship: :worship:

see this bothers me about those two, why they are sitting here calling everyone ignorant, they really display a lack of awareness and even basic sense.

few things in this life has as much soul and intensity of emotion and POWER as does beethoven's 9th. the final movement is just out of this world. really truly amazing stuff.

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:57 PM
i will check out the moonlight sonata.

i have a question do you which peice is the super famous one that goes...
dah dah dah daaaaaaaaaah with like a big thud each time.

i know that doesn't help much. but i figure one has to true.

maybe its more like domm domm domm dommmmmmmmmmm

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:57 PM
i didnt say anything when you made your first comment. i asked why, maybe you had something reasonable to say but it turns out you just wanted to soapbox. which i am not going to go there.

and if read what happened mandy and co just said what THEY like, they didnt soap box at all. and when it started to go the wrong way i just ignored them.

did NOT berate you :lol: :haha:, i was actually very nice to you. i said i am not touching it. you want to soap box and go on personal attacks and preach about what you THINK is a requirement, all because i said i wanted to learn about classical music.

i say you need to stop whatever it is you are doing and take a breath and move on because it's not that serious. my wanting to learn about this music has NOTHING to do you with what you called a short coming for america. relax guy. its really not that serious.

again, woosey is not a guy.

you did not ask anything. you said you didn't know what it would have to do with anything.

that is not a simple question. that is basically saying why bother to mention that. like i said before, you didn't care if people mention charlotte church or whatever other stuff folk were mentioning. you are the one who got freaked out because i said you should consider familiarity with jazz as essential to being well rounded, cultured...whatever you're trying to do fill in your shortcomings.

you are the one who made a stupid remark to something that was merely a suggestion. i merely, expounded on my earlier remark because of your silly one.

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 04:59 PM
blah blah blah...
just go away. you are being a major pest today.

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:03 PM
Speak for yourself. I don't know any person who has any sort of interest in classical music and who doesn't think it's soulful and can convey so much emotion.

So, soulful for a "classical musician" or for a French? :lol: Regardeless, it's a stupid point anyway, whether it was addressed to classical musicians, French people or white people.

Anyway, your post history clearly shows what you are obsessed with. For someone who wants to impose on black celebrities and posters what they should like, who they should date and how they should behave, your post was hardly surprising. Your (some what hostile) questionning of wiggly's knowledge of Jazz out of nowhere in a thread devoted to the discussion of classical music shows what an insecure little trot you are. But that's as much time I'm spending on you today.

no, many people who are unfamiliar with classical music would regard it not only as soulless but clinical. it is not an improvised music as jazz is.

and what do black celebrities and posters have to do with any of this? i rarely talk about black celebrities or celebrity of any kind.

excuse me, you are the one who decided to bring race into this discussion. i never brought race into this thread. you brought it into this discussion.

you are the one with issues. you jump to conclusions and assume you know what someone is thinking based on your own effed up illogical thinking.

like i said, if others can mention the other kinds of music they listen or value, then i will do the same.

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:04 PM
just go away. you are being a major pest today.

um, i never wrote blah blah blah. so you need to somehow stop being a liar here.

and why don't you take your fake, ignorant, climber self away.

woosey
Sep 28th, 2007, 05:06 PM
:worship: :worship:

see this bothers me about those two, why they are sitting here calling everyone ignorant, they really display a lack of awareness and even basic sense.

few things in this life has as much soul and intensity of emotion and POWER as does beethoven's 9th. the final movement is just out of this world. really truly amazing stuff.

you're a ding dong for even going along with his stupidity.

excuse me, both hippity hop and i, individually, probably know more about music than apolowhatever and you combined.

sense? you think becuase you start some thread about classical music that you've got sense? girl please.

Epigone
Sep 28th, 2007, 07:07 PM
Since people are discussing jazz, maybe you could try listening to Gershwin...:dance:

IceSkaTennisFan
Sep 28th, 2007, 08:00 PM
I would suggest listening to Baroque (1685-1750) music first. Most of it is shorter than the other forms of "classical" music, because it tends not to be as complex, not as much development to the music. I started on Vivaldi, Bach, Corelli, etc. I also liked Karl Jenkin's neo-baroque "Palladio" (Debeers diamond music theme). It was great for me :)

Wigglytuff
Sep 28th, 2007, 10:02 PM
I would suggest listening to Baroque (1685-1750) music first. Most of it is shorter than the other forms of "classical" music, because it tends not to be as complex, not as much development to the music. I started on Vivaldi, Bach, Corelli, etc. I also liked Karl Jenkin's neo-baroque "Palladio" (Debeers diamond music theme). It was great for me :)

cool thanx

Wigglytuff
Sep 29th, 2007, 01:49 AM
special thanks to Dementieva_Dude for answering the dom dom dom dommmmmm question.

beethoven's 5th. i just purchased it from amazon!! very nice!

Sam L
Sep 29th, 2007, 03:36 AM
I would suggest listening to Baroque (1685-1750) music first. Most of it is shorter than the other forms of "classical" music, because it tends not to be as complex, not as much development to the music. I started on Vivaldi, Bach, Corelli, etc. I also liked Karl Jenkin's neo-baroque "Palladio" (Debeers diamond music theme). It was great for me :)

Actually I would say it's very complex. Baroque is my favourite style of classical music. You can break it down and listen to each and every single sound in a song. The combination of lute and harpsichord sounds are just magnificent.

Wigglytuff, thanks for the heads up on that Amazon site. Now I can buy classical songs as I want them. I do have collections which I want and keep as CDs - usually in beautiful covers. But some songs you just want to listen to them.

LudwigDvorak
Sep 29th, 2007, 03:55 AM
:speakles: How did I forget Gerswhin. He's like God as far as I'm concerned.

Pachelbel's "Canon in D" is also very popular if you wanna check that out too Wiggly.

Previous suggestions like Rachmaninoff are good--if you wanna get into some really dark stuff, try Igor Stravinsky, or Shostakovich. Both were masters at string quartets. :hearts:

Tchaikovsky is so ridiculously catchy, The Nutcracker Suite is at least, but I never know where to go from there. :unsure: I hear Swan Lake is great but I see so many different versions...

Elske
Sep 29th, 2007, 04:24 AM
The most beautiful piece ever is Scheherazade by Rimsky Korsakov, especially the fourth movement. It moves me every time I hear it

Wigglytuff
Sep 29th, 2007, 04:28 AM
nice suggestions guys..

amazon has 3 full ballet suites from Tchaikovsky for $7.99

not bad for 19 tracks

Wigglytuff
Sep 29th, 2007, 04:33 AM
i have spent $20+ on amazon music downloads thank to the suggestions :worship: :worship: still need more though

Elske
Sep 29th, 2007, 04:34 AM
And if you want to listen to opera, try Lakmé (Bell Song, The Flower Duet,...) and of course Guiseppe Verdi

Sam L
Sep 29th, 2007, 05:24 AM
I don't know if you've seen Barry Lyndon, tuff. But try this one: http://www.amazon.com/Piano-Trio-flat-major-929/dp/B000Q3TF4S/ref=sr_f2_8/103-6172331-2252625?ie=UTF8&s=dmusic&qid=1191043348&sr=102-8

It's one of my favourite pieces of music ever. It's Schubert.

If you like it get his other piano trios. They're all great.

Dementieva_Dude
Sep 29th, 2007, 05:39 AM
And if you want to listen to opera, try Lakmé (Bell Song, The Flower Duet,...) and of course Guiseppe Verdi

Lakmé's "Flower Duet" is a gorgeous song...:hearts:

Umm..here are pieces I loved when I studied them in University...off the top of my head...

Beethoven's String Quartet #14 in C# Major - Allegro Movement - is very pretty and intense.
Orff's "O Fortuna" from "Carmina Burana" is also intense...it's a vocal piece, so I don't know how much you like operatic stuff...

I love Liszt...I LOVE all of his piano études

Berlioz's "Symphony Fantastique" is an amazing program piece...if you can manage to get ahold of the narrative to read as you listen to the piece you'll find some very creative instrumental nuances...like the "sound" of someone being beheaded, and their head bouncing across stage :)

Chopin's "Polonaise #6" for piano....

Chopin's "Funeral March" (I forget the actual piece number)

Schumann's "Phantasiestucke" Op. 12 No.5 "In Der Nacht"

Okay...I'm done being a music nerd...
Enjoy :wavey:

dybbuk
Sep 29th, 2007, 05:42 AM
I just got Liszt's 1st and 2nd Piano Concerto's and his Sonata in B minor (for Piano), all played by Sviatoslav Richter. I would recommend all three. The 1st Concerto and Sonata are amazing. :worship:

If you are looking for a specific performer, Sviatoslav is my favorite pianist, he's worth a look. ;)

égalité
Sep 29th, 2007, 06:04 AM
Chopin. Basically.

His ballades are amazing. Everything he ever did is amazing.

GoDominique
Sep 29th, 2007, 07:19 AM
Mozart - String Quartet in C, Op. 59 No. 3 - 3rd movement
String Quartet in C, Op. 59 No. 3 - 4th movement
String Quartet in F, Op. 59 No. 1 - 4th movement

dont ask me what any of this means i just copied the track names.
Well either your CD or your copying sucks. Because that's all Beethoven, not Mozart.

GoDominique
Sep 29th, 2007, 07:45 AM
Having said that, it seems you like Beethoven.

You can't do wrong with Beethoven. Any of his nine symphonies, 16 string quartets and 32 piano sonatas is worth listening to. Plus most of the other works.

Be aware though that all of this is not supposed to be background music. Especially the late works are difficult pieces.

Wigglytuff
Sep 29th, 2007, 12:51 PM
Well either your CD or your copying sucks. Because that's all Beethoven, not Mozart.

:lol: :lol: well that would explain why i cant find it in the list of mozart's work. i bought the songs on emusic. good thing i dont use them anymore. :(

really amazon.com might be the best place to get classical music online. better than itunes. woot. :worship:

Olórin
Sep 29th, 2007, 04:59 PM
Samuel Barber is a 20th Century composter, and his stuff is very good. Especially his violin showcase pieces.

I find I really like lots of classical music made part of film scores, especially for easy yet evocative listening. So I would also recommend:
Mozart: Canzonetta sull'aria (from the Shawshank redemption)
Strauss: The Blue Danube (2001)
Plus John Williams' classical scores for films like Star Wars and Harry Potter are worth buying on their own merit, as is Shore's Lord of the Rings score imo. Hans Zimmer is another one to look out for in this area.

Oh, and the Jean de Florette theme tune also.

Not sure how much of this is useful to you. You've more than likely heard quite a few already. But I mention the film theme tunes as listening to them without the film ennables you to appreciate them in their own right.

And my final recommendation, my favourite classical piece ever: Handel's the Messiah

:)

Epigone
Sep 30th, 2007, 12:41 AM
If you're gonna listen to Tchaikovsky, try to get both the original and Soviet versions of pieces like 1812 Overture and Marche Slave.

Tchaikovsky loved God Save the Tsar! (which was the Russian anthem until the revolution in 1917) and included it in a number of his works. However, the Soviets decided to substitute patriotic melodies in place of it (or removed those sections of music altogether), resulting in some interesting differences between the "censored" and "uncensored" versions

HippityHop
Sep 30th, 2007, 01:36 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXMi-1Fv7y0

dybbuk
Sep 30th, 2007, 03:37 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PXMi-1Fv7y0

Mozart's piano pieces are great, but there are far better interpretations of it than Bang-Bang. :tape:

Apoleb
Sep 30th, 2007, 03:57 AM
Got the names of the Bach ones:

Cello suite no. 1
Badinerie
Air on the G string

Ofcourse everyone knows the following one, but it's still amazing:

Chopin: Prelude in E minor Opus 28 no. 4

Another favorite of mine is Erik Satie:

http://www.locusnovus.com/lnprojects/gymnopedie1/

Grossienne No.1 is also very nice

wta_zuperfann
Sep 30th, 2007, 03:57 AM
Please tell me you're joking. Gottschalk is an interesting diversion for someone who is looking for obscure piano music. But the greatest composer who ever lived? That's a stretch. :lol: :lol:



In his time Gottschalk was considered every bit as great as any classical composer in Europe. His work exerted great influence over Igor Stravinsky and Maurice Ravel. Unfortunately, we Yanks have a tendency to allow ourselves to believe we are not as cultured as are Europeans. This myth is totally baseless as anyone who is familiar with American artists from the 19th century know fully well.

So go ahead and laugh - but all you are doing is showing your ignorance of the subject.

HippityHop
Sep 30th, 2007, 04:13 AM
Mozart's piano pieces are great, but there are far better interpretations of it than Bang-Bang. :tape:

Actually Lang Lang does a pretty good job of this. Usually he's so busy looking at the ceiling that his playing suffers. :D

HippityHop
Sep 30th, 2007, 04:22 AM
In his time Gottschalk was considered every bit as great as any classical composer in Europe. His work exerted great influence over Igor Stravinsky and Maurice Ravel. Unfortunately, we Yanks have a tendency to allow ourselves to believe we are not as cultured as are Europeans. This myth is totally baseless as anyone who is familiar with American artists from the 19th century know fully well.

So go ahead and laugh - but all you are doing is showing your ignorance of the subject.


Sorry but this is not true. Gottschalk was one of the foremost virtuosos but he was never considered a great composer. I played a piece of his called The Banjo which is quite hard (I can't play it anymore, at least not well) but his work has never been considered anything but 19th century showmanship. Much like Alkan, Thalberg and Herz.

As for the being as cultured as the Europeans the fact is that until the 20th century nearly all American composers were copies of European composers. It wasn't until Edward McDowell that Americans began to break away at least a little from the influence of European composers. Even Copland, Bernstein, Harris and others who established a true American school of composition studied in France with Nadia Boulanger.

Charles Ives of course was his own man from the beginning.

There's nothing wrong with Gottschalk but no musician is going to take seriously the claim that he was the greatest composer ever.

wta_zuperfann
Sep 30th, 2007, 04:58 AM
If that's what you want to believe, that's fine with me even though there isn't any truth in it.

Gottschalk certainly was an influence upon the music of Scott Joplin though I recall reading at one time that a biographer of the latter disputed that claim. But there can be no question that Gottschalk brought the ''cake walk'' and other New Orleans style dances, songs, and entertainment to the public. He also influenced and popularized certain music styles of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Brazil. He was probably the most widely travelled musician/composer of his time and this would not have happened if his work did not have great merit. He died at age 40 just his skills as a composer were blossoming.

Gottschalk is buried at Greenwood Cemetary in Brooklyn, NY. For several years, I lived 5 blocks from his gravesite.

HippityHop
Sep 30th, 2007, 05:35 AM
If that's what you want to believe, that's fine with me even though there isn't any truth in it.

Gottschalk certainly was an influence upon the music of Scott Joplin though I recall reading at one time that a biographer of the latter disputed that claim. But there can be no question that Gottschalk brought the ''cake walk'' and other New Orleans style dances, songs, and entertainment to the public. He also influenced and popularized certain music styles of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Brazil. He was probably the most widely travelled musician/composer of his time and this would not have happened if his work did not have great merit. He died at age 40 just his skills as a composer were blossoming.

Gottschalk is buried at Greenwood Cemetary in Brooklyn, NY. For several years, I lived 5 blocks from his gravesite.

You're certainly correct about his New Orleans influence and his Cuba/Brazilian influences.


And he was very widely traveled but the 19th century piano virtuosos were heralded not for the quality of their composition but for the quality of their virtuoso playing.

And Liszt was the greatest virtuoso of them all. I love Liszt but apart from a few of his compositions he is not one of the better composers. But he knew what he was doing as did all of the virtuosos of that time. They were playing to their audience.

Even Rachmaninoff who lived into the 20th century was idolized as a virtuoso rather than as a composer. They were in fact the rock stars of their time. The women used to fight for Liszt's handkerchief that he left on the piano. :lol:

Interestingly enough though the compositions that Liszt wrote at the end of his life are very forward looking and very influential.

If you really want to dig into it check out Alan Walker's three volume biography of Liszt. But be warned it's around a thousand pages. But it's very easy and interesting reading.

woosey
Sep 30th, 2007, 07:45 AM
In his time Gottschalk was considered every bit as great as any classical composer in Europe. His work exerted great influence over Igor Stravinsky and Maurice Ravel. Unfortunately, we Yanks have a tendency to allow ourselves to believe we are not as cultured as are Europeans. This myth is totally baseless as anyone who is familiar with American artists from the 19th century know fully well.

So go ahead and laugh - but all you are doing is showing your ignorance of the subject.

i would agree with this which is why i always encourage americans in particular to explore jazz as it is our indigenous "classical" music. not only is it "classical," is is far more modern, actually postmodern, than european art music is - at least the people who are being mentioned in this thread.

LudwigDvorak
Sep 30th, 2007, 07:53 AM
If wiggly doesn't want to learn about jazz music, while I personally would not encourage that, it's her choice. :shrug:

If you care enough about it, why not make your own jazz thread? That'd be worthwhile, and us jazz fans can discuss it. But this isn't the thread for jazz talk if wiggly doesn't want it to be.

woosey
Sep 30th, 2007, 08:17 AM
If that's what you want to believe, that's fine with me even though there isn't any truth in it.

Gottschalk certainly was an influence upon the music of Scott Joplin though I recall reading at one time that a biographer of the latter disputed that claim. But there can be no question that Gottschalk brought the ''cake walk'' and other New Orleans style dances, songs, and entertainment to the public. He also influenced and popularized certain music styles of Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Brazil. He was probably the most widely travelled musician/composer of his time and this would not have happened if his work did not have great merit. He died at age 40 just his skills as a composer were blossoming.

Gottschalk is buried at Greenwood Cemetary in Brooklyn, NY. For several years, I lived 5 blocks from his gravesite.

i don't think someone bringing a particular genre to the public makes him genius or great. to me, elvis is not genius because he popularized a song by big mama thornton. and janis joplin was not genius because she brought a semblance of the musical style of bessie smith to the masses.

for me, great musicians may absorb other styles, but in the end, they forge new musical paths and traditions. for example, in "jazz" you can basically draw a line between charlie parker and those that came before him. he's that significant.

to me, you're elevating someone to a level that he may not be deserving of.

doing noteworthy things is not the same as being a musical milepost, nor is achieving popularity. and i think that's all that's being said. perhaps he was more noteworthy but he is not a milemarker.

woosey
Sep 30th, 2007, 08:20 AM
If wiggly doesn't want to learn about jazz music, while I personally would not encourage that, it's her choice. :shrug:

If you care enough about it, why not make your own jazz thread? That'd be worthwhile, and us jazz fans can discuss it. But this isn't the thread for jazz talk if wiggly doesn't want it to be.

in case you don't realize this, gottschalk was not a "classical" musician perse. so, don't try to jump on me for adding on to their discussion. the poster referred to him specifically as an american composer deserving mention and remarked that americans do not appreciate their own. there is nothing wrong with adding another dimension to the discussion.

if you don't like it, ignore my comments. it's that simple.

wta_zuperfann
Sep 30th, 2007, 09:52 PM
Re Gottschalk, you say: ''to me, you're elevating someone to a level that he may not be deserving of''.

Now consider this comment regarding historical scholar S Frederick Starr's bio: ''"Innovating American composer, virtuoso pianist, and swashbuckling Romantic hero, Louis Moreau Gottschalk produced immensely popular works combining the French, Hispanic, and African influences of his native New Orleans. Many of his syncopated compositions anticipated ragtime by half a century ...''

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Murray Perahia, the Berlin Symphony Orchestra, and others would not play Gottschalk festivals or dedicate entire albums to his music if he was obscure or an unworthy composer. There can be no doubt that he did influence ragtime which means his creativty was an inspiration to many musicians who were born well after he died. An obscure or unworthy composer certainly would not have done anything like that.

But if you insist that he is unworthy of the type of praise that I, and professional music historians have accorded him, then so be it.

LudwigDvorak
Sep 30th, 2007, 10:07 PM
in case you don't realize this, gottschalk was not a "classical" musician perse. so, don't try to jump on me for adding on to their discussion. the poster referred to him specifically as an american composer deserving mention and remarked that americans do not appreciate their own. there is nothing wrong with adding another dimension to the discussion.

if you don't like it, ignore my comments. it's that simple.

:unsure: Touchy much? I wasn't being malicious.

I have never heard Gottschalk before, so I didn't know. And my entire post wasn't about disliking your comments, this is a public forum regardless, it was about wanting to discuss jazz elsewhere.

This thread is hazardous. :help:

woosey
Oct 1st, 2007, 12:16 AM
Re Gottschalk, you say: ''to me, you're elevating someone to a level that he may not be deserving of''.

Now consider this comment regarding historical scholar S Frederick Starr's bio: ''"Innovating American composer, virtuoso pianist, and swashbuckling Romantic hero, Louis Moreau Gottschalk produced immensely popular works combining the French, Hispanic, and African influences of his native New Orleans. Many of his syncopated compositions anticipated ragtime by half a century ...''

The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Murray Perahia, the Berlin Symphony Orchestra, and others would not play Gottschalk festivals or dedicate entire albums to his music if he was obscure or an unworthy composer. There can be no doubt that he did influence ragtime which means his creativty was an inspiration to many musicians who were born well after he died. An obscure or unworthy composer certainly would not have done anything like that.

But if you insist that he is unworthy of the type of praise that I, and professional music historians have accorded him, then so be it.

well, you're perfectly entitled to your opinion as am i. reasonable people can agree to disagree.

just as there are music historians and musicians who agree with you, there are those would do not.

woosey
Oct 1st, 2007, 12:17 AM
:unsure: Touchy much? I wasn't being malicious.

I have never heard Gottschalk before, so I didn't know. And my entire post wasn't about disliking your comments, this is a public forum regardless, it was about wanting to discuss jazz elsewhere.

This thread is hazardous. :help:

you can start a thread. :bounce:

wta_zuperfann
Oct 1st, 2007, 02:17 AM
well, you're perfectly entitled to your opinion as am i. reasonable people can agree to disagree.
just as there are music historians and musicians who agree with you, there are those would do not.


As Emerson said many years ago, to be great is to be misunderstood. If people are confused about Gottschalk's musical influence and the proper accord he should be given, then his accomplishments are a fitting example of Emerson's words.

Wigglytuff
Oct 1st, 2007, 02:57 AM
If wiggly doesn't want to learn about jazz music, while I personally would not encourage that, it's her choice. :shrug:

If you care enough about it, why not make your own jazz thread? That'd be worthwhile, and us jazz fans can discuss it. But this isn't the thread for jazz talk if wiggly doesn't want it to be.

jazz music is not what i am in the mood for these days i AM in the mood for classical and learning more about classical i think that anyone (read: woosey) is a prick if they think they have a right to tell others what they should listen to, learn about, be in the mood for and WHEN.

woosey can say whatever because i dont follow his instructions about what i should listen, WHEN and how. but he's being a prick and he can kiss my black ass. :wavey:

Wigglytuff
Oct 1st, 2007, 03:02 AM
:unsure: Touchy much? I wasn't being malicious.

I have never heard Gottschalk before, so I didn't know. And my entire post wasn't about disliking your comments, this is a public forum regardless, it was about wanting to discuss jazz elsewhere.

This thread is hazardous. :help:

i was enjoying the recommendations. it looks that i really love beethoven, thinks the bigness of it all that movies the Wigglytuff.